Announcement of Classes: Fall 2017

Course #
Instructor
Course Area

R1A/1

Reading and Composition:
Eating Bodies

MWF 9-10

In this course we will collectively re-think what we think we know about eating bodies. We will build and share nuanced analyses of the many meanings of food, practices of eating, and bodies who eat, as well as bodies who eat other bodies...(read more)

Diaz, Rosalind

R1A/2

Reading and Composition:
The Dust Bowl and the American Cultural Imagination

MWF 11-12

In this course, we will explore the aesthetic forms and social locations of the Dust Bowl and consider the ways in which these forms and locations have echoed in the American cultural imagination since the Great Depression. We will develop your pra...(read more)

Cruz, Frank Eugene

R1A/7

Reading and Composition:
Image and Text

TTh 9:30-11

This class will look at a variety of works that combine image and text to tell stories. How, we will ask, do words and images play with, against, or off of one another when we read these hybrid texts? How has their combination helped authors altern...(read more)

Clark, Rebecca

R1B/1

Reading and Composition:
Re-Visioning the 1960s

MWF 10-11

Note the changes in instructor, topic, book list and course description for this section of English R1B (as of Aug 30).

This reading and composition course will explore selected works of literature, music, and visual art produced...(read more)

Koerner, Michelle

R1B/2

Reading and Composition:
Blank Generation: The Changing Arts in 1970s New York City

MWF 11-12

In the decade of urban decay, energy crisis, deindustrialization, and Watergate, artists of all stripes were thrown back on their own resources, seeking the means and reasons for continuing the avant-garde’s project of cultural revolution aft...(read more)

Alexander, Edward Sterling

R1B/3

Reading and Composition:
The Cultural Lives of Higher Education

MWF 12-1

The purpose, nature, and structure of higher education in the West are currently undergoing dramatic revision. Tuition is rising steadily at both private and public institutions, as public support for teaching and research shifts; concerns and hope...(read more)

Greer, Erin

R1B/5

Reading and Composition:
Endings

MWF 2-3

What’s in an ending?  In this class, we will explore literature about endings: personal endings (elegiac forms), national endings (the end of an era), and apocalyptic endings (the end of the world).  In addition, we will focus ...(read more)

Lesser, Madeline

R1B/6

Reading and Composition:
Writing Cuban-America

MWF 3-4

The history of Cubans living in the US is a complicated one, caught between the US’s imperialist wars of the late-19th and early-20th centuries and the Cold War machinations of the first and second worlds. This...(read more)

Artiz, Ernest T.

R1B/7

Reading and Composition:
After Empires

MW 5-6:30

In this course, we will investigate how literature and literary criticism from the 1950s to today has responded to various forms of imperialism, focusing on how the concerns of "postcolonial" texts change according to ...(read more)

Choi, Jeehyun

R1B/8

Reading and Composition:
Re-Visioning the 1960s

MW 5-6:30

Note the changes in instructor, topic, book list and course description for this section of English R1B (as of Aug 30).

This reading and composition course will explore selected works of literature, music, and visual art produced...(read more)

Koerner, Michelle

R1B/9

Reading and Composition:
Technophobia

TTh 8-9:30

Science fiction often investigates how technology affects human drives and desires. Insofar as thought experiments with non-human forms of intelligence and artificial life are major tropes of the genre, representations of computers and robots in fi...(read more)

Barbour, Andrew John

R1B/10

Reading and Composition:
Narratives of Enlightenment

TTh 9:30-11

This class explores what it means to be wise, enlightened, or educated. While it will offer no definitive answers to those enormous questions, it will look at how writers in a number of traditions have offered their own answers and written compelli...(read more)

Wilson, Evan

R1B/11

Reading and Composition:
University Life

TTh 11-12:30

How have British and American writers formed their work around and inside the university? How does reading and writing literature fit into university life? How do we know whether a piece of fiction or poetry is "academic" or "anti-ac...(read more)

Neal, Allison

R1B/12

Reading and Composition:
The Undiscovered Country

TTh 12:30-2

Note the changes in instructor, topic, book list, and course description for this section of English R1B (as of May 30).

The experience of death is one of the most difficult, yet most urgent, to imaginatively represent in literatur...(read more)

Lorden, Jennifer A.

