Announcement of Classes: Fall 2017


Reading and Composition: Eating Bodies

English R1A

Section: 1
Instructor: Diaz, Rosalind
Time: MWF 9-10
Location: 211 Dwinelle


Book List

Conrad, Joseph: Heart of Darkness; Jacobs, Harriet: Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl; Marryat, Florence: The Blood of the Vampire

Other Readings and Media

Other texts may include: "A Subtlety," Kara Walker; "We Ate the Birds," Margaret Atwood; "Tales from the Breast," Hiromi Goto; The Blob, dir. Chuck Russell; and other selected films, poems, and short stories.

Description

In this course we will collectively re-think what we think we know about eating bodies. We will build and share nuanced analyses of the many meanings of food, practices of eating, and bodies who eat, as well as bodies who eat other bodies. To guide our exploration, we will consider frameworks from feminist fat studies, postcolonial studies, critical race studies, disability studies, and queer-of-color critique. We will ask: who gets to eat and what do they eat? What counts as “eating”? When is eating understood to be normal, healthy, and wholesome, and when is it represented as excessive, addictive, immoral, disruptive, horrifying, and/or pathological? Whose bodies supply food and sustenance for other bodies? Whose bodies are categorized as parasitic, vampiric, cannibalistic, or otherwise unruly eaters? We will seek out texts (books, but also films, short stories, art installations, and other cultural artifacts) and practice interpretive strategies that help us dig into the strange, complex, and multidimensional meanings of eating bodies. We’ll begin our exploration with a cluster of late-nineteenth-century texts, focusing on the racialized and gendered history of eating bodies in the context of imperialism and slavery. Midway through the course, students (that’s you) will nominate and vote on texts for us to study together. We will develop our critical and analytical skills through reading, writing, and other rhetorical modes that enable exploration, argumentation, and critique. We will work together to tackle the challenge of developing and revising interesting, substantive projects that change over time to reflect our emerging ideas.  


Reading and Composition: The Dust Bowl and the American Cultural Imagination

English R1A

Section: 2
Instructor: Cruz, Frank Eugene
Time: MWF 11-12
Location: 54 Barrows


Book List

Galati, Frank: John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath; Graff, Gerald: They Say/I Say: The Moves That Matter in Academic Writing; Rauchway, Eric: The Great Depression and the New Deal: A Very Short Introduction; Steinbeck, John: The Grapes of Wrath

Other Readings and Media

Films: Pare Lorentz, The Plough That Broke the Plains; John Ford, The Grapes of Wrath; Christopher Nolan, Interstellar

Photography: Dorothea Lange, Migrant Mother; Matt Black, The Geography of Poverty

Music: Woody Guthrie, Dust Bowl Ballads; Bruce Springsteen, The Ghost of Tom Joad; Rage Against the Machine, Renegades

Theater: Builders Association, House/Divided (play)

Description

In this course, we will explore the aesthetic forms and social locations of the Dust Bowl and consider the ways in which these forms and locations have echoed in the American cultural imagination since the Great Depression. We will develop your practical fluency in college-level academic writing. In total, you will produce a minimum of 32 pages of writing, including a short diagnostic essay at the beginning of the semester. Full attendance, weekly reading responses, team teaching, writing workshops, and participation in classroom discussion are all required to earn a passing grade in this course.


Reading and Composition: Image and Text

English R1A

Section: 7
Instructor: Clark, Rebecca
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 211 Dwinelle


Book List

Baker, Kyle: Nat Turner; Bechdel, Alison: Fun Home; Clowes, Daniel: Ghost World; Moore, Alan and Gibbons, Dave: Watchmen; Rankine, Claudia: Citizen; Sacco, Joe: Palestine; Tomine, Adrian: Shortcomings;

Recommended: Carson, Anne: Nox

Other Readings and Media

Reader including works by John Keats, William Blake, William Carlos Williams, W.H. Auden, Anne Sexton, Adrienne Rich, Scott McCloud, and others. Film adaptations TBD.

Description

This class will look at a variety of works that combine image and text to tell stories. How, we will ask, do words and images play with, against, or off of one another when we read these hybrid texts? How has their combination helped authors alternately to create fantastical new worlds, document the painfully or playfully quotidian, or navigate very real and frequently traumatic personal and national histories? What special demands do these forms make on their readers? What narrative and thematic possibilities do they open up?

In this course, you will be asked to write several short essays of increasing length in order to develop your academic reading and writing skills. We will work on reading critically, posing analytical questions, and crafting and supporting well-reasoned arguments through both these papers and additional in-class exercises. Students will be asked to draft, revise, and peer-review their written assignments over the course of the semester.


Reading and Composition: Re-Visioning the 1960s

English R1B

Section: 1
Instructor: Koerner, Michelle
Time: MWF 10-11
Location: 80 Barrows


Book List

Baldwin, James: The Fire Next Time; Charter, Ann: The Sixties Reader; Perec, George: Things; Pynchon, Thomas: The Crying of Lot 49

Other Readings and Media

Further course materials will be available through bcourses and will likely include: images from Andy Warhol’s Death and Disaster series (1964), George Oppen’s long poem “Of Being Numerous” (1968), Valerie Solanas’s The SCUM Manifesto (1967); Bob Dylan’s Highway 61 Revisted (1965) as well as excerpts from The Black Power Mixtape and Berkeley in the Sixties.

Description

Note the changes in instructor, topic, book list and course description for this section of English R1B (as of Aug 30).

This reading and composition course will explore selected works of literature, music, and visual art produced during the 1960s. Placing emphasis on the relationship between artistic experimentation and emancipatory social movements (both in the United States and internationally), we will ask how innovative practices of language, image, and sound engaged with the more directly political events of the period. How did writers, visual artists, and musicians use their creative work to challenge war, racism, social and economic inequality, sexual violence and gendered discrimination? What role do poetry, music, and visual art play in composing new collectivities and new potentials for social transformation?

In addition to gaining skills in literary and rhetorical analysis, students will strengthen their capacities to make persuasive arguments and to formulate compelling questions to guide their own research. Writing assignments emphasize drafting, revising, and responding to peer-feedback. In addition to several in-class writing exercises, students should expect to write two response essays (3-5 pages) as well as complete a final research project.


Reading and Composition: Blank Generation: The Changing Arts in 1970s New York City

English R1B

Section: 2
Instructor: Alexander, Edward Sterling
Time: MWF 11-12
Location: 80 Barrows


Book List

Ashbery, John: Self-Portrait in a Convex Mirror; Berrigan, Ted: The Sonnets; Mayer , Bernadette: Midwinter Day; Reed, Ishmael: Mumbo Jumbo; Waldman, Anne: Fast Speaking Woman

Other Readings and Media

Course reader with writings by Ron Padget, Joe Brainard, Alice Notley, Eileen Myles, Hannah Weiner, Patti Smith, Richard Meltzer, Lester Bangs, Jane Jacobs and others. 

Non-print media: Poetry in Motion (Dir. Ron Mann); Permanent Vacation (Dir. Jim Jarmusch); Bob Dylan: Blood on the Tracks; Miles Davis: On the Corner; No New York (curated by Brian Eno); Public Access Poetry

Description

In the decade of urban decay, energy crisis, deindustrialization, and Watergate, artists of all stripes were thrown back on their own resources, seeking the means and reasons for continuing the avant-garde’s project of cultural revolution after the political defeats of the late 1960s.  In this course we will examine 1970s New York as a time and place of both collapse and reinvention.  Devoting special attention to particular locations that served as vital sites of activity for the remnants of the postwar counterculture—most obviously, the St. Mark’s Poetry Project, the SoHo lofts, Max’s Kansas City, and CBGB—we will examine the shifts and reversals of this era across a variety of media that both exemplify and challenge the category of “literature.”  At a time when academic thought about literature was itself undergoing radical restructuring in the Anglo-American university’s adoption of European literary theory, members of the American literary culture began to migrate into other media such as music, film and television in order to locate new possibilities for their work.  Faced with unprecedented obstacles to their flourishing, artists thus found that their best skill was to become moving targets.  

Since this is an R1B course, students will continue developing the skills in critical reading and essay composition that they began to cultivate in R1A. This time around we will build upon those skills by introducing students to the basics of research methodology as they produce final research papers on a topic of their choice pertaining to the course materials. Students will learn how to locate and cite scholarly articles relevant to their topic of interest. We will continue to work on writing and argumentation skills in a series of in-class exercises, revisions and peer editing workshops.


Reading and Composition: The Cultural Lives of Higher Education

English R1B

Section: 3
Instructor: Greer, Erin
Time: MWF 12-1
Location: 211 Dwinelle


Book List

Coetzee, J.M.: Disgrace; Smith, Zadie: On Beauty; Woolf, Virginia: Three Guineas

Other Readings and Media

Selections from the following theorists and historians will be made available online: Matthew Arnold, Wendy Brown, John Dewey, Immanuel Kant, Achille Mbembe, Fred Moten and Stefano Harney, Nietzsche, Christopher Newfield, Cardinal Newman, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Craig Steven Wilder, and Mary Wollstonecraft.

In addition, students will follow higher education news coverage in the Chronicle of Higher Education and Inside Higher Ed.

Description

The purpose, nature, and structure of higher education in the West are currently undergoing dramatic revision. Tuition is rising steadily at both private and public institutions, as public support for teaching and research shifts; concerns and hopes abound about the potential of Massive Open Online Courses to revolutionize education; and every few months, an Op-Ed appears in a major publication defending the model of a broad humanities education against critics who demand to know what tangible value such education offers for students. In 2015, student demonstrations against administrative attitudes toward alleged racism on campuses across the US––and, simultaneously, South Africa––sparked additional heated debates about the intellectual, political, and personal nature of the spaces in which students live and learn.

Against this backdrop, this course will undertake a rigorous analysis of the ideals and realities of higher education, adopting interpretive lenses from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. With works of philosophy, we will explore the relationship between education, theories of human nature, and social contracts. With works of literature, we will interrogate the relation between higher education and various forms of power and social privilege. We will read contemporary critical essays championing the value of a broad, liberal education, and we will analyze the historical transformation of the organizational structure of universities in the U.S, U.K, and South Africa. In other words, this course integrates literary, historical, and philosophical perspectives to consider the past, present, and possible futures of higher education.

In addition to exploring questions surrounding higher education, students will develop their writing skills, practicing integrating close-readings of literature with research in other disciplines.


Reading and Composition: Endings

English R1B

Section: 5
Instructor: Lesser, Madeline
Time: MWF 2-3
Location: 225 Dwinelle


Book List

McCarthy, Cormac: The Road; Morrison, Toni : Beloved

Other Readings and Media

Note that the texts for this class will be available at University Press Books, on Bancroft Way.

All other readings—poetry, selected criticism, short stories—will be provided in a course reader. 

Description

What’s in an ending?  In this class, we will explore literature about endings: personal endings (elegiac forms), national endings (the end of an era), and apocalyptic endings (the end of the world).  In addition, we will focus our class on the question of how each text ends.  Endings can serve a variety of purposes—as a new beginning, a failure to let go, a neat conclusion.  We will strive to characterize the ending of each text in order to question how formal decisions contribute to its “sense” of an ending.

The goal of R1B is to develop your writing and research skills.  As such, we will pay particular attention to the question often introduced by the ends of our own essays: so what?  How do we determine the context of our arguments?  How do we frame our arguments so as to intervene in a particular critical framework?  You will write and revise two long essays (~8 pages each) over the course of the semester.  You will also be responsible for weekly reading assignments, peer writing reviews, and an ongoing writing journal. 


Reading and Composition: Writing Cuban-America

English R1B

Section: 6
Instructor: Artiz, Ernest T.
Time: MWF 3-4
Location: 50 Barrows


Book List

Cruz, Nilo: Anna in the Tropics; Fraxedes, J. Joaquin: The Lonely Crossing of Juan Cabrera; Garcia, Cristina: Dreaming in Cuban; Hemingway, Ernest: The Old Man and the Sea; Hijuelos, Oscar: The Mambo Kings Play Songs of Love

Other Readings and Media

The class will watch selected episodes of I Love Lucy.

Secondary critical texts provided by instructor.

Description

The history of Cubans living in the US is a complicated one, caught between the US’s imperialist wars of the late-19th and early-20th centuries and the Cold War machinations of the first and second worlds. This course will consider the cultural representation of Cubans and Cuba within the US, and, in particular, look to the Cuban-American novel as repository of the divergent and conflicting historical narratives that have produced and been produced by Cuban-Americans. In this way, the generational struggles of Cuban-Americans (and, in particular, the lasting image of the émigré in Cuban-American culture) will be related as a focal point, through which drastically different senses of Cubanidad have come to be represented. This course will look to interrogate a selected set of literature closely alongside Cuban-American scholarship in order to generate specific underlying problematics, questions, and relationships that can be used for student research. This course will emphasize research skills and the construction of complex arguments in composition.


Reading and Composition: After Empires

English R1B

Section: 7
Instructor: Choi, Jeehyun
Time: MW 5-6:30
Location: 279 Dwinelle


Book List

Achebe, Chinua: Things Fall Apart; Aidoo, Ama Ata: Our Sister Killjoy; Diaz, Junot: The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao; Hagedorn, Jessica: Dogeaters; Hamid, Mohsin: The Reluctant Fundamentalist; Nguyen, Viet Thanh: The Sympathizer: A Novel; Okada, John: No-No Boy

Description

In this course, we will investigate how literature and literary criticism from the 1950s to today has responded to various forms of imperialism, focusing on how the concerns of "postcolonial" texts change according to temporal and spatial locations. Overview questions that will guide our readings include: What constitutes an empire, and what is its relation to literature and culture? How has postcolonial literature used language and form to resist imperialist initiatives and to represent colonial experiences? What can literature tell us about how colonialism intersects with gender, race, nation, and class? We will read literary texts as well as critical and historical works that explore the ongoing aftermaths of the British, Japanese, and U.S. empires. In particular, the course will tend to a number of texts that evoke the question of American empire and concern the implications of reading—or failing to read—the United States as an imperial power.

As we explore literatures of various parts of the world and their historical contexts, we will develop your fluency in college-level academic writing and refine your research skills. This is a writing-intensive course, and accordingly, we will use our class discussions as platforms to hone your skills in generating original research questions and crafting compelling arguments. You will outline, draft, revise, and workshop papers throughout the course of the semester, producing a substantial research paper at the end of the semester according to your own interests.


Reading and Composition: Re-Visioning the 1960s

English R1B

Section: 8
Instructor: Koerner, Michelle
Time: MW 5-6:30
Location: 80 Barrows


Book List

Baldwin, James: The Fire Next Time; Charter, Ann: The Sixties Reader; Perec, George: Things; Pynchon, Thomas: The Crying of Lot 49

Other Readings and Media

Further course materials will be available through bcourses and will likely include: images from Andy Warhol’s Death and Disaster series(1964), George Oppen’s long poem “Of Being Numerous” (1968), Valerie Solanas’s The SCUM Manifesto (1967); Bob Dylan’s Highway 61 Revisted (1965) as well as excerpts from The Black Power Mixtape and Berkeley in the Sixties.

Description

Note the changes in instructor, topic, book list and course description for this section of English R1B (as of Aug 30).

This reading and composition course will explore selected works of literature, music, and visual art produced during the 1960s. Placing emphasis on the relationship between artistic experimentation and emancipatory social movements (both in the United States and internationally), we will ask how innovative practices of language, image, and sound engaged with the more directly political events of the period. How did writers, visual artists, and musicians use their creative work to challenge war, racism, social and economic inequality, sexual violence and gendered discrimination? What role do poetry, music, and visual art play in composing new collectivities and new potentials for social transformation?

