Announcement of Classes: Spring 2008

The Announcement of Classes is available one week before Tele-Bears begins every semester. Creative Writing and (for fall) Honors Course applications are available at the same time in the racks outside of 322 Wheeler Hall.
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

R1A /1

Reading & Composition:
Knocking Words Together, or Playing with Words

MWF 12-1

"�So, thought Septimus, looking up, they are signaling to me. Not indeed in actual words; that is, he could not read the language yet; but it was plain enough, this beauty, this exquisite beauty, and tears filled his eyes as he looked at the smoke wor...(read more) David Menilla

R1A /2

Reading & Composition:
Writing the Civil War

MWF 3-4

"This course will explore writing in two ways: first, by examining how literary responses to the Civil War have shaped, and continue to shape, Americans� sense of racial and national history; and second, by studying the process of argumentative exposi...(read more) Cody Marrs

R1A /3

Reading & Composition:
"Games in Narrative/Games as Narrative

"

MW 4-5:30

"The R1 series is built to hone your critical thinking, and to train you in the basic reading and composition techniques necessary to organize, sharpen, and communicate that thinking. Each section is formed around a discussion topic; since anything in...(read more) Matthew Sergi

R1A /4

Reading & Composition:
Writing from Memory

TTh 8-9:30

"At the beginning of Trout Fishing in America, Richard Brautigan frets over accurately remembering and recording his own memories, saying, �I�d like to get it right.� What does this mean? �Getting it right� may not always mean reporting it the way it ...(read more) Marisa Libbon

R1A /5

Reading & Composition:
Representations of Slavery in British Literature

TTh 9:30-11:00

"Is it ethical, or even possible, to represent the trauma of slavery in the form of literature? Though representations of slavery are inherently problematic, they are an important part of British literary tradition. In this course, we will examine rep...(read more) Jhoanna Infante

R1A /6

Reading & Composition:
Amnesia and Anamnesis

TTh 11-12:30

"A narrative trope and a metaphor for fractured identity, the condition of amnesia has taken on cultural weight. Memory is coded as progress; haunted by the warning that �those who forget history are doomed to repeat it,� we as a society struggle to l...(read more) Talissa Ford

R1A /7

Reading & Composition:
Caribbean Voices

TTh 12:30-2:00

"By foregrounding the concept of voice, this course addresses the dual goal of Reading & Composition courses -- to improve students� written and oral expression. Early in the twentieth century, the voices of writers and artists from the British co...(read more) Kea Anderson

R1A /8

Reading & Composition:
The Uses of Art

TTH 2-3:30

"This is a composition class loosely structured around the (admittedly huge) question of what art does for us personally and for the culture as a whole. Why do we respond to certain music or movies or novels and not others? What governs the art trends...(read more) Monica Soare

R1A /9

Reading & Composition:
Identity in Modern Fiction

TTh 5-6:30

"This class will focus on developing critical reading and writing skills through the study of modern fiction. The main point of entry for our texts will be the complex issue of personal identity, which we will examine from several different angles ove...(read more) Gordon, Zachary
Zach Gordon

R1B/1

Reading & Composition:
Bay Area Social Movements and Literatures

MWF 9-10

"Alfred Arteaga, Imamu Amiri Baraka, Elaine Brown, Angela Davis, Allen Ginsberg, Thom Gunn, Robert Hass, Lyn Hejinian, Janice Gould, June Jordan, Cherr�e Moraga, Maxine Hong Kingston, Huey P. Newton, Ishmael Reed, Sonia Sanchez, Amy Tan.Course Descrip...(read more) Marcelle Maese-Cohen

R1B/2

Reading & Composition:
Egypt in the Cultural Memory of the West

MWF 10-11

Various myths and constructions of Egypt have been centrally important to the cultural development of the Western tradition from antiquity to the present. Egypt has often been viewed in a highly conflicted manner as both a land of idolatry and magic a...(read more) Marques Redd

R1B/3

Reading & Composition:
What�s So New About New Media?

