Announcement of Classes: Spring 2018

Course #
Instructor
Course Area

R1A/1

Reading and Composition:
Making Heirs and Heirlooms

MWF 10-11

W.B. Yeats once wondered, "Did that play of mine send out / Certain men the English shot?" But in a poem in honor of Yeats, W.H. Auden famously assured us that "poetry makes nothing happen," while Paul Muldoon put it more to the...(read more)

Lorden, Jennifer A.

R1A/2

Reading and Composition:
Nostalgic Notions: Feeling How the Past Persists in the Present

MWF 11-12

Nostalgia is an oft-felt, but seldom understood feeling. Originally a medical designation for a form of home-sickness, in the present nostalgia connotes a more general longing for the past. We experience some form of nostalgia in the inte...(read more)

Artiz, Ernest T.

R1A/3

Reading and Composition:
Image and Text

MWF 12-1

Note the revised course description:

This class will explore the relationship between image and text in poetry, novels, and the graphic novel.  We'll ask both questions of formal genre—how do images inflect, augment, or com...(read more)

Lesser, Madeline

R1A/4

Reading and Composition:
Transpacific Routes and Asian America

MWF 1-2

The field of Asian American literature has long been contested: what are the dialogues that have shaped the unstable definition of “Asian American,” and how might we think about Asian American literature as more than an additive categor...(read more)

Choi, Jeehyun

R1A/5

Reading and Composition:
Stranger than Fiction: Metafiction

MWF 2-3

In this course, we’ll be reading, thinking, and writing about metafiction: fiction about fiction. Frame narratives, dream visions, plays-within-plays: these are just a few examples of the metafictional techniques that can be found in...(read more)

Ripplinger, Michelle

R1A/6

Reading and Composition:
The Muslim-American Experience

MW 5-6:30

"Why can't I have my interpretation where I'm just nice and eat pork? For you guys, religion has this cultural value. It's not like that for me. It's people calling me terrorist and getting pulled out of...(read more)

Rajabzadeh, Shokoofeh

R1A/7

Reading and Composition:
The Sound of Modern American Literature

TTh 8-9:30

How can we best listen to literature? How is literature like or unlike a conversation, a piece of music, or the cacophony of a city street? This course will examine a vast swath of twentieth-century American poetry and prose in order to probe the w...(read more)

Neal, Allison

R1B/1

Reading and Composition:
Nature Poetry Before and After the Industrial Revolution

MWF 9-10

Beginning in the mid-eighteenth century and continuing into the mid-nineteenth, the Industrial Revolution fundamentally altered individuals' relationships to and conceptions of labor, family, subjectivity, religious belief, and nature. The Indu...(read more)

Heimlich, Timothy

R1B/2

Reading and Composition:
The Booker Prize, Literary Speculation, and the Global Anglophone Novel

MWF 10-11

In 1968, Booker McConnell Ltd, “an international company dealing in sugar, rum, mining machinery, and James Bond,” established the Man Booker Prize for Fiction: a £5,000 literary prize to be awarded to a British Commonwealth, Iris...(read more)

Hu, Jane

R1B/3

Reading and Composition:
The Essay as Genre

MWF 11-12

Building on the skills students have acquired in R1A, this course will continue to develop reading, writing, and research skills. To this end, you will write and revise one shorter argumentative essay (4-5 pages) and one longer research paper (8-10...(read more)

Levesque, Raina

R1B/4

Reading and Composition:
Blank Generation: The Changing Arts in 1970s New York City

MWF 12-1

In the decade of urban decay, energy crisis, deindustrialization, and Watergate, artists of all stripes were thrown back on their own resources, seeking the means and reasons for continuing the avant-garde's project of cultural revolution after...(read more)

Alexander, Edward Sterling

R1B/5

Reading and Composition:
Memory & the Nation

MWF 12-1

Note the changes in the instructor, topic, book list, and course description for this section of English R1B (as of Jan. 10).

This course examines narratives of cultural and historical trauma that attempt to represent what cannot be repre...(read more)

Cho, Jennifer

R1B/6

Reading and Composition:
Memory & the Nation

MWF 1-2

This course examines narratives of cultural and historical trauma that attempt to represent what cannot be represented. Clinically defined, trauma is an occurrence that misses psychic registration and returns as a series of haunting symptoms, and w...(read more)

Cho, Jennifer

R1B/7

Reading and Composition:
Media Fictions / Fictional Medias

MWF 1-2

Note the changes in instructor, topic, book list, and course description.

What does it mean to be mediated? According to the OED, the word "media" comes from the Latin medium, for "middle, center, intermediary.&quo...(read more)

Wilson, Mary

R1B/8

Reading and Composition:
Sympathy and Identification "After" the Affective Turn

MWF 2-3

In recent years, certain sectors of the humanities have been undergoing an "affective turn." Put broadly, scholars from diverse fields are challenging an older model of the self as the repository of deep, private feelings ("interiori...(read more)

Ding, Katherine

R1B/9

Reading and Composition:
Writing the American City, 1900 to today

TTh 8-9:30

The American city is an incredibly complex and dynamic organism—and the subject of a great body of literature, both fiction and non-fiction. This course will trace and critically engage how American urban development has been written about fr...(read more)

Beckett, Balthazar I.

