Announcement of Classes: Fall 2017


Graduate Courses

Graduate students from other departments and exceptionally well-prepared undergraduates are welcome in English graduate courses (except for English 200) insofar as limitations of class size allow. Graduate courses are usually limited to 15 students; courses numbered 250 are usually limited to 10.

When demand for a graduate course exceeds the maximum enrollment limit, the instructor will determine priorities for enrollment and inform students of his/her decisions at the second class meeting. Prior enrollment does not guarantee a place in a graduate course that turns out to be oversubscribed on the first day of class; in fact, a few students could be required to drop the course, starting with people who are not English Department graduate students -- though, fortunately, this situation does not arise very often.

Please refer to page 2 of the English Department's Graduate Handbook for the "Group" descriptions referred to at the end of each graduate course offering.


Problems in the Study of Literature

English 200

Section: 1
Instructor: Marno, David
Time: MW 12:30-2
Location: 305 Wheeler


Description

Readings TBA

Approaches to literary study, including textual analysis, scholarly methodology and bibliography, critical theory and practice.

Enrollment is limited to entering doctoral students in the English program. 

This course satisfies the Group 1 requirement (problems in the study of literature).


Graduate Readings: Caribbean Literature and Culture

English 203

Section: 1
Instructor: Ellis, Nadia
Time: M 9-12
Location: 301 Wheeler


Book List

Brathwaite, Kamau: Rights of Passage (1973); Danticat, Edwidge: The Dew Breakers (2004); Díaz, Junot: The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao (2007); Kincaid, Jamaica: Annie John (1985); Lovelace, Earl: The Dragon Can't Dance (1979); McKay, Claude: Home to Harlem (1928); Rhys, Jean: Voyage in the Dark (1934); Salkey, Andrew: Escape to an Autumn Pavement (1960); Wekker, Gloria: The Politics of Passion (2005)

Other Readings and Media

Highly recommended: Selvon, Sam: The Lonely Londoners (1956); Kincaid, Jamaica: A Small Place (1988) 

Film: Life and Debt (2001)

Course Reader with works by CLR James, Derek Walcott, Dennis Scott, Gordon Rohlehr, Michel-Rolph Trouillot, M. Jacqui Alexander, Michelle Stephens, Brent Hayes Edwards, Patricia Saunders, Deborah Thomas, Omise'eke Natasha Tinsley, and others, available at Copy Central, Bancroft Avenue.

**Please consult the bCourses website before purchasing books.

Description

“and either I’m nobody, or I’m a nation.” -Derek Walcott

Walcott’s mongrel regionalism is an apt invitation to consider a field of cultures whose richness comes, at least in part, from its provoking tendency toward paradox. Caribbean literature poses enormous challenges to the discipline--challenges of form (traditions are inherited, then broken); of literary history (memory, tradition, and rumor face off against historiography); of genre (artists extravagantly ignore boundaries between literature, music, performance, and theory); and of language (at least four European languages are spoken, and there are several more Creole languages). This course will evidence all these challenges, moving through a wide array of literature and cultural critique in order to establish the grounds of advanced research into Caribbean literary studies. We’ll specify and explore major themes and debates in the field and think through the often baffling dialectic between hegemony and counter-hegemony in national cultures, whereby popular forms at once displace and secure regressive versions of subjecthood. We’ll think, then, alongside extraordinary artists and critics, about the Caribbean tradition’s quicksilver threat and promise; its development on a knife’s edge “either…or” (which is, as Walcott shows, also always “and”).

The course is designed to provide a range of readings in English across the region; to establish the contours and discourse of a field; and to stage the possibilities for asking new questions. Instead of a single final research paper there will be shorter pieces due throughout the semester.

The texts for this course will be available at University Press Books, on Bancroft Way.  Please note the changes in the texts (as of August 10).

This course satisfies the Group 5 (20th Century) requirement.


Graduate Readings: Comparative Colonialisms: Latin America and the U.S.