R1B/13

Reading and Composition:
Visions of the World

TTh 2-3:30

“To see the Earth as it truly is, small and blue and beautiful in that eternal silence where it floats, is to see ourselves as riders on the Earth together.” – Archibald MacLeish, comment on the “Earthrise” after t...(read more)

Rajabzadeh, Shokoofeh

R1B/14

Reading and Composition:
GLBT and Queer Chicanx/Latinx Literature and Cultural Work

TTh 3:30-5

In this course, we will read and write about Chicanx/Latinx literatures and cultural productions that explore GLBT and queer themes. In our approaches to the course materials, we will consider the notion of the queer, GLBT, and Chicano text.&n...(read more)

Trevino, Jason Benjamin

R1B/15

Reading and Composition:
Genre Trouble

TTh 5-6:30

This course will examine the complex relationships between gender and literary genre. What social and historical forces have, at various points in time, caused certain genres to be marginalized as “women’s writing” or “...(read more)

Ripplinger, Michelle

24/1

Freshman Seminar:
Reading Walt Whitman’s Leaves of Grass

M 12-2, 8/28 to 10/16 only

Walt Whitman self published the first edition of Leaves of Grass, a collection of poems, in 1855.  For the rest of his life, he reworked, revised, and added to this collection. He produced at least six distinguishable editions. We wil...(read more)

Wong, Hertha D. Sweet

24/2

Freshman Seminar:
Shakespeare's Sonnets

W 12-1

Shakespeare's sonnets were first published in 1609, rather late in his career, with a second, curiously distorted edition in 1640. Although little is known about how they were first received by the reading public, the sonnets still cause p...(read more)

Nelson, Alan H.

24/3

Freshman Seminar:
African American Poetry

Tues. 4-5

We will read, discuss, and write about poems by African American authors including Phillis Wheatley, Frances Harper, Paul Laurence Dunbar, Claude McKay, Countee Cullen, Langston Hughes, Gwendolyn Brooks, Amiri Baraka, Audre Lorde, Na...(read more)

Wagner, Bryan

45A/1

Literature in English: Through Milton

MW 12-1 + discussion sections F 12-1

In this course we will read some of the best books ever written in English, and the course will try to treat both you and those books seriously and justly. The course will give you a sense of the shape of literary history from the earlier middle ag...(read more)

Justice, Steven

45A/2

Literature in English: Through Milton

MW 2-3 + discussion sections F 2-3

This course focuses on three major works of late medieval and early modern English literature: Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, Spenser’s Faerie Queene, and Milton’s Paradise Lost.  We’ll discuss t...(read more)

Knapp, Jeffrey

45B/1

Literature in English: Late-17th Through Mid-19th Centuries

MW 10-11 + discussion sections F 10-11

As we read works produced in a period of tumultuous change, we shall consider those works as zones of contact, reflecting and sometimes negotiating conflict. In a world of expanding global commerce (imports like tea suddenly becoming commonplace in...(read more)

Sorensen, Janet

45B/2

Literature in English: Late-17th Through Mid-19th Centuries

MW 3-4 + discussion sections F 3-4

Our course begins at sea, with the “violent storm” and shipwreck of Gulliver’s Travels, and ends with Benito Cereno’s strange maritime encounter at “a small, desert, uninhabited island” off the ...(read more)

Goldsmith, Steven

45C/1

Literature in English: Mid-19th Through the 20th Century

MW 11-12 + discussion sections F 11-12

This course will survey British, American, and global Anglophone literature from the end of the 19th century through the beginning of the 21st. Moving across a number of genres and movements, this course will examine the ...(read more)

Gang, Joshua

45C/2

Literature in English: Mid-19th Through the 20th Century

MW 1-2 + discussion sections F 1-2

This course will focus on the formal consequences of the cultural and social revolutions of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. After examining the changes in narrative strategy and poetic diction that have come to be known as "...(read more)

Abel, Elizabeth

84/1

Sophomore Seminar:
The Coen Brothers

W 1-4

We will concentrate on the high and low cultural elements in the noir comedies of the Coen brothers, discussing their use of Hollywood genres, parodies of classic conventions, and representation of arbitrariness.  We will also read some fictio...(read more)

Bader, Julia

84/2

Sophomore Seminar:
Modern Utopian and (mostly) Dystopian Movies

Tues. 5-8:30 PM incl. 1/2 hr. break

Among the films likely to be included in the syllabus and discussed in class are the following: Fritz Lang, Metropolis (1927); Leni Riefenstahl, The Triumph of the Will (1934); Charlie Chaplin, Mo...(read more)

Starr, George A.

104/1

Introduction to Old English

MWF 10-11

Hwæt! Leorniað Englisc!