MWF 10-11

"This course will continue to develop and polish the critical thinking and writing skills introduced in English 1A. Through the primary works of the class, we will refine close reading, analysis, argumentation and organization. In addition, we will en...(read more) Franklin Melendez

R1B/4

Reading & Composition:
Reading Closely and Writing

MWF 11-12

In this course we will read closely and write about markedly different kinds of literature � a novel, verse, a couple short stories, a play � with the aim of coming to some conclusions about what makes great literature great. The reading list is thus ...(read more) Joseph Jordan

R1B/5

Reading & Composition:
T.B.A.

MWF 11-12

"The reader of science fiction often finds him or herself venturing into a world where the rules of the reader�s reality simply don�t apply: lands inhabited by alien species and races, existing in prehistoric or futuristic eras; societies governed by ...(read more) Tiffany Tsao

R1B/6

Reading & Composition:
Victorian Mysteries

MWF 12-1

"In this class, we will read mystery stories written during the Victorian era, and we will approach Victorian culture as a mystery to be explored through students� own research into the laws and culture of this period (1837-1901). We will develop a se...(read more) Karen Leibowitz

R1B/7

Reading & Composition:
War and Literary Form

MWF 1-2

"This course will explore the connections between war and literary form, with a general focus on 20 th century literature written in English. We will consider how writers represent war in explicit and implicit ways, how various literary genres set up ...(read more) Marguerite Nguyen

R1B/8

Reading & Composition:
Truth and Fiction

MWF 1-2

"This course will examine the relationship between truth and fiction in literature and film. Some of these works dramatize real events; others show the impact that stories have on their readers and authors. What do we seek from fictional works�how do ...(read more) Misa Oyama

R1B/9

Reading & Composition:
Literature and the History of the Senses

MWF 2-3

"Scholars used to assume that the number, function, and ranking of the senses were determined entirely by biology and, therefore, were among the only constants of human experience across different cultures and throughout the centuries. However, in the...(read more) Tracy Auclair

R1B/10

Reading & Composition:
Travels with America

MWF 2-3

"Is globalism really a new thing for America? The colonization and settlement of the Americas was the first time that people from four continents were all part of the same ""global"" economic system, a system defined by immigration and put into place ...(read more) Aaron Bady

R1B/11

Reading & Composition:
�Horseman, Pass By�: Crossing Over in the Southwest

MWF 3-4

"What is it about the American Southwest � a region famed for sweeping vistas, a vibrant syncretic culture, and prickly traditions of independence � that perennially fascinates people of all ages and backgrounds? This course will attempt a literary an...(read more) Bradford Boyd

R1B/12

Reading & Composition:
Mobility, Identity, and the Law

MW 4-5:30

"From affirmative action to enemy combatants, �identity� and legally-supported identifications maintain important yet often-challenged positions within our society. In this course we will utilize readings, class discussions, group work, and essays to ...(read more) Aurelio Perez

R1B/13

Reading & Composition:
The Art of Stasis

TTh 8-9:30

"This class will focus on literary texts which use various representational strategies to depict scenes of personal and social stasis. With each text, we will return to a central question: How does this author represent stasis? We will also often ask ...(read more) Sumner, Charles

R1B/14

Reading & Composition:
Talking Normal: Speech Disorders and Disability in the 20 th Century

TTh 9:30-11

"This course explores the numerous conflicted and contradictory ways in which speech disorders have been represented in twentieth century literature. We will engage with texts from a range of genres including novels, plays, nonfiction memoirs, essays ...(read more) Chris Eagle

R1B/15

Reading & Composition:
Boredom

TuTh 11-12:30

"�Boredom,� E.M. Cioran writes, �is the echo in us of time tearing itself apart�the revelation of the void, the drying up of that delirium which sustains�or invents�life.� Cioran is just one of many writers convinced that the seemingly unremarkable ph...(read more) Ayon Roy