English 203

Section: 2
Instructor: Saldaña, Maria
Time: Wed. 6-9 PM
Location: 180 Barrows


Book List

Deloria, Phil : Playing Indian; Forbes, Jack D.: Africans and Native Americans: The Language of Race and the Evolution of Red-Black Peoples; Lockhart, James : Nahuas and Spaniards: Postconquest Central Mexican History and Philology; Martinez, María Elena: Genealogical Fictions: Limpieza de Sangre, Religion, and Gender in Colonial Mexico; Rama, Angel: The Lettered City; Saldana Portillo, Maria Josefina: Indian Given: Racial Geographies across Mexico and the United States; Simpson, Audra : Mohawk Interruptus: Political Life Across the Borders of Settler States; Williams, Robert : The American Indian in Western Legal Thought: The Discourses of Conquest

Description

A comparative study of Spanish and British colonialism, this course examines specific forms of governmentality implanted in the Americas and consequences thereof, with particular attention to racialization. British and Spanish modes of colonialism produced distinct racial formations in Hispanophone and Anglophone America, and yet both Mexico and the United States are made up of racially stratified social systems today. Slavery, the encomienda, policies of limpieza de sangre and blood quantum and more are examined as modes of colonial governmentality that organized labor, reproduction, leisure, and space in New England and New Spain. Focusing on the colonial production of what are today indigenous and black/afromestizo identities, we consider how race was accomplished through the disciplining of gender and sexuality, and thus course readings necessarily engage this active entwining of race, gender, and sex. The syllabus includes a mixture of primary archival and literary material, and secondary historical and literary studies of the colonial archives.

This course satisfies the Group 6 (Non-historical) requirement.


Graduate Readings: Materiality

English 203

Section: 3
Instructor: Flynn, Catherine
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 186 Barrows


Book List

Derrida, Jacques: Spectres of Marx; Dolphijn, Rick: New Materialism: Interviews & Cartographies; Freud, Sigmund: Civilization and Its Discontents; Lucretius: The Nature of Things; Marx, Karl: Capital; Meillasoux, Quentin: After Finitude; Merleau-Ponty, Maurice: The Visible and the Invisible

Other Readings and Media

Course Reader

Description

In recent years, new theories of materiality have emerged to account for physical processes and eventualities outside of human volition and identificatory categories. In this course, we will examine these theories in relation to the older paradigms—philosophical, psychoanalytic, Marxist, phenomenological and anthropological—on which they build and from which they depart. Exploring materiality in the opposing but interrelated senses of the physical world and of social, productive forces, we will read a set of foundational thinkers, such as Lucretius, Aristotle, Marx, and Freud, along with a series of theorists who respond to them in divergent ways. Two key contemporary directions under consideration will be speculative realism’s shift away from socio-linguistic and anthropocentric modes of thought and, contrastingly, the exploration of consciously queer subjectivities in feminist and other phenomenologies. Readings will be arranged in strands that develop, diverge or reflect critically: for example, Husserl, Merleau-Ponty and Sara Ahmed; Descartes, Judith Butler and Diana Coole; Marx, Derrida, and Fredric Jameson; and Hume, Quentin Meillasoux, and Martin Hägglund.

This course satisfies the Group 6 (Non-historical) requirement.


Chaucer

English 211

Section: 1
Instructor: Justice, Steven
Time:
Location:


Description

This course was canceled (on August 1).


Poetry Writing Workshop

English 243B

Section: 1
Instructor: Hejinian, Lyn
Time: Tues. 9-12
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Manuscripts in progress by course participants will provide students with ample reading materials.

Description

This workshop/seminar is for poets who already have a body of work (however large or small) and who are currently working on a project or collection. Participants should be working toward furthering development of the project and toward the formulation of a theoretical understanding of its purport and the technical elements that are contributing to its success. Poetry is a capacious genre; for the purposes of this course, any corpus of writing that its author wishes to label “poetry” is poetry.

Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligible to apply for this course. To be considered for admission, please electronically submit 5 of your poems, by clicking on the link below; fill out the application you'll find there and attach the writing sample as a Word document or .rtf file. The deadline for completing this application process is 11 PM, THURSDAY, APRIL 27.

Also be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses.  