In this introduction to Old English, you will begin to read and write Old English from your first day in class, while also learning fundamental principles of grammar and historical language change. As you...(read more)

Thornbury, Emily V.

110/1

Medieval Literature

MWF 12-1

For more information about this course, please contact Professor Miller at j_miller@berkeley.edu.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

...(read more)
Miller, Jennifer

115A/1

The English Renaissance (through the 16th Century)

MWF 3-4

For more information about this course, please contact Professor Miller at j_miller@berkeley.edu.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

...(read more)
Miller, Jennifer

117B/1

Shakespeare:
Later Works

TTh 12:30-2

A survey of the second half of Shakespeare’s working life, including the later “problem” comedies, the major tragedies and the magical romances, his final works. Lectures will touch upon the complete writings and present sample sc...(read more)

Turner, James Grantham

117S/1

Shakespeare

MWF 3-4

This class focuses on a selection of works from Shakespeare’s entire career. We'll be reading a limited number of plays and some of the poetry. One of the main issues I'd like to focus on is the oscillation between "regular"...(read more)

Marno, David

120/1

Literature of the Later 18th Century

TTh 2-3:30

We’ll investigate the relationship of literature to other arts in the period, particularly painting and landscape design. Our focus will be on engagements with “nature,” understood as the non-human world and the ground of culture....(read more)

Picciotto, Joanna M

122/1

The Victorian Period

MW 2-3 + discussion sections F 2-3

The Victorian period witnessed dramatic and probably permanent changes to the literary culture of Britain, including: the morphing of scattered memoirs into formal autobiographies; the rise of the realist novel as the indispensable genre of bourgeo...(read more)

Lavery, Grace

125D/1

The 20th-Century Novel

TTh 9:30-11

This course is a general survey of the 20th-century novel. The novel is the quintessential form of experession of modernity and modern subjectivity. In this survey of key works of the century, we will explore the novel form as it is framed by these...(read more)

Jones, Donna V.

126/1

British Literature, 1900-1945

TTh 11-12:30

The British novel in the first half of the twentieth century was a site of massive formal experimentation. Time, space, narrators, characters, and language were dismantled and reconfigured in startling new ways. In this survey, we will look at...(read more)

Flynn, Catherine

130A/1

American Literature: Before 1800

MWF 2-3

This course has been canceled (as of 4/6/17).

...(read more)
Otter, Samuel

130B/1

American Literature: 1800-1865

TTh 5-6:30 PM

On July 4 fifty years after the Declaration of Independence was signed, both John Adams and Thomas Jefferson died, an astonishing coincidence that many Americans took to signify the ending of the revolutionary era, and the beginning of a new p...(read more)

Breitwieser, Mitchell

130C/1

American Literature: 1865-1900

TTh 2-3:30

A survey of U.S. literature from the Civil War through 1900, with special attention to the years following Reconstruction and to rise of literary realism and naturalism. Authors will include Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Louisa May Alcott, Mark Tw...(read more)

Tamarkin, Elisa

130D/1

American Literature 1900-1945:
Literature in the Age of Extremes

MW 1-2 + discussion sections F 1-2

The aim of this course will be to capture the aesthetic and political extremes of the first half of the twentieth century.  We will examine conflicting efforts to bridge the boundary between art and life against the backdrop of two world wars ...(read more)

Lee, Steven S.

133A/1

African American Literature and Culture Before 1917

TTh 12:30-2

A survey of major works produced in the context of slavery and its aftermath.

...(read more)
Wagner, Bryan

133T/1

Topics in African American Literature and Culture:
Do What You Gotta Do: The Art of Black Diaspora

MWF 1-2

Just find that dappled dream of yours
Come on back and see me when you can

– Clarence Carter & Nina Simone & Roberta Flack, et al

The black diaspora is, of course and amongst other things, a litera...(read more)

Ellis, Nadia

C136/1

Topics in American Studies:
New Orleans

TTh 2-3:30

We will consider the representation of New Orleans in four related formats: (1) historical monograph, (2) folklore collection, (3) as-told-to autobiography, and (4) cinematic documentary. Our premise is that New Orleans is stranger than f...(read more)

Wagner, Bryan

137T/1

Topics in Chicana/o Literature and Culture:
Chicana/o Popular Culture

TTh 11-12:30

What is Chicanx popular culture? We answer this question by first exploring the meaning of these three terms separately. Chicana/o/x, popular (or lo popular), and culture have rich political trajectories that span the transnational co...(read more)

Saldaña, Maria

141/1

Modes of Writing (Exposition, Fiction, Verse, etc.)