In addition to gaining skills in literary and rhetorical analysis, students will strengthen their capacities to make persuasive arguments and to formulate compelling questions to guide their own research. Writing assignments emphasize drafting, revising, and responding to peer-feedback. In addition to several in-class writing exercises, students should expect to write two response essays (3-5 pages) as well as complete a final research project


Reading and Composition: Technophobia

English R1B

Section: 9
Instructor: Barbour, Andrew John
Time: TTh 8-9:30
Location: 211 Dwinelle


Book List

Butler, Samuel: Erewhon; Powers, Richard: Galatea 2.2; Shelley, Mary: Frankenstein; Čapek, Karel: R.U.R.

Other Readings and Media

A course reader with selections from Coleridge, Hoffman, Kleist, affect theory, and STS

Description

Science fiction often investigates how technology affects human drives and desires. Insofar as thought experiments with non-human forms of intelligence and artificial life are major tropes of the genre, representations of computers and robots in film and literature tend to make us think critically about the very qualities that come to define the human, and what falls outside or threatens the anthropomorphic. How does technology probe the precarity and vulnerability of what we take to be distinctively human qualities and emotions? How do technological narratives hold up a speculative mirror (black or otherwise) to what we take to divide the human from the non-human world? Over the semester, we’ll read major technological narratives alongside contemporary scholarship in affect theory and science and technology studies. You’ll also refine your techniques for innovative writing and research in the humanities and beyond.


Reading and Composition: Narratives of Enlightenment

English R1B

Section: 10
Instructor: Wilson, Evan
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 225 Dwinelle


Book List

Hesse, Hermann: Siddhartha; Pamuk, Orhan: The New Life

Other Readings and Media

A course reader with excerpts from: Ecclesiastes; Augustine, Confessions; Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Emile; Walt Whitman, Leaves of Grass; Henry David Thoreau, Civil Disobedience; Henry Adams, The Education of Henry Adams; John Dewey, Democracy and Education; Paolo Freire, Pedagogy of the Oppressed; Gloria Anzaldua, Borderlands/La Frontera

 

Description

This class explores what it means to be wise, enlightened, or educated. While it will offer no definitive answers to those enormous questions, it will look at how writers in a number of traditions have offered their own answers and written compelling narratives about the process of attaining wisdom. We will read and think comparatively about three related concepts: enlightenment, education, and conversion. What distinguishes them from each other? How does each one, as it’s framed by various writers, demand particular attitudes and ways of behaving from those of us who want to follow these paths? What relevance do such apparently fuzzy or spiritual qualities as “wisdom” or “enlightenment” have for your own college education in 2017?

In the process of reading narratives of enlightenment, you’ll also be writing and developing the research skills that help make you a critical citizen and curator of information in our twenty-first-century digital world. Units on analyzing different genres and media, including newspaper articles, scholarly articles, and film, along with frequent chances to write both formally and informally, will help equip you to write a research paper on a topic of your choosing.


Reading and Composition: University Life

English R1B

Section: 11
Instructor: Neal, Allison
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 279 Dwinelle


Book List

Amis, Kingsley: Lucky Jim; Batuman, Elif: The Idiot; DeLillo, Don: White Noise; Smith, Zadie: On Beauty

Other Readings and Media

We will read essays by I.A. Richards, Cleanth Brooks and Robert Penn Warren, Mark McGurl, and John Guillory. We will also engage with a vast swath of poetry, including work by Marianne Moore, W.H. Auden, Frank O'Hara, Sylvia Plath, and Adrienne Rich. These materials will be available on bCourses. Please do not purchase course materials before the first day of class.

Description

How have British and American writers formed their work around and inside the university? How does reading and writing literature fit into university life? How do we know whether a piece of fiction or poetry is "academic" or "anti-academic" in style? How does reading as a "student" differ from reading for pleasure? This course will explore the place of English literature within the university system by engaging with a series of post-WWII campus novels and poems. We will also read a number of contemporary treatises that explore the purpose of the humanities within higher education, and we'll ask how the conception of English literature (and its purpose, particularly in relation to Rhetoric and Composition courses) has evolved since 1945.

This class is organized around texts that thematize the academic aspects of literature, but its primary goal is to help you to approach literature both in and out of the university system. Just as literature produces different modes of reception (academic or otherwise), your writing will be characterized by different modes of analytic inquiry. This class will be structured as a workshop and will include peer revision, individual meetings, and in-class discussions of various techniques of essay writing. Students will be responsible for writing two research papers and revisions.


Reading and Composition: The Undiscovered Country

English R1B

Section: 12
Instructor: Lorden, Jennifer A.
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 50 Barrows


Book List

Calvocoressi, Gabrielle: The Last Time I Saw Amelia Earhart: Poems; Delanty, Greg, ed.: The Word Exchange: Anglo-Saxon Poems in Translation; Faulkner, William: As I Lay Dying; Morrison, Toni: Beloved; Shakespeare, William: Hamlet

Other Readings and Media

Film screening: Sunset Boulevard. (We will be screening this in-class.)

Description

Note the changes in instructor, topic, book list, and course description for this section of English R1B (as of May 30).

The experience of death is one of the most difficult, yet most urgent, to imaginatively represent in literature. Since, of course, no writer can offer a firsthand account of that "undiscovered country from whose bourn no traveler returns," each who seeks to deal with the subject of death must resort to myriad creative strategies to paint a portrait of death that is, so to speak, true to life. This class will approach one category of such representations, those in which a main character or group of characters is dead from the very beginning of the narration. How does the presence of the dead function in a work of literature, and what do these texts suggest about the way death functions in life?

For the purposes of this class, of course, our primary concern will be to develop critical arguments from these texts. You'll share your findings through in-class discussions and writing workshops and discover ways to construct arguments from such disparate genres of writing. You'll write and revise two research papers, in addition to a short initial diagnostic exercise.


Reading and Composition: Visions of the World

English R1B

Section: 13
Instructor: Rajabzadeh, Shokoofeh
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 262 Dwinelle


Book List

Butler , Octavia : Blood Child ; Maalouf, Amin: Leo Africanus ; Rowlandson, Mary: The Sovereignty and Goodness of God; Wilson, G. Willow: Ms. Marvel ; Zitkala-Sa: American Indian Stories, Legends and Other Writings

Description

“To see the Earth as it truly is, small and blue and beautiful in that eternal silence where it floats, is to see ourselves as riders on the Earth together.” – Archibald MacLeish, comment on the “Earthrise” after the Apollo 8 mission.

While NASA was collecting images of Earth as early as the 1940s, it was not until the 1972, when the famous "Blue Marble" photo was released, that the public saw an image of Earth in its entirety. How did this vision of our home from space affect our perception of our world and our place in it? How could this isolated object, so “small and blue and beautiful,” sustain a global community? 

In this class we will interrogate the role that place plays in creating, dividing, and imagining community. How do acts that change inhabitable geographies, such as colonialism, exploitation, and environmental disasters, change the communities formed on that land? How does one's perception of a community change as one physically moves across land, whether traveling, migrating, or making a pilgrimage? How do authors write their characters into, or out of, the communities sustained by the worlds they portray?

The goal of this course is two-fold. Firstly, its aim is to help you develop and strengthen your close reading, critical thinking, use of secondary sources, and research skills as we explore the relationship between people, earth, and our idea or sense of place. And secondly, the course aims to help you develop the ability to craft your analyses into clear and effective academic writing through drafts, revisions, peer-review feedback, and weekly writing exercises.  


Reading and Composition: GLBT and Queer Chicanx/Latinx Literature and Cultural Work

English R1B

Section: 14
Instructor: Trevino, Jason Benjamin
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 89 Dwinelle


Book List

Anzaldúa, Gloria: Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza ; Cuadros, Gil: City of God; Islas, Arturo: The Rain God: A Desert Tale

Other Readings and Media

Other Required Texts (all available in course reader): Short pieces by authors including but not limited to Cherríe Moraga, Jose Estéban Muñoz, Heather Love, Tomás Almaguer, Antonio Viego, Leo Bersani, Mel Chen, Michael Hames-Garcia, Judith Butler, and David Halperin.

Description

In this course, we will read and write about Chicanx/Latinx literatures and cultural productions that explore GLBT and queer themes. In our approaches to the course materials, we will consider the notion of the queer, GLBT, and Chicano text.  What is a queer, Chicano, GLBT text? What is queer, Chicano, and/or GLBT writing? How and to what extent are these identitarian descriptors appropriate to the texts we study? Alongside these questions, we will also consider the interrelationships between art and activism. Can literature “do” activism? How and to what extent? In the types of literature we will be reading, is it even supposed to? What are the costs? These are some of the questions we ask as we read a set of multivalent texts situated within a triangle encompassing the Texas Río Grande Valley, Los Angeles, and the San Francisco Bay Area.

As we analyze the various methods of research and exposition that our authors employ to convey social and literary meaning, we will work on developing our own methods of research and analysis for effective critical writing. To this end, we will focus throughout the semester on asking precise and significant questions, on identifying useful print and online sources to help us refine and answer these questions, and on translating our research findings into strong scholarly arguments.  The goal of the course is to encourage students to craft compelling questions and arguments that will grow into papers supported by student research.  


Reading and Composition: Genre Trouble

English R1B

Section: 15
Instructor: Ripplinger, Michelle
Time: TTh 5-6:30
Location: 262 Dwinelle


Book List

Adichie, Chimamanda Ngozi : Dear Ijeawele, or A Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions; Austen, Jane: Northanger Abbey; Kempe, Margery: The Book of Margery Kempe; Woolf, Virginia: A Room of One's Own

Other Readings and Media

A course reader that may include selections from: Geoffrey Chaucer’s “The Wife of Bath’s Prologue and Tale,” Julian of Norwich’s Revelation of Love, and Ann Radcliff’s The Mysteries of Udolpho, among others

Films and television may include: Bridget Jones's Diary

Description

This course will examine the complex relationships between gender and literary genre. What social and historical forces have, at various points in time, caused certain genres to be marginalized as “women’s writing” or “chick lit”? How have female authors negotiated the fact that literary activity is often implicitly, or even explicitly, gendered male? In order to get at these questions, we will consider several different historical moments and ask of each how gendered discourse relates to, informs, and perhaps even constitutes an essential component of literary authority. We will situate each literary work in relation to its own moment, but we will also ask how these works, medieval and modern alike, speak to each other. We will wonder, for instance, what the first-personal rhetorical strategies deployed in the late-medieval Book of Margery Kempe—the first autobiography written in English—have to do with the narratological innovations of Victorian women’s popular novels. We will ask how Virginia Woolf and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie each position themselves in relation to predominantly male literary traditions.

We will be thinking a lot about gender and genre, then, but our engagement with these literary works will be guided by an underlying goal, which is to focus on your writing. In order to refine the core skills of critical reading and analytical thinking—essential tools for writing insightful and persuasively argued papers—the course requires two essays and will culminate in a final research project and presentation. A peer-review process will provide added support as we approach the research paper as a cumulative series of distinct and individually manageable steps. By the end of the semester, you will have produced at least thirty-two pages of writing, including both drafts and revisions.


Freshman Seminar: Reading Walt Whitman’s Leaves of Grass

English 24

Section: 1
Instructor: Wong, Hertha D. Sweet
Time: M 12-2, 8/28 to 10/16 only
Location: Unit 2, Wada Apts., Seminar Room L08, 2650 Haste St.


Book List

Whitman, Walt: Leaves of Grass and Other Writings, 2nd Rev. Ed. (New York: W.W. Norton & Co., 2002)

Description

Walt Whitman self published the first edition of Leaves of Grass, a collection of poems, in 1855.  For the rest of his life, he reworked, revised, and added to this collection. He produced at least six distinguishable editions. We will read selectively from what has been called “the Deathbed Edition” (1891-1892), but we will examine the first (1855) and third (1860) editions as well. In addition, we will explore the online Walt Whitman Archive, “the most comprehensive Web-based collection of Whitman’s writings and biographical information.” The seminar will culminate in actor-educator John Slade’s visit to class and his one-person performance entitled Whitman Sings! in which, in Whitman’s persona, he sets Whitman’s words to “folk, gospel, and hip hop frames.”

Note that this section of English 24 will run from August 28 to October 16 only (two hours per class meeting).

This 1-unit course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.


Freshman Seminar: Shakespeare's Sonnets

English 24

Section: 2
Instructor: Nelson, Alan H.
Time: W 12-1
Location: 186 Barrows


Book List

Shakespeare, William: Shakespeare's Sonnets and A Lover's Complaint, ed. Stanley Wells

Description

Shakespeare's sonnets were first published in 1609, rather late in his career, with a second, curiously distorted edition in 1640. Although little is known about how they were first received by the reading public, the sonnets still cause puzzlement and delight more than 400 years later. Over the course of the semester we will read all 154 sonnets, at the rate of approximately ten per week. All students will be expected to participate actively in seminar discussions. Each student will present one informal and one formal seminar report.

The first meeting of the seminar will be Wednesday, 6 September.

This 1-unit course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.


Freshman Seminar: African American Poetry

English 24

Section: 3
Instructor: Wagner, Bryan
Time: Tues. 4-5
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

There will be a course reader.

Description

We will read, discuss, and write about poems by African American authors including Phillis Wheatley, Frances Harper, Paul Laurence Dunbar, Claude McKay, Countee Cullen, Langston Hughes, Gwendolyn Brooks, Amiri Baraka, Audre Lorde, Nathaniel Mackey, Harryette Mullen, and Claudia Rankine.

This 1-unit course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.


Literature in English: Through Milton

English 45A

Section: 1
Instructor: Justice, Steven
Time: MW 12-1 + discussion sections F 12-1
Location: 60 Barrows


Book List

Chaucer, Geoffrey: The Canterbury Tales: A Selection; Donne, John: Poetry; Milton, John: Paradise Lost; Shakespeare, William: Macbeth; Shakespeare, William: Sonnets

Description

In this course we will read some of the best books ever written in English, and the course will try to treat both you and those books seriously and justly. The course will give you a sense of the shape of literary history from the earlier middle ages through 1667: Chaucer, Shakespeare, Donne, and Milton will get our closest attention, but they will also provide the scaffolding on which to hang a more detailed picture of the imaginative and intellectual development of literature. It will work hard to give you the skills to read easily and intelligently (and out loud) the earlier forms of the language in which these works are written, and to develop also the skills by which you can take writing apart and see how it works. It will also take up the big questions raised by the whole undertaking: what literary art is good for, what forms of reason and understanding are most at home in it, and why the past is worth bothering with--all, in fact, questions that the works themselves are preoccupied with.


Literature in English: Through Milton

English 45A

Section: 2
Instructor: Knapp, Jeffrey
Time: MW 2-3 + discussion sections F 2-3
Location: 60 Barrows


Book List

Chaucer, Geoffrey: The Canterbury Tales; Donne, John: The Complete English Poems; Milton, John: Paradise Lost; Spenser, Edmund: Edmund Spencer's Poetry

Description

This course focuses on three major works of late medieval and early modern English literature: Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, Spenser’s Faerie Queene, and Milton’s Paradise Lost.  We’ll discuss the works in themselves and as parts of a developing literary tradition.  We’ll also read shorter poems by Donne, Sidney, Wroth, Herbert, Suckling, and Lovelace.