R1B/16

Reading & Composition:
Worlds Apart in Shakespeare

TTh 12:30-2

"Shakespeare�s plays often project stereoptic visions of worlds set apart from the geographical center of the dramatic action. These removed places, like Arden forest in As You Like It, the realm of fairies in A Midsummer Night�s Dream, or romantic Be...(read more) Joseph Ring

R1B/17

Reading & Composition:
The Russian Short Story

TTh 3:30-5

"This is a writing course whose main objective is to turn you into competent writers of academic prose. However, since we need a subject to write about, I decided on one I am interested in and which, I hope, will be of interest to you: short stories b...(read more) Vitaliy Eyber

R1B/18

Reading & Composition:
Consciousness and Feeling in Narrative

TTh, 3:30-5

"This course takes on a basic assumption about the experience of reading literature: namely, that we not only feel and experience emotions when we read, but also that the narratives we encounter in literature seem to house feelings and forms of consci...(read more) Ryan P. McDermott

R1B/19

Reading & Composition:
Literature in a Time of War

MWF 9-10

"In your writing for this course, you will try to come up with an answer to one question: what does literature say or tell us about war? Some poets glorify or rationalize war, while others protest. For still others, a work of literature does not say a...(read more) Charles Legere
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

24/1

Freshman Seminar:
Visual Culture and Autobiography

W 5-8 P.M.

Visual culture is not just about pictures, but the (post) �modern tendency to picture or visualize experience��what W.J.T. Mitchell calls �the pictorial turn.� Not surprisingly, as contemporary writers and artists struggle to find forms that convey po...(read more) Wong, Hertha D. Sweet
Wong, Hertha

25/1

Freshman Seminar:
English as a Language

TTh 11-12:3

This course examines the English language as a particular instance of the general phenomenon of human language. We will consider aspects of its phonology (sound structure), morphology (word structure), syntax (sentence structure) and semantics (lingui...(read more) Hanson, Kristin
Hanson, Kristin

31AC/1

Literature of American Cultures:
Passing

TTh 12:30-2

"A passing narrative is an account�fiction or nonfiction�of a person or group claiming a racial or ethnic identity that they do not ""possess."" Such narratives speak�directly, indirectly, and very uneasily�to the authenticity, the ambiguity, and the ...(read more) Giscombe, Cecil S.
Giscombe, Cecil S.

43B/1

Lower Division English:
Introduction to the Writing of Verse

TTh 11-12:30

This workshop will teach various approaches toward the writing of verse. In addition to weekly writing assignments, students will read a range of poetry and essays, and will be encouraged to attend local poetry readings. ...(read more) Fisher, Jessica
Fisher, Jessica

45A/1

Literature in English:
Through Milton

Lectures MW 12-1, plus one hour of discussion section per week

This course is an introduction to major works by Chaucer, Spenser, Marlowe, and Milton, with supplemental poetry from a class reader. In each case I will ask you to consider both the strangeness and the odd familiarity of these works, so far away from...(read more) Adelman, Janet
Adelman, Janet

45A/2

Literature in English:
Through Milton

MW 2-3, plus one hour of discussion section per week

This class introduces students to the production of poetic narrative in English through the close study of major works in that tradition: The Canterbury Tales, The Faerie Queene, Doctor Faustus, and Paradise Lost. Each of these texts reflects differen...(read more) Justice, Steven
Justice, Steven

45B/1

Literature in English:
Late-17 th Through the Mid-19 th Century

MW 1-2, plus one hour of discussion section per week

This course traces the expansion and transformation of English literature, from an insular cultural form to an incipient global fact, from a writing produced in England to a writing produced in English. We will begin in the wake of one civil war, in E...(read more) Blanton, Dan

45B/2

Literature in English:
Late-17 th Through the Mid-19 th Century

MW 3-4, Section F 3-4

I will lecture on the cataclysmic rise of bourgeois modernity as it registers in English and American literature during the period 1660-1860. I will emphasize the mixture of euphoria, wonder, deprivation and anxiety that this transformation provokes, ...(read more) Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell

45C/1

Literature in English:
Mid-19 th Through the 20 th Century

MW 9-10, F 9-10

This survey course of literature in English from the mid-nineteenth century to the present will consider a variety of literary forms and movements in their historical and cultural contexts. We�ll read literature in English not only by English and Euro...(read more) Wong, Hertha D. Sweet
Wong, Hertha

45C/2

Literature in English:
Mid-19 th Through the 20 th Century

MW 11-12, F 11-12

This course is an introduction to literature written in English mainly between the late 19 th century and the late 20 th century. There will be two kinds of emphases running through the course�one paid to the formal innovations credited to the signifi...(read more) Lye, Colleen
Lye, Colleen

R50/1

Freshman and Sophomore Studies:
Visions and Revisions

TTh 2-3:30

"This course begins with the premise that literary texts make their meanings in dialogue with one another and in engagement with their social and cultural contexts. We will be reading three nineteenth-century works alongside late-twentieth-century ada...(read more) Goodwin, Peter
Goodwin, Peter

R50/2

Freshman and Sophomore Studies:
Short & Sweet

TTh 5-6:30

"This course continues your R1A training in the systematic practice of reading and writing, with the aim of developing your fluency through longer expository papers and the incorporation of research into argumentation. You will be responsible for writ...(read more) Bartlett, Jami L
Bartlett, Jami

80K/1

Freshman and Sophomore Studies:
Children�s Literature

TTh 9:30-11

This course will explore the complex and controversial issues that arise around a literature defined by its audience. We'll read British and American children's books from the 19th century to the present as well as a wide range of critical commentary....(read more) Wright, Katharine E.
Wright, Katharine

84/1

Freshman and Sophomore Studies:
High Culture / Low Culture: Comedy and the Films of Woody Allen

Thurs. 2-5

We will examine the films and writings of Woody Allen in terms of themes, narration, comic and visual inventiveness and ideology. The course will also include a consideration of cultural contexts and events at Cal Performances and the Pacific Film Arc...(read more) Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

100/1

Junior Seminar:
Chicano/a Novels and the Law

MW 9:30-11

This course will examine representations of working-class characters and their encounters with the law in several Chicana and Chicano novels. Some of these novels were written by lawyers. Others are narrated from the perspective of a lawyer. All of th...(read more) Gonzalez, Marcial
Gonzalez, Marcial

100/3

Junior Seminar:
Novel Genealogies�Balzac, Eliot, and James

MW 4-5:30

In an 1873 letter to Grace Norton, Henry James writes, �To produce some little exemplary works of art is my narrow and lowly dream. They are to have less �brain� than Middlemarch; but (I boldly proclaim it) they are to have more form.� For the young...(read more) Puckett, Kent
Puckett , Kent

100/4

Junior Seminar:
Representing the Holocaust�A Question of Genre

MW 4-5:30

The German philosopher Theodor Adorno made the famous comment that to write poetry after Auschwitz was barbaric�but not to produce it even more barbarous. Of course, Adorno referred to �poetry� in the metaphorical sense, connoting artistic representat...(read more) Liu, Sarah

100/5

Junior Seminar:
American Captivity Narratives

TTh 9:30-11

The captivity narrative is the first literary genre that might be called uniquely �American.� Although its standard protagonist was a white woman kidnapped by Indians, American captivity narratives also related the troubles of sailors and pirates at s...(read more) Donegan, Kathleen
Donegan, Kathleen

100/6

Junior Seminar:
The Culture of Efficiency�Literature and Popular Culture in Early-Twentieth-Century America

TTh 9:30-11

"This course will examine the origins and, more specifically, the cultural consequences of America's fascination with efficiency, with what has been called ""a secular Great Awakening, an outpouring of ideas and emotions in which a gospel of efficienc...(read more) McQuade, Donald
McQuade, Don

100/7

Junior Seminar:
19th-Century African-American Women Writers

TTh 11-12:30

"This course surveys a variety of writing by early African-American women writers, both south and north, primarily of the nineteenth century. Readings include slave narrative, spiritual autobiography, memoir, journal writing, abolitionist and feminist...(read more) Beam, Dorri
Beam, Dorri

