Announcement of Classes: Fall 2018

Course #
Instructor
Course Area

R1A/1

Reading and Composition:
Party Time

MWF 9-10

This course broadly explores the concept of “party temporalities.” By examining parties as they appear across a range of subgenres and mediums (novels, short stories, plays, film, TV, pop songs), we will think critically about the relat...(read more)

Hu, Jane

R1A/2

Reading and Composition:
Persona and Personality in the English Essay

MWF 10-11

This course will move rapidly through time, navigating the dense and heterogeneous terrains of the essay as a form in English. From the wondrous and choppy syntactical shores of Renaissance prose (Francis Bacon, Erasmus and Mont...(read more)

Swensen, Dana

R1A/3

Reading and Composition:
No Laughing Matter

MWF 11-12

Can comedy be an effective vehicle for social criticism? Or does “having a sense of humor” make social life easier only by helping us ignore life’s more unpleasant aspects? We will consider these questions while reading texts from...(read more)

Eisenberg, Emma C.

R1A/4

Reading and Composition:
Something Resolutely Indefinable: The African-American Novel, the Individual, and Sociological Thought

MWF 12-1

This class will consider how a series of important 20th-century African-American novels confront questions of individual identity, categorization, social definiition. To this end, we shall attend to the complex connection between the tradition of b...(read more)

Creasy, CFS

R1A/5

Reading and Composition:
Materialist Aesthetics

MWF 1-2

Materialism has often been a shared premise and point of confluence between literature and science, even the precondition for any relation between literary and scientific practice. If since the 18th century, aesthetics in the expanded sen...(read more)

Barbour, Andrew John

R1A/6

Reading and Composition:
Pre-Raphaelite Art and Literature

MWF 1-2

This course examines the relationship between literature and art through the lives and works of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood — a revolutionary artistic movement of the mid-nineteenth century — and those in their circle. In addition to...(read more)

Forbes-Macphail, Imogen

R1A/7

Reading and Composition:
The Personal Essay

MWF 2-3

The personal essay and the lyric poem share many qualities: aside from the (not insignificant!) fact that they’re short, they affect both personal intimacy and a supposedly equally intimate relationship to the truth. But the essay is far less...(read more)

Stevenson, Max

R1A/8

Reading and Composition:
Cold War Literature and Culture

MW 5-6:30

This course explores literature and culture from the Cold War era. Topics we will focus on include: how literature represents the threat of nuclear confrontation between global superpowers; the rise (and weaponization) of pop and mass culture; poet...(read more)

Gaydos, Rebecca

R1A/9

Reading & Composition:
Identity as Performance

MWF 9-10

"All the world's a stage, And all the men and women merely players."—As You Like It, Act II Sc. VII

We often hear people say that actions speak louder than words. We express our identities, who we are, ...(read more)

Ghosh, Srijani

R1A/10

Reading & Composition:
Cold War Literature and Culture

MWF 1-2

This course explores literature and culture from the Cold War era. Topics we will focus on include: how literature represents the threat of nuclear confrontation between global superpowers; the rise (and weaponization) of pop and mass culture; poet...(read more)

Gaydos, Rebecca

R1B/1

Reading and Composition:
The Marriage Plot and Its Afterlife

MWF 9-10

The marriage plot novel is seen as a thing of the past, but its influence very much lives on today in our movies, our music, and our notions of romance. This course will examine a series of genre-defining marriage plot novels from the 19th century,...(read more)

Mittnacht, Veronica Vizuet

R1B/2

Reading and Composition:
Comic Relief

MWF 10-11

In this course, we’ll consider the varied uses of comic relief in literature and popular culture, from the therapeutic effects of frivolity to the ingenuity with which comic intelligence brings what has been interpretively foreclosed into sta...(read more)

Chiang, Cheng-Chai

R1B/3

Reading and Composition:
Utopian and Dystopian Fictions

MWF 10-11

What would it be like to live in a perfect world? What could be worse than the world we live in?

This course will trace attempts to answer these questions—and investigate why they have proven so compelling—in English ...(read more)

Homans-Turnbull, Marian

R1B/4

Reading and Composition:
Staging Desire: Sex and Sexuality in Renaissance Drama

MWF 11-12

The drama of Shakespeare and his contemporaries offers a fascinating site for the analysis of gender and sexuality as historical and theoretical constructs, rather than as the timeless and universal ‘facts’ of human experience which the...(read more)

Scott, Mark JR

R1B/5

Reading and Composition:
Started From the Bottom: Masculinity, the American Dream, and the Myth of Starting Over from Horatio Alger to Jay-Z

MWF 11-12

The texts for this course consider the roots and routes of the American Dream and the figure of the “self-made man” in the American cultural imagination over the past 150 years. From American literature to contemporary politics to popul...(read more)

Cruz, Frank Eugene

R1B/6

Reading and Composition:
Stories of Exile and Dislocation

MWF 12-1

This course turns to the experience of exile and its plural representations in texts drawing from the post-Enlightenment to contemporary periods. To open up our line of inquiry, we will reflect upon the following questions: How might exile be ...(read more)

Cho, Jennifer

R1B/7

Reading and Composition:
Nature on the Page

MWF 12-1

In this course, we will examine how relationships between humans and nature are represented; what histories, perceptions, and biases inform such representations; and what the real-world consequences of particular representations may be. We will rea...(read more)