Literature in English: Late-17th Through Mid-19th Centuries

English 45B

Section: 1
Instructor: Sorensen, Janet
Time: MW 10-11 + discussion sections F 10-11
Location: 141 McCone


Book List

Austen, Jane: Emma; Behn, Aphra: Oroonoko; Defoe, Daniel: Moll Flanders; Equiano, Olaudah: The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano or Gustavus Vassa, the African, Written by Himself; Pope, Alexander: The Rape of the Lock and Other Major Writings; Wordsworth, William: Lyrical Ballads

Description

As we read works produced in a period of tumultuous change, we shall consider those works as zones of contact, reflecting and sometimes negotiating conflict. In a world of expanding global commerce (imports like tea suddenly becoming commonplace in England), political revolution (English, American, French), and changing conceptions of what it means to be a man or woman (a new medical discourse viewing them as categorically distinct), increasingly available printed texts become sites of contestation—including debates about what constitutes “proper” language and Literature itself. We shall think about the ways in which separate groups—British and African, masters and slaves, slave owners and abolitionists, arch capitalists and devout religious thinkers, Republicans and Conservatives, men and women—use writing to devise ongoing relationships with each other, often under conditions of inequality. Throughout we shall be especially attuned to formal choices—from linguistic register to generic conventions and innovations—and how writers deploy these to incorporate opposition, resist authority or authorize themselves. Requirements will include two papers, a mid-term exam, a final exam, and reading quizzes.


Literature in English: Late-17th Through Mid-19th Centuries

English 45B

Section: 2
Instructor: Goldsmith, Steven
Time: MW 3-4 + discussion sections F 3-4
Location: 60 Barrows


Book List

Norton Anthology of English Literature, Volume C; Norton Anthology of English Literature, Volume D; Austen, Jane: Pride and Prejudice; Brown, Charles Brockden: Wieland; or the Transformation; Franklin, Benjamin: The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin; Jacobs, Harriet: Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl; Melville, Herman: Billy Budd and Other Stories

Description

Our course begins at sea, with the “violent storm” and shipwreck of Gulliver’s Travels, and ends with Benito Cereno’s strange maritime encounter at “a small, desert, uninhabited island” off the southern tip of Chile.  These scenes of oceanic dislocation correspond to the rise of modernity that forms our topic.  Eighteenth- and nineteenth-century modernity involves a variety of new or accelerating instabilities: epistemological uncertainty; cultural relativism in newly imagined global contexts; the transformation of economic value from land to (liquid) capital; linguistic self-consciousness in a rapidly expanding print culture; and altered forms of subjectivity navigating the new political rhetoric of republicanism, freedom, and individualism.  Throughout the course, we will ask what literary anxieties and opportunities such large scale transformations entail, at a time when everything solid—self, world, and society—turns fluid, as if at sea. 


Literature in English: Mid-19th Through the 20th Century

English 45C

Section: 1
Instructor: Gang, Joshua
Time: MW 11-12 + discussion sections F 11-12
Location: 101 Morgan


Book List

Bechdel, Alison: Fun Home; Coetzee, JM: Disgrace; Faulkner, William: The Sound and the Fury; Johnson, James Weldon: Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man; Luiselli, Valeria: The Story of My Teeth; Woolf, Virginia: Mrs. Dalloway

Other Readings and Media

Required course reader available from MetroPublishing.

Description

This course will survey British, American, and global Anglophone literature from the end of the 19th century through the beginning of the 21st. Moving across a number of genres and movements, this course will examine the ways 20th- and 21st-century writers have used literary form to represent, question, and even produce different aspects of modernity. Particular attention will be paid to close reading and key concepts in literary study, as well as literature’s broader engagements with questions of race, gender and sexuality, colonialism, religion, mass media, economy, and ecology.  Evaluation will be based on two papers, a midterm, and a final exam.

Readings will likely include: fiction by James Weldon Johnson, Virginia Woolf, William Faulkner, Salman Rushdie, Alison Bechdel, JM Coetzee, and Valeria Luiselli; drama by Samuel Beckett, Susan-Lori Parks, and Caryl Churchill; poetry by Matthew Arnold, William Butler Yeats, Langston Hughes, TS Eliot, and Caroline Bergvall, among others.


Literature in English: Mid-19th Through the 20th Century

English 45C

Section: 2
Instructor: Abel, Elizabeth
Time: MW 1-2 + discussion sections F 1-2
Location: 60 Barrows


Book List

Bechdel, Alice: Fun Home; Beckett, Samuel: Waiting for Godot; Faulkner, William: The Sound and the Fury; Hurston, Zora Neale: Their Eyes Were Watching God; James, Henry: The Turn of the Screw; Joyce, James: Dubliners; Pynchon , Thomas: The Crying of Lot 49; Rhys, Jean: Wide Sargasso Sea; Woolf, Virginia: To the Lighthouse

Other Readings and Media

Poetry and critical essays will be made available on our bCourses site.

Description

This course will focus on the formal consequences of the cultural and social revolutions of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. After examining the changes in narrative strategy and poetic diction that have come to be known as "modernism," we will trace their reverberations by examining key texts and genres across the century. We will also analyze the pressures brought to bear on formal innovation by diverse national and ethnic traditions, the legacies of colonialism, the unprecedented violence of two world wars, and the rapid development of technology.


Sophomore Seminar: The Coen Brothers

English 84

Section: 1
Instructor: Bader, Julia
Time: W 1-4
Location: 300 Wheeler


Book List

Lahiri, J.: Interpreter of Maladies

Description

We will concentrate on the high and low cultural elements in the noir comedies of the Coen brothers, discussing their use of Hollywood genres, parodies of classic conventions, and representation of arbitrariness.  We will also read some fiction and attend events at the Pacific Film Archive and Cal Performances.

This 2-unit course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.


Sophomore Seminar: Modern Utopian and (mostly) Dystopian Movies

English 84

Section: 2
Instructor: Starr, George A.
Time: Tues. 5-8:30 PM incl. 1/2 hr. break
Location: 300 Wheeler


Description

Among the films likely to be included in the syllabus and discussed in class are the following: Fritz Lang, Metropolis (1927); Leni Riefenstahl, The Triumph of the Will (1934); Charlie Chaplin, Modern Times (1936); George Lucas, THX -1138 (1970); Stanley Kubrick, A Clockwork Orange (1971); Michael Radford, Nineteen Eighty Four (1984); Terry Gilliam, Brazil (1985); Volker Schlondorff, The Handmaid’s Tale (1990); Andrew Niccol, Gattaca (1997); Alfonso Cuarón, Children of Men (2006); Mark Romanek, Never Let Me Go (2010); and Alex Garland, Ex Machina (2015). No texts will be assigned, but certain background materials will be posted on bCourses.

This 2-unit course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.


Introduction to Old English

English 104

Section: 1
Instructor: Thornbury, Emily V.
Time: MWF 10-11
Location: 120 Wheeler


Book List

Mitchell, Bruce, and Fred C. Robinson: Guide to Old English

Other Readings and Media

A coursepack

Description

Hwæt! Leorniað Englisc!

In this introduction to Old English, you will begin to read and write Old English from your first day in class, while also learning fundamental principles of grammar and historical language change. As you progress in your knowledge, you will begin exploring the wide range of literature in Old English, including riddles, love-laments, heroic poetry, and exotic travel narratives. You will learn what to do about demons, and the surprising reason that pepper is black. (Hint: it involves snakes.) By the end of the course, you will be able to read most Old English texts with the aid of a dictionary. You will also have a strong grasp of the linguistic principles that still shape modern English, and will be well prepared for further study of modern and medieval languages.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

There are no prerequisites for this course, and no prior knowledge is expected. Graduate students interested in Old English should contact the instructor: a concurrent version of this course may be taken for graduate credit.


Medieval Literature

English 110

Section: 1
Instructor: Miller, Jennifer
Time: MWF 12-1
Location: 56 Barrows


Other Readings and Media

A course reader

Description

For more information about this course, please contact Professor Miller at j_miller@berkeley.edu.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


The English Renaissance (through the 16th Century)

English 115A

Section: 1
Instructor: Miller, Jennifer
Time: MWF 3-4
Location: 187 Dwinelle


Other Readings and Media

A course reader

Description

For more information about this course, please contact Professor Miller at j_miller@berkeley.edu.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


Shakespeare: Later Works

English 117B

Section: 1
Instructor: Turner, James Grantham
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 102 Wheeler


Book List

Shakespeare, William: The Norton Shakespeare

Description

A survey of the second half of Shakespeare’s working life, including the later “problem” comedies, the major tragedies and the magical romances, his final works. Lectures will touch upon the complete writings and present sample scenes (with a selection of sonnets), so that you will know at least something about every work. Discussions will focus on a smaller group of six plays, to be explored in depth: Twelfth Night, Measure for Measure, Macbeth, King Lear, The Winter’s Tale, The Tempest. If schedules permit I will also plan class visits to live performances and/or cinema presentations of relevant Shakespeare plays.

Quizzes with passages from the sample texts (ID and brief critical commentary); two papers on the in-depth plays; final exam.


Shakespeare

English 117S

Section: 1
Instructor: Marno, David
Time: MWF 3-4
Location: 2 Le Conte


Book List

Greenblatt, S., ed.: The Norton Shakespeare

Other Readings and Media

Additional materials will be distributed through bCourses.

Description

This class focuses on a selection of works from Shakespeare’s entire career. We'll be reading a limited number of plays and some of the poetry. One of the main issues I'd like to focus on is the oscillation between "regular" and "irregular." What is the rule, and what is the exception in Shakespeare's works? How is a comedy supposed to end? How does it end? What makes a tragic hero? Is Hamlet a tragic hero? What are the rules of theater? What are the rules of literature? Who creates them and why? When do they get transgressed, and why? A tentative list of the plays includes Titus Andronicus, Richard III, A Midsummer Night's Dream, As You Like It, Troilus and Cressida, King Lear, and The Tempest. We'll also read some of the sonnets. Three short assignments and a final exam.


Literature of the Later 18th Century

English 120

Section: 1
Instructor: Picciotto, Joanna M
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: note new locations: 20 Wheeler


Book List

See below.

Description

We’ll investigate the relationship of literature to other arts in the period, particularly painting and landscape design. Our focus will be on engagements with “nature,” understood as the non-human world and the ground of culture. In this period, nature also served as the foundation for the “rights of man,” yet those imagined as living “closest” to nature—animals, the laboring poor, slaves, and women—could not find a secure place in this discourse. We will explore why.

The books for this course will be available at University Press Books on Bancroft; other readings will be available on the course website. Texts will include the following:

James Thomson, The Seasons; William Hogarth, The Analysis of Beauty; Christopher Smart, Jubilate Agno; Oliver Goldsmith, The Deserted Village; George Crabbe, The Village; Quobna Ottobah Cugoano, Thoughts and Sentiments on the Evil of Slavery; Mary Woolstonecraft, A Vindication of the Rights of Women; William Godwin, Caleb Williams; Edmund Burke, Reflections on the Revolution in France; Thomas Paine, Rights of Man; William Blake, Milton: A Poem in Two Books, as well as poems by William Collins, Thomas Gray, Anna Letitia Barbauld, and Charlotte Smith. 

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


The Victorian Period

English 122

Section: 1
Instructor: Lavery, Jos
Time: MW 2-3 + discussion sections F 2-3
Location: 20 Barrows


Book List

Arnold, Matthew: Essays in Criticism; Barrett Browning , Elizabeth: Poems; Braddon, Mary Elizabeth: Lady Audley's Secret; Bronte, Emily: Wuthering Heights; Dickens, Charles: Selected Journalism, 1850 - 1870; Eliot, George : Adam Bede; Tennyson, Alfred: Poems

Description

The Victorian period witnessed dramatic and probably permanent changes to the literary culture of Britain, including: the morphing of scattered memoirs into formal autobiographies; the rise of the realist novel as the indispensable genre of bourgeois life; the investment of culture with the power to effect epochal political change and rearrange readers' sexualities; the invention of vampires, robots, serial killers, and other new forms of monstrosity; the modernization of narrative pornography; and the rejuvenation of bardic poetry. At the same time British authors were trying and failing to manage the largest empire in history, both devising new ways to dominate the world through writing and interrupting the violence that imperialism—the so-called "final phase of capitalism"—produced.

This course engages the major theoretical questions posed by Victorian literature, questions which emerge from the unprecedented global suffusion of British imperial influence. How might the enormity of this new world be meaningfully represented in language? What new accounts of personhood, ethics, sexuality, ethnicity, evolution, and art are required? Dealing with these and related questions, we will perhaps come to understand the enduring power of Victorian literature to speak to our own moment of globalization and crisis—our perennial return to the unanswered questions and open wounds of the nineteenth century.

The texts for this course will be available at University Press Books, on Bancroft Way.


The 20th-Century Novel

English 125D

Section: 1
Instructor: Jones, Donna V.
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 120 Wheeler


Book List

Dreiser, Theodore: Sister Carrie; Garcia Marquez, Gabriel: One Hundred Years of Solitude; Gibson, William: Neuromancer; Woolf, Virginia: Mrs. Dalloway; Zola, Emile: La Bete Humaine;

Recommended: Culler, Jonathan: Literary Theory: A Very Short Introduction

Description

This course is a general survey of the 20th-century novel. The novel is the quintessential form of experession of modernity and modern subjectivity. In this survey of key works of the century, we will explore the novel form as it is framed by these three thematics—history, modernism, and empire. These are some questions we will address: How have the vicissitudes of modernity led to a re-direction of historical narratiion within the novel? How has modernist aesthetic experimentation re-shaped the very form of the novel? And lastly, how has the phenomenon of imperialism, the asymmetrical relations of power between center and periphery, widened the scope of fictive milieu?

Please note the changes (made on May 17) in the book list, above.


British Literature, 1900-1945

English 126

Section: 1
Instructor: Flynn, Catherine
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 20 Wheeler


Book List

Beckett, Samuel: Watt; Conrad, Joseph: Lord Jim; Ford, Ford Madox: The Good Soldier; Forster, E. M.: Howards End; Joyce, James: Ulysses; Rhys, Jean: Good Morning, Midnight; Woolf, Virginia: The Waves

Description

The British novel in the first half of the twentieth century was a site of massive formal experimentation. Time, space, narrators, characters, and language were dismantled and reconfigured in startling new ways. In this survey, we will look at novelistic experiments by seven authors: Joseph Conrad, E. M. Forster, Ford Madox Ford, James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, Jean Rhys and Samuel Beckett. Using close reading and formal analysis, we ask what these experiments were. We will gather a set of varied and precise ways of talking about modernism's formal features, its philosophical issues and its social and historical context.


American Literature: Before 1800

English 130A

Section: 1
Instructor: Otter, Samuel
Time: MWF 2-3
Location: 182 Dwinelle


Description

This course has been canceled (as of 4/6/17).


American Literature: 1800-1865

English 130B

Section: 1
Instructor: Breitwieser, Mitchell
Time: TTh 5-6:30 PM
Location: 240 Mulford


Book List

Douglass, Frederick: Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass; Emerson, Ralph Waldo: Nature and Selected Essays; Hawthorne, Nathaniel: The Scarlet Letter; Melville, Herman: Moby Dick; Thoreau, Henry David: Walden and Civil Disobedience; Whitman, Walt: Leaves of Grass, The Original 1855 edition)

Description

On July 4 fifty years after the Declaration of Independence was signed, both John Adams and Thomas Jefferson died, an astonishing coincidence that many Americans took to signify the ending of the revolutionary era, and the beginning of a new phase in American nationality. They had little in their national past to draw upon in forming a sense of identity, and the material and cultural sparseness of the present seemed to offer little more, so they began to think of themselves as forerunners to an historically unprecedented future greatness to be realized in the vast territorial expanse that the U.S. had become. This idealizing imagination of magnificent destiny sharply contrasted with social, political and economic realities—slavery, imperialist expansionism, Indian relocation, and the wrenching dislocations of emergent capitalism. Each of the works we will read in this class is an exploration of that contradiction, a measurement of the experiential consequences of those severe historical powers, and an evaluation of the credibility of American national optimism under the growing threat of civil war.