R1B/10

Reading and Composition:
Tricksters and Transformations in the Old, Weird America

TTh 5-6:30

In this course, we'll examine how authors have imagined and re-imagined the carnivalesque aspects of American life. We'll read stories about con-men, tricksters, wandering ghosts, seducers, conjurers, and other rhetorical magicians. In addi...(read more)

McWilliams, Ryan

R1B/11

Reading and Composition:
Life Writing

TTh 5-6:30

Life writing seems self-explanatory as writing that is about one’s life, but what does that mean, exactly? How does a life become literature, and why should literature, the province of the imagination, be made to present a real life?  Th...(read more)

Bauer, Mark

R1B/12

Reading and Composition:
Music and Noise

MWF 9-10

The word "noise" came from the Latin word "nausea" or "seasickness," before it developed in Middle English to mean "quarreling." "Music," on the other hand, came from the Greek word "mousa&quot...(read more)

Stancek, Claire Marie

R1B/13

Reading and Composition:
Started from the Bottom: Masculinity, the American Dream, and the Myth of Starting Over from Jay Gatsby to Jay Z

MWF 10-11

The texts for this course consider the figure of the "self-made man" and his function in the American cultural imagination. From his representation in American literature to his representation in contemporary popular culture and politics,...(read more)

Cruz, Frank Eugene

R1B/14

Reading and Composition:
Gender and Culture: Psychological and Literary Perspectives on Social Hierarchy

MWF 12-1

The anthropologists Rosaldo, Lamphere, and Bamberger note, "all contemporary societies are to some extent male-dominated, and ... sexual asymmetry is presently a universal fact of human social life" (Woman, Culture, and Socie...(read more)

Carr, Jessica

R1B/15

Reading and Composition:
Nature Poetry and the Nature of Poetry

MWF 1-2

Reading a number of texts from different genres, time periods, and literary traditions, we will think about how and why poetry has represented and reflected upon nonhuman nature since at least the classical period. In doing so, we will also ask our...(read more)

Greenwald, Jordan

R1B/16

Reading and Composition:
Modern Literature Between Past and Future

MWF 2-3

This course explores what it means to be modern. We will investigate modern historical consciousness in modern literature and thought, roughly from 1850 forward, with special attention to how each text we read figures the past, prese...(read more)

O'Rourke, Emily

R1B/17

Reading and Composition:
Translating Poetry: Imitation and Interpretation

Note new time: MW 11-12:30

Translating a poem is somewhat like solving a puzzle, but also somewhat like writing a poem.  If the rhyme, meter, and rhythm of a poem are rooted in the sounds of the language in which it was composed, how do translators decide to render thes...(read more)

Thow, Diana

R1B/18

Reading and Composition:
On Lives Unlived: Frustration, Hope, and the Novel

Note new time: MW 12-1:30

Roads untaken, opportunities unpursued, the people we might have known, and the losses of what might have been – what are the potentials and pitfalls locked within fictions of alternate realities? Why does our knowledge of what could...(read more)

Xin, Wendy Veronica

R1B/19

Reading and Composition:
Re-Visioning the Sixties

MWF 2-3

This reading and composition course will explore selected works of literature, music, and visual art produced during the 1960s. Placing emphasis on the relationship between artistic experimentation and emancipatory social movements (both in the Uni...(read more)

Koerner, Michelle

R1B/20

Reading and Composition:
Meaning in Modern and Contemporary American Literature

MWF 2-3

In this course, students will learn the skills of analysis and argumentation. As we learn in-depth techniques to improve our critical reading and writing strategies, the course's theme will look at the role meaning plays in d...(read more)

Clancy, Brian

R1B/21

Reading & Composition:
Identity as Performance

MWF 11-12

We often hear people say that actions speak louder than words. We express our identities, who we are, through our actions, our performances, our lived experiences amidst the context and structures within which we operate. We connect w...(read more)

Ghosh, Srijani

R1B/22

Reading & Composition:
Modernism, Perception, and the Reader

MWF 1-2

In this course, you will learn how to write a paper using the skills of analysis and argumentation. As we learn techniques to improve our critical reading and writing strategies, the course theme will largely examine the role perception plays withi...(read more)

Clancy, Brian

26/1

Introduction to the Study of Poetry

MWF 2-3

In this course we’ll read poems together, intensively, across a long historical span, a variety of contexts (cultural, philosophical, political), and a wide range of modes, forms, genres, styles and techniques. We’ll respond to poems, a...(read more)

Schweik, Susan

43B/1

Introduction to the Writing of Verse

MW 9-10:30

This is a collaborative workshop where participants will learn to think critically and supportively about others’ creative work and their own, fostering an ongoing practice of editing and revision throughout the semester. Students will develo...(read more)