Graduate Pro-seminar: Renaissance: Seventeenth-Century Literature, before the Restoration

English 246D

Section: 1
Instructor: Turner, James Grantham
Time: Tues. 3:30-6:30
Location: 186 Barrows


Other Readings and Media

My intention is to scan all assigned texts for downloading, from the best available scholarly editions

Description

A sampling of literature in English from 1600 to 1660, a turbulent period of intellectual innovation and political revolution. Key bodies of work will be studied complete – Donne’s Songs and Sonnets and Holy Sonnets, Herbert’s The Temple, Marvell’s poetry before the Restoration satires – while many other authors in prose and verse will be anthologized. Since Shakespeare and Milton get their own courses they will be cited as recommended comparands rather than required reading. The syllabus is necessarily selective, but will include multiple genres – court masque, philosophical treatise, spiritual autobiography as well as standard literary forms such as drama, lyrical and topographical poems – plus works from cultural minorities (women, lower-class radicals, colonial Americans). The focus will be on primary texts, with an austere selection of “classic” criticism from T.S. Eliot to New Historicism. I will ask you for two papers on self-chosen topics, giving you the option of exploring more recent secondary literature if this matches your research interests; this course is designed to be accessible to specialists in all periods, however, so close-reading essays without full bibliography are perfectly fine.

This course satisfies the Group 3 (17th through 18th Century) requirement.


Graduate Pro-seminar: Romantic Period

English 246G

Section: 1
Instructor: Langan, Celeste
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 186 Barrows


Description

Book List:  Austen, J., Lady Susan; Blake, W. Complete Poetry and Prose;  Burke, Reflections on the Revolution in France;  Byron, Lord Byron: The Major Works; Coleridge, S.T., Major Works; Godwin, Caleb Williams; Hazlitt, W., The Fight and Other Writings;  Keats, J. Major Works; Scott, W., Waverley; Shelley, M., History of a Six Weeks' Tour; Shelley, P.B., Shelley's Poetry and Prose; WIlliams, H.M., Letters from France; Wordsworth, D., Grasmere and Alfoxden Journals; Wordsworth, W., Major Works.

Other Readings and Media:  A course reader with critical texts from T. Adorno, H. Arendt, W. Benjamin, M. Dolar, P. de Man, J. Fabian, G.W.F. Hegel, F. Kittler, R. Koselleck, J. Lacan, F. Nietzsche, C. Schmitt, and others. 

This course on the Romantic “period” will consider concepts of time as they are imagined, experienced, represented in some characteristic genres: song, prophecy, lyrical ballad, romance, fragment, travel narrative, essay, letter, autobiography, historical novel, periodical review. How do Romantic writers understand time’s periodicity—crisis, presence, afterwardsness, ephemerality, wartime, deep time? What relation might such categories have to an emergent concept of “voice” as something distinct from what is said, written, prescribed-- from “law”?

Students will be responsible for two short essays (2-4 pages) to be circuluated for discussion and a final paper (15-17 pages).

This course satisfies the Group 4 (19th Century) requirement.


Research Seminar: Victorian Cultural Studies

English 250

Section: 1
Instructor: Puckett, Kent
Time: W 9-12
Location: 301 Wheeler


Book List

Berger, J.: Ways of Seeing; Coleridge, S.T.: Biographia Literaria ; Eliot, G.: Middlemarch; Eliot, T.S.: The Sacred Wood; Empson, W.: Some Versions of Pastoral; Hoggart, R.: The Uses of Literacy; James, C.L.R.: Beyond a Boundary; Mill, J.S.: On Liberty; Newman, J.H.: The Idea of a University; Richards, I.A.: Practical Criticism; Williams, R.: The Long Revolution; Woolf, V.: To the Lighthouse

Other Readings and Media

A course reader with selections from Carlyle, Ruskin, Arnold, Morris, Wilde, Tylor, Hulme, Frazer, Malinowski, Leavis, Orwell, E.P. Thompson, Nairn, Hall, Hebdidge, Gilroy, and others.