TTh 3:30-5

Modes of Writing: Writing Fiction, Poetry, and the Personal Essay

This course will introduce students to the study of creative writing--fiction, poetry, and (to a lesser degree) the personal essay.  Students will learn to talk critic...(read more)

Chandra, Melanie Abrams

141/2

Modes of Writing (Exposition, Fiction, Verse, etc.)

TTh 3:30-5

Modes of Writing: Writing Fiction, Poetry, and the Personal Essay

This course will introduce students to the study of creative writing--ficction, poetry, and (to a lesser degree) the personal essay. Students will learn to talk critic...(read more)

Hass, Robert L.

143A/1

Short Fiction

MW 11-12:30

A short fiction workshop.  Over the course of the semester, each student will write and revise two stories.  Each participant in the workshop will edit student-written stories and will write a formal critique of each manuscript.  Stu...(read more)

Chandra, Vikram

143B/1

Verse

MW 12:30-2

In this course you will conduct a progressive series of explorations in which you will try some of the fundamental options for writing poetry today (or any day)--aperture and closure; rhythmic sound patterning; sentence and line; short and long-lin...(read more)

Shoptaw, John

143B/2

Verse

W 3-6

Soundings:  A Poetry Workshop

"How you sound??" the poet Amiri Baraka asked. This workshop is designed to be an exploration of "voice" through poetic form, music, kitchen appliances, rush hour traffic, and the nat...(read more)

Singleton, Giovanni

143B/3

Verse

TTh 2-3:30

The purpose of this class will be to produce a collective language in which to treat poetry. Writing your own poems will be a part of this task, but it will also require readings in contemporary poetry and essays in poetics, as well as some wr...(read more)

O'Brien, Geoffrey G.

143N/1

Prose Nonfiction:
Creative Nonfiction Workshop: Covering Culture

MW 9:30-11

This course is a nonfiction workshop in which you'll learn to write about many different types of art and culture, from TV and music to theater and visual art—in other words, the genres discussed in the culture-and-arts pages of major new...(read more)

Saul, Scott

143T/1

Poetry Translation Workshop

TTh 12:30-2

This is a workshop in the translation of poetry into English. Workshop members will develop a project and submit a translation a week (together with the original poem and a word-for-word version), and the work of the class will be for members to gi...(read more)

Hass, Robert L.

161/1

Introduction to Literary Theory

MWF 2-3

This course will offer an introduction to literary theory with a focus on twentieth- and twenty-first-century political approaches to the study of literature, including theories of Marxism, feminism, sexuality, race, post-colonialism, and ecocritic...(read more)

Gonzalez, Marcial

165/1

Special Topics:
Genres of Free Speech

MW 5-6:30

We endure a difficult relation to free speech. Most arguments on the topic, whether for or against, focus on the capacity of language to harm others, directly or indirectly, and therefore concern the scope and nature of necessary prohibitions of sp...(read more)

Lavery, Grace

165/2

Special Topics:
Art of Writing

TTh 2-3:30

This seminar/workshop, co-taught by Lyn Hejinian and Daniel Benjamin, will be devoted to collaboratively composed writing in a range of genres, including poetry, short fiction, performance, and critical essays. Multiple examples of collaborations w...(read more)

Benjamin, Daniel
Hejinian, Lyn

166/3

Special Topics:
Black Science Fiction

TTh 3:30-5

This course addresses two genres—black fiction and science fiction—at their point of intersection, which is sometimes called Afrofuturism. The umbrella term “black fiction” will include texts that issue out of and specu...(read more)

Serpell, C. Namwali

166/4

Special Topics:
Writing Poetry and Nonfiction, Writing as Social Practice

TTh 5-6:30

One of the ideas behind this course offering is that poetry and essays (life-writing, creative non-fiction, “essaying,” etc.) have similar aims or field-marks—both are literary vehicles of exploration and documentation; both value...(read more)

Giscombe, Cecil S.