Class meetings will mix lecture and discussion. I will be referring to individual passages to be discussed by page number, so you should purchase the assigned editions of the books (being ordered through the campus bookstore)  to make following along easier. Two eight-page essays and a final exam will be required, along with regular attendance. 


American Literature: 1865-1900

English 130C

Section: 1
Instructor: Tamarkin, Elisa
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 108 Wheeler


Description

A survey of U.S. literature from the Civil War through 1900, with special attention to the years following Reconstruction and to rise of literary realism and naturalism. Authors will include Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Louisa May Alcott, Mark Twain, Stephen Crane, Charles Chesnutt, William Dean Howells, Henry James, and Edith Wharton.


American Literature 1900-1945: Literature in the Age of Extremes

English 130D

Section: 1
Instructor: Lee, Steven S.
Time: MW 1-2 + discussion sections F 1-2
Location: 20 Barrows


Book List

Hemingway, E.: The Sun Also Rises; Hurston, Z. N.: Their Eyes Were Watching God; Lewis, S.: It Can't Happen Here; Roth , H.: Call it Sleep; West, N.: The Day of the Locust; Wright, R.: Native Son

Description

The aim of this course will be to capture the aesthetic and political extremes of the first half of the twentieth century.  We will examine conflicting efforts to bridge the boundary between art and life against the backdrop of two world wars and economic depression, as well as ongoing struggles for race, gender, and class-based equality.  The course is structured around three interrelated oppositions—modernism versus realism, protest literature versus folk literature, and fascism versus communism.  These oppositions subsequently gave way to more sanguine notions of cultural freedom amid an “American Century” that was only first articulated in 1941.  As we will see, however, these oppositions provide a useful precedent for considering what seems to be a new age of extremes in the contemporary United States.

Note: Since the reading list may change, please don't purchase books until after the first class.


African American Literature and Culture Before 1917

English 133A

Section: 1
Instructor: Wagner, Bryan
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 2030 VLSB


Book List

Brown, William Wells: Clotel; Chesnutt, Charles W.: The Marrow of Tradition; Douglass, Frederick: Narrative of the Life; Du Bois, W. E. B.: The Souls of Black Folk; Equiano, Olaudah: Interesting Narrative; Harper, Frances E. W.: Iola Leroy; Hopkins, Pauline E.: Of One Blood; Jacobs, Harriet: Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl; Walker, David: Appeal to the Coloured Citizens of the World; Wheatley, Phillis: Poems on Various Subjects

Other Readings and Media

Additional readings will be made available in PDF format.

Description

A survey of major works produced in the context of slavery and its aftermath.


Topics in African American Literature and Culture: Do What You Gotta Do: The Art of Black Diaspora

English 133T

Section: 1
Instructor: Ellis, Nadia
Time: MWF 1-2
Location: 155 Barrows


Book List

Adichie, Chimamanda Ngozi: Americanah; Hurston, Zora Neale: Tell My Horse; McKay, Claude: Home to Harlem; Rankine, Claudia: Citizen; Scott, Dennis: An Echo in the Bone

Other Readings and Media

Please note the revised book list (above) as of July 18.

Films: Daughters of the Dust, dir. Julie Dash; Moonlight, dir. Barry Jenkins, writer Tarell Alvin McCraney

Music: 'Nuff Said, Nina Simone (1968); Marcus Garvey, Burning Spear (1975); Lemonade, Beyoncé (2016)

Course Reader with works by Marcus Garvey, Alain Locke, Katherine Dunham, James Baldwin, Stuart Hall, Saidiya Hartman, and others, available at Copy Central, Bancroft Avenue

Description

Just find that dappled dream of yours
Come on back and see me when you can

– Clarence Carter & Nina Simone & Roberta Flack, et al

The black diaspora is, of course and amongst other things, a literary tradition: a complex, internally differentiated set of texts produced by black writers located in almost every nation across the globe, equal in complexity and variation to the modern concept of race that is inextricably tied to its formation. But what conceptual framework could possibly contain such a dazzlingly various literary canon? In this class we’ll read novels, watch films, listen to music, and look at art to begin to answer that question. As the title of the course suggests, we’ll begin with a certain supposition: what happens when we think of black diasporic creativity as emerging between imperative and dream (…you gotta do); between roving and recovery (come on back...)? What, then, are the necessities of black invention; and what are its luxuries, its excesses, its pleasures? And what changes, politically, conceptually, when we attend to diasporic difference as we do to the shifts in tonality and meaning between versions of a song?

The texts for this course will be available at University Press Books, on Bancroft Way.


Topics in American Studies: New Orleans

English C136

Section: 1
Instructor: Wagner, Bryan
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 140 Barrows


Book List

Asbury, Herbert: The French Quarter; Bechet, Sidney: Treat It Gentle; Evans, Freddi: Congo Square; Hall, Gwendolyn Midlo: Africans in Colonial Louisiana; Hurston, Zora Neale: Mules and Men; Lomax, Alan: Mister Jelly Roll; Powell, Lawrence: The Accidental City; Tallant, Robert: Gumbo Ya Ya

Other Readings and Media

Documentaries: Always for Pleasure (Les Blank, 1978), All on a Mardi Gras Day (Royce Osborn, 2003), When the Levees Broke (Spike Lee, 2006).

All other texts and images will be made available on BCourses in PDF format.

Description

We will consider the representation of New Orleans in four related formats: (1) historical monograph, (2) folklore collection, (3) as-told-to autobiography, and (4) cinematic documentary. Our premise is that New Orleans is stranger than fiction.

This class is cross-listed with American Studies C111E, section 1. 


Topics in Chicana/o Literature and Culture: Chicana/o Popular Culture

English 137T

Section: 1
Instructor: Saldaña, Maria
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 305 Wheeler


Book List

Abel, Jessica: La Perdida; Corpi, Lucha: Black Widow's Wardrobe; Guillermo Gomez Pena et al.: Codex Espangliensis: From Columbus to the Border Patrol; Hernandez, Gilbert: Love and Rockets Vol. 14: Luba Conquers the World; Hernandez, Gilbert: Love and Rockets Vol. 8: "Blood of Palomar"; Hernandez, Jaime: Love and Rockets Vol. 13: Chester Square; Hernandez Brothers: Love and Rockets, New Stories no. 8; Joseph Rodriguez & Ruben Martinez: East Side Stories: Gang Life in East L.A.; Rechy, John: The Miraculous Day of Amalia Gomez: A Novel; Romo, Ito: The Border Is Burning; Romo, Ito: The Bridge/El Puente; Serros, Michele: Chicana Falsa: And Other Stories of Death, Identity, & Oxnard

Other Readings and Media

Short pieces (via bCourses) by Ricardo Bracho, Alice Bag, Harry Gamboa, Chingo Bling, La Santa Cecilia, and Cristina Ibarra

Description

What is Chicanx popular culture? We answer this question by first exploring the meaning of these three terms separately. Chicana/o/x, popular (or lo popular), and culture have rich political trajectories that span the transnational context of the Americas and that reach back to the nineteenth century. The course begins with three to four weeks on the genealogy of these three terms, and some essays on aesthetics, politics, and identity. We then turn to the study of popular culture by examining various kinds of objects and texts produced by Chicanx artists since the rise of the Chicano movement in the 1960s through the "post"-nationalist, transgendered present: graphic novels, photographs, visual culture, performance, literature and film. The meaning of each of these terms—Chicana/o->x, popular, culture—is always shifting, determined by the social and political contexts of cultural production, contexts these objects allow us to explore and understand in their full complexity. Our goal is simple: to better understand the relationship that existed or exists between the Chicana/o/x artists and the populations they create art for and about through cultural products. What are the multifaceted dimensions and the multiple histories contained in these cultural products? How is "popular culture" different from mass culture or high culture? What is the difference between popular culture and cultura popular? What is the relationship between Chicana/o culture, Mexcian culture, and the Chicanx present? How do objects of culture address questions of identity, asethetics, geography, history, politics, and political art? These are the questions this course seeks to investigate and address.


Modes of Writing (Exposition, Fiction, Verse, etc.)

English 141

Section: 1
Instructor: Chandra, Melanie Abrams
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 103 Moffitt


Other Readings and Media

Course reader available at Instant Copying and Laser Printing

Description

Modes of Writing: Writing Fiction, Poetry, and the Personal Essay

This course will introduce students to the study of creative writing--fiction, poetry, and (to a lesser degree) the personal essay.  Students will learn to talk critically about these forms and begin to feel comfortable and confident writing within these genres.  Students will write a variety of exercises and more formal pieces and partake in class workshops where their work will be edited and critiqued by other students in the class. 

Please note that although Melanie Abrams will be the instructor of record for this section of English 141, Professor Robert Hass and Lecturer Melanie Abrams will actually team-teach the two sections of the course.  Students will enroll in one section and spend six weeks reading and writing poetry with Hass, and six weeks reading and writing fiction with Abrams.  Both instructors will collaborate over the last two weeks to teach the personal essay.

This course is open to English majors only.


Modes of Writing (Exposition, Fiction, Verse, etc.)

English 141

Section: 2
Instructor: Hass, Robert L.
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 140 Barrows


Other Readings and Media

Course reader available at Instant Copying and laser Printing

Description

Modes of Writing: Writing Fiction, Poetry, and the Personal Essay

This course will introduce students to the study of creative writing--ficction, poetry, and (to a lesser degree) the personal essay. Students will learn to talk critically about these forms and begin to feel comfortable and confident writing within these genres. Students will write a variety of exercises and more formal pieces and partake in class workshops where their work will be edited and critiqued by other students in the class.

Please note that although Robert Hass will be the instructor of record for this section of English 141, Lecturer Melanie Abrams and Professor Robert Hass will actually team-teach the two sections of the course. Students will enroll in one section and spend six weeks reading and writing poetry with Hass, and six weeks reading and writing fiction with Abrams. Both instructors will collaborate over the last two weeks to teach the personal essay.

This course is open to English majors only.


Short Fiction

English 143A

Section: 1
Instructor: Chandra, Vikram
Time: MW 11-12:30
Location: 305 Wheeler


Book List

Furman, Laura: The O. Henry Prize Stories 2016

Other Readings and Media

A course reader, which will be available from Instant Copying & Laser Printing ((510) 704-9700; 2138 University Ave, Berkeley, CA 94704).

Description

A short fiction workshop.  Over the course of the semester, each student will write and revise two stories.  Each participant in the workshop will edit student-written stories and will write a formal critique of each manuscript.  Students are required to attend two literary readings over the course of the semester and write a short report about each reading they attend.  Students will also take part in online discussions about fiction.  Attendance is mandatory.

Throughout the semester, we will read published stories from various sources and also essays by working writers about fiction and the writing life.  The intent of the course is to have the students confront the problems faced by writers of fiction and to discover the techniques that enable writers to construct a convincing and engaging representation of reality on the page.

Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligible to apply for this course. To be considered for admission, please electronically submit 10-15 pages of your fiction, by clicking on the link below; fill out the application you'll find there and attach the writing sample as a Word document or .rtf file. The deadline for completing this application process is 11 PM, THURSDAY, APRIL 27.

Also be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses.


Verse

English 143B

Section: 1
Instructor: Shoptaw, John
Time: MW 12:30-2
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

A course reader

Description

In this course you will conduct a progressive series of explorations in which you will try some of the fundamental options for writing poetry today (or any day)--aperture and closure; rhythmic sound patterning; sentence and line; short and long-lined poems; image & figure; stanza; poetic forms; the first, second, and third person (persona, address, drama, narrative, description); prose poetry, and revision. Our emphasis will be on recent possibilities, with an eye and ear to renovating traditions. We will also read a number of poems by graduates of my 143B sections who have gone on to publish books and win prizes.  I have no “house style” and only one precept:  you can do anything, if you can do it. You will write a poem a week, and we’ll discuss four or five in rotation (I’ll also respond each week to every poem you write). On alternate days, we’ll discuss illustrative poems in our course reader (our only text). If the past is any guarantee, the course will be fun and will make you a better poet.

Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligible to apply for this course. To be considered for admission, please electronically submit 5 of your poems, by clicking on the link below; fill out the application you'll find there and attach the writing sample as a Word document or .rtf file. The deadline for completing this application process is 11 PM, THURSDAY, APRIL 27.

Also be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses.


Verse

English 143B

Section: 2
Instructor: Singleton, Giovanni
Time: W 3-6
Location: 211 Dwinelle


Book List

Padgett, Ron, ed.: The Teachers and Writers Handbook of Poetic Forms; Pinsky, Robert: The Sounds of Poetry: A Brief Guide

Other Readings and Media

Course reader

Description

Soundings:  A Poetry Workshop

"How you sound??" the poet Amiri Baraka asked. This workshop is designed to be an exploration of "voice" through poetic form, music, kitchen appliances, rush hour traffic, and the natural world. Our lens for cultivating "deep listening" is wide and may consist of touchstones by poets John Taggart, Gertrude Stein, Theodore Roethke, Lucille Clifton, and N. H. Pritchard as well as musicians John Cage, Alice Coltrane, Igor Stravinsky, and Sun Ra. There will be assigned readings and class discussion of craft and form, but expect to focus primarily on your own poetry's "soundscapes" throughout the semester.

Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligible to apply for this course. To be considered for admission, please electronically submit 5 of your poems, by clicking on the link below; fill out the application you'll find there and attach the writing sample as a Word document or .rtf file. The deadline for completing this application process is 11 PM, THURSDAY, APRIL 27.

Also be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses.


Verse

English 143B

Section: 3
Instructor: O'Brien, Geoffrey G.
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Course Reader.

Description

The purpose of this class will be to produce a collective language in which to treat poetry. Writing your own poems will be a part of this task, but it will also require readings in contemporary poetry and essays in poetics, as well as some writing assignments done under extreme formal constraints. In addition, there’ll be regular commentary on other students’ work and two instances of recitation. All readings will be drawn from a course reader.

Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligible to apply for this course. To be considered for admission, please electronically submit 5 of your poems, by clicking on the link below; fill out the application you'll find there and attach the writing sample as a Word document or .rtf file. The deadline for completing this application process is 11 PM, THURSDAY, APRIL 27.

Also be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses.


Prose Nonfiction: Creative Nonfiction Workshop: Covering Culture

English 143N

Section: 1
Instructor: Saul, Scott
Time: MW 9:30-11
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

A course reader.

Description

This course is a nonfiction workshop in which you'll learn to write about many different types of art and culture, from TV and music to theater and visual art—in other words, the genres discussed in the culture-and-arts pages of major newspapers and magazines. By the end of the class, you should come away with a working knowledge of how to write reviews, profiles, "think pieces," and essays of cultural criticism. For examples of student writing from an earlier version of the course, visit "The Annex" at www.medium.com/the-annex.

Our semester will be guided by a few basic questions: what can we demand from culture? What does it mean to love or hate a song, TV show, or work of art? How are we changed by our encounters with specific works of art? And how do our arguments about a particular piece of "culture" connect to broader dreams about politics, freedom, community, and our sense of the possible?