Description

This course will follow the long history of the culture concept in Britain.  We will begin by working through Raymond Williams’ account in Culture & Society in order to see how several senses of the word “culture”—culture as “the idea of human perfection,” as “society as a whole,” as “the general body of the arts,” or as “a whole way of life”—appear and reappear in Coleridge, Mill, Carlyle, Arnold, Eliot, Newman, Ruskin, and Morris.  We’ll supplement these readings with selections from the emerging fields of nineteenth-century anthropology, ethnography, and sociology.  In the course’s second half, we’ll follow the culture concept as it makes its way through twentieth-century Britain: before, between, and after the wars (T. S. Eliot, Virginia Woolf, I. A. Richards, Q. D., and F. R. Leavis); in the long, fraught wake of British socialism (Richard Hoggart, Raymond Williams, C. L. R. James, and E. P. Thompson); and in the “New Times” of British cultural studies under and after Thatcher (Stuart Hall, Paul Gilroy, and Dick Hebdige).  In the process of reading through these works, we’ll consider the strange tenacity of an especially Victorian idea, a particularly British effort to mark out practical relations between the social and the aesthetic, and the institutional and literary roles that education and, in particular, adult education have played in the post-Romantic imagination.

This course may be used to satisfy the Group 4 (19th Century),Group 5 (20th Century), or the Group 6 (Non-historical) requirement.


Research Seminar: How to Write a Book

English 250

Section: 2
Instructor: Kahn, Victoria
Time: M 2-5
Location: 189 Dwinelle


Other Readings and Media

The reading materials for this class will be in the form of on-line PDFs.

Description

Did you ever wonder how other people get their work done? Or what great ideas look like and where they come from? Are you curious about the best strategies and habits for clear, forceful, and engaging writing? This seminar about writing and publishing is for you. You must have a seminar paper that you wish to revise in the course of the semester. You must also commit to sending your revised essay out for review by a journal at the end of the fall. The vast majority of our time will be spent discussing the written work of the seminar members. We will also read and discuss some important articles in the fields of English and Comparative Literature and analyze how and why they work. There will be a number of guest visits by Berkeley faculty who will discuss their writing habits and their own work in progress. Enrollment is limited to six English Dept. graduate students; six Comparative Literature graduate students will be able to enroll in the cross-listed component of this course, Comparative Literature 256.


Research Seminar: Paranoid States: Empire and the Rise of the Surveillance State

English 250

Section: 3
Instructor: Saha, Poulomi
Time: W 3-6
Location: 107 Mulford


Other Readings and Media

Readings and films may include: Foucault, Discipline and Punish; Fanon, The Wretched of the Earth; LeFebvre, The Production of Space; Hardt & Negri, Empire; Orwell, 1984; Pontecorvo, Battle of Algiers; Scott, Seeing Like a State; McCoy, Policing America's Empire; Hathaway, The Real Glory

Description

This course examines the long, intimate relationship between technologies of surveillance and the making of British and American empires. While digital technology and state surveillance has been significant in the post-9/11 world, identifying, monitoring, and tracking populations and individuals has been central to the consolidation of state power for much longer. We will consider the development of technologies such as photography, fingerprinting, biometrics, and aerial drones in the context of their imbrication with imperial governance. Beginning in the late 19th century to the contemporary moment, this course will track the shifting forms that surveillance and the state take from the decline of British colonialism to the rise of American empire. It will look to South Asia, the Phillippines, North America, and the Middle East to ask how discourses of security, risk, and vulnerability have rationalized state policies of containment and scrutiny on the one hand, and justified and catalyzed the expansion of imperial power on the other.

This course satisfies the Group 6 (Non-historical) requirement.


Research Seminar: Gender, Sexuality, Modernism

English 250

Section: 4
Instructor: Abel, Elizabeth
Time: Thurs. 3:30-6:30
Location: 102 Barrows


Book List

Baldwin, James: Giovanni's Room; Barnes, Djuna: Nightwood; Bechdel, Alison: Fun Home; James, Henry: The Turn of the Screw and Other Short Fiction; Larsen, Nella: Passing; Nelson, Maggie: The Argonauts; Stein, Gertrude: Tender Buttons; Toibin, Colm: The Master; Truong, Monique: The Book of Salt; Wilde, Oscar: The Picture of Dorian Gray; Woolf, Virginia: Mrs. Dalloway; Woolf, Virginia: Orlando;

Recommended: Butler, Judith: Gender Trouble; Foucault, Michel: The History of Sexuality (Volume 1); Nutt, Amy Ellis: Becoming Nicole; Sedgwick, Eve Kosofsky: Epistemology of the Closet

Other Readings and Media

Critical essays, short fiction, plays and poetry will be available on our b-Courses.