100/9

Junior Seminar:
Mark Twain

TTh 12:30-2

Reading , discussion, and writing about the works, life and times of Mark Twain. The primary texts will include a selection of short stories and sketches by Mark Twain and earlier humorists of the �Old Southwest� and the West; The Innocents Abroad; Ro...(read more) Starr, George A.
Starr, George

100/10

Junior Seminar:
Emily Dickinson

TTh 12:30-2

This is an intensive course in the poetry of Emily Dickinson. We will learn how to read (to describe and interpret) her poems, along with her letters and a biography, deeply but also broadly throughout her career. Topics include early poetry; poetic r...(read more) Shoptaw, John
Shoptaw, John

100/12

Junior Seminar:
F. Scott Fitzgerald and Ernest Hemingway

TTh 2-3:30

In this seminar, we will read extensively and intensively in the fiction of these two iconic American modernists. We will attend especially to the ways that issues of gender, both femininity and masculinity, inform Fitzgerald�s and Hemingway�s writing...(read more) Snyder, Katie

100/14

Junior Seminar:
Why Do We Cry? The Literature of Sorrow, Sympathy, and Indifference

TTh 3:30-5

�Why do we cry?� asks Jerome Neu. �My short answer is: because we think.� Neu, like many other philosophers, believes emotions express intelligence rather than physiology. In this class, we will test Neu�s proposition, first by considering some promin...(read more) Goldsmith, Steven
Goldsmith, Steven

100/15

Junior Seminar:
Nonsense

TTh 3:30-5

This course will justify the indulgence of re-reading of favorite children's books by exploring two dimensions of nonsense literature in general. One is its extreme foregrounding of linguistic structure, including verse structure, a characteristic sha...(read more) Hanson, Kristin
Hanson, Kristin

100/16

Junior Seminar:
Chicano Narrative�New Mexico/California

TTh 3:30-5

"This course will study the historical and ideological formation of Chicano narrative in two regions. Chicano narrative in New Mexico is suffused with the iconography of Spanish colonial history, religious imagery and ritual, open and communal space r...(read more) Padilla, Genaro M.
Padilla, Genaro

100/17

Junior Seminar:
Asian American Melodrama

MW 4-5:30

This course examines melodrama�s role in dramatizing Asians in American literature, theater, and film. Since Madame Butterfly and Fu Manchu, melodrama has been the most popular mode for casting Asians as victims and villains, but it has also been a wa...(read more) Oyama, Misa
Oyama, Misa

100/18

Junior Seminar:
Film Melodrama

"MW 5:30-7 P.M, plus weekly film screenings<br><br>M 7-10 P.M."

We will focus on a range of film melodramas from early silents to contemporary examples, analyzing melodrama�s relationship to the body, the family, gender roles, excess and spectacle. We will be interested in melodrama and modernity, and in the genre...(read more) Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia

112/1

:
Middle English Literature

MWF 2-3

This course will survey Middle English literature, excluding Chaucer, beginning with the earliest Middle English texts and ending with Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. We will focus on language, translation, and close reading to start, leading up to a...(read more) Nolan, Maura
Nolan, Maura

117B/1

:
Shakespeare

TTh 11-12:30

This course treats the second half of Shakespeare�s career, focusing on the major tragedies, the so-called �problem plays� and romances. Our general approach will be to read each text closely and with attention to the socio-historical issues at play. ...(read more) Nishimura, Kimiko
Nishimura, Kimiko

118/1

:
Milton

MWF 12-1

A survey of John Milton�s career, a life-long effort to unite intellectual, political, and artistic experimentation. There will be two short papers and a final exam....(read more) Picciotto, Joanna M
Picciotto, Joanna

120/1

:
Scotland in the Eighteenth Century

TTh 2-3:30

The official title for this course is �The Age of Johnson.� Although we�ll be reading Samuel Johnson�s masterpiece of philosophical tourism, A Journey to the Western Islands of Scotland, this is not a course on �the age of Johnson� but on writing in S...(read more) Sorensen, Janet
Sorensen, Janet