Two special features of the course bear specific mention. First, on several occasions, we will be honored to host a visit with an esteemed writer, whose work will be featured in the class. Second, the class will at times take us out of the classroom and have us engage with artists and the public. For one assignment in particular, you will have the opportunity to connect with local artists. You are also invited to publish some of your work in digital form so as to shape ongoing cultural conversations in the Bay Area and at large.

Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligible to apply for this course. To be considered for admission, please electronically submit 5-10 double-spaced pages of your creative nonfiction (no poetry or academic writing) by clicking on the link below; fill out the application you'll find there and attach the writing sample as a Word document or .rtf file. The deadline for completing this application process is 11 PM, THURSDAY, APRIL 27.

Also be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of the instructions are of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses.


Poetry Translation Workshop

English 143T

Section: 1
Instructor: Hass, Robert L.
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

A course reader will be available from Copy Central on Bancroft Way.

Description

This is a workshop in the translation of poetry into English. Workshop members will develop a project and submit a translation a week (together with the original poem and a word-for-word version), and the work of the class will be for members to give one another feedback on their translations and to talk with one another about the pleasures and perils of the process. There will be weekly reading in the theory and practice of verse translation. The final project will be for each workshop member to produce a chapbook of a dozen or so translations.

Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligible to apply for this course. To be considered for admission, please electronically apply by clicking on the link below; fill out the application you'll find there and attach the following items as a Word document or .rtf file: (1) 5-8 pages of YOUR OWN translations of either your own poems or other people's poems (or a combination of the two) into English, as well as the corresponding pages in the original language; (2) a brief statement (no more than a sentence or two) describing the translation project you hope to work on; and (3) a one-paragraph statement of your interest in translation.

Also be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses.


Introduction to Literary Theory

English 161

Section: 1
Instructor: Gonzalez, Marcial
Time: MWF 2-3
Location: note new location: 182 Dwinelle


Other Readings and Media

See below.

Description

This course will offer an introduction to literary theory with a focus on twentieth- and twenty-first-century political approaches to the study of literature, including theories of Marxism, feminism, sexuality, race, post-colonialism, and ecocriticism. The course will strive to provide students with an understanding of the basic concepts, methods, and vocabulary employed in these various theoretical systems, as well as the similarities and differences between them. We will ground our study of literary theory by reading and discussing selected works of short fiction or poems. The course will require a substantial amount of reading and writing. You will need to purchase two course readers: one will include theoretical/critical works, and the other will include literary works.


Special Topics: Genres of Free Speech

English 165

Section: 1
Instructor: Lavery, Jos
Time: MW 5-6:30
Location: 183 Dwinelle


Book List

The Book of Lamentations; Augustine: Confessions; Foucault, Michel: Fearless Speech; Pope, Alexander: The Dunciad; Shakespeare, W: King Lear; Silverman, Sarah: Jesus Is Magic; Simpson, O. J.: If I Did It: Confessions of the Killer; Solanas, Valerie: SCUM Manifesto; Walker, David: Walker's Appeal

Description

We endure a difficult relation to free speech. Most arguments on the topic, whether for or against, focus on the capacity of language to harm others, directly or indirectly, and therefore concern the scope and nature of necessary prohibitions of speech. In this class, we will approach the topic quite differently, and ask how we recognize free speech, whether in ourselves or others; how we differentiate it from “unfree” speech; and how it may variously enable or jam the operations of power. First, we will pursue these questions in philosophical, theoretical, and psychoanalytical registers, and inquire whether free speech is desirable (with Kant), whether it is psychologically possible (with Freud), and whether the public telling of unpopular truths may weaken, rather than regulate, the democratic institutions the practice apparently serves to uphold (with Foucault). We will quickly, however, move on to consider the more practical and more literary-historical matter of genres of free speech, and examine the literary modes most associated with risky truth-telling. These will include: the jeremiad, in which the ruin of a civilization is prophesied, at risk to the prophet’s position and reputation (Lamentations, David Walker); the comedy, in which the privileged figure of the fool is empowered to disclose unspeakable political truths (King Lear, Sarah Silverman); the confession, in which a guilty party discloses the nature of his crimes under condition of aesthetic absolution (O. J. Simpson, Augustine); and the polemic, in which an apparently outrageous discourse articulates the social location of subjects outside the bounds of mainstream opinion (The SCUM Manifesto, A Modest Proposal). The class will therefore assess through historical examples Plato’s famous exclusion of poets from his ideal Republic, and will maintain an occasional focus on the frequent (and, indeed, often jeremiadical, comic, confessional, and/or polemical) evocations of free speech in our contemporary historical and institutional climate.

The texts for this course will be available at University Press Books, on Bancroft Way.

This section of English 165 is open to English majors only.


Special Topics: Art of Writing

English 165

Section: 2
Instructor: Benjamin, Daniel
Hejinian, Lyn
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 106 Wheeler


Book List

Ashbery, John: Nest of Ninnies; Harney, Stefano: The Undercommons: Fugitive Planning and Black Study; Philip, M. NourBese: Zong!

Other Readings and Media

A course reader will be available from Bancroft Copy.

Description

This seminar/workshop, co-taught by Lyn Hejinian and Daniel Benjamin, will be devoted to collaboratively composed writing in a range of genres, including poetry, short fiction, performance, and critical essays. Multiple examples of collaborations will be provided, and some theoretical readings will be assigned. All readings are intended to further inquiry into the aesthetic and social characteristics that are special to collaboratively authored writings. Meanwhile, the principle focus of the course will involve course participants in undertaking collaborations themselves. 

This small seminar will be limited to 12 students.


Special Topics: Black Science Fiction

English 166

Section: 3
Instructor: Serpell, C. Namwali
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 130 Wheeler


Book List

Butler, Octavia: Dawn; Delaney, Samuel: Babel-17; Duffy, Damian: Kindred: A Graphic Novel; Johnson, Mat: Pym; LaValle, Victor: Destroyer; Laymon, Kiese: Long Division; Lovecraft, H.P.: The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym; Schuyler, George: Black No More

Other Readings and Media

Screenings of a Star Trek episode (1966), Sun Ra, Space is the Place (1974), John Sayles, The Brother from Another Planet (1984). Stories by Octavia Butler, Ray Bradbury, W.E.B. DuBois, Samuel Delaney, Derrick Bell.

Description

This course addresses two genres—black fiction and science fiction—at their point of intersection, which is sometimes called Afrofuturism. The umbrella term “black fiction” will include texts that issue out of and speculate about the African-American experience. The category “science fiction” will comprise texts that speculate about alternative, cosmic, dystopian, and future worlds. Overlapping—and mutually transforming—concepts will include: genetics, race, diaspora, miscegenation, double consciousness, technology, ecology, biology, language, history, futurity, space (inner and outer), and, of course, the alien. We will consider stories, novels, graphic novels, comics, films, music, and television clips. 


Special Topics: Writing Poetry and Nonfiction, Writing as Social Practice

English 166

Section: 4
Instructor: Giscombe, Cecil S.
Time: TTh 5-6:30
Location: 174 Barrows


Other Readings and Media

See below.

Description

One of the ideas behind this course offering is that poetry and essays (life-writing, creative non-fiction, “essaying,” etc.) have similar aims or field-marks—both are literary vehicles of exploration and documentation; both value experimental approaches; and both traffic with versions of the incomplete.

Another idea is that various wide particulars make up each of us—social class, race, gender, place of birth, etc.  These particulars endow us with privileges, deficits, blindnesses, insights, and the like.  Prompts in this course will encourage students to document these and explore how they qualify us (and how or if they obligate us) to “speak” from various positions.  The purpose of writing in this course is to engage public language on one hand and personal (meaning specific) observations and experiences on the other.  The purpose here is to pursue consciousness.  The experiment is to attempt to do so in the forms of poetry and the personal essay.

A third idea is that hybrid forms—works that defy a single categorization or order, works that join rather than exclude—are of great interest.

Some points of departure:

How Scared Should People on the Border Be?

(New York Times headline, 31 March 2017)

 

The situation is aggravated by the tremor that breaks into discourse on race.  It is further complicated by the fact that the habit of ignoring race is understood to be a graceful, even generous, liberal gesture.  To notice is to recognize an already discredited difference.

(Toni Morrison)

 

The sea cannot be fenced,/ el Mar does not stop at borders.

(Gloria Anzaldua)

 

Writing.  Reading.  Discussion.  Collaborative Projects.  Class field trips.  Performance.

Texts (tentative list): Borderlands/ La Frontera, by Gloria Anzaldua; The Lemonade album, by Beyonce; Marvelous Bones of Time, by Brenda Coultas; The Art of the Personal Essay, by Philip Lopate; American Born Chinese, by Glenn Wang; Cane, by Jean Toomer. Supplemental readings by Dorothy Allison, James Baldwin, CAConrad, Gish Jen, X. J. Kennedy, Maxine Hong Kingston, Claudia Rankine, others.


Special Topics in American Cultures: Race and Revision in Early America

English 166AC

Section: 1
Instructor: Donegan, Kathleen
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 3 Le Conte


Book List

Brown, W. W.: Clotel; Cesaire, A. : A Tempest; Conde, M.: I, Tituba; Morrison, T. : A Mercy; Shakespeare, W.: The Tempest

Other Readings and Media

course reader

Description

In this course, we will read both historical and literary texts to explore how racial categories came into being in New World cultures and how these categories were tested, inhabited, and re-imagined by the human actors they sought to define. Our study will be organized around four early American sites: Landfall in the North Atlantic, Pocahontas at Jamestown, Witchcraft at Salem, and Jefferson’s Virginia. In each of these places Native, European, and African ways of making meaning collided, and concepts of racial difference were formed. These sites will function as interpretive nodes; for each, we will read a selection of primary documents and then explore how racial constructions forged at each site have been re- imagined and revised throughout American cultural history to the present day. 

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

This course satisfies UC Berkeley's American Cultures requirement.


Literature and the Arts: Literature and Music

English 170

Section: 1
Instructor: Falci, Eric
Time: MW 11-12 + discussion sections F 11-12
Location: 141 McCone


Book List

Morrison, Toni: Jazz

Description

In this course, we will think about the strangely vital links between literature and music.  Beginning in the early nineteenth century, we’ll track a series of crossings, conjunctions, and fissures.  We’ll think about the place of music, and of ideas about music, within literary Romanticism.  We’ll watch what happens as classical music in the mid-nineteenth century becomes increasingly literary-minded, and how poets in the late nineteenth century experimented with sound and rhythm.  We’ll pair a few of the key texts of literary modernism with touchstones of modern music.  We’ll trace the emergence of blues poetry and jazz poetry in the Harlem Renaissance and into the 1960s.  We’ll watch the basic categories of music and literature dissolve and reform in the work of avant-garde writers and musicians throughout the twentieth century.  We’ll speculate about the literariness of folk and pop music and the poetics of hip hop.  Throughout, we’ll watch poetry and narrative attempt to be like music, and songs and scores act like literature.  

The great majority of texts and music will be available in a course reader and/or on bCourses, and students will be responsible for writing two essays and taking a final exam.  We'll read texts by William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, John Keats, Emily Dickinson, Walt Whitman, Gerard Manley Hopkins, Stéphane Mallarmé, T.S. Eliot, Virginia Woolf, Willa Cather, Ezra Pound, Langston Hughes, Toni Morrison, Fred Moten, Rita Dove, Bob Dylan, Nina Simone, Linton Kwesi Johnson, and Lin-Manual Miranda, among a number of others.  And we'll listen to a lot of music.


The Language and Literature of Films: The Film Essay: Cinema, the Minoritized Subject, and the Practice of Writing

English 173

Section: 1
Instructor: Best, Stephen M.
Young, Damon
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 142 Dwinelle


Book List

Baldwin, James: The Devil Finds Work; Bryant, Tisa : Unexplained Presence; Watts, Philip: Roland Barthes' Cinema

Description

Taking as a point of departure James Baldwin’s dazzling work of film criticism, The Devil Finds Work, this course introduces students to some of the best writing on film that describes the encounter with cinema—and with particular films—as formative of the minority subject.  How are our experiences of race, gender, and sexuality informed by our encounters with cinema?  How do those encounters generate a writing practice that gives an account of those films and speaks about and in some cases back to them?  We will read great essays about cinema, by writers including Baldwin, Ralph Ellison, Virginia Woolf, Susan Sontag, Stanley Cavell, Roland Barthes, Tisa Bryant, D.A. Miller, and Kaja Silverman.  We will consider how these authors make their arguments, what their close attention to film language allows us to see that we didn’t see before, and—especially—how they interrogate the relationship between film aesthetics and the politics of race, gender, and sexuality.  We will approach the essay as a form in its own right, one that rewards close formal analysis.  In the last part of the course, we will look at film works that themselves function like essays, offering critical perspectives on race, gender, sexuality, and the phenomenology of cinema.  

The course includes a weekly screening, which will be held on Thursday evenings--sometimes 5-7 PM at 142 Dwinelle, and sometimes 7-10 PM in the Pacific Film Archive's Barbara Osher Theater (on Center Street), as indicated.  

This course is crosslisted with Film 140.


Literature and Disability

English 175

Section: 1
Instructor: Langan, Celeste
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 108 Wheeler


Book List

Coetzee, J.M.: Slow Man; Haddon, M.: Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time; Keller, Helen: Story of My Life; Kleege, Georgina: Blind Rage: Letters to Helen Keller; Melville, Herman: The Shorter Novels of Herman Melville; Oe, Kenzaburo: A Quiet Life; Shakespeare: Richard III; Wordsworth and Coleridge: Lyrical Ballads, 1798;

Recommended: Davis, Lennard: Disability Studies Reader

Description

This course will have several components. An introductory section will provide students with a grounding in disability theory; we’ll wonder whether it’s possible to develop a common “theory” adequate to various disability categories (sensory, cognitive, motor; illness/injury; ugliness/fatness/queerness; legal disabilities of race/gender/class/religion). We will then shift to an examination of the role of literature in the "humanization" of disability, and read a series of texts that work at once to represent disability and to "disable" generic norms. Rather than focus simply on literary representations of disability, we will try to think about the concept of literature via the category of disability. We are told that “poems make nothing happen" (Auden); that dramatic performance and fictional utterance are peculiarly "parasitic" forms of speech (Austin/Searle). Noting the negativity of these definitions, we will consider how literature can operate to disable "normal," instrumental assumptions about communication.  Finally, we'll consider the extent to which print literature is "disabled" by the advent of new media--which will give us a chance to consider ways media and other designed objects, including designed environments, produce as well as neutralize disabilities.

Assignments will include two short (5-8 page) critical essays, a group or individual presentation project, and regular discussion posts.  There will be no final exam, but regular attendance is required.

This is a core course for the Disability Studies Minor.


Literature and Linguistics

English 179

Section: 1
Instructor: Hanson, Kristin
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 105 Dwinelle


Book List

Booth, Stephen: Shakespeare's Sonnets; Heaney, Seamus: Beowulf: A New Verse Translation, Bilingual Edition; Woolf, Virginia: Mrs. Dalloway;

Recommended: Pinker, Steven: The Language Instinct

Other Readings and Media

A photocopied course reader containing most required readings and literary texts.

Description

The medium of literature is language.  This course aims to deepen understanding of what this means through consideration of how certain literary forms can be defined as grammatical forms.  These literary forms include meter; rhyme and alliteration; syntactic parallelism; formulas of oral composition; and special narrative uses of pronouns, tenses and other subjective features of language to express point of view and represent speech and thought.  The emphasis will be on literature in English, but comparisons with literature in other languages will also be drawn.  No knowledge of linguistics will be presupposed, but linguistic concepts will be introduced, explained and used.