Description

“Is queer modernism simply another name for modernism?” The question Heather Love poses in her special issue of PMLA will also guide this seminar on the crossovers between formal and sexual “deviance” in modernist literature. We will read back and forth across a century (Henry James to Colm Toibin, James Joyce to Alison Bechdel, Oscar Wilde to Yinka Shonibare, Virginia Woolf to Caryl Churchill, Gertrude Stein to Monique Truong) to stage a series of encounters between the aesthetic practices  and discourses of modernism and those of contemporary queer theory and cultural production.  As we map the shifting contours of some key forms and terms, we will pause to consider (among other things) the mobile dimensions of queer time and space; the historical migration of concepts such as perversion, inversion, masquerade, transvestism, abjection, and shame; the mutual implication of race, gender, and sexuality; the formal attributes of the closet; the legibility of transgender bodies; and the composition of affective histories. To complement (and complicate) the chronological axis of this inquiry, we will also attend to the metropolitan spaces in which sexual boundaries blurred and subcultures thrived, especially the three urban sites central to modernist experimentation: London, New York, and Paris.  

This course satisfies the Group 5 (20th Century) requirement.


Field Studies in Tutoring Writing

English 310

Section: 1
Instructor: T. B. A. Time: T. B. A.
Location: T. B. A.


Book List

Meyer, E. and L. Smith: Practical Tutor;

Recommended: Leki, I.: Understanding ESL Writers

Description

Through seminars, discussions, and reading assignments, students are introduced to the language/writing/literacy needs of diverse college-age writers such as the developing, bi-dialectal, and non-native English-speaking (NNS) writer. The course will provide a theoretical and practical framework for tutoring and composition instruction.

The seminar will focus on various tutoring methodologies and the theories which underlie them. Students will become familiar with relevant terminology, approaches, and strategies in the fields of composition teaching and learning. New tutors will learn how to respond constructively to student writing, as well as develop and hone effective tutoring skills. By guiding others towards clarity and precision in prose, tutors will sharpen their own writing abilities. New tutors will tutor fellow Cal students in writing and/or literature courses. Tutoring occurs in the Cesar E. Chavez Student Center under the supervision of experienced writing program staff.

In order to enroll for the seminar, students must have at least sophomore standing and have completed their Reading and Composition R1A and R1B requirements.

Some requirements include: participating in a weekly training seminar and occasional workshops; reading assigned articles, videotaping a tutoring session, and becoming familiar with the resources available at the Student Learning Center; tutoring 4-6 hours per week; keeping a tutoring journal and writing a final paper; meeting periodically with both the tutor supervisor(s) and tutees' instructors.

This course meets the field study requirements for the Education minor, but it cannot be used toward fulfillment of the requirements for the English major. It must be taken P/NP.

Pick up an application for a pre-enrollment interview at the Student Learning Center, Atrium, Cesar Chavez Student Center (Lower Sproul Plaza), beginning April 3. No one will be admitted after the first week of fall classes.

This course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the undergraduate English major nor may it be counted to satisfy a graduate-level requirement.


The Teaching of Composition and Literature

English 375

Section: 1
Instructor: Snyder, Katherine
Liu, Aileen
Time: Thurs. 10:30-12:30
Location: 301 Wheeler


Book List

Recommended: Graff, G.: They Say/I Say; Rosenwasser, D.: Writing Analytically

Other Readings and Media

All required readings will be posted on bCourses and available in a Course Reader.

Description

Co-taught by a faculty member and a graduate student instructor (the department's R & C Assistant Coordinator), this course introduces new English GSIs to the practice and theory of teaching literature and writing at UC Berkeley in sections linked to English 45 and select upper-division courses, as well in R1A and R1B, and beyond. At once a seminar and a hands-on practicum, the class will cover topics such as strategies for leading discussion, teaching critical reading skills and the elements of composition, responding to and evaluating student writing, developing paper topics and other exercises, and approaching the other responsibilities that make up the work of teaching here and elsewhere. The course will offer a space for mutual support, individual experimentation, and the discovery of each member's pedagogical style. We will pair each class participant with an experienced GSI teaching in R1A or R1B, so that new teachers can observe different kinds of teaching situations and classes besides their own. There will also be opportunities to be observed teaching and to receive feedback during the term. 

This course satisfies the Pedagogy Requirement.