166AC/1

Special Topics in American Cultures:
Race and Revision in Early America

TTh 12:30-2

In this course, we will read both historical and literary texts to explore how racial categories came into being in New World cultures and how these categories were tested, inhabited, and re-imagined by the human actors they sought to define. Our s...(read more)

Donegan, Kathleen

170/1

Literature and the Arts:
Literature and Music

MW 11-12 + discussion sections F 11-12

In this course, we will think about the strangely vital links between literature and music.  Beginning in the early nineteenth century, we’ll track a series of crossings, conjunctions, and fissures.  We’ll think about the...(read more)

Falci, Eric

173/1

The Language and Literature of Films:
The Film Essay: Cinema, the Minoritized Subject, and the Practice of Writing

TTh 3:30-5

Taking as a point of departure James Baldwin’s dazzling work of film criticism, The Devil Finds Work, this course introduces students to some of the best writing on film that describes the encounter with cinema—and with particu...(read more)

Best, Stephen M.
Young, Damon

175/1

Literature and Disability

TTh 3:30-5

This course will have several components. An introductory section will provide students with a grounding in disability theory; we’ll wonder whether it’s possible to develop a common “theory” adequate to various disability ca...(read more)

Langan, Celeste

179/1

Literature and Linguistics

TTh 11-12:30

The medium of literature is language.  This course aims to deepen understanding of what this means through consideration of how certain literary forms can be defined as grammatical forms.  These literary forms include meter; rhyme and all...(read more)

Hanson, Kristin

180H/1

The Short Story:
The Short Story

MWF 2-3

The lyf so short, the crafte so longe to lerne…

                         &nbsp...(read more)

Chandra, Vikram

180L/1

Lyric Verse

TTh 5-6:30 PM

This course will examine the historical trajectory of a very fuzzy category, “lyric,” from its identified origins and early practice in English (anonymous medieval lyrics) to its 20th- and 21st- cent...(read more)

O'Brien, Geoffrey G.

180N/1

The Novel:
"The Novel as the Book of Other People"

MW 5-6:30

In 2007, Zadie Smith edited an anthology of short fiction entitled The Book of Other People.  In her preface to this volume, Smith describes her desire to give contemporary writers the opportunity to try on “different skins,&rdq...(read more)

Hale, Dorothy J.

190/1

Research Seminar:
Britain in the ‘60s

MW 2-3:30

This seminar will examine the fiction, drama, poetry, film, and music of Great Britain in the 1960s. Topics will possibly include: post-war and post-Empire; race and immigration; economic austerity and welfare policy; social realism and dystopia; f...(read more)

Gang, Joshua

190/2

Research Seminar:
The Historical Novel

MW 2-3:30

“It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the ...(read more)

Puckett, Kent

190/3

Research Seminar:
Another Day in Purgatory: Irish Literature and the Afterlife

MW 3:30-5

Life is full of death; the steps of the living cannot press the earth without disturbing the ashes of the dead—we walk upon our ancestors—the globe itself is one vast churchyard.
(read more)

Creasy, CFS

190/6

Research Seminar:
Literature and Revolution

MW 5-6:30

This seminar will piece together a cross-regional, cross-linguistic genre that we will loosely call “the literature of revolution”—texts that try to capture (and, at times, direct) great historical and political upheaval.  Ou...(read more)

Lee, Steven S.

190/7

Research Seminar:
Monsters, Exiles, and Outlaws in Medieval Literature

TTh 9:30-11

This course focuses on murderers, monsters, and thieves. Zombies, although not our main focus, also arise. Such figures are excluded from society and cut off from their fellow human beings, whether because they have committed an unpardonable crime ...(read more)

Hobson, Jacob

190/8

Research Seminar:
George Eliot and the Realist Novel

TTh 11-12:30

Note the changes in the topic, book list, and course description for this section of English 190 as of early June, 2017.

Beginning at the age of 37, publishing under a male pen name,George Eliot reinvented the novel as we know it...(read more)

Kolb, Margaret

190/9

Research Seminar:
Historiography and Narrative: Literature and the Interstices of History

TTh 2-3:30

Historiography is a study of the writing of history; indeed, it is an examination of the problematic of historical writing—how does one derive and form a coherent narrative of what has happened from incomplete and fragmented artifacts of the ...(read more)

Jones, Donna V.

190/10

Research Seminar:
Suspicious Mind

TTh 12:30-2

Literary critics have made suspicion an essential aspect of what it means to read.  When we set out to do a “suspicious reading” of a text we assume a few things about it: that its true meaning consists in what it cannot say, know,...(read more)

Best, Stephen M.

190/11

Research Seminar:
Nonsense

TTh 3:30-5

This course will explore nonsense as a literary genre, connecting its distinctive linguistic form to the ideas it takes up.   In nonsense, conventional meanings of linguistic forms are prevented from arising, but the forms themselves are ...(read more)

Hanson, Kristin

190/12

Research Seminar:
Making Memories

TTh 5-6:30

This seminar examines a literary turn toward narratives of counterfeit confessional memory. It asks what is at stake in narratiing and even confessing a past that didn't happen—and what that even means in the context of a fictional text. ...(read more)

Yoon, Irene

H195A/1

Honors Course

MW 3:30-5

H195 is a two-semester course that gives students the training they need to conduct original research and develop their findings into a successful scholarly essay, 40-60 pages in length.