The Short Story: The Short Story

English 180H

Section: 1
Instructor: Chandra, Vikram
Time: MWF 2-3
Location: 102 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

A course reader, which will be available from Instant Copying & Laser Printing ((510) 704-9700; 2138 University Ave, Berkeley, CA 94704).

Description

The lyf so short, the crafte so longe to lerne…

                                                                  -- Chaucer

This course will investigate how authors craft stories, so that both non-writers and writers may gain a new perspective on reading stories.  In thinking of short stories as artefacts produced by humans, we will consider – without any assertions of certainty – how those people may have experienced themselves and their world, and how history and culture may have participated in the making of these stories.  So, in this course we will explore the making, purposes, and pleasures of the short story form.  We will read – widely, actively and carefully – many published stories from various countries in order to begin to understand the conventions of the form, and how this form may function in diverse cultures.  Students will write a short story and revise it; engaging with a short story as a writer will aid them in their investigations as readers and critics. Students will also write two analytical papers about stories we read in class. Attendance is mandatory.


Lyric Verse

English 180L

Section: 1
Instructor: O'Brien, Geoffrey G.
Time: TTh 5-6:30 PM
Location: 109 Dwinelle


Other Readings and Media

Course Reader

Description

This course will examine the historical trajectory of a very fuzzy category, “lyric,” from its identified origins and early practice in English (anonymous medieval lyrics) to its 20th- and 21st- century rejections and rehabilitations (all the way up to last year’s Citizen by Claudia Rankine, whose subtitle is “An American Lyric”). Rather than define the term decisively, we will attempt to amass data about what kinds of modes, contents, and formal features have been associated with lyric over time and how poets have responded to that growing archive when contributing new instances of such verse. Along the way, we will also consider several theorizations and histories of lyric practice, including the idea that the very category has become a useless or even misrepresentative synonym for “poetry” that collapses multiple verse genres.

All poems and essays will be drawn from a course reader available at Metro Publishing on Bancroft by the 2nd class meeting.


The Novel: "The Novel as the Book of Other People"

English 180N

Section: 1
Instructor: Hale, Dorothy J.
Time: MW 5-6:30
Location: 108 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

See the course description, below.

A course reader is also required.  Details TBA.

Description

In 2007, Zadie Smith edited an anthology of short fiction entitled The Book of Other People.  In her preface to this volume, Smith describes her desire to give contemporary writers the opportunity to try on “different skins,” to wander “into landscapes one would not have placed them in previously.”  In 1993, Toni Morrison had already stressed the potentially high stakes of seeking out an encounter with difference through the novel.  Morrison declared her work as a novelist to be not just the imagination of “others,” but the risky encounter with strange or alien value systems: “to project consciously into the danger zones such others may represent for me.”

This course explores major works of Anglo-American fiction that link the value of the novel as a literary genre to the ethical, social or political good of encountering people different from oneself.   Within this tradition, the aesthetic accomplishment of the novel is linked to its formal resources for depicting otherness.  Students should be prepared to read widely.  The literary tradition that we are studying includes George Eliot’s Middlemarch (1871), William Faulkner’s As I Lay Dying (1930), Virginia Woolf’s The Waves (1931), Toni Morrison's Sula (1973), J.M. Coetzee’s Disgrace (1999) and Elizabeth Costello (2003), and Zadie Smith’s On Beauty (2005).  Lectures will focus on the narrative techniques that each novelist develops in response to the value and difficulty of knowing and representing social others.  We will consider how these narrative techniques contribute to an aesthetics of otherness, which by 2007 confers upon the novel a privileged status as the literary genre most qualified to be “the book of other people.”

Written course requirements include two seven-page papers and a final exam.


Research Seminar: Britain in the ‘60s

English 190

Section: 1
Instructor: Gang, Joshua
Time: MW 2-3:30
Location: 305 Wheeler


Book List

Burgess, Anthony: A Clockwork Orange; Fleming, Ian: Dr. No; Lessing, Doris: The Golden Notebook; Selvon, Samuel: The Lonely Londoners ; Spark, Muriel: The Driver's Seat

Other Readings and Media

Required course reader from MetroPublishing.

Description

This seminar will examine the fiction, drama, poetry, film, and music of Great Britain in the 1960s. Topics will possibly include: post-war and post-Empire; race and immigration; economic austerity and welfare policy; social realism and dystopia; feminism; “Angry Young Men”; Swinging London and mod; obscenity; the decriminalization of homosexuality; the British Invasion; and the Cold War. Course grades will be based on a 4-5 page paper, a 15-20 page research paper, and in-class discussion.

Readings will possibly include: fiction by Doris Lessing, Muriel Spark, Sam Selvon, Anthony Burgess, Alan Sillitoe, and Ian Fleming; plays by Samuel Beckett, Caryl Churchill, Harold Pinter, Shelagh Delaney, Joe Orton, and Edward Bond; poetry by Kamau Brathwaite, Stevie Smith, Seamus Heaney, Philip Larkin, Ted Hughes, and JH Prynne; films Seven Up, Dr. No, Kes, Victim, Women in Love, Quadrophenia, and A Hard Day’s Night; albums by the Beatles, Rolling Stones, and Zombies; and various political texts, including the British Nationality Act of 1948 and the Commonwealth Immigrant Acts of 1962 and 1968, the 1959 Obscene Publications Act, the Wolfenden Report, and Enoch Powell’s 1968 “Address to the General Meeting of the West Midlands Area Conservative Centre” (a.k.a., the “Rivers of Blood” speech).

Please read the paragraph about English 190 on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.


Research Seminar: The Historical Novel

English 190

Section: 2
Instructor: Puckett, Kent
Time: MW 2-3:30
Location: 301 Wheeler


Book List

Dickens, C.: A Tale of Two Cities; Eliot, G.: Middlemarch; Flaubert, G.: Sentimental Education; Scott, W.: Waverley; or, 'Tis Sixty Years Since; Tolstoy, L.: War and Peace

Description

“It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way—in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only.”  Charles Dickens’ famous opening to A Tale of Two Cities (1859) seems to begin with an effort to characterize a portion of the past, the years leading up to and including the French Revolution.  Instead, though, of giving us a clear sense of what the past was really about, Dickens presents both the era and efforts to capture the era in the self-consciously complex terms of contradiction, paradox, and comparison.  For Dickens the represented past is both a historical fact and a conceptual problem.  In this class we’ll look at a number of nineteenth-century historical novels.  Reading works by Sir Walter Scott, Dickens, George Eliot, Leo Tolstoy, and Gustave Flaubert, we’ll ask what it means to try to capture real and often famous events in the form of narrative fiction.  Does a novel about history always imply one or another philosophy of history?  What does it mean to treat real historical figures—like Napoleon—within the context of imaginative prose?  How much time—ten years, sixty years, a hundred years—needs to pass before remembered events become properly historical?  What happens when the political conditions of the past are remembered, revived, or revised in relation to the politics of the present?  What, indeed, does writing about the past have to say about the condition, the needs, the dreams of the present?

Please read the paragraph about English 190 on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.


Research Seminar: Another Day in Purgatory: Irish Literature and the Afterlife

English 190

Section: 3
Instructor: Creasy, CFS
Time: MW 3:30-5
Location: 301 Wheeler


Book List

Beckett, Samuel: Echo's Bones; Beckett, Samuel: More Pricks than Kicks; Bowen, Elizabeth: The Collected Stories of Elizabeth Bowen; Joyce, James: A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man; Joyce, James: Dubliners; O'Brienn, Flann: The Third Policeman; Stoker, Bram: Dracula; Yeats, Jack B.: The Aramanthers

Other Readings and Media

A course reader that may include excerpts from Sheridan Le Fanu, Lady Wilde (Speranza), Lady Gregory, W.B. Yeats, Jack B. Yeats, Seamus Heaney, Samuel Beckett, Hester Dowden, Seán O'Casey, John M. Synge, and others.

Description

Life is full of death; the steps of the living cannot press the earth without disturbing the ashes of the dead—we walk upon our ancestors—the globe itself is one vast churchyard.
                —Charles Maturin

This class will focus on a series of Irish writers who, in the period of crisis culminating in the establishment of an independent Irish nation (roughly, from about 1890 to about 1940), all seem to organize their works with recourse to notions of the afterlife—the purgatorial, the ghostly, the vestigial. We will attend to this recurring idea as both a theme and a trope; in other words, we will seek to understand how and why these writers are concerned with representing a purgatorial world, but also how the afterlife structures their works as a set of formal literary devices for thinking through a complex social and historical crisis. We likewise will take the opportunity to learn a little bit about the history of Ireland in the period, particularly in its relationship to Great Britain: first as a colonial territory, then as a Free State racked by civil war, and then as a fledgling nation whose autonomy is threatened by being drawn into the international conflict that becomes World War II.

Please read the paragraph about English 190 on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.                                 


Research Seminar: Literature and Revolution

English 190

Section: 6
Instructor: Lee, Steven S.
Time: MW 5-6:30
Location: 206 Dwinelle


Book List

Doctorow, E. L.: The Book of Daniel; Malraux, A.: Man's Fate; Platonov, A.: The Foundation Pit; Serge, V.: Conquered City; Stoppard, T.: The Coast of Utopia

Description

This seminar will piece together a cross-regional, cross-linguistic genre that we will loosely call “the literature of revolution”—texts that try to capture (and, at times, direct) great historical and political upheaval.  Our starting point will be the French Revolution, our ending point will be the Arab Spring, but our primary focus will be the troubled, international history of twentieth-century communism.  Throughout the semester, we will trace how literary texts allow for multiple ways of theorizing revolution and, more broadly, the flow of history.  How do these texts help us to understand the tendency for revolutionary illusions to give way to disillusion?  How do revolutions both expand and limit creative possibilities?  What does revolution mean in the twenty-first century—long after communism’s collapse and the supposed “end of history”?

Note: Since the reading list may change, please don't purchase books until after the first class.

Please read the paragraph about English 190 on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.


Research Seminar: Monsters, Exiles, and Outlaws in Medieval Literature

English 190

Section: 7
Instructor: Hobson, Jacob
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 279 Dwinelle


Book List

Bernard Scudder, trans.: The Saga of Grettir the Strong; Bjork, Robert E., ed. & trans.: Old English Shorter Poems: Wisdom and Lyric; Byock, Jesse L., trans.: The Saga of King Hrolf Kraki; Hobsbawm, E. J.: Bandits; Knight, Stephen and Ohlgren,Thomas, eds.: Robin Hood and Other Outlaw Tales; Kunz, Keneva, trans.: The Vinland Sagas; Liuzza, R. M., ed. & trans.: Beowulf; McKim, Anne, ed.: The Wallace: Selections; Palsson, Hermann and Edwards, Paul, trans.: Eyrbygga saga

Other Readings and Media

Shorter readings and additional secondary literature will be made available on bcourses.

Description

This course focuses on murderers, monsters, and thieves. Zombies, although not our main focus, also arise. Such figures are excluded from society and cut off from their fellow human beings, whether because they have committed an unpardonable crime or are undead. This course examines how that exclusion helps to define the society doing it as well as the outcasts themselves. What crimes are unpardonable, and why? Why are some outcasts exiled or outlawed, some treated as monsters, and some actually monstrous? What does it mean to be an outlaw, someone literally outside the law? Over the course of the semester, we will read texts from medieval England and Scandinavia featuring such characters, with an eye toward their rhetorical construction as a society's insiders and outsiders.

This section of English 190 satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

Please read the paragraph about English 190 on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.


Research Seminar: George Eliot and the Realist Novel

English 190

Section: 8
Instructor: Kolb, Margaret
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 50 Barrows


Book List

Eliot, George: Adam Bede; Eliot, George: Daniel Deronda; Eliot, George: Felix Holt; Eliot, George: Middlemarch; Eliot, George: The Lifted Veil; Eliot, George: The Mill on the Floss

Other Readings and Media

A course reader will include selections of George Eliot’s poetry and prose nonfiction, as well as selections drawn from the writings of thinkers contemporary to her, including Charles Darwin, Auguste Comte, Charles Dickens, John Stewart Mill, and George Henry Lewes.

Description

Note the changes in the topic, book list, and course description for this section of English 190 as of early June, 2017.

Beginning at the age of 37, publishing under a male pen name,George Eliot reinvented the novel as we know it. Over the course of seven novels, she showed how, “with a single drop of ink for a mirror,” the realist novel could forge deep into characters’ inner lives, as well as far beyond them, to explain social change, resurrect lost pasts, and address pressing scientific questions. In this seminar, we’ll study Eliot's novels—what Virginia Woolf called “the incomplete story of George Eliot herself.” We’ll ask how meaningful Woolf’s link—between Eliot’s own story and Eliot’s fictional stories—might be. How do we organize questions of form, gender, voice, and genre through the figure of the author, and how did Eliot herself conceive of authorship through her writing? Through readings of five of Eliot’s major novels, as well as her short fiction, nonfiction prose, and poetry, we’ll track Eliot’s engagement with the conventions of the realist novel, her experimentations with narrative form and voice, and her relationship to the scientific, political, aesthetic, and philosophical debates contemporary to her. ​

The texts for this class will be available at University Press Books, on Bancroft Way.


Research Seminar: Historiography and Narrative: Literature and the Interstices of History

English 190

Section: 9
Instructor: Jones, Donna V.
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 305 Wheeler


Book List

Akomfrah, John: The Nine Muses; Bastos, Augusto Roa: I the Supreme; Carpentier, Alejo: Explosion in the Cathedral; Danticat, Edwidge: Brother, I'm Dying; Delillo, Don: Libra; Derrida, Jacques: Archive Fever; LeGuin, Ursula: The Dispossessed; Morrison, Toni: A Mercy; Nietzsche, Friedrich: The Use and Abuse of History; Trouillot, Michel-Rolph: Silencing the Past: Power and the Production of the Past; White, Hayden: Metahistory; de Certeau, Michel: The Writing of History

Description

Historiography is a study of the writing of history; indeed, it is an examination of the problematic of historical writing—how does one derive and form a coherent narrative of what has happened from incomplete and fragmented artifacts of the past? In this class we will focus on the interplay between the literary and history. Our questions: How does literature address the interstices of history—the past that evades narration (the Haitian Revolution), the agents absent from the archive (the enslaved or refugees)? What is the relation between the writing of history and power? Can we narrate history from a fictional future? What happens when an historical event transitions into conspiracy (the Kennedy assassination)?

Please read the paragraph about English 190 on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Clases for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.


Research Seminar: Suspicious Mind

English 190

Section: 10
Instructor: Best, Stephen M.
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 106 Mulford


Book List

Coetzee, J.M.: Disgrace; Conrad, Joseph: Heart of Darkness; James, Henry: The Ambassadors; James, Henry: The Turn of the Screw; Melville, Herman: Benito Cereno; Poe, Edgar Allan: The Purloined Letter

Other Readings and Media

Films:  Rope (dir., Alfred Hitchcock); The Lives of Others (dir., Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck); The White Ribbon (dir., Michael Haneke)

Description

Literary critics have made suspicion an essential aspect of what it means to read.  When we set out to do a “suspicious reading” of a text we assume a few things about it: that its true meaning consists in what it cannot say, know, or understand about itself; that such meaning lies at a certain remove from the reader; and that “symptoms” of meaning’s buried presence need to be “demystified” by the critical reader.  This is a class on suspicious and non-suspicious modes of reading.  We will interrogate the roots of suspicious reading, most pointedly in the writings of Karl Marx and Sigmund Freud, but we will also be unafraid in asking whether conceiving literary works as hiding their meaning or possessing an “unconscious” remain relevant ways to conceptualize texts in an era of fake news, unsubstantiated allegations, conspiracy theories, and “alternative facts.”  Should we continue to see literature as a laboratory for critique, where we interrogate the work of art and diagnose its hidden anxieties and meanings, or as a possible resource for alternatives to suspicion?  To answer this question, we will explore recent shifts toward an “ethics of reading” that reorients reading from something we do to the text to something that is done to us (where ethics refers not to the situation of readers and characters, or the author’s worldview, but to the varieties of formal relationality that works of literature afford in the process of reading -- i.e., building networks, communicating with intellectual strangers).