Gaston, Lise

45A/1

Literature in English: Through Milton

Lectures MW 3-4 + one hour of discussion section per week (sec. 101: F 9-10; sec. 102: F 3-4; sec. 103: Thurs. 10-11; sec. 104: Thurs. 11-12; sec. 105: F 12-1; sec. 106: F 1-2)

This is a story of discovering, then forgetting, then discovering again the fact that a particular language can be used not only for communication but also for creation. At the beginning of our story Caedmon, a shepherd, is called upon in his dream...(read more)

Marno, David

45B/1

Literature in English: Late-17th Through Mid-19th Centuries

Lectures MW 10-11 + one hour of discussion section per week (sec. 101: F 10-11; sec. 102: F 1-2; sec. 103: Thurs. 9-10; sec. 104: Thurs. 10-11)

(read more)

Tamarkin, Elisa

45B/2

Literature in English: Late-17th Through Mid-19th Centuries

Lectures MW 12-1 + one hour of discussion section per week (sec. 201: F 10-11; sec. 202: F 12-1)

An introductory survey or “tasting menu” of writing in English from the last words of John Milton to the early poems of Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson. This period saw revolutions in England, America and France, civil war in the new U...(read more)

Turner, James Grantham

45C/1

Literature in English: Mid-19th Through the 20th Century

Lectures MW 1-2 + one hour of discussion section per week (sec. 101: F 12-1; sec. 102: F 1-2; sec. 103: Thurs. 9-10; sec. 104: Thurs. 10-11; sec. 105: F 11-12; sec. 106: F 12-1; sec. 107: F 10-11; sec. 108: F 1-2)

This course will survey a range of modern English-language literature (novels, poetry, and drama), paying particular attention to the ways in which literary form has responded to the rapid social and cultural changes of modernity. These c...(read more)

Zhang, Dora

84/1

Sophomore Seminar:
High Culture / Low Culture: Woody Allen

W 1-4

We will examine the films and writings of Woody Allen in terms of themes, narration, comic and visual inventiveness, and ideology. The course will also include consideration of cultural contexts and events at Cal Performances and the Pacific Film A...(read more)

Bader, Julia

102/1

Topics in the English Language:
The Structure of English

MWF 11-12

This course is an introduction to linguistic analysis of present-day English.  The focus will be on phonology (sound structure), morphology (word structure), syntax (sentence structure) and semantics (linguistic meaning); some attention will a...(read more)

Hanson, Kristin

107/1

The Bible as Literature

Lectures MW 12-1 + one hour of discussion section per week (sec. 101: F 10-11; sec. 102: F 12-1; sec. 103: F 12-1; sec. 104: F 2-3)

In this class, we will read a selection of biblical texts as literature; that is, we will read them in many ways but not as divine revelation.  We will take up traditional literary questions of form, style, and structure, but we will also lear...(read more)

Goldsmith, Steven

112/1

Middle English Literature

TTh 2-3:30

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

...(read more)
Hobson, Jacob

117S/1

Shakespeare

Lectures MW 2-3 + one hour of discussion section per week (sec. 101: F 11-12; sec. 102: F 2-3)

I am mostly interested in having the class appreciate how capacious, complex, humane, and Intelligent Shakespeare's plays can be.  So I will concentrate on the plays themselves rather than on any talk about context or political assessment....(read more)

Altieri, Charles F.

117S/2

Shakespeare

TTh 12:30-2

Focusing on a selection of Shakespeare's many astonishing plays, we’ll consider the range of his dramaturgy and why this range was important to him.  We’ll also explore how the variety of dramatic genres in which he w...(read more)

Knapp, Jeffrey

118/1

Milton

Lectures TTh 11-12 + one hour of discussion section per week (sec. 101: F 9-10; sec. 102: F 1-2)

We'll explore John Milton's whole career, a lifelong effort to unite intellectual, political, and artistic experimentation.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

...(read more)
Picciotto, Joanna M

125A/1

The English Novel (Defoe through Scott)

TTh 12:30-2

The period from which our reading draws has been credited with the “rise of the novel”—the emergence of the then new genre, the “novel,” so familiar to us today. While critics have qualified and revised that claim, the...(read more)

Sorensen, Janet

125B/1

The English Novel (Dickens through Conrad)

TTh 3:30-5

In this class we'll read novels by Charles Dickens, Charlotte Brontë, George Eliot, W.M. Thackeray, and others. We'll think about these novels in two related ways. First, what was it about the novel—as opposed, for instance, to t...(read more)

Puckett, Kent

125E/1

The Contemporary Novel:
The Latest Pulitzer Prize-Winning Novels

Lectures MW 9-10 + one hour of discussion section per week (sec. 101: F 9-10; sec. 102: F 11-12; sec. 103: Thurs. 9-10; sec. 104: Thurs. 11-12)

The Pulitzer Prize in Fiction is awarded for “distinguished fiction by an American author, preferably dealing with American life.” In this course, we will read the five most recent (2013-2017) Pulitzer-Prize winning novels and two novel...(read more)

Wong, Hertha D. Sweet

130A/1

American Literature: Before 1800

MWF 2-3

This course surveys the literatures of early America, from the tracts that envisioned the impact of British colonization to the novels that measured the aftermath of the American Revolution.  Throughout, we will consider colonial America as a ...(read more)

Donegan, Kathleen

131/1

American Poetry

Note new time: TTh 12:30-2

This survey of U.S. poetries will begin with 17th- and 18th-century poems by two women, Anne Bradstreet and Phyllis Wheatley, move to another (19th-century) pairing in Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson, and then touch down in expatriate and statesid...(read more)

O'Brien, Geoffrey G.