Crucial to this enterprise is an understanding of i...(read more)

Hale, Dorothy J.

H195A/2

Honors Course

TTh 12:30-2

This two-semester course is designed as an accompaniment to the writing of your Honors Thesis. The fall semester prepares you to write this long essay (40-60 pages) on a topic and texts of your choosing. It will behoove you to decide on t...(read more)

Serpell, C. Namwali

200/1

Problems in the Study of Literature

MW 12:30-2

Readings TBA

Approaches to literary study, including textual analysis, scholarly methodology and bibliography, critical theory and practice.

Enrollment is limited to entering doctoral students in the English program. 

...(read more)
Marno, David

203/1

Graduate Readings:
Caribbean Literature and Culture

M 9-12

“and either I’m nobody, or I’m a nation.” -Derek Walcott

Walcott’s mongrel regionalism is an apt invitation to consider a field of cultures whose richness comes, at least in part, from its provoking ...(read more)

Ellis, Nadia

203/2

Graduate Readings:
Comparative Colonialisms: Latin America and the U.S.

Wed. 6-9 PM

A comparative study of Spanish and British colonialism, this course examines specific forms of governmentality implanted in the Americas and consequences thereof, with particular attention to racialization. British and Spanish modes of colonialism ...(read more)

Saldaña, Maria

203/3

Graduate Readings:
Materiality

TTh 2-3:30

In recent years, new theories of materiality have emerged to account for physical processes and eventualities outside of human volition and identificatory categories. In this course, we will examine these theories in relation to the older paradigms...(read more)

Flynn, Catherine

211/1

Chaucer

This course was canceled (on August 1).

...(read more)
Justice, Steven

243B/1

Poetry Writing Workshop

Tues. 9-12

This workshop/seminar is for poets who already have a body of work (however large or small) and who are currently working on a project or collection. Participants should be working toward furthering development of the project and toward the formula...(read more)

Hejinian, Lyn

246D/1

Graduate Pro-seminar: Renaissance:
Seventeenth-Century Literature, before the Restoration

Tues. 3:30-6:30

A sampling of literature in English from 1600 to 1660, a turbulent period of intellectual innovation and political revolution. Key bodies of work will be studied complete – Donne’s Songs and Sonnets and Holy Sonnets, H...(read more)

Turner, James Grantham

246G/1

Graduate Pro-seminar: Romantic Period

TTh 12:30-2

Book List:  Austen, J., Lady Susan; Blake, W. Complete Poetry and Prose;  Burke, Reflections on the Revolution in France;  Byron, Lord Byron: The Major Works; Coleridge, S...(read more)

Langan, Celeste

250/1

Research Seminar:
Victorian Cultural Studies

W 9-12

This course will follow the long history of the culture concept in Britain.  We will begin by working through Raymond Williams’ account in Culture & Society in order to see how several senses of the word “culture&rdquo...(read more)

Puckett, Kent

250/2

Research Seminar:
How to Write a Book

M 2-5

Did you ever wonder how other people get their work done? Or what great ideas look like and where they come from? Are you curious about the best strategies and habits for clear, forceful, and engaging writing? This seminar about writing and publish...(read more)

Kahn, Victoria

250/3

Research Seminar:
Paranoid States: Empire and the Rise of the Surveillance State

W 3-6

This course examines the long, intimate relationship between technologies of surveillance and the making of British and American empires. While digital technology and state surveillance has been significant in the post-9/11 world, identifying, moni...(read more)

Saha, Poulomi

250/4

Research Seminar:
Gender, Sexuality, Modernism

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

“Is queer modernism simply another name for modernism?” The question Heather Love poses in her special issue of PMLA will also guide this seminar on the crossovers between formal and sexual “deviance” in modernist l...(read more)

Abel, Elizabeth

310/1

Field Studies in Tutoring Writing

T. B. A.

Through seminars, discussions, and reading assignments, students are introduced to the language/writing/literacy needs of diverse college-age writers such as the developing, bi-dialectal, and non-native English-speaking (NNS) writer. The course wil...(read more)

T. B. A.

310/1

Field Studies in Tutoring Writing

T.B.A.

Through seminars, discussions, and reading assignments, students are introduced to the language/writing/literacy needs of diverse college-age writers such as the developing, bi-dialectal, and non-native English-speaking (NNS) writer. The course wil...(read more)

T.B.A.