Tomasula y Garcia, Alba

R1B/8

Reading and Composition:
Conspiracy and Detection

MWF 12-1

This course teaches critical analysis and research skills through their doubles: forensic detection and conspiracy theory. We will therefore consider the disciplinary demands of academic writing in tandem with indisciplined forms of knowledge-produ...(read more)

Cohan, Nathan

R1B/9

Reading and Composition:
Romantic Self / Romantic Others

MWF 1-2

What shocks the virtuous philosopher delights the chameleon poet... A poet is the most unpoetical of anything in existence, because he has no identity—he is continually in for and filling some other body.—John Keats, Letter to Richard W...(read more)

O'Connor, Megan

R1B/10

Reading and Composition:
Tricksters and Transformations in the Old, Weird America

MWF 1-2

In this course, we'll examine how authors have imagined and re-imagined the carnivalesque aspects of American life. We'll read stories about con-men, tricksters, wandering ghosts, seducers, conjurers, and other rhetorical magicians. In addi...(read more)

McWilliams, Ryan

R1B/11

Reading and Composition:
The Feeling of Labor

MWF 1-2

This course will take up the changing ways in which work and labor have been depicted in literature and other arts as conditions and conceptions of labor have transformed over time, from subsistence labor to post-industrial prod...(read more)

Walton, Alex

R1B/12

Reading and Composition:
Riddle Me This: Puzzles, Puns, and Palimpsests

MWF 2-3

"Have you guessed the riddle yet?" the Hatter said, turning to Alice again.

"No, I give it up," Alice replied. "What's the answer?"

"I haven't the slightest idea,&...(read more)

Clark, Amy

R1B/13

Reading and Composition:
Re-Visioning the "Sixties"

MWF 2-3

This reading and composition course will explore selected works of literature, music, and visual art produced during the 1960s. Placing emphasis on the relationship between artistic experimentation and social movements of the era, we will ask how i...(read more)

Koerner, Michelle

R1B/14

Reading and Composition:
When Reading Goes Wrong

MW 5-6:30

Every day, we're called upon to make hundreds of interpretive judgments based on things we read, see, or hear. But what happens when we misjudge one of these texts, or when we're unable to judge it at all? Besides being a common element in ...(read more)

Bauer, Mark

R1B/15

Reading and Composition:
Decadent Poetry

MW 5-6:30

“The ballads teem with imagination, they palpitate with emotion. We read them with laughter and tears; the metres throb in our pulses, the cunningly-ordered words tingle with life; and if this be not poetry, what is?” So wrote the ...(read more)

Viragh, Atti

R1B/16

Reading and Composition:
Books with Pictures

Note new time: MWF 3-4

This course studies books with pictures in them, although we will occasionally ditch the books altogether to look at pictures in the Berkeley Art Museum and to watch moving pictures. We will study the relationship between image and text in a variet...(read more)

Hobson, Jacob

R1B/17

Reading & Composition:
Stories of Exile and Dislocation

MWF 1-2

This course turns to the experience of exile and its plural representations in texts drawing from the post-Enlightenment to contemporary periods. To open up our line of inquiry, we will reflect upon the following questions: How might exile be a sel...(read more)

Cho, Jennifer

R1B/18

Reading & Composition:
When Reading Goes Wrong

MWF 8-9

Every day, we're called upon to make hundreds of interpretive judgments based on things we read, see, or hear. But what happens when we misjudge one of these texts, or when we're unable to judge it at all? Besides being a common element in ...(read more)

Bauer, Mark

R1B/19

Reading & Composition:
Re-Visioning the "Sixties"

MWF 12-1

This reading and composition course will explore selected works of literature, music, and visual art produced during the 1960s. Placing emphasis on the relationship between artistic experimentation and social movements of the era, we will ask how i...(read more)

Koerner, Michelle

17/1

Shakespeare

Lectures MW 11-12 + one hour of discussion section per week (sec. 101: F 9-10; sec. 102: F 10-11; sec. 103: F 11-12; sec. 104: F 12-1)

English 17 offers an introduction to the study of Shakespeare that is intended for students new to the Berkeley English Department. Incoming transfer students, future majors, and non-majors are especially welcome.

The premise of our class...(read more)

Landreth, David

20/1

Modern British and American Literature:
Reliving the Past: Art and the Historical Imagination

TTh 9:30-11

In 1951, William Faulkner wrote: "The past is never dead. It's not even past." In 2008, Barack Obama invoked Faulkner to discuss the racial inequalities that continue to fracture the American nation, suggesting that we can only allevi...(read more)

Cordes Selbin, Jesse

24/1

Freshman Seminar:
Emily Dickinson

Tues. 3:30-4:30

We will read and discuss extraordinary poems by Emily Dickinson.

This 1-unit course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.