133T/1

Topics in African American Literature and Culture:
The African-American Essay

TTh 2-3:30

Readers have often turned to the essays of James Baldwin, W. E. B. DuBois, Ralph Ellison, Zora Neale Hurston (among others) with a mind to better understanding their literary work.  In this course we will consider the African-American essay as...(read more)

Best, Stephen M.

134/1

Contemporary Literature

Lectures MW 11-12 + one hour of discussion section per week (sec. 101: F 9-10; sec. 102: F 11-12; sec. 103: Thurs. 9-10; sec. 104: Thurs. 1-2)

This course will survey Irish and British writing since World War II.  As we dig into the formal and generic workings of a range of texts, we will also think through the political and cultural contexts from which they emerge.  Along ...(read more)

Falci, Eric

137B/1

Chicana/o Literature and Culture Since 1910:
Chicanx Novels

TTh 11-12:30

This course will focus exclusively on the study of Chicanx novels. As we shall see, the formal features and thematic representations of these novels have been influenced to a large degree by a broad range of social experiences: living in the border...(read more)

Gonzalez, Marcial

138/1

Studies in World Literature in English:
Orphans, Feral Children, Runaways—Strange Childhood in World Literature

TTh 2-3:30

From Harry Potter to Oliver Twist, the figure of the orphan is a much beloved literary trope. Why do children have to be denuded of family ties in order to set off on self-making adventures? What in the traditional family form hinders our developme...(read more)

Saha, Poulomi

143A/1

Short Fiction

MW 1:30-3

The aim of this course is to explore the genre of short fiction –  to discuss the elements that make up the short story, to talk critically about short stories, and to become comfortable and confident with the writing of them.  Stud...(read more)

Chandra, Melanie Abrams

143A/2

Short Fiction

TTh 11-12:30

A short fiction workshop. Over the course of the semester, each student will write and revise two stories. Each participant in the workshop will edit student-written stories and will write a formal critique of each manuscript. Students are req...(read more)

Chandra, Vikram

143A/3

Short Fiction

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

A fiction workshop in which students will be expected to turn in material approximately every third week, to be edited and discussed in class.

Emphasis will be upon editing and revising. Quality rather than quantity is the ideal, but each...(read more)

Oates, Joyce Carol

143B/1

Verse

TTh 9:30-11

This is a workshop, a studio class. The principle is immersion.  Students will be expected to be reading poetry all the time, writing it, giving and receiving feedback on the drafts of  poems you will be turning in weekly. Attendance...(read more)

Hass, Robert L.

143B/2

Verse

TTh 12:30-2

In this course you will conduct a progressive series of explorations in which you will try some of the fundamental options for writing poetry today (or any day)--aperture and closure; rhythmic sound patterning; sentence and line; short and long-lin...(read more)

Shoptaw, John

143N/1

Prose Nonfiction:
Food Writing

TTh 3:30-5

This is a creative nonfiction writing workshop focused on the topic of food.  Food writing encompasses more than snooty restaurant reviews or poetic descriptions of the taste of wine, coffee, and chocolate.  Food writing can include memoi...(read more)

Kleege, Georgina

152/1

Women Writers: Studies in Prose Fiction: Isak Dinesen

TTh 11-12:30

This course will examine the works of the Danish author Karen Blixen (1885-1962), who also wrote under the pen name of Isak Dinesen. Dinesen is often seen as a modern-day Scheherazade, making storytelling into a matter of life and death. She famous...(read more)

Sanders, Karin

160/1

Special Topics:
Methods and Materials of Literary Criticism

TTh 12:30-2

In this course, we will look at some major moments in and read some major works of literary criticism written in English.  Beginning with Sir Philip Sidney’s “The Defence of Poesy” and moving through writing by William Wordsw...(read more)

Puckett, Kent

165/1

Special Topics:
H.P. Lovecraft in His Tradition

MW 3-4:30

--William Hope Hodgson, The House on the Borderland (Dover: 978-0486468792)

--D. Thin, ed., Shadows of Carcosa: Tales of Cosmic Horror (New York Book Review of Books Classics).