The course takes up its topic in three distinct observances: [1] the literary and cinematic tradition in which a hermeneutics of suspicion is subjected to scrutiny (Henry James, The Turn of the Screw; Edgar Allan Poe, The Purloined Letter; Herman Melville, Benito Cereno; A. Hitchcock, Rope; F. H von Donnersmarck, The Lives of Others); [2] the literary-critical turn toward “surface reading,” a portmanteau term that captures reading practices willing “to respect rather than reject what is in plain view,” in the words of Rita Felski, particularly those attributes of a text that in the past may have been dismissed as either too feminine or too queer, i.e., style, texture, surface, the ephemeral, the obvious, and the enchanting; and [3] works of literature and film that reward attentiveness to the play of their surfaces (Henry James, The Ambassadors; J. M. Coetzee, Disgrace; Michael Haneke, The White Ribbon).

Please read the paragraph about English 190 on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.


Research Seminar: Nonsense

English 190

Section: 11
Instructor: Hanson, Kristin
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 305 Wheeler


Book List

Carroll, Lewis: The Annotated Alice; Lear, Edward: The Complete Nonsense; Seuss, Dr.: Horton Hatches the Egg; Seuss, Dr.: Your Favorite Seuss;

Recommended: Pinker, Steven: Words and Rules

Other Readings and Media

A short photocopied reader containing miscellaneous secondary articles.

Description

This course will explore nonsense as a literary genre, connecting its distinctive linguistic form to the ideas it takes up.   In nonsense, conventional meanings of linguistic forms are prevented from arising, but the forms themselves are unimpeachable, and the system that created them allows new meanings to arise according to its own logic.  This foregrounds the linguistic system itself, making nonsense of special interest to children learning language.  At the same time, it lends nonsense an inherently subversive streak:  amidst their humor and charm, the classic nineteenth-century English nonsense writers Lear and Carroll, and their American descendant Dr. Seuss, criticize educational practices, social inequality, environmental destruction, imperialism, capitalism and even philology.  In class, we will explore the nonsense of these writers; in research papers, students may explore English nonsense literature from any period. 

Please read the paragraph about English 190 on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.


Research Seminar: Making Memories

English 190

Section: 12
Instructor: Yoon-Milner, Irene
Time: TTh 5-6:30
Location: 263 Dwinelle


Book List

Atwood, Margaret: The Blind Assassin (2000); Barnes, Julian: The Sense of an Ending (2011); Cole, Teju: Open City (2011); Eskin, Blake: The Making and Unmaking of Binjamin Wilkomirski (2003); Gondry, Michel, and Kaufman, Charlie: Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004); Ishiguro, Kazuo: Pale View of Hills (1982); McCarthy, Tom: Remainder (2005); McEwan, Ian: Atonement (2001); Murdoch, Iris: Jackson's Dilemma (1995); Sebald, W.G.: Austerlitz (2001)

Other Readings and Media

A course reader with select critical readings:  Paul Ricoeur, "Narrative Time" (1985); Benedict Carey, "A Study of Memory Looks at Fact and Fiction," New York Times (2/3/2007); Michael Hopkin, "Iris Murdoch's last book reveals early Alzheimer's," Nature (12/1/2004); P. Garrard, et al, "The effects of very early Alzheimer's disease on the characteristics of writing by a renowned author," Brain (2005): 250-60; (selections) Frank Kermode, The Sense of an Ending (1967); (selections) Alison Winter, Memory: Fragments of a Modern History (2012); (selections) Marianne Hirsch, The Generation of Postmemory (2012).

Description

This seminar examines a literary turn toward narratives of counterfeit confessional memory. It asks what is at stake in narratiing and even confessing a past that didn't happen—and what that even means in the context of a fictional text. These works invite us to consider both conscious and unconscious counterfeiters, those who only belatedly—or never—realize that their memories were imagined all along. These questions find echoes in recent heated debates over the nature of "recovered memories"; the ethics of certain therapeutic and pharmaceutical memory treatments for PTSD; and the proliferation of social media platforms for curating experience with varying degrees of regulation and accountability. Familiar debates over the status of voluntary and involuntary memory in both life and literature take on new valences as the unreliability of a narrator becomes as much a function of his or her own capacity to remember as the desire to present a particular version of a story. The course moves between examinations of narrative and memory construction at the levels of narrators, authors, and narrator-authors, as we consider a wide range of contemporary novels, secondary criticism, and relevant literary controversies.

Please read the paragraph about English 190 on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.


Honors Course

English H195A

Section: 1
Instructor: Hale, Dorothy J.
Time: MW 3:30-5
Location: 305 Wheeler


Book List

Booth, et al., Wayne: The Craft of Research, 2nd ed.; Eagleton, Terry: Literary Theory: An Introduction, 3rd edition; MLA: MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, 7th ed.;

Recommended: Lentricchia, et al., Frank: Critical Terms for Literary Study

Other Readings and Media

Required course reader is available from Copy Central, 2576 Bancroft Way.  Contact: <bancroft@copycentral.com>  510-848-8649.  Pre-order on-line before 5pm and reader will be ready by 8am the next day.

Description

H195 is a two-semester course that gives students the training they need to conduct original research and develop their findings into a successful scholarly essay, 40-60 pages in length.

Crucial to this enterprise is an understanding of interpretative methods.  What kind of criticism will you practice?  Which scholarly conversation will you seek to join?  To help orient you in the field, the fall semester of H195 gives students the opportunity to learn about the major theoretical movements that have helped shape literary study as its now conducted.  Special attention will be given to theories of close reading (New Critical, psychoanalytic, deconstructive); structuralist theories (linguistic, ideological, discursive, narrative); and theories of identity (gender and sexuality, race and ethnicity, post-colonial).  Since many of the assigned essays are also superb examples of effective argumentation, our consideration of method will also extend to writerly practices such as thesis construction, rhetorical techniques and uses of evidence.

The most important requirement for the course is curiosity.  What would you like to know more about?  What author, issue, or era would you like to spend a year thinking about?  Some students begin the class with a strong intuition about what they might like to do; others are wrestling with two or three research ideas.  These are happy problems and can be sorted out in consultation with the professor.  But do not sign up for the Honors Course if you can’t imagine immersing yourself in a topic of your own choosing for a full year.

By the beginning of October, research topics should be in place.  You will be expected to work closely with the Humanities Librarian to develop expertise in navigating scholarly resources.  A prospectus and bibliography are required by the end of the fall term.  Students who have satisfactorily completed the fall course requirements will receive the grade of IP for the fall term. Written work includes a short analysis of one of the assigned works of criticism.  All written work for the fall will be graded.

In the spring semester, students organize into writing groups and meet regularly to help one another with their independent research.  There are a few required meetings of the class as a whole, a modest amount of assigned reading, and no written work other than the Honors thesis.  A complete draft of the thesis is due before spring break.

Students who satisfactorily complete H195A-B (the Honors Course) will satisfy the Research Seminar requirement for the English major. (More details about H195A prerequisites, how and when students will be informed of the results of their applications, etc., are in the paragraph about the Honors Course on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes.)

To be considered for admission to this course, you will need to electronically apply by:

• Clicking on the link below and filling out the application you will find there, bearing in mind that you will also need to attach:

• a PDF of your Academic Summary (go into Cal Central, click your "My Academics" tab, then click "View Academic Summary" and "Print as PDF"),

• a PDF of your non-UC Berkeley transcript(s), if any,

• a PDF (or Word document) of a critical paper that you wrote for another class (the length of this paper not being as important as its quality), and

• a PDF (or Word document) of a personal statement, including why you are interested in taking this course and indicating your academic interest and, if possible, the topic or area you are thinking of addressing in your honors thesis.

The deadline for completing this application is 11 PM, FRIDAY, MAY 12.


Honors Course

English H195A

Section: 2
Instructor: Serpell, C. Namwali
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 305 Wheeler


Book List

Parks, Suzan-Lori: Topdog/Underdog; Stevenson, Robert Louis: Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde;

Recommended: Leitch , Vincent B.: The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism

Other Readings and Media

Online coursepack with essays on: narrative theory, poetics, film theory, linguistics, psychoanalysis, structuralism, poststructuralism, ideology, and identity.

Description

This two-semester course is designed as an accompaniment to the writing of your Honors Thesis. The fall semester prepares you to write this long essay (40-60 pages) on a topic and texts of your choosing. It will behoove you to decide on that topic and/or those texts before we begin. As a class, we will read some literary theory and critical essays that offer different approaches to analyzing and writing about texts. The readings will not necessarily be lengthy, but they will be intense and sometimes difficult. Along the way, you will each do some preliminary research, outlining, and writing, which will culminate in your thesis prospectus. Throughout the semester, we will focus on negotiating the challenges of composing an essay of this length; developing efficient research methods; engaging critically with secondary material; organizing your thoughts; and honing the writing and rhetorical skills that will yield lucid, cogent, and perhaps even beautiful theses.

Students who satisfactorily complete H195A-B (the Honors Course) will satisfy the Research Seminar requirement for the English major. (More details about H195A prerequisites, how and when students will be informed of the results of their applications, etc., are in the paragraph about the Honors Course on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes.)

To be considered for admission to this course, you will need to electronically apply by:

• Clicking on the link below and filling out the application you will find there, bearing in mind that you will also need to attach:

• a PDF of your Academic Summary (go into Cal Central, click your "My Academics" tab, then click "View Academic Summary" and "Print as PDF"),

• a PDF of your non-UC Berkeley transcript(s), if any,

• a PDF (or Word document) of a critical paper that you wrote for another class (the length of this paper not being as important as its quality), and

• a PDF (or Word document) of a personal statement, including why you are interested in taking this course and indicating your academic interest and, if possible, the topic or area you are thinking of addressing in your honors thesis.

The deadline for completing this application is 11 PM, FRIDAY, MAY 12. 


Graduate Courses

Graduate students from other departments and exceptionally well-prepared undergraduates are welcome in English graduate courses (except for English 200) insofar as limitations of class size allow. Graduate courses are usually limited to 15 students; courses numbered 250 are usually limited to 10.

When demand for a graduate course exceeds the maximum enrollment limit, the instructor will determine priorities for enrollment and inform students of his/her decisions at the second class meeting. Prior enrollment does not guarantee a place in a graduate course that turns out to be oversubscribed on the first day of class; in fact, a few students could be required to drop the course, starting with people who are not English Department graduate students -- though, fortunately, this situation does not arise very often.

Please refer to page 2 of the English Department's Graduate Handbook for the "Group" descriptions referred to at the end of each graduate course offering.


Problems in the Study of Literature

English 200

Section: 1
Instructor: Marno, David
Time: MW 12:30-2
Location: 305 Wheeler


Description

Readings TBA

Approaches to literary study, including textual analysis, scholarly methodology and bibliography, critical theory and practice.

Enrollment is limited to entering doctoral students in the English program. 

This course satisfies the Group 1 requirement (problems in the study of literature).


Graduate Readings: Caribbean Literature and Culture

English 203

Section: 1
Instructor: Ellis, Nadia
Time: M 9-12
Location: 301 Wheeler


Book List

Brathwaite, Kamau: Rights of Passage (1973); Danticat, Edwidge: The Dew Breakers (2004); Díaz, Junot: The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao (2007); Kincaid, Jamaica: Annie John (1985); Lovelace, Earl: The Dragon Can't Dance (1979); McKay, Claude: Home to Harlem (1928); Rhys, Jean: Voyage in the Dark (1934); Salkey, Andrew: Escape to an Autumn Pavement (1960); Wekker, Gloria: The Politics of Passion (2005)

Other Readings and Media

Highly recommended: Selvon, Sam: The Lonely Londoners (1956); Kincaid, Jamaica: A Small Place (1988) 

Film: Life and Debt (2001)

Course Reader with works by CLR James, Derek Walcott, Dennis Scott, Gordon Rohlehr, Michel-Rolph Trouillot, M. Jacqui Alexander, Michelle Stephens, Brent Hayes Edwards, Patricia Saunders, Deborah Thomas, Omise'eke Natasha Tinsley, and others, available at Copy Central, Bancroft Avenue.

**Please consult the bCourses website before purchasing books.

Description

“and either I’m nobody, or I’m a nation.” -Derek Walcott

Walcott’s mongrel regionalism is an apt invitation to consider a field of cultures whose richness comes, at least in part, from its provoking tendency toward paradox. Caribbean literature poses enormous challenges to the discipline--challenges of form (traditions are inherited, then broken); of literary history (memory, tradition, and rumor face off against historiography); of genre (artists extravagantly ignore boundaries between literature, music, performance, and theory); and of language (at least four European languages are spoken, and there are several more Creole languages). This course will evidence all these challenges, moving through a wide array of literature and cultural critique in order to establish the grounds of advanced research into Caribbean literary studies. We’ll specify and explore major themes and debates in the field and think through the often baffling dialectic between hegemony and counter-hegemony in national cultures, whereby popular forms at once displace and secure regressive versions of subjecthood. We’ll think, then, alongside extraordinary artists and critics, about the Caribbean tradition’s quicksilver threat and promise; its development on a knife’s edge “either…or” (which is, as Walcott shows, also always “and”).

The course is designed to provide a range of readings in English across the region; to establish the contours and discourse of a field; and to stage the possibilities for asking new questions. Instead of a single final research paper there will be shorter pieces due throughout the semester.

The texts for this course will be available at University Press Books, on Bancroft Way.  Please note the changes in the texts (as of August 10).

This course satisfies the Group 5 (20th Century) requirement.


Graduate Readings: Comparative Colonialisms: Latin America and the U.S.

English 203

Section: 2
Instructor: Saldaña, Maria
Time: Wed. 6-9 PM
Location: 180 Barrows


Book List

Deloria, Phil : Playing Indian; Forbes, Jack D.: Africans and Native Americans: The Language of Race and the Evolution of Red-Black Peoples; Lockhart, James : Nahuas and Spaniards: Postconquest Central Mexican History and Philology; Martinez, María Elena: Genealogical Fictions: Limpieza de Sangre, Religion, and Gender in Colonial Mexico; Rama, Angel: The Lettered City; Saldana Portillo, Maria Josefina: Indian Given: Racial Geographies across Mexico and the United States; Simpson, Audra : Mohawk Interruptus: Political Life Across the Borders of Settler States; Williams, Robert : The American Indian in Western Legal Thought: The Discourses of Conquest

Description

A comparative study of Spanish and British colonialism, this course examines specific forms of governmentality implanted in the Americas and consequences thereof, with particular attention to racialization. British and Spanish modes of colonialism produced distinct racial formations in Hispanophone and Anglophone America, and yet both Mexico and the United States are made up of racially stratified social systems today. Slavery, the encomienda, policies of limpieza de sangre and blood quantum and more are examined as modes of colonial governmentality that organized labor, reproduction, leisure, and space in New England and New Spain. Focusing on the colonial production of what are today indigenous and black/afromestizo identities, we consider how race was accomplished through the disciplining of gender and sexuality, and thus course readings necessarily engage this active entwining of race, gender, and sex. The syllabus includes a mixture of primary archival and literary material, and secondary historical and literary studies of the colonial archives.