121/1

:
The Romantic Period

MWF 11-12

"In 1796, Samuel Taylor Coleridge published a poem in the Monthly Magazine with an odd subtitle: ""A Poem which affects not to be Poetry."" Why write a poem that doesn�t want to seem like a poem? Literature since that time has been in conversation wit...(read more) Langan, Celeste
Langan, Celeste

122/1

:
The Victorian Period

MWF 12-1

This course is an introduction to the literature and culture of the Victorian period. Victorian poets, novelists, and critics responded to rapid industrial growth, colonial expansion, and profound developments in science, technology, and social life w...(read more) Puckett, Kent
Puckett , Kent

125C/1

:
The European Novel: History and the Novel

TTh 9:30-11

Focusing on key texts from English, French, and Russian traditions, this course examines how the genre of the novel approaches and appropriates historical material as well as reflects its own particular historical contexts. We will consider 5 European...(read more) Golburt, Luba

125D/1

:
The Twentieth -Century Novel

TTh 12:30-2

By reading one of the most significant 20 th-century novels in detail, the course will attempt to answer questions about the thematic concerns and formal techniques of modernism. The relationships between changing conceptions of language and desire, o...(read more) Bernstein, Michael A.
Bernstein, Michael

130A/1

American Literature:
Before 1800

TTh 3:30-5

"This course will offer a survey of the literature produced in North America before 1800: European accounts of ""discovery"" and exploration; competing British versions of settlement; Puritan history, sermons, and poetry; conversion, captivity, and sl...(read more) Otter, Sam

130C/1

American Literature:
1865-1900

TTh 2-3:30

"American Literature Between the Wars (Civil and World War One). This course will survey American Literature from the Civil War into the early twentieth century in order to explore the ways in which changes wrought on the American landscape by war, ur...(read more) Fielding, John David
Fielding, John

131/1

American Literature:
American Poetry

TTh 9:30-11

This is a survey of American poetry from its beginnings to the present. We will spend particular time on Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, the modernist poets of the first half of the 20th century, the Harlem Renaissance, the Beat Generation and the Poet...(read more) Hass, Robert L.
Hass, Robert

134/1

Contemporary Literature:
Contemporary Literature

MW 3-4, Discussion F 3-4

We will sketch the far-flung field of contemporary British literature, closely reading some key texts written since the end of World War II. In addition to paying careful attention to varieties of poetic form and narrative style, we will think through...(read more) Falci, Eric
Falci, Eric

135AC/1

Literature of American Cultures:
Native American, African American, and European American Literature, 1865-1917

MWF 10-11

This is a course on Native American, African American and European American writers in the Gilded Age, roughly from the end of the Civil War to the beginning of World War I. I am especially interested in these writers� responses to the extensive and p...(read more) Hutson, Richard
Hutson, Richard

C136/1

Topics In American Studies:
The U.S. in the Progressive Era, 1890-1917

MWF 2-3

This is an introduction to a number of cultural/political/economic/social issues from a �transitional� period of the United States between the rise of industrial capitalism (big corporate businesses and huge urban centers) in the late-19 th century an...(read more) Hutson, Richard
Hutson, Richard

138/1

Studies in World Literature in English:
Postcolonial Narrative

TTh 11-12:30

At the midpoint of the twentieth century much of the world was still ruled by a handful of European colonial powers. Today nearly all the world is comprised of formally independent nations. This course will consider the literature that has arisen as p...(read more) Premnath, Gautam
Premnath, Gautam

139/1

The Cultures of English:
The African Novel

TTh 2-3:30

In this course we will examine the history of the African novel, from narratives of exploration, colonial dominance, and ethnographic encounter to the reassertion of tribal, ancestral, linguistic legitimacy in the late- and post-colonial novel. We wil...(read more) Jones, Donna V.
Jones, Donna