--H. P. Lovecraft, Tales...(read more)

Breitwieser, Mitchell

165/2

Special Topics:
Handel's Art in Setting English Words to Music

MW 3:30-5

Rhythm is a significant source of artistic effects in both poetry and music.  However, while the forms it can take in the two arts are similar in some ways, they are different in others.  An interesting window into these similarities and ...(read more)

Hanson, Kristin

165/3

Special Topics:
Is It Useless To Revolt?

MW 9:30-11

“Is it useless to revolt?”  Our course borrows its title from an essay by Foucault on the Iranian Revolution of 1979.  Foucault urges us to suspend judgment and listen to the voices of revolt, even as they seem entangled in a ...(read more)

Goldsmith, Steven

165/4

Special Topics:
Neo-Slave Narratives

TTh 3:30-5

While this course will focus on neo-slave narratives, we will begin by briefly examining several slave narratives.  The course will explore the similarities and differences between the two groups, asking the following kinds of questions: how d...(read more)

JanMohamed, Abdul R.

165/5

Special Topics:
Incarcerations: The Literature of (Physical, Mental, Spiritual) Imprisonment

TTh 3:30-5

This is a course on the literature of incarceration variously defined and experienced across a range of control systems that attempt to stunt the entire human being. I want to think about the forms of suppression, confinement and the humiliations o...(read more)

Padilla, Genaro M.

166/1

Special Topics:
Comedy & Violence

MWF 2-3

What relation does comedy have to violence? Can humor be a gauge of political freedom? How does it resist violence or ally itself with it? In this class, we will consider various styles of humor—wit, buffoonery, satire, parody, nonsense, absu...(read more)

Flynn, Catherine

166/2

Special Topics:
Romantic Science

Note new time: TTh 2-3:30

Today we use the word “experimental” to designate both the most respected scientific method and the most outlandish works of art. This course on Romantic era literature and science explores a key phase of the hidden interrelation (and r...(read more)

Goldstein, Amanda Jo

166/3

Special Topics:
Classical & Renaissance Drama

TTh 3:30-5

In a poem for the first edition of Shakespeare’s collected plays in 1623, his fellow playwright Ben Jonson expressed a characteristic ambivalence about classical drama.  On the one hand, he praised it as the standard by which all subsequ...(read more)

Knapp, Jeffrey

166/4

Special Topics:
Marxism & Literature

TTh 3:30-5

For the past thirty years, it’s become a cliché that it’s easier to imagine the end of the world than the end of capitalism. Yet, ever since the 2008 financial crash, there’s been rising popular consciousness of capitalism&...(read more)

Lye, Colleen

166/5

Special Topics:
Emily Dickinson

TTh 11-12:30

This seminar will provide you with a sustained reading course in the poetry of Emily Dickinson, my favorite poet.  We’ll begin with her early poetry, and trace her evolution into the singular poet we read today, with particular attention...(read more)

Shoptaw, John

166/6

Special Topics:
Speculative Fiction

Lectures MW 1-2 + one hour of discussion section per week (sec. 101: F 10-11; sec. 102: F 1-2)

This course will examine in depth the history of speculative fiction and its engagement with the thematics and topoi of the new life sciences—representation of cloning, ecological dystopias, hybrid life-forms, genetic engineering dystopias. W...(read more)

Jones, Donna V.

170/1

Literature and the Arts:
Moving Through Loss; or, The Space and Stage of Mourning

Note new time: MW 5-6:30

“My suffering is inexpressible but all the same utterable, speakable. The very fact that

language affords me the word ‘intoler...(read more)

Xin, Wendy Veronica

173/1

The Language and Literature of Films:
(Post)colonial Film

Lectures TTh 11-12:30 + film screenings W 6-9 PM

This course will screen and examine a series of films that focus on the nature and structure of Western colonialism and postcolonialism.  We will study the different forms of colonialism, as depicted from various perspectives, as well as the s...(read more)

JanMohamed, Abdul R.

174/1

Literature and History:
The 1970s

TTh 11-12:30

As one historian has quipped, it was the worst of times, it was the worst of times. “The ’70s” routinely come in for mockery: even at the time, it was known as the decade when “it seemed like nothing happened.&rdquo...(read more)

Saul, Scott

174/2

Literature and History:
History as Literature

TTh 3:30-5

Are the events of the world and human lives meaningful? And if they are, how do we discern the meaning?

History, as a form of narrative literature, seeks to answer these questions. In this class we will read a range of historical texts, w...(read more)

Thornbury, Emily V.