...(read more)
Wagner, Bryan

24/3

Freshman Seminar:
The Films of Alfred Hitchcock

W 2-3

We will watch and discuss films that span the length of Alfred Hitchcock's cinematic career, with a special focus on "Vertigo," "Rear Window," "Psycho" and other masterpieces from the decades after World War Two. I...(read more)

Goble, Mark

24/4

Freshman Seminar:
Graphic Journalism: Reading Joe Sacco’s Palestine

Note new time: Tues. 2-4 on the following dates: August 28, September, 4, 11, 18, 25, October 9, 16

“The landmark work of comics journalism,” Joe Sacco’s Palestine is “a political and aesthetic work of extraordinary originality.”  In this seminar, we will devote ourselves to a close reading of Pales...(read more)

Wong, Hertha D. Sweet

24/5

Freshman Seminar:
The Handmaid's Tale on Stage, Page, and Screen

Tuesdays 1:30-3:30 (Aug. 28 to Oct. 9 only)

In concert with the selection of Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale for the campus's 2018 On the Same Page program, this seminar will offer a closer look at this award-winning 1985 novel and the ...(read more)

Snyder, Katherine

45A/1

Literature in English: Through Milton

Lectures MW 1-2 + one hour of discussion section per week (sec. 101: F 1-2; sec. 102: F 2-3; sec. 103: F 1-2; sec. 105: Thurs. 2-3; sec. 106: Thurs. 4-5; sec. 107: Thurs. 2-3; sec. 108: Thurs. 4-5)

This course will introduce students to Chaucer, Spenser, Marlowe, Donne, and Milton; to literary history as a mode of inquiry; and to the analysis of the way literature makes meaning, produces emotional experience, and shapes the way human beings t...(read more)

Arnold, Oliver

45B/1

Literature in English: Late-17th Through Mid-19th Centuries

Lectures: MW 9-10 + one hour of discussion section per week (sec. 101: F 9-10; sec. 102: F 10-11; sec. 104: F 12-1; sec. 105: F 9-10; sec. 107: Th 9-10; sec 108: Th 11-12; sec. 109: Th 9-10; sec. 110: Th 11-12)

As we read works produced in a period of tumultuous change, we shall consider those works as zones of contact, reflecting and sometimes negotiating conflict. In a world of expanding global commerce (imports like tea suddenly becoming commonplace in...(read more)

Sorensen, Janet

45C/1

Literature in English: Mid-19th Through the 20th Century

Lectures: MW 12-1 + one hour of discussion section per week (sec. 102: F 12-1; sec. 103: F 9-10; sec. 104: F 1-2; sec. 105: F 12-1; sec. 107: Thurs. 1-2; sec. 108: Thurs. 2-3; sec. 109: Thurs. 1-2; sec. 110: Thurs. 2-3)

(read more)

Goble, Mark

84/1

Sophomore Seminar:
The Coen Brothers

Mon. 12-3

We will concentrate on the high and low cultural elements in the noir comedies of the Coen brothers, discussing their use of Hollywood genres, parodies of classic conventions, and representation of arbitrariness.  We will also read some fictio...(read more)

Bader, Julia

101/1

History of the English Language

TTh 11-12:30

This course surveys the history of the English language from its Indo-European roots, through its Old, Middle and Early Modern periods, and up to its different forms in use throughout the world today. Topics include changes in its core grammatical ...(read more)

Hanson, Kristin

104/1

Introduction to Old English

MWF 11-12

This course will equip you to read the earliest English literature: lives of saints, accounts of Viking invasion, poetry about onions, and the rest. You will learn to read Old English by direct study of texts in the original. This course will help ...(read more)

Hobson, Jacob

110/1

Medieval Literature

MWF 2-3

For more information on this course, please contact Professor Miller at j_miller@berkeley.edu.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

...(read more)
Miller, Jennifer

117T/1

Shakespeare in the Theater:
Cymbeline

Lectures MWF 2-3 in 310 Hearst Mining, plus rehearsals MW 3-4:30 in 300 Wheeler

Imagine that the play is an exquisite silk dress. In lectures, we look at it from many different angles; we consider the materials it’s made of; we imagine who made it and why; we listen to the sounds it makes as it moves. If you ever felt in...(read more)

Marno, David

118/1

Milton

MW 5-6:30

Probably the most influential and famous (and, in his own time, infamous) literary figure of the seventeenth century, John Milton has too often been misrepresented as a mainstay of a traditional canon rather than as the rebel he was. Those who do n...(read more)

Goodman, Kevis

121/1

The Romantic Period

TTh 12:30-2

Romanticism was once defined as a turn toward “nature” in response to the industrialization marking Britain’s transition to modern capitalism in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries.  Rather than simply resurrec...(read more)

Francois, Anne-Lise

122/1

Victorian Period

Lectures MW 12-1 + one hour of discussion section per week (sec. 101: F 12-1; sec. 102: F 2-3)

The Victorian period witnessed dramatic and probably permanent changes to the literary culture of Britain, including: the morphing of scattered memoirs into formal autobiographies; the rise of the realist novel as the indispensable genre of bourgeo...(read more)

Lavery, Grace

125C/1

The European Novel:
Society and Desire

TTh 2-3:30

This course will examine diverse instances of the European novel from the sixteenth to the twentieth century and consider how appetites of various kinds feature as organizing forces. How do hunger, lust, material greed, and the desire for order, be...(read more)

Flynn, Catherine

125C/2

The European Novel:
The Many Faces of the 19th-Century European Novel

TTh 5-6:30

The novel emerged as the principal literary genre in 19th-century Europe and has continued to dominate the literary market in Europe and North America ever since. What were the constitutive formal elements as well as social and psychological c...(read more)

Golburt, Luba

125D/1

The 20th-Century Novel

TTh 11-12:30

This course is a survey of the 20th-century novel. The novel is the quintessential form of expression of modernity and modern subjectivity. In this survey of key works of the century, we will explore the novel form as it is framed by these three th...(read more)

Jones, Donna V.