375/1

The Teaching of Composition and Literature

Thurs. 10:30-12:30

Co-taught by a faculty member and a graduate student instructor (the department's R & C Assistant Coordinator), this course introduces new English GSIs to the practice and theory of teaching literature and writing at UC Berkeley in sections...(read more)

Snyder, Katherine
Liu, Aileen

PLEASE READ CAREFULLY ALL THE PARAGRAPHS BELOW THAT APPLY TO ENGLISH COURSES IN WHICH YOU WANT TO ENROLL. SOME COURSES HAVE LIMITED ENROLLMENT AND/OR HAVE EARLY APPLICATION PROCEDURES.

ALL ENGLISH COURSES: Some courses are in such high demand that they will end up having wait lists. If you end up having to put yourself on one for an English course, please attend the first few classes, as space might open up for you after classes have started.

BERKELEY CONNECT: Would you like to get together with your peers to talk about literature and books? Are you wondering what to do with your English major once you graduate? Do you want to hear about the books that most influenced your English professors? Do you want expert advice about which courses to take? Would you like to see your favorite professors debating about a great work of literature? If so, please join Berkeley Connect!

Berkeley Connect in English fosters community in the English Department and offers a space for “serious play”: small group discussions about ideas and texts, explorations of the many riches of the Berkeley campus, visits by department faculty and distinguished alumni, and one-on-one advice on courses and graduate programs from graduate students and professors.

Individual Berkeley Connect groups (each with about 15-20 students) meet every other week for one hour of “serious play.” On the off weeks, your graduate student mentor will hold office hours so that you can talk individually about issues important to you. Some of the small group meetings will be informal discussions of a range of literary issues, while others involve visits to places around campus (such as the Berkeley Art Museum and the Bancroft Library). On other weeks we will meet as a large group to hear from distinguished alumni, or to listen to Berkeley English professors talk about their own paths into literary study or debate key books in their field with other professors.

There are no essays, papers, exams, or outside reading for Berkeley Connect, just lots of good discussion, valuable advice, and all sorts of “serious play.” Although this is not a traditional course, each participant will enroll in and earn one unit for group independent study (as English 98BC or 198BC, on a Pass/NP basis). The program is not meant to offer extra help or tutoring on things like the mechanics of paper-writing or literary analysis; rather, it aims at providing a more relaxed and fun way to make the best of your Berkeley experience.

Berkeley Connect in English sections:  English 98BC sections 1-3 are intended for lower-division (freshmen and sophomore) students.  English 198BC sections 3, 4, 6, and 8 are intended for new junior transfer students.  English 198BC sections 1, 2, 5, 7, and 9 are intended for upper-division (junior and senior) students.

CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP COURSES (English 143A, 143B, 143N, 143T and 243B): These are instructor-approved courses, and enrollment is limited.  Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligible to apply.  Only upper-division students should apply for 143A, 143B, 143N, and 143T; only graduate students should apply for 243B. In order to be considered for admission to any of these classes, you must electronically submit a writing sample AND an application form, using the link on the corresponding class entry on this "Announcement of Classes," BY 11 PM, THURSDAY, APRIL 27, AT THE LATEST.  (If you are applying for more than one of these classes, you will need to submit an application and the corresponding writing sample for each of the classes/sections you are applying for.)  The instructors will review the writing samples and applications, and the class lists will be posted on one of the partitions near the front desk as you enter Hearst Field Annex, Building B (the English Department office) on Thursday, May 4. Please come on or shortly after Thursday, May 4 to see if your name is on the class list for the section(s) you applied for; please check in person, as this information is NOT available over the phone (and please come within a few days after May 4, as the English Department will be moving back to Wheeler Hall sometime over the summer). ONLY STUDENTS ON THESE CLASS LISTS WILL BE ADMITTED TO THE CORRESPONDING CLASSES, AND EACH ADMITTED STUDENT WILL NEED TO OBTAIN HIS/HER INDIVIDUAL PERMISSION CODE  FROM THE INSTRUCTOR AT THE FIRST OR SECOND CLASS MEETING. NO ONE WILL THEREFORE BE ABLE TO ACTUALLY ENROLL IN THESE PARTICULAR CLASSES BEFORE THESE CLASSES START MEETING IN THE FALL.