177/1

Literature and Philosophy:
Surveillance, Paranoia, and State Power

TTh 9:30-11

This course examines the long, intimate relationship between technologies of surveillance and the making of British and American empires. While digital technology and state surveillance has been significant in the post-9/11 world, identifying, moni...(read more)

Saha, Poulomi

180A/1

Autobiography:
Disability Memoir

TTh 12:30-2

This course will examine autobiography as a literary genre. We will survey the history of the genre and consider such questions as: How is reading autobiography like/unlike reading fiction? How do the truth claims made by autobiographies shape read...(read more)

Kleege, Georgina

180R/1

The Romance

MW 5-6:30

Everybody thinks they know what “romance” is, but in fact the term is controversial and difficult to define. Does it mean escapist fiction with monsters and enchanters, entertaining but unbelievable? (What makes fiction believable(read more)

Turner, James Grantham

190/1

Research Seminar:
Trials of Literature: Romanticism, Justice, and the Law

MW 9:30-11

This seminar will focus on the way literature imagines the relation between law and justice, concentrating on literature of the Romantic period. We’ll consider writers’ interest in persons (from beggars and trespassers to gods and sover...(read more)

Langan, Celeste

190/2

Research Seminar:
James Joyce

MW 10:30-12

Our course traces the evolution of Joyce’s writing, from his angry essays at the turn of the twentieth century to his all-compassing comedy, Finnegans Wake, published just before the outbreak of World War II. We will consider the tra...(read more)

Flynn, Catherine

190/3

Research Seminar:
Hawthorne & Melville

MW 2-3:30

This course takes a close and critical look at the literary careers of Nathaniel Hawthorne and Herman Melville.  We will read their works in relation to each other and within their historical and intellectual contexts, with special attention t...(read more)

Tamarkin, Elisa

190/4

Research Seminar:
Reading Walden Carefully

MW 5-6:30

Assigned text: Henry David Thoreau, Walden, Civil Disobedience and Other Writings (Norton Critical Editions).  You are required to use this edition.

We will read Walden twice, in order to gain a deeper understanding...(read more)

Breitwieser, Mitchell

190/5

Research Seminar:
Harlem Renaissance

MW 5-6:30

The Harlem Renaissance was a cultural and intellectual movement of black artists and writers in the 1920s. Centered in the Harlem neighborhood in Manhattan, the movement extended outward through international collaboration that reached to Hava...(read more)

Wagner, Bryan

190/6

Research Seminar:
Sixty Years Since: The Historical Novel

TTh 9:30-11

“Sixty Years Since” takes up Waverley’s audacious claim that sixty years is the ideal distance for fictional representations of history. Grounded in theories of the novel in relation to history, we’ll ask how (and ...(read more)

Kolb, Margaret

190/7

Research Seminar:
Contemporary Historical Fiction

TTh 9:30-11

The last few decades of British fiction have brought with them a notable resurgence of interest in historical literary fiction. Why this renewed investment in writing about the past now, two centuries after the historical novel’s emergence? I...(read more)

Yoon, Irene

190/8

Research Seminar:
Literary Theory and Its Objects

TTh 12:30-2

This course explores some ...(read more)

Creasy, CFS

190/9

Research Seminar:
The Faerie Queene: The Ethics of Imagination

TTh 2-3:30

Edmund Spenser's Faerie Queene (1590-96) is the most vast, most gorgeous, and most deliriously strange of English poems. Its hallucinatory dreamworld mingles self with landscape, character with plot, happenstance events with ...(read more)

Landreth, David

190/10

Research Seminar:
Pagan Fictions in Christian Literature

TTh 5-6:30

Although late antique and medieval Christian authors routinely decried the falsehood of pagan literature, they could hardly get enough of it. Pagan mythology became not only a major inspiration of medieval poetry and philosophy but even a part of e...(read more)

Hobson, Jacob

190/11

Research Seminar:
Andrew Marvell

TTh 5-6:30

An intensive study of Marvell's poetry and prose. Students will complete a final research paper of 15-20 pages. 

All readings will be made available on the course site.

This section of English 190 satisfies the pre-...(read more)

Picciotto, Joanna M

190/12

Research Seminar:
California Books and Movies Since World War I

Tues. 5-8:30 (incl. 1/2 hr. break)

Besides reading and discussing some fiction and poetry with Western settings, and essays that attempt to identify or explain distinctive regional characteristics, this course will consider various movies shaped by and shaping conceptions of Califor...(read more)

Starr, George A.

190/13

Research Seminar:
Alfred Hitchcock

W 4-7:30 (incl. a 1/2-hour break)

This course will focus on the Hitchcock oeuvre from the early British through the American period, with emphasis on analysis of cinematic representation of crime, victimhood, and the investigation of guilt. Our discussions and critical readings wil...(read more)

Bader, Julia

H195B/1

Honors Course

TTh 3:30-5

This course is a continuation of H195A section 1, taught by Dorothy Hale in Fall 2017.  No new students will be admitted.  No new application needs to be submitted.  Professor Hale will give out permission codes in&nbs...(read more)

Hale, Dorothy J.

H195B/2

Honors Course

MW 12:30-2

This course is a continuation of H195A section 2, taught by Namwali Serpell in Fall 2017.  No new students will be admitted.  No new application needs to be submitted.  Professor Serpell will give out permission codes in class in Nov...(read more)

Serpell, C. Namwali

203/1

Graduate Readings:
Radical Enlightenment?