143A/1

American Literature:
Short Fiction

MW 1:30-3

"A short fiction workshop. Over the course of the semester, each student will write and revise two stories. Each participant in the workshop will edit student-written stories, and will write a formal critique of each manuscript. Students are required ...(read more) Chandra, Vikram
Chandra, Vikram

143B/1

Verse:
Verse

TTh 9:30-11

In this course you will conduct a progressive series of experiments in which you will explore the fundamental options for writing poetry today�aperture, partition, closure; rhythmic sound patterning; sentence & line; stanza; short & long-lined...(read more) Shoptaw, John
Shoptaw, John

143B/2

Verse:
Verse

TTh 3:30-5

The purpose of this class will be to produce an unfinished language in which to treat poetry. Writing your own poems will be a part of this task, but it will also require readings in contemporary poetry and essays in poetics, as well as some writing d...(read more) O�Brien, Geoffrey

143B/3

Verse:
Docents of the Expanded Field

W 3-6

This class will mine site-specific writing and post-conceptual art. Collectively we�ll develop a critical vocabulary through readings; individually students will pursue forms of experimental research that will inform their own projects. Our readings w...(read more) Shaw, Lytle

143N/1

Prose Nonfiction:
Traveling, Thinking, Writing

TTh 9:30-11

"Much of American literature has had to do with a sense of motion. Note the journeys, e.g., in the best known texts of Melville and Twain. But note also that Harlemite Langston Hughes� autobiography, The Big Sea, begins on a boat and details his adven...(read more) Giscombe, Cecil S.
Giscombe, Cecil

143N/2

Prose Nonfiction:
The Personal Essay

TTh 12:30-2:00

This workshop course concentrates on the form, theory and practice of creative nonfiction, particularly on the writing of the personal essay. Students are required to fulfill specific assignments and to write 45 pages of nonfictional narrative....(read more) Mukherjee, Bharati
Mukherjee, Bharati

143N/3

Prose Nonfiction:
The Personal Essay

M 3-6

This class will be conducted as a writing workshop to explore the art and craft of the personal essay. We will closely examine the essays in Phillip Lopate�s anthology, as well as students� exercises and essays. Writing assignments will include three ...(read more) Kleege , Georgia

143T/1

Poetry Translation:
Poetry Translation Workshop

TTh 12:30-2

The purpose of the class is to give students a chance to work on verse translation, to share translations and give and receive feedback on their work, to read about the theory and practice of translation, and perhaps to try out different practices and...(read more) Hass, Robert L.
Hass, Robert

Graduate students from other departments and exceptionally well-prepared undergraduates are welcome in English graduate courses (except for English 200 and 375) insofar as limitations of class size allow. Graduate courses are usually limited to 15 students; courses numbered 250 are usually limited to 10.

When demand for a graduate course exceeds the maximum enrollment limit, the instructor will determine priorities for enrollment and inform students of his/her decisions at the second class meeting. Prior enrollment does not guarantee a place in a graduate course that turns out to be oversubscribed on the first day of class; fortunately, this situation does not arise very often.

Course #
Instructor
Course Area

202/1

History of Literary Criticism:
Critical Realism

W 3:30-6:30

This course in the �History of Literary Criticism� will be an intensively focused and partial survey of the dialectic of formalism and historicism in the history of literary (and aesthetic) criticism. A core focus of the course will be the theoretical...(read more) Lye, Colleen
Lye, Colleen

203/1

Graduate Readings:
Disability in Theory

TTh 11-12:30

Disability Studies as it has emerged in the academy in the last decade is a multidisciplinary, cross-disciplinary, interdisciplinary field. For complex historical reasons themselves worth exploring, in the United States that field has had particularly...(read more) Schweik, Susan
Schweik, Susan

203/2

Graduate Readings:
Virginia Woolf

TTh 2-3:30

This course will examine the evolution of Woolf�s career across the nearly three decades that define the arc of British modernism. This co-incidence will allow us to theorize the shape of a career and of a literary movement, and to re-read that moveme...(read more) Abel, Elizabeth
Abel, Elizabeth