ENGLISH 190 (RESEARCH SEMINAR): English 190 is intended for senior and junior English majors. During at least Phase I of enrollment, only already-declared majors who will be in their fourth or third year as of fall '17 will be able to enroll in this course; upper-division students who intend to major in English and have taken some courses that will count towards the major but who have not yet declared will need to put themselves on the wait list of the section they are interested in taking, and they will be admitted later (probably towards the end of Phase II) if and when there is still room for them. Due to space limitations (maximum enrollment is 18 students per section), students may initially enroll in or wait-list themselves for only one section of English 190. However, if it turns out that some sections still have room in them at or near the end of Phase II appointments, we may loosen the restrictions for admission to those sections.

ENGLISH H195A (HONORS COURSE): This is an instructor-approved course open only to senior English majors with an overall G.P.A. of 3.51 or higher and a G.P.A. of 3.65 or higher in courses taken at Berkeley in the major. In order to be considered for admission to H195A, you must electronically apply, using the link on the course listing in this "Announcement of Classes"; your submission will need to include: (a) the on-line application form, along with PDFs of: (b) your Academic Summary (go into Cal Central, click your "My Academics" tab, then click "View Academic Summary" and "Print as PDF"); (c) your non-UC Berkeley transcript(s), if any; (d) a critical paper (in a PDF or Word document) that you wrote for another class (the length of this paper not being as important as its quality); and (e) a personal statement (in a PPF or Word document), including why you are interested in taking this course and indicating your academic interest and, if possible, the topic or area you are thinking of addressing in your honors thesis. These applications must be submitted, via the corresponding link, BY 11 PM, FRIDAY, MAY 12. Since the department must review the G.P.A.s of H195A applicants for courses taken all the way through the Spring 2017 semester, and the instructors must carefully assess the applications, it will not be possible to determine who has been admitted until the fall semester is about to start. Therefore, applicants will be contacted by email sometime between late July and late August to be informed if they have been selected for admission, and, if so, to which section. (Since there might be more applicants for one section than the other, some students might end up being placed in the section that was not their first choice.)  EACH STUDENT ADMITTED TO H195A WILL NEED TO OBTAIN HIS OR HER INDIVIDUAL PERMISSION CODE AT THE FIRST CLASS MEETING FROM THE CORRESPONDING INSTRUCTOR.  NO ONE WILL THEREFORE BE ABLE TO ACTUALLY ENROLL IN THIS PARTICULAR COURSE BEFORE INSTRUCTION BEGINS IN THE FALL.

DE-CAL CLASSES: All proposals for Fall 2017 DE-Cal courses must be submitted at the front desk at the English Department office (in Hearst Field Annex, Building B) BY 4:00 P.M., THURSDAY, APRIL 27. Please note that individual faculty members may sponsor only one DE-Cal course per semester. Students wishing to offer a DE-Cal course must provide, to the English Department office, the following for approval: 1) a completed COCI Special Studies Course Proposal Form, available at: academic-senate.berkeley.edu/committee/coci/339, for 198 classes. Students must download and complete this form and obtain the proposed faculty sponsor’s signature on it before submitting it, along with the other necessary paperwork; 2) a copy of the syllabus of the proposed course; 3) a copy of the course description, including the criteria for passing the course. A few days after the April 27 submission deadline, the students whose proposals have been approved by the Department Chair will be notified that they need to see Laurie Kerr, in Hearst Field Annex, Building B, in order to arrange for a classroom for their course and to work out a few other details before the delivery of copies of their approved proposals to COCI and to the DE-Cal office.

INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSES: These are instructor-approved courses and require a written application, available (until June or July) from the rack at the front desk in Hearst Field Annex, Building B. Completed applications should be signed by the instructor and returned by the student to the drop box at the front desk (in Hearst Field Annex, Building B). Students will be emailed the class number that they will use to enroll in the class on Cal Central. Often students will elect to wait until fall courses have started to apply for independent study courses. Note that as of sometime in the summer (probably June or July), the English Department Office will be moving back to Wheeler Hall, so that is where the application forms will be available as of that time.

UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE STUDENTS INTERESTED IN BECOMING WRITING TUTORS (ENGLISH 310): This is an instructor-approved course with limited enrollment. In order to be considered for admission, you must pick up an application for an interview at the Student Learning Center, Atrium, in the Cesar Chavez Student Center, during the spring semester through finals week or during the week before fall semester classes begin. No one may apply after Wednesday of the first week of classes. Students admitted to 310 will need to appear in person at the Student Learning Center, at the time the Learning Center specifies, in order to obtain the course control number and then enroll. See the course description in this Announcement of Classes under English 310 for more details.