Note new time: TTh 9:30-11

Channeling the voice of his own Enlightened despot, Kant’s famous answer to the question “What is Enlightenment?” included the chilling injunction to “argue as much as you want and about whatever you want, ...(read more)

Goldstein, Amanda Jo

203/2

Graduate Readings:
The Novel in Theory

TTh 11-12:30

This course traces the development of novel theory in the twentieth century.  Designed as an introduction to major arguments that are still influential in literary studies generally, the course asks why so many different theoretical schools ha...(read more)

Hale, Dorothy J.

203/3

Graduate Readings:
Prospectus and Grant Workshop

TTh 11-12:30

This workshop is intended for graduate students who are currently working on proposals for major research projects, especially for large multi-year projects such as the doctoral dissertation or long-term grants or fellowships. We will deal with the...(read more)

Thornbury, Emily V.

203/4

Graduate Readings:
Digital Humanities for Medieval Studies

Note new time: TTh 2-3:30

This course serves as an introduction to the practice of digital humanities in the field of Medieval Studies. The goals of the course are threefold:

  • to explore the conceptual terrain of digital humanities and to become familiar wi...(read more)
Nolan, Maura

203/5

Graduate Readings:
Contemporary Chicanx/Latinx Novels

TTh 2-3:30

In this course, we’ll examine narrative form in several Chicanx/Latinx novels, focusing on the role of problematic narrators. We’ll explore the specific ways that these novels tend to reify the social world through the eyes and voice of...(read more)

Gonzalez, Marcial

250/2

Research Seminar:
Ways of Knowing, Ways of Representing in Eighteenth-Century English Fiction

Tues. 3:30-6:30

In this course we will read the early English fiction once associated with “the rise of the novel” with a view to the strategies this writing deployed to address new epistemological challenges. An expanding empire, an urbanizing nation ...(read more)

Sorensen, Janet

250/3

Research Seminar:
Milton and the English Civil War

W 3-6

An introduction to the literature of the English civil war and following decades, focusing on the work of John Milton, but including the work of Henry Parker, Thomas Hobbes, Andrew Marvell, Margaret Cavendish, Katherine Phillips, Lucy Hutchinson, &...(read more)

Kahn, Victoria

250/4

Research Seminar:
The Rhetoric of Technique

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

“Sex is boring,” Foucault declared in an interview published posthumously in 1986, before expressing his interest in those “intentional and voluntary actions by which men […] make their life an oeuvre that car...(read more)

Lavery, Grace

250/5

Research Seminar:
Black Abstraction

F 12-3

This course bears a distinct title, Black Abstraction, the strikeout meant to indicate the degree to which the blackness in "black abstraction" remains perennially subject to question.  The course will inquire into the ways in...(read more)

Best, Stephen M.

310/1

Field Studies in Tutoring Writing

TBA

Through seminars, discussions, and reading assignments, students are introduced to the language/writing/literacy needs of diverse college-age writers such as the developing, bi-dialectal, and non-native English-speaking (NNS) writer. The course wil...(read more)

No instructor assigned yet.

PLEASE READ CAREFULLY ALL THE PARAGRAPHS BELOW THAT APPLY TO ENGLISH COURSES IN WHICH YOU WANT TO ENROLL. SOME COURSES HAVE LIMITED ENROLLMENT AND/OR HAVE EARLY APPLICATION PROCEDURES.

ALL ENGLISH COURSES: Some courses are in such high demand that they will end up having wait lists. If you end up having to put yourself on one for an English course, please attend the first few classes, as space might open up for you after classes have started.

BERKELEY CONNECT: Would you like to get together with your peers to talk about literature and books? Are you wondering what to do with your English major once you graduate? Do you want to hear about the books that most influenced your English professors? Do you want expert advice about which courses to take? Would you like to see your favorite professors debating about a great work of literature? If so, please join Berkeley Connect!

Berkeley Connect in English fosters community in the English Department and offers a space for “serious play”: small group discussions about ideas and texts, explorations of the many riches of the Berkeley campus, visits by department faculty and distinguished alumni, and one-on-one advice on courses and graduate programs from graduate students and professors.

Individual Berkeley Connect groups (each with about 15-20 students) meet every other week for one hour of “serious play.” On the off weeks, your graduate student mentor will hold office hours so that you can talk individually about issues important to you. Some of the small group meetings will be informal discussions of a range of literary issues, while others involve visits to places around campus (such as the Berkeley Art Museum and the Bancroft Library). On other weeks we will meet as a large group to hear from distinguished alumni, or to listen to Berkeley English professors talk about their own paths into literary study or debate key books in their field with other professors.

There are no essays, papers, exams, or outside reading for Berkeley Connect, just lots of good discussion, valuable advice, and all sorts of “serious play.” Although this is not a traditional course, each participant will enroll in and earn one unit for group independent study (as English 98BC or 198BC, on a Pass/NP basis). The program is not meant to offer extra help or tutoring on things like the mechanics of paper-writing or literary analysis; rather, it aims at providing a more relaxed and fun way to make the best of your Berkeley experience.