125E/1

The Contemporary Novel:
The Latest Pulitzer Prize-Winning Novels

Lectures MW 11-12 + one hour of discussion section per week (sec. 101: F 11-12; sec. 102: F 2-3; sec. 103: Thurs. 9-10; sec. 104: Thurs. 10-11)

The Pulitzer Prize in Fiction is awarded for “distinguished fiction by an American author, preferably dealing with American life.” In this course, we will read the four most recent (2015-2018) Pulitzer-Prize winning novels and two novel...(read more)

Wong, Hertha D. Sweet

126/1

British Literature, 1900-1945

MWF 2-3

How did British and Irish literature change over the first half of the twentieth-century? Was “modernism” a historical moment, an aesthetic movement, or a critical attitude—or some combination of the three? How did write...(read more)

Gang, Joshua

127/1

Modern Poetry

TTh 11-12:30

This course will concentrate intensively on four poets at the center of the modernist poetic canon: T. S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, Wallace Stevens, and W. B. Yeats. We will read several volumes by each, but will do so chronologically, in the order of the...(read more)

Blanton, C. D.

130B/1

American Literature: 1800-1865

TTh 12:30-2

On July 4 fifty years after the Declaration of Independence was signed, both John Adams and Thomas Jefferson died, an astonishing coincidence that many Americans took to signify the ending of the revolutionary era, and the beginning of a new phase ...(read more)

Breitwieser, Mitchell

133A/1

African American Literature and Culture Before 1917

TTh 2-3:30

This course explores African American literary history from its beginning in the eighteenth century to the turn of the twentieth century, interpreting major works in the context of slavery and its aftermath. We will reflect on the complicated relat...(read more)

Wagner, Bryan

133T/1

Topics in African American Literature and Culture:
The Art of Black Diaspora -- Do What You Gotta Do

TTh 9:30-11

Just find that dappled dream of yours
Come on back and see me when you can

– "Do What You Gotta Do," Clarence Carter (& Nina Simone & Roberta Flack, et al...)

The black diaspora is, amongs...(read more)

Ellis, Nadia

139/1

The Cultures of English:
Cultures of the Great War: Art in the Age of Decline

TTh 2-3:30

In the years following World War One, European intellectuals debated the implications of the new balance of power and the terms of the peace among the combatant nations, but they were haunted by the prospect of the decline of the West itself. A fou...(read more)

Jones, Donna V.

141/1

Modes of Writing (Exposition, Fiction, Verse, etc.)

MW 5-6:30

We'll study some of the ways that fiction writers, essayists, story-tellers, and poets have responded to the worlds that their cultures have built.  We'll read published work by our predecessors and by contemporary writers (including M...(read more)

Giscombe, Cecil S.

143A/2

Short Fiction

TTh 11-12:30

This workshop is designed to hone basic elements of the short story. We will read some exceptional stories in a variety of genres. We will compose and revise 1-2 stories over the course of the semester. 

Only continuing students are ...(read more)

Serpell, C. Namwali

143A/3

Short Fiction

TTh 3:30-5

The aim of this course is to explore the genre of short fiction –  to discuss the elements that make up the short story, to talk critically about short stories, and to become comfortable and confident with the writing of them.  Stud...(read more)

Chandra, Melanie Abrams

143B/1

Verse

TTh 2-3:30

In addition to reading and writing poems, we'll also: study prosody via weekly scanning assignments; read critical essays on poetics; historicize formal conventions and talk about genre; create; destroy; rebuild; delight. I'm hoping th...(read more)

Nicholson, Sara

143B/2

Verse

Tues. 3:30-6:30

The purpose of this class will be to produce a collective language in which to treat poetry. Writing your own poems will be a part of this task, but it will also require readings in contemporary poetry and essays in poetics, as well as some wr...(read more)

O'Brien, Geoffrey G.

143N/1

Prose Nonfiction:
Culture Writing and Life Writing

MW 3-4:30

This course is a nonfiction workshop in which you'll learn to write about many different types of art and culture, from TV and film to music and other forms of performance, while developing your own voice as a writer and reflecting on...(read more)

Saul, Scott

143N/2

Prose Nonfiction:
The Personal Essay

TTh 12:30-2

This class will be conducted as a writing workshop to explore the art and craft of the personal essay.  We will closely examine the essays in the assigned anthology, as well as students’ exercises and essays.  Writing assignments wi...(read more)

Kleege, Georgina

161/1

Introduction to Literary Theory:
Free Speech, in Theory

TTh 2-3:30

This course will interrogate the way in which “free” speech informs and complicates our understanding of literature and the literary.  We will trace the conceptual intersection of freedom and speech both historically and across sev...(read more)

Langan, Celeste

165/1

Special Topics:
Oscar Wilde and the Nineteenth Century

MW 3-4:30

Oscar Wilde's jokes, and his pathos, can seem out of place in Victorian literature: they leap off the dusty page and into a present moment where their author seems to fit more happily. Without wishing to consign him back to that potentially hos...(read more)