203/3

Graduate Readings:
American Transcendentalism and American Pragmatism

MW 12:30-2

We will study the (mostly) productive tension between consolidating and dispersing impulses in American philosophical literature. Most of the discussion time will be spent on close reading, but members of the class will on occasion present secondary c...(read more) Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell

203/4

Graduate Readings:
English Fiction to 1800

TTh 9:30-11

As we read a variety of works of eighteenth-century fiction we shall consider a series of revisionist (especially feminist) histories and theories of the early novel. The eighteenth-century British texts we have retroactively named novels often argued...(read more) Sorensen, Janet
Sorensen, Janet

203/5

Graduate Readings:
Modernism in Poetry

Tues. 3:30-6:30

"I am concerned with what the new historical work in modernism puts at risk�the possibility that it has continuing vitality for engaged imaginations because it still does significant affective and intellectual work. I think much of this work derives ...(read more) Altieri, Charles F.
Altieri, Charles

203/6

Graduate Readings:
The Novel and Romanticism

TTh 11-12:30

We will read major works of Gothic, Jacobin, domestic, regional, national and historical fiction, published in Great Britain between 1764 and 1824, in relation to the literary and historical contexts of British Romanticism. Critical readings will be a...(read more) Duncan, Ian
Duncan, Ian

243A/1

Graduate Course:
Fiction Writing Workshop

MW 10:30-12

"A graduate-level fiction workshop. Students will write fiction, produce critiques of work submitted to the workshop, and participate in discussions about the theory and practice of writing. We�ll also read published fiction and essays about writing f...(read more) Chandra, Vikram
Chandra, Vikram

246F/1

Graduate Pro-seminar:
"The Later-Eighteenth Century

"

M 3:30-6:30

This course offers a survey of the period from 1740 to 1800, or from Hume�s new �science of man� to Wordsworth�s account of poetry as the �history or science of feelings.� The many different titles that have affixed themselves to these years (Pre-Roma...(read more) Goodman, Kevis
Goodman, Kevis

246I/1

Graduate Pro-seminar:
American Literature to 1855

TTh 12:30-2

We will consider American prose literature from the late-eighteenth to the mid-nineteenth century in a transatlantic context. We will analyze literary influence as it travels, in some familiar and some surprising ways, between North America and Englan...(read more) Otter, Sam

250/1

Research Seminar:
Form and Style from Chaucer to Spenser

Tues. 3:30-6:30

In this course, we will explore the lyric tradition in English, beginning with Chaucerian lyrics and ending with Spenser�s sonnets. Along the way, we will read poems from figures like Gower, Hoccleve, Lydgate, Charles d�Orleans, Hawes, Barclay, Audela...(read more) Nolan, Maura
Nolan, Maura

250/2

Research Seminar:
Compassion and Representation in Early Modern England

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

How did early modern subjects represent and conceptualize compassion, pity, and sympathy? We will be especially interested in compassion as a complex point of intersection among literary, political, theological, and devotional discourses and practices...(read more) Arnold, Oliver
Arnold, Oliver

250/3

Research Seminar:
Proust

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

A reading of Proust�s Recherche (in the Moncrieff/Kilmartin translation) alongside�and as�a reflection on traditional novel form. ...(read more) Miller, D.A.
Miller, D.A.

250/4

Research Seminar:
A Small Place �Irish Fictions, 1890-2005

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

This course is a survey of Irish literature and culture from the Celtic Revival (1890-1930) to the Celtic Tiger (1990s-present). The Celtic Revival was an upsurge of nationalist sentiment that resulted in the creation of an Irish Republic in defiance...(read more) Rubenstein, Michael
Rubenstein, Michael

310/1

Graduate Course:
Field Studies in Tutoring Writing

T.B.A.

"Through seminars, discussions, and reading assignments, students are introduced to the language/writing/literacy needs of diverse college-age writers such as the developing, bi-dialectal, and non-native English-speaking (NNS) writer. The course will ...(read more) Staff