Berkeley Connect in English sections:  English 98BC sections 1-3 are intended for lower-division (freshmen and sophomore) students.  English 198BC sections 1-2 and 5-9 are intended for upper-division (junior and senior) students, while English 198BC sections 3 and 4 are intended for new (spring) junior transfer students as well as other juniors and seniors.

CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP COURSES (English 43B, 143A, 143B, and 143N): These are instructor-approved courses, and enrollment is limited.  Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligible to apply.  Only lower-division students should apply for 43B; only upper-division students should apply for 143A, 143B, and 143N.  In order to be considered for admission to any of these courses, you must electronically submit a writing sample AND an application form, using the link on the corresponding class entry on this "Announcement of Classes," BY 11 P.M., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 26, AT THE LATEST.  (If you are applying for more than one of these classes, you will need to submit an application and the corresponding writing sample for each of the classes/sections you are applying for.)  The instructors will review the writing samples and applications, and the class lists will be posted on the bulletin board in the hall just across from the entrance to the English Department main office (322 Wheeler Hall) on Thursday, November 2. Please come on or shortly after Thursday, November 2, to see if your name is on the class list for the section(s) you applied for; please check in person, as this information is NOT available over the phone. ONLY STUDENTS ON THESE CLASS LISTS WILL BE ADMITTED TO THE CORRESPONDING CLASSES, AND EACH ADMITTED STUDENT WILL NEED TO OBTAIN HIS/HER INDIVIDUAL PERMISSION CODE FROM THE INSTRUCTOR AT THE FIRST CLASS MEETING. NO ONE WILL THEREFORE BE ABLE TO ACTUALLY ENROLL IN THESE PARTICULAR CLASSES BEFORE THESE CLASSES START MEETING IN THE SPRING.

ENGLISH 190 (RESEARCH SEMINAR): English 190 is intended for senior and junior English majors. During at least Phase I of enrollment, only already-declared majors who will be in their fourth or third year as of Spring '18 will be able to enroll in this course; upper-division students who intend to major in English and have taken some courses that will count towards the major but who have not yet declared will need to put themselves on the wait list of the section they are interested in taking, and they will be admitted later (probably towards the end of Phase II) if and when there is still room for them. Due to space limitations (maximum enrollment is 18 students per section), students may initially enroll in or wait-list themselves for only one section of English 190. However, if it turns out that some sections still have room in them at or near the end of Phase II appointments, we may loosen the restrictions for admission to those sections.

ENGLISH H195B (HONORS COURSE): This course is open only to students who are enrolled in a Fall 2017 English H195A section. Your H195A instructor will give each of you a permission code for H195B in class sometime in November.

DE-CAL CLASSES: All proposals for Spring 2018 DE-Cal courses must be submitted to the work-study student at the front desk of the English Department main office (322 Wheeler Hall), addressed to the attention of the Chair of the English Department, BY 4:00 P.M., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 26. Please note that individual faculty members may sponsor only one DE-Cal course per semester. Students wishing to offer a DE-Cal course must provide, to the English Department Chair, the following for approval: (1) a completed COCI Special Studies Course Proposal Form, available on the COCI website at http://academic-senate.berkeley.edu/committees/coci/sfc, for 98 and 198 classes. (Note that the form has been recently revised, and there are some new requirements, so please be sure to use this latest version.) Students must download and complete this form and obtain the proposed faculty sponsor’s signature on it before submitting it, along with the other necessary paperwork: (2) a letter of support from the faculty sponsor; (3) a copy of the syllabus of the proposed course; (4) a copy of the course description, including the criteria for passing the course; (5) a unit value worksheet (obtainable by following these steps: log onto: academic-senate.berkeley.edu; click "committees" [in the left-hand toolbar]; click "COCI"; click "Information on student-facilitated courses"; scroll down and click "unit value worksheet"). A few days after the October 26 submission deadline, the students whose proposals have been approved will be notified that they need to see Laurie Kerr, in 322 Wheeler, in order to arrange for a classroom for their course and to work out a few other details before the submission of copies of their approved proposals to COCI and to DE-Cal.

INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSES: These are instructor-approved courses and require a written petition, available from the front desk in the English Department's advising office (319 Wheeler). Completed petitions should be signed by the instructor and returned by the student to the "undergraduate petitions" drop box on the same counter as the rack containing the blank petition forms. Students will subsequently be emailed the Class Number that they will use to actually enroll in the class. Often students will elect to wait until spring courses have started to apply for independent study courses.

UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE STUDENTS INTERESTED IN BECOMING WRITING TUTORS (ENGLISH 310): This is an instructor-approved course with limited enrollment. In order to be considered for admission, you must pick up an application for an interview at the Student Learning Center, Atrium, in the Cesar Chavez Student Center, during the fall semester through finals week or during the week before spring semester classes begin. No one may apply after Wednesday of the first week of classes. Students admitted to 310 will need to appear in person at the Student Learning Center, at the time the Learning Center specifies, in order to obtain the Class Number and then enroll. See the course description in this Announcement of Classes under English 310 for more details.