Lavery, Grace

165/2

Special Topics:
The English Department

MW 5-6:30

The English Department is one of the most curious developments in the history of human civilization. What do we study? The answer used to be, “literary texts of the English canon.” But then we questioned what belonged to the canon, what...(read more)

Marno, David

165/3

Special Topics:
Literature and Media Theory

TTh 9:30-11

This course will consider literature in relation to media theory.  Is literature made obsolete by new media?  What happens when we consider print literature in re...(read more)

Langan, Celeste

165/4

Special Topics:
The Ecology of Utopia

TTh 2-3:30

Since long before Thomas More coined the catching term “Utopia” – meaning “no place” or “not-place” – to name his fiction of a perfect island commonwealth, the literature of non-existent worlds has be...(read more)

Goldstein, Amanda Jo

165/5

Special Topics:
Reading Walden With Care

TTh 3:30-5

Assigned text: Henry David Thoreau, Walden, Civil Disobedience and Other Writings (Norton Critical Editions). You are required to use this edition.

We will read Walden twice, in order to gain a d...(read more)

Breitwieser, Mitchell

165/6

Special Topics:
Hardly Strictly Lyric Poems

TTh 3:30-5

Historically and etymologically, lyric poetry was sung to the accompaniment of a lyre.  Most lyric poetry studied as English literature today, however, reflecting the term "literature"'s own history and etymology, is related...(read more)

Hanson, Kristin

165/7

Special Topics:
Utopian and (mostly) Dystopian Movies

Tues. 5-8:30 (incl. 1/2-hr. break)

Most utopian and dystopian authors are more concerned with persuading readers of the merits of their ideas than with the "merely" literary qualities of their writing. Although utopian writing has sometimes made converts, inspiring readers...(read more)

Starr, George A.

166/2

Special Topics:
Alfred Hitchcock

Mon. 4:30-9:00 (incl. half-hour break)

This course will focus on the Hitchcock oeuvre from the early British through the American period, with emphasis on analysis of cinematic representation of crime, victimhood, and the investigation of guilt. Our discussions and critical readings wil...(read more)

Bader, Julia

166/3

Special Topics:
Journeys: British World-Building, c. 700-1700

TTh 11-12:30

"Britain, formerly known as Albion, is an island in the ocean, lying towards the north west at a considerable distance from the coasts of Germany, Gaul, and Spain, which together form the greater part of Europe." (Bede, Ecclesias...(read more)

Miller, Jasmin

166/4

Special Topics:
"this morning's minion": Sonic Mysticism in Gerard Manley Hopkins and Emily Dickinson

TTh 3:30-5

"...it is said that light is a sound too high-pitched for the human ear to hear but that one day it will become accessible to another ear awakened in another life and that, indeed, we will be able to hear the music of the spheres, like the mov...(read more)

Stancek, Claire Marie

166/5

Special Topics

TTh 9:30-11

This section of English 166 has been canceled (7/5/18).

...(read more)
Le, Serena

166AC/1

Special Topics in American Cultures:
Race & Revision in Early America

Lectures MW 1-2 + one hour of discussion section per week (sec. 101: F 10-11; sec. 102: F 1-2; sec. 103: Thurs. 10-11; sec. 104: Thurs. 1-2; sec. 105: Thurs. 1-2; sec. 106: Thurs. 4-5)

In this course, we will read both historical and literary texts to explore how racial categories came into being in New World cultures, and how these categories were tested, inhabited, and re-imagined by the human actors they sought to define.&nbsp...(read more)

Donegan, Kathleen

172/1

Literature and Psychology:
Literatures of the Self

TTh 11-12:30

In this course, we will survey literatures of the self and their history from antiquity to the present. We will attend to the writing of the self in its many genres and forms: the diary, the autobiography, the poem, the novel, the memoir, the case ...(read more)

Zeavin, Hannah

173/1

The Language and Literature of Films:
The Film Essay: James Baldwin, Roland Barthes, Susan Sontag

Lectures TTh 3:30-5 + film screenings Thurs. 5-8

This course offers an in-depth study of three of the most influential public intellectuals of the twentieth century: James Baldwin, Roland Barthes, and Susan Sontag. Working in the postwar period between France and the United States, and grappling ...(read more)

Best, Stephen M.
Young, Damon

174/1

Literature and History:
Culture in the Age of Obama

MWF 12-1

This seminar explores the forms of culture that emerged, or experienced a renaissance, during the presidency of Barack Obama. Starting with Obama's own bildungsroman-like Dreams from My Father, we will then explore such forms as t...(read more)

Saul, Scott

175/1

Literature and Disability

TTh 3:30-5

We will examine the ways disability is represented in a variety of works of fiction and drama.  Sometimes disability is used as a metaphor or symbol of something else.  In other cases, texts explore disability as a lived experience. ...(read more)

Kleege, Georgina

180A/1

Autobiography:
Chicanx Autobiographies

TTh 11-12:30

The autobiography is a problematic narrative form. In telling their stories, Chicanx autobiographers reconstruct the past partly by relying on unreliable memory, creating the illusion of historical accuracy through the imagination. Chicanx autobiog...(read more)

Gonzalez, Marcial

180E/1

The Epic

TTh 12:30-2

Homer’s Iliad was composed in the eighth century BCE. Both the story that it narrated (the conflict between the Greeks and the Trojans) and the particular form that the story took (the genre of the epic) would become foundational bui...(read more)