This course satisfies the Group 6 (Non-historical) requirement.


Graduate Readings: Materiality

English 203

Section: 3
Instructor: Flynn, Catherine
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 186 Barrows


Book List

Derrida, Jacques: Spectres of Marx; Dolphijn, Rick: New Materialism: Interviews & Cartographies; Freud, Sigmund: Civilization and Its Discontents; Lucretius: The Nature of Things; Marx, Karl: Capital; Meillasoux, Quentin: After Finitude; Merleau-Ponty, Maurice: The Visible and the Invisible

Other Readings and Media

Course Reader

Description

In recent years, new theories of materiality have emerged to account for physical processes and eventualities outside of human volition and identificatory categories. In this course, we will examine these theories in relation to the older paradigms—philosophical, psychoanalytic, Marxist, phenomenological and anthropological—on which they build and from which they depart. Exploring materiality in the opposing but interrelated senses of the physical world and of social, productive forces, we will read a set of foundational thinkers, such as Lucretius, Aristotle, Marx, and Freud, along with a series of theorists who respond to them in divergent ways. Two key contemporary directions under consideration will be speculative realism’s shift away from socio-linguistic and anthropocentric modes of thought and, contrastingly, the exploration of consciously queer subjectivities in feminist and other phenomenologies. Readings will be arranged in strands that develop, diverge or reflect critically: for example, Husserl, Merleau-Ponty and Sara Ahmed; Descartes, Judith Butler and Diana Coole; Marx, Derrida, and Fredric Jameson; and Hume, Quentin Meillasoux, and Martin Hägglund.

This course satisfies the Group 6 (Non-historical) requirement.


Chaucer

English 211

Section: 1
Instructor: Justice, Steven
Time:
Location:


Description

This course was canceled (on August 1).


Poetry Writing Workshop

English 243B

Section: 1
Instructor: Hejinian, Lyn
Time: Tues. 9-12
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Manuscripts in progress by course participants will provide students with ample reading materials.

Description

This workshop/seminar is for poets who already have a body of work (however large or small) and who are currently working on a project or collection. Participants should be working toward furthering development of the project and toward the formulation of a theoretical understanding of its purport and the technical elements that are contributing to its success. Poetry is a capacious genre; for the purposes of this course, any corpus of writing that its author wishes to label “poetry” is poetry.

Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligible to apply for this course. To be considered for admission, please electronically submit 5 of your poems, by clicking on the link below; fill out the application you'll find there and attach the writing sample as a Word document or .rtf file. The deadline for completing this application process is 11 PM, THURSDAY, APRIL 27.

Also be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses.  


Graduate Pro-seminar: Renaissance: Seventeenth-Century Literature, before the Restoration

English 246D

Section: 1
Instructor: Turner, James Grantham
Time: Tues. 3:30-6:30
Location: 186 Barrows


Other Readings and Media

My intention is to scan all assigned texts for downloading, from the best available scholarly editions

Description

A sampling of literature in English from 1600 to 1660, a turbulent period of intellectual innovation and political revolution. Key bodies of work will be studied complete – Donne’s Songs and Sonnets and Holy Sonnets, Herbert’s The Temple, Marvell’s poetry before the Restoration satires – while many other authors in prose and verse will be anthologized. Since Shakespeare and Milton get their own courses they will be cited as recommended comparands rather than required reading. The syllabus is necessarily selective, but will include multiple genres – court masque, philosophical treatise, spiritual autobiography as well as standard literary forms such as drama, lyrical and topographical poems – plus works from cultural minorities (women, lower-class radicals, colonial Americans). The focus will be on primary texts, with an austere selection of “classic” criticism from T.S. Eliot to New Historicism. I will ask you for two papers on self-chosen topics, giving you the option of exploring more recent secondary literature if this matches your research interests; this course is designed to be accessible to specialists in all periods, however, so close-reading essays without full bibliography are perfectly fine.

This course satisfies the Group 3 (17th through 18th Century) requirement.


Graduate Pro-seminar: Romantic Period

English 246G

Section: 1
Instructor: Langan, Celeste
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 186 Barrows


Description

Book List:  Austen, J., Lady Susan; Blake, W. Complete Poetry and Prose;  Burke, Reflections on the Revolution in France;  Byron, Lord Byron: The Major Works; Coleridge, S.T., Major Works; Godwin, Caleb Williams; Hazlitt, W., The Fight and Other Writings;  Keats, J. Major Works; Scott, W., Waverley; Shelley, M., History of a Six Weeks' Tour; Shelley, P.B., Shelley's Poetry and Prose; WIlliams, H.M., Letters from France; Wordsworth, D., Grasmere and Alfoxden Journals; Wordsworth, W., Major Works.

Other Readings and Media:  A course reader with critical texts from T. Adorno, H. Arendt, W. Benjamin, M. Dolar, P. de Man, J. Fabian, G.W.F. Hegel, F. Kittler, R. Koselleck, J. Lacan, F. Nietzsche, C. Schmitt, and others. 

This course on the Romantic “period” will consider concepts of time as they are imagined, experienced, represented in some characteristic genres: song, prophecy, lyrical ballad, romance, fragment, travel narrative, essay, letter, autobiography, historical novel, periodical review. How do Romantic writers understand time’s periodicity—crisis, presence, afterwardsness, ephemerality, wartime, deep time? What relation might such categories have to an emergent concept of “voice” as something distinct from what is said, written, prescribed-- from “law”?

Students will be responsible for two short essays (2-4 pages) to be circuluated for discussion and a final paper (15-17 pages).

This course satisfies the Group 4 (19th Century) requirement.


Research Seminar: Victorian Cultural Studies

English 250

Section: 1
Instructor: Puckett, Kent
Time: W 9-12
Location: 301 Wheeler


Book List

Berger, J.: Ways of Seeing; Coleridge, S.T.: Biographia Literaria ; Eliot, G.: Middlemarch; Eliot, T.S.: The Sacred Wood; Empson, W.: Some Versions of Pastoral; Hoggart, R.: The Uses of Literacy; James, C.L.R.: Beyond a Boundary; Mill, J.S.: On Liberty; Newman, J.H.: The Idea of a University; Richards, I.A.: Practical Criticism; Williams, R.: The Long Revolution; Woolf, V.: To the Lighthouse

Other Readings and Media

A course reader with selections from Carlyle, Ruskin, Arnold, Morris, Wilde, Tylor, Hulme, Frazer, Malinowski, Leavis, Orwell, E.P. Thompson, Nairn, Hall, Hebdidge, Gilroy, and others.

Description

This course will follow the long history of the culture concept in Britain.  We will begin by working through Raymond Williams’ account in Culture & Society in order to see how several senses of the word “culture”—culture as “the idea of human perfection,” as “society as a whole,” as “the general body of the arts,” or as “a whole way of life”—appear and reappear in Coleridge, Mill, Carlyle, Arnold, Eliot, Newman, Ruskin, and Morris.  We’ll supplement these readings with selections from the emerging fields of nineteenth-century anthropology, ethnography, and sociology.  In the course’s second half, we’ll follow the culture concept as it makes its way through twentieth-century Britain: before, between, and after the wars (T. S. Eliot, Virginia Woolf, I. A. Richards, Q. D., and F. R. Leavis); in the long, fraught wake of British socialism (Richard Hoggart, Raymond Williams, C. L. R. James, and E. P. Thompson); and in the “New Times” of British cultural studies under and after Thatcher (Stuart Hall, Paul Gilroy, and Dick Hebdige).  In the process of reading through these works, we’ll consider the strange tenacity of an especially Victorian idea, a particularly British effort to mark out practical relations between the social and the aesthetic, and the institutional and literary roles that education and, in particular, adult education have played in the post-Romantic imagination.

This course may be used to satisfy the Group 4 (19th Century),Group 5 (20th Century), or the Group 6 (Non-historical) requirement.


Research Seminar: How to Write a Book

English 250

Section: 2
Instructor: Kahn, Victoria
Time: M 2-5
Location: 189 Dwinelle


Other Readings and Media

The reading materials for this class will be in the form of on-line PDFs.

Description

Did you ever wonder how other people get their work done? Or what great ideas look like and where they come from? Are you curious about the best strategies and habits for clear, forceful, and engaging writing? This seminar about writing and publishing is for you. You must have a seminar paper that you wish to revise in the course of the semester. You must also commit to sending your revised essay out for review by a journal at the end of the fall. The vast majority of our time will be spent discussing the written work of the seminar members. We will also read and discuss some important articles in the fields of English and Comparative Literature and analyze how and why they work. There will be a number of guest visits by Berkeley faculty who will discuss their writing habits and their own work in progress. Enrollment is limited to six English Dept. graduate students; six Comparative Literature graduate students will be able to enroll in the cross-listed component of this course, Comparative Literature 256.


Research Seminar: Paranoid States: Empire and the Rise of the Surveillance State

English 250

Section: 3
Instructor: Saha, Poulomi
Time: W 3-6
Location: 107 Mulford


Other Readings and Media

Readings and films may include: Foucault, Discipline and Punish; Fanon, The Wretched of the Earth; LeFebvre, The Production of Space; Hardt & Negri, Empire; Orwell, 1984; Pontecorvo, Battle of Algiers; Scott, Seeing Like a State; McCoy, Policing America's Empire; Hathaway, The Real Glory

Description

This course examines the long, intimate relationship between technologies of surveillance and the making of British and American empires. While digital technology and state surveillance has been significant in the post-9/11 world, identifying, monitoring, and tracking populations and individuals has been central to the consolidation of state power for much longer. We will consider the development of technologies such as photography, fingerprinting, biometrics, and aerial drones in the context of their imbrication with imperial governance. Beginning in the late 19th century to the contemporary moment, this course will track the shifting forms that surveillance and the state take from the decline of British colonialism to the rise of American empire. It will look to South Asia, the Phillippines, North America, and the Middle East to ask how discourses of security, risk, and vulnerability have rationalized state policies of containment and scrutiny on the one hand, and justified and catalyzed the expansion of imperial power on the other.

This course satisfies the Group 6 (Non-historical) requirement.


Research Seminar: Gender, Sexuality, Modernism

English 250

Section: 4
Instructor: Abel, Elizabeth
Time: Thurs. 3:30-6:30
Location: 102 Barrows


Book List

Baldwin, James: Giovanni's Room; Barnes, Djuna: Nightwood; Bechdel, Alison: Fun Home; James, Henry: The Turn of the Screw and Other Short Fiction; Larsen, Nella: Passing; Nelson, Maggie: The Argonauts; Stein, Gertrude: Tender Buttons; Toibin, Colm: The Master; Truong, Monique: The Book of Salt; Wilde, Oscar: The Picture of Dorian Gray; Woolf, Virginia: Mrs. Dalloway; Woolf, Virginia: Orlando;

Recommended: Butler, Judith: Gender Trouble; Foucault, Michel: The History of Sexuality (Volume 1); Nutt, Amy Ellis: Becoming Nicole; Sedgwick, Eve Kosofsky: Epistemology of the Closet

Other Readings and Media

Critical essays, short fiction, plays and poetry will be available on our b-Courses.

Description

“Is queer modernism simply another name for modernism?” The question Heather Love poses in her special issue of PMLA will also guide this seminar on the crossovers between formal and sexual “deviance” in modernist literature. We will read back and forth across a century (Henry James to Colm Toibin, James Joyce to Alison Bechdel, Oscar Wilde to Yinka Shonibare, Virginia Woolf to Caryl Churchill, Gertrude Stein to Monique Truong) to stage a series of encounters between the aesthetic practices  and discourses of modernism and those of contemporary queer theory and cultural production.  As we map the shifting contours of some key forms and terms, we will pause to consider (among other things) the mobile dimensions of queer time and space; the historical migration of concepts such as perversion, inversion, masquerade, transvestism, abjection, and shame; the mutual implication of race, gender, and sexuality; the formal attributes of the closet; the legibility of transgender bodies; and the composition of affective histories. To complement (and complicate) the chronological axis of this inquiry, we will also attend to the metropolitan spaces in which sexual boundaries blurred and subcultures thrived, especially the three urban sites central to modernist experimentation: London, New York, and Paris.  

This course satisfies the Group 5 (20th Century) requirement.


Field Studies in Tutoring Writing

English 310

Section: 1
Instructor: T. B. A.
Time: T. B. A.
Location: T. B. A.


Description

Through seminars, discussions, and reading assignments, students are introduced to the language/writing/literacy needs of diverse college-age writers such as the developing, bi-dialectal, and non-native English-speaking (NNS) writer. The course will provide a theoretical and practical framework for tutoring and composition instruction.

The seminar will focus on various tutoring methodologies and the theories which underlie them. Students will become familiar with relevant terminology, approaches, and strategies in the fields of composition teaching and learning. New tutors will learn how to respond constructively to student writing, as well as develop and hone effective tutoring skills. By guiding others towards clarity and precision in prose, tutors will sharpen their own writing abilities. New tutors will tutor fellow Cal students in writing and/or literature courses. Tutoring occurs in the Cesar E. Chavez Student Center under the supervision of experienced writing program staff.

In order to enroll for the seminar, students must have at least sophomore standing and have completed their Reading and Composition R1A and R1B requirements.

Some requirements include: participating in a weekly training seminar and occasional workshops; reading assigned articles, videotaping a tutoring session, and becoming familiar with the resources available at the Student Learning Center; tutoring 4-6 hours per week; keeping a tutoring journal and writing a final paper; meeting periodically with both the tutor supervisor(s) and tutees' instructors.

This course meets the field study requirements for the Education minor, but it cannot be used toward fulfillment of the requirements for the English major. It must be taken P/NP.

Pick up an application for a pre-enrollment interview at the Student Learning Center, Atrium, Cesar Chavez Student Center (Lower Sproul Plaza), beginning April 3. No one will be admitted after the first week of fall classes.

This course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the undergraduate English major nor may it be counted to satisfy a graduate-level requirement.


The Teaching of Composition and Literature

English 375

Section: 1
Instructor: Liu, Aileen
Snyder, Katherine
Time: Thurs. 10:30-12:30
Location: 301 Wheeler


Book List

Recommended: Graff, G.: They Say/I Say; Rosenwasser, D.: Writing Analytically

Other Readings and Media

All required readings will be posted on bCourses and available in a Course Reader.

Description

Co-taught by a faculty member and a graduate student instructor (the department's R & C Assistant Coordinator), this course introduces new English GSIs to the practice and theory of teaching literature and writing at UC Berkeley in sections linked to English 45 and select upper-division courses, as well in R1A and R1B, and beyond. At once a seminar and a hands-on practicum, the class will cover topics such as strategies for leading discussion, teaching critical reading skills and the elements of composition, responding to and evaluating student writing, developing paper topics and other exercises, and approaching the other responsibilities that make up the work of teaching here and elsewhere. The course will offer a space for mutual support, individual experimentation, and the discovery of each member's pedagogical style. We will pair each class participant with an experienced GSI teaching in R1A or R1B, so that new teachers can observe different kinds of teaching situations and classes besides their own. There will also be opportunities to be observed teaching and to receive feedback during the term. 

This course satisfies the Pedagogy Requirement.