Nolan, Maura

180H/1

The Short Story

MWF 10-11

The lyf so short, the crafte so longe to lerne…

                              &nb...(read more)

Chandra, Vikram

190/1

Research Seminar:
Melville in the 50s

MW 9-10:30

In this seminar we will read as much of Herman Melville’s fiction from the 1850s as we can, delving patiently into Moby-Dick (1851) early in the semester and then tracking the experiments in prose that eventually led Melville to the ...(read more)

Goldsmith, Steven

190/2

Research Seminar:
Laughter and Vision: Explorations in the Novel of Ideas

Note new time: Tuesdays 2-5

In this seminar we will trod fiction's "path not taken"—the tradition of the novel of ideas that, with the triumph of Realism in the nineteenth century of Dickens and Balzac, became mainstream fiction's dark shadow. Our expl...(read more)

Danner, Mark

190/3

Research Seminar:
Representations of Coercion and Resistance in African American Slave, Jim Crow, and Neo-slave Narratives

MW 5-6:30

Within the context of slavery, the Jim Crow version of slavery, and the continuing racism in the U.S., African American literature bears witness to centuries of oppression, coercion, and exploitation; at the same time it documents great tenacity an...(read more)

JanMohamed, Abdul R.

190/4

Research Seminar:
William Blake

TTh 9:30-11

In this seminar, we will read our way slowly into William Blake's forbidding and exciting “fourfold” poetic environments: graphic works of “Illuminated Printing” in which a city like London, or “Golgonooza,” ...(read more)

Goldstein, Amanda Jo

190/7

Research Seminar:
The Urban Postcolonial

TTh 12:30-2

An intensive research seminar exploring the relationship between urban landscapes and postcolonial literary cultures. Readings in theories of postcoloniality and diaspora as well as studies in city planning and architecture will accompany...(read more)

Ellis, Nadia

190/8

Research Seminar:
Repression and Resistance

TTh 2-3:30

In this course, we’ll analyze representations of repression and resistance in a collection of contemporary American novels. We’ll examine various forms of repression—physical, social, political, and psychological—represented...(read more)

Gonzalez, Marcial

190/9

Research Seminar:
Mark Twain

TTh 2-3:30

This course is designed as an investigation of Mark Twain's writings, and a chance to develop skills essential to research.  Classes will be held in the Bancroft Library, making use of the unique collections of the Mark Twain Papers—...(read more)

Griffin, Ben

190/10

Research Seminar

This section of English 190 has been canceled.

...(read more)
No instructor assigned yet.

190/11

Research Seminar

This section of English 190 has been canceled.

...(read more)
No instructor assigned yet.

190/12

Research Seminar:
California Books and Movies Since World War I

Thurs. 5-8:30 (incl. 1/2-hr. break)

Besides reading and discussing some fiction and poetry with Western settings, and essays that attempt to identify or explain distinctive regional characteristics, this course will consider various movies shaped by and shaping conceptions of Califor...(read more)

Starr, George A.

190/13

Research Seminar:
The Jamesian Novel

MW 10:30-12

This seminar seeks to introduce students to the pleasure of Jamesian difficulty. We will undertake an intensive reading of James's fiction, playing close attention to the extended figuration and syntax that is the signature of Jamesian style. T...(read more)

Hale, Dorothy J.

190/14

Research Seminar

MW 5-6:30

For more information on this course, please contact Professor Miller at j_miller@berkeley.edu.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

Please read the paragraph about English 190 on page 2 ...(read more)

Miller, Jennifer

H195A/1

Honors Course

MW 1:30-3

In the first semester of this two-semester-long course, we will familiarize ourselves with a number of critical approaches to literary study and reflect a bit on the institution of criticism itself. These discussions will provide a background from ...(read more)

Sorensen, Janet

H195A/2

Honors Course

TTh 12:30-2

H195A/B is a two-semester seminar that lays the groundwork for and guides you through the completion a 40-60 page Honors thesis on a subject of your choice. The first semester offers an inquiry into critical approaches, research methods, and theore...(read more)

Abel, Elizabeth

200/1

Problems in the Study of Literature

MW 12-1:30

Readings TBA.

Approaches to literary study, including textual analysis, scholarly methodology and bibliography, critical theory and practice.

Enrollment is limited to entering doctoral students in the English program.

...(read more)

Goldsmith, Steven

202/1

History of Literary Criticism

W 2-5

An introduction to Western literary theory from antiquity to the present, focusing on the historical shift from the disciplines of poetics and rhetoric to that of aesthetics, with special attention to the concept of aesthetics and the discourse of ...(read more)

Kahn, Victoria

203/1

Graduate Readings:
Allegorical Moments: Public, Private, and the Writing of Everyday Life

MW 10:30-12

This seminar will undertake a critical reading of, and participation in, some possibilities (or impossibilities) of contemporary realisms and realities, public and private. It will query, from an array of perspectives, problems of process, represen...(read more)

Hejinian, Lyn

203/4

Graduate Readings:
American Genres

TTh 2-3:30

We’ll discuss canonical works of American genre fiction, except for the one genre we usually read: “literary fiction.” Our genres include: children’s lit, YA, spy thriller, fantasy, science fiction, magical realism, noir, cr...(read more)

Serpell, C. Namwali

203/5

Graduate Readings:
Prospectus Workshop

W 3-6

This will be a hands-on writing workshop intended to facilitate and accelerate the transition from qualifying exams to prospectus conference, from prospectus conference to first dissertation chapter, and from the status of student to that of schola...(read more)

Abel, Elizabeth

211/1

Chaucer:
Early Chaucer

M 3-6

Please note that this course description was revised on April 30.

This course focuses on the works that Chaucer wrote prior to the Canterbury Tales: the Book of the Duchess, Parliament of Fowls, House ...(read more)

Nolan, Maura

243A/1

Fiction Writing Workshop

MW 1:30-3

A graduate-level fiction workshop. Students will write fiction, produce critiques of work submitted to the workshop, and participate in discussions about the theory and practice of writing. We’ll also read published fiction and essays about w...(read more)

Chandra, Vikram

243B/1

Poetry Writing Workshop

Thurs. 9:30-12:30

In this semester's 243B we'll be actively fielding questions around environmentally conscious/location-oriented writing.

Some beginnings:

From Jonathan Skinner's introduction to the Ecopoetics section of the new...(read more)

Giscombe, Cecil S.

250/3

Research Seminar:
Textual Communities and the Modern

Tues. 3:30-6:30

We’ll explore collectives made possible by the early modern communications revolution, focusing on print and the rise of periodical and serial forms. Case studies will include the Levellers, the Royal Society, and the Methodists, along with r...(read more)

Picciotto, Joanna M

250/4

Research Seminar:
Evolution and Literary Form, 1800-1900

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

Reading the newly published On the Origin of Species together in November 1859, George Eliot and George Henry Lewes hailed Charles Darwin’s book as confirmation of the “Development Hypothesis,” founded a hundred years ear...(read more)

Duncan, Ian

310/1

Field Studies in Tutoring Writing

T. B. A.

Through seminars, discussions, and reading assignments, students are introduced to the language/writing/literacy needs of diverse college-age writers such as the developing, bi-dialectal, and non-native English-speaking (NNS) writer. The course wil...(read more)

T. B. A.

375/1

The Teaching of Composition and Literature

Tues. 10:30-12:30

Co-taught by a faculty member and a graduate student instructor (the department's R & C Assistant Coordinator), this course introduces new English GSIs to the practice and theory of teaching literature and writing at U...(read more)

Snyder, Katherine
Klavon, Evan

PLEASE READ CAREFULLY ALL THE PARAGRAPHS BELOW THAT APPLY TO ENGLISH COURSES IN WHICH YOU WANT TO ENROLL. SOME COURSES HAVE LIMITED ENROLLMENT AND/OR HAVE EARLY APPLICATION PROCEDURES.

ALL ENGLISH COURSES: Some courses are in such high demand that they will end up having wait lists. If you end up having to put yourself on one for an English course, please attend the first few classes, as space might open up for you after classes have started.

BERKELEY CONNECT: Would you like to get together with your peers to talk about literature and books? Are you wondering what to do with your English major once you graduate? Do you want to hear about the books that most influenced your English professors? Do you want expert advice about which courses to take? Would you like to see your favorite professors debating about a great work of literature? If so, please join Berkeley Connect!

Berkeley Connect in English fosters community in the English Department and offers a space for “serious play”: small group discussions about ideas and texts, explorations of the many riches of the Berkeley campus, visits by department faculty and distinguished alumni, and one-on-one advice on courses and graduate programs from graduate students and professors.

Individual Berkeley Connect groups (each with about 15-20 students) meet every other week for one hour of “serious play.” On the off weeks, your graduate student mentor will hold office hours so that you can talk individually about issues important to you. Some of the small group meetings will be informal discussions of a range of literary issues, while others involve visits to places around campus (such as the Berkeley Art Museum and the Bancroft Library). On other weeks we will meet as a large group to hear from distinguished alumni, or to listen to Berkeley English professors talk about their own paths into literary study or debate key books in their field with other professors.

There are no essays, papers, exams, or outside reading for Berkeley Connect, just lots of good discussion, valuable advice, and all sorts of “serious play.” Although this is not a traditional course, each participant will enroll in and earn one unit for group independent study (as English 98BC or 198BC, on a Pass/NP basis). The program is not meant to offer extra help or tutoring on things like the mechanics of paper-writing or literary analysis; rather, it aims at providing a more relaxed and fun way to make the best of your Berkeley experience.

Berkeley Connect in English sections:  English 98BC sections 1-2 are intended for lower-division (freshmen and sophomore) students.  English 198BC sections 1, 2, 5, 7, 8, and 9 are intended for upper-division (junior and senior) students.

CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP COURSES (English 143A, 143B, 143N, 243A, and 243B):  These are instructor-approved courses, and enrollment is limited.  Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligible to apply.  Only upper-division students should apply for 143A, 143B, and 143N; graduate students and highly qualified undergraduates can apply for 243A and 243B. In order to be considered for admission to any of these classes, you must electronically submit a writing sample AND an application form, using the link on the corresponding class entry on this "Announcement of Classes," BY 11 PM, THURSDAY, APRIL 26, AT THE LATEST.  (If you are applying for more than one of these classes, you will need to submit an application and the corresponding writing sample for each of the classes/sections you are applying for.)  The instructors will review the writing samples and applications, and the class lists will be posted on the wall in the hall across from 322 Wheeler on Thursday, May 3. Please come on or shortly after Thursday, May 3 to see if your name is on the class list for the section(s) you applied for; please check in person, as this information is NOT available over the phone. ONLY STUDENTS ON THESE CLASS LISTS WILL BE ADMITTED TO THE CORRESPONDING CLASSES, AND EACH ADMITTED STUDENT WILL NEED TO OBTAIN HIS/HER INDIVIDUAL PERMISSION CODE  FROM THE INSTRUCTOR AT THE FIRST OR SECOND CLASS MEETING. NO ONE WILL THEREFORE BE ABLE TO ACTUALLY ENROLL IN THESE PARTICULAR CLASSES BEFORE THESE CLASSES START MEETING IN THE FALL.

ENGLISH 190 (RESEARCH SEMINAR): English 190 is intended for senior and junior English majors. During at least Phase I of enrollment, only already-declared majors who will be in their fourth or third year as of fall '18 will be able to enroll in this course; upper-division students who intend to major in English and have taken some courses that will count towards the major but who have not yet declared will need to put themselves on the wait list of the section they are interested in taking, and they will be admitted later on if and when there is still room for them. Due to space limitations (maximum enrollment is 18 students per section), students may initially enroll in or wait-list themselves for only one section of English 190. However, if it turns out that some sections still have room in them during Phase II of enrollment, we may loosen the restrictions for admission to those sections.

ENGLISH H195A (HONORS COURSE): This is an instructor-approved course open only to senior English majors with an overall G.P.A. of 3.51 or higher and a G.P.A. of 3.65 or higher in courses taken at Berkeley in the major. In order to be considered for admission to H195A, you must electronically apply, using the link on the course listing in this "Announcement of Classes"; your submission will need to include: (a) the on-line application form, along with PDFs of: (b) your Academic Summary (go into Cal Central, click your "My Academics" tab, then click "View Academic Summary" and "Print as PDF"); (c) your non-UC Berkeley transcript(s), if any; (d) a critical paper (in a PDF or Word document) that you wrote for another class (the length of this paper not being as important as its quality); and (e) a personal statement (in a PPF or Word document), including why you are interested in taking this course and indicating your academic interest and, if possible, the topic or area you are thinking of addressing in your honors thesis. These applications must be submitted, via the corresponding link, BY 11 PM, FRIDAY, MAY 11. Since the department must review the G.P.A.s of H195A applicants for courses taken all the way through the Spring 2018 semester, and the instructors must carefully assess the applications, it will not be possible to determine who has been admitted until the fall semester is about to start. Therefore, applicants will be contacted by email sometime between late July and late August to be informed if they have been selected for admission, and, if so, to which section. (Since there might be more applicants for one section than the other, some students might end up being placed in the section that was not their first choice.)  EACH STUDENT ADMITTED TO H195A WILL NEED TO OBTAIN HIS OR HER INDIVIDUAL PERMISSION CODE AT THE FIRST CLASS MEETING FROM THE CORRESPONDING INSTRUCTOR.  NO ONE WILL THEREFORE BE ABLE TO ACTUALLY ENROLL IN THIS PARTICULAR COURSE BEFORE INSTRUCTION BEGINS IN THE FALL.

DE-CAL CLASSES: All proposals for Fall 2018 DE-Cal courses must be submitted at the front desk in the English Department main office (322 Wheeler) BY 4:00 P.M., THURSDAY, APRIL 26. Please note that individual faculty members may sponsor only one DE-Cal course per semester. Students wishing to offer a DE-Cal course must provide, to the English Department office, the following for approval: 1) a carefully completed COCI Special Studies Course Proposal Form, available at: academic-senate.berkeley.edu/committee/coci/339, for 198 classes. Students must download and complete the newest version of this form and obtain the proposed faculty sponsor’s signature on it before submitting it, along with the other necessary paperwork; 2) a copy of the fully developed syllabus of the proposed course; 3) a copy of the course description, including the criteria for passing the course; 4) a completed Unit Value Worksheet; and 5) the faculty sponsor's letter of support. A few days after the April 26 submission deadline, the students whose proposals have been approved by the Department Chair will be notified that they need to see Laurie Kerr, in  322 Wheeler, in order to arrange for a classroom for their course and to work out a few other details before the submission of copies of their proposals to COCI (for its final approval) and to the DE-Cal office.

INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSES: These are instructor-approved courses and require a written application, available from the rack on the front desk in 319 Wheeler. Applications should be signed by the instructor and returned by the student to 319 Wheeler. Students will be emailed the class number that they will use to enroll in the class on Cal Central. Often students will elect to wait until fall courses have started to apply for independent study courses.

UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE STUDENTS INTERESTED IN BECOMING WRITING TUTORS (ENGLISH 310): This is an instructor-approved course with limited enrollment. In order to be considered for admission, you must pick up an application for an interview at the Student Learning Center, Atrium, in the Cesar Chavez Student Center, during the spring semester through finals week or during the week before fall semester classes begin. No one may apply after Wednesday of the first week of classes. Students admitted to 310 will need to appear in person at the Student Learning Center, at the time the Learning Center specifies, in order to obtain the class number and then enroll. See the course description in this Announcement of Classes under English 310 for more details.