Announcement of Classes: Fall 2018


Shakespeare

English 17

Section: 1
Instructor: Landreth, David
Time: Lectures MW 11-12 + one hour of discussion section per week (sec. 101: F 9-10; sec. 102: F 10-11; sec. 103: F 11-12; sec. 104: F 12-1)
Location: Lectures: 2 Le Conte; disc. secs. in different locations


Book List

Shakespeare: A Midsummer Night's Dream; Shakespeare: Henry IV, Part One; Shakespeare: Macbeth; Shakespeare: Romeo and Juliet; Shakespeare: Sonnets; Shakespeare: The Merchant of Venice; Shakespeare: The Winter's Tale

Description

English 17 offers an introduction to the study of Shakespeare that is intended for students new to the Berkeley English Department. Incoming transfer students, future majors, and non-majors are especially welcome.

The premise of our class (and part of the reason the department requires a Shakespeare class of its majors) is that Shakespeare's texts are remarkably good to think with—remarkably pleasurable, remarkably productive. The class will give sustained attention to about half a dozen major plays and the Sonnets, using them to develop a rich set of themes and ideas as the semester unfolds: ideas about beauty and cruelty, performance and nature, citizenship and individuality, future and past.

We'll devote special attention to developing the skills that will allow us to think most productively with Shakespeare: skills of reading, of close analysis, of reasoned and structured argument, and maybe too some elementary skills of performance.

We will alternate between large-scale lectures on Mondays and Wednesdays, in which I will offer some concepts and arguments as raw material for your thinking; and discussion sections on Fridays, where you, your classmates, and your discussion leader will develop your thinking in conversation and work on techniques for realizing your ideas in writing.

We will start with a number of short assignments focusing on particular skills, which will build up to two medium-sized papers and a final exam.


Modern British and American Literature: Reliving the Past: Art and the Historical Imagination

English 20

Section: 1
Instructor: Cordes Selbin, Jesse
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: note new location: 103 GPB


Book List

Brown, William Wells: Clotel: or, the President's Daughter: A Narrative of Slave Life in the United States; Scott, Walter: Waverley: or, 'Tis Sixty Years Since; Whitehead, Colson: The Underground Railroad; Woolf, Virginia: Orlando: A Biography

Other Readings and Media

Course reader that includes supplementary texts by R. G. Collingwood, Hayden White, Michel-Rolph Trouillot, W. E. B. DuBois, Walter Benjamin, Jorge Luis Borges, Art Spiegelman, Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, Zeina Hashem Beck, and more.

Description

In 1951, William Faulkner wrote: "The past is never dead. It's not even past." In 2008, Barack Obama invoked Faulkner to discuss the racial inequalities that continue to fracture the American nation, suggesting that we can only alleviate today's problems by confronting our past—by seeking in it both positive and negative models for inhabiting the present and building the future. Following that injunction, this course asks how history is made vivid through art (including literature, theatrical performance, dance, music, and visual media) and how that art can help reframe or reinterpret histories that are seemingly remote, messy, or unfinished. We will read works of historical and counterfactual fiction—from Walter Scott's Waverley (1814) to Colson Whitehead's The Underground Railroad (2016)—alongside secondary texts from the fields of literary criticism, history and art history, philosophy, media studies, and cultural studies. In addition, we will study musical and visual art that puts the past back into play, from Kara Walker's debut installation Gone (1994) to the Hamilton (2015) soundtrack. Through these works and the Cal Performances events we attend, we will explore diverse theories of aesthetic and cultural change, from those that view art as a distraction from the "real" work of politics to those that regard art as the ideal medium for reimagining or redressing the past, and so reshaping the present.

In addition to the class meetings, students are required to attend the following evening performances: Schaubühne (Enemy of the People): Oct. 12-13

Wynton Marsalis and the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra, Greek Theater: Sept. 23

Jordi Savall, Routes of Slavery: Nov. 3

Compagnie Kãfig, Pixel: Nov. 16-17

Big Dance Theater, 17c: Dec. 13-16

This course, including free student tickets to performances, is made possible by Cal Performances, with support from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

 Note that this course was previously listed as English 170, but on May 30 it was changed to English 20.  Although it is now a lower-division class, the content, time, and location have not changed.


Freshman Seminar: Emily Dickinson

English 24

Section: 1
Instructor: Wagner, Bryan
Time: Tues. 3:30-4:30
Location: 305 Wheeler


Book List

Dickinson, Emily: The Complete Poems of Emily Dicksinson (Johnson Ed.)

Other Readings and Media

The text for this class will be available online.

Description

We will read and discuss extraordinary poems by Emily Dickinson.

This 1-unit course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.


Freshman Seminar: The Films of Alfred Hitchcock

English 24

Section: 3
Instructor: Goble, Mark
Time: W 2-3
Location: 189 Dwinelle


Description

We will watch and discuss films that span the length of Alfred Hitchcock's cinematic career, with a special focus on "Vertigo," "Rear Window," "Psycho" and other masterpieces from the decades after World War Two. In addition to discussing Hitchcock's style and place in film history, we will also explore how his work reflects on the period's politics and popular genres.

This 1-unit course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.


Freshman Seminar: Graphic Journalism: Reading Joe Sacco’s Palestine

English 24

Section: 4
Instructor: Wong, Hertha D. Sweet
Time: Note new time: Tues. 2-4 on the following dates: August 28, September, 4, 11, 18, 25, October 9, 16
Location: Note new location: 301 Wheeler


Book List

McCloud, Scott: Understanding Comics: The Invisible Art (Paradox Press, 2000); Sacco, Joe: Palestine (Seattle Fantagraphics Books, 2001)

Description

“The landmark work of comics journalism,” Joe Sacco’s Palestine is “a political and aesthetic work of extraordinary originality.”  In this seminar, we will devote ourselves to a close reading of Palestine, informed by comics scholarship.  Maintaining an open and inclusive discussion, we will consider the comics form and its possibilities for reportage and narrative, Sacco’s representation of the Occupied Territories, and Sacco’s self-representation in relation to his encounters with diverse Palestinian perspectives.  Students should be prepared for active participation and at least 6 pages of informal writing.

This 1-unit course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.


Freshman Seminar: The Handmaid's Tale on Stage, Page, and Screen

English 24

Section: 5
Instructor: Snyder, Katherine
Time: Tuesdays 1:30-3:30 (Aug. 28 to Oct. 9 only)
Location: 305 Wheeler


Book List

Atwood, Margaret: The Handmaid's Tale

Description

In concert with the selection of Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale for the campus's 2018 On the Same Page program, this seminar will offer a closer look at this award-winning 1985 novel and the award-winning Hulu television series that first aired in 2017, with a second season released in spring 2018. What made this such a powerful novel in its own moment? And why do its reverberations continue to be felt so powerfully today? We will read some of the journalistic think pieces about the TV series and, if we have time, we may explore one or more of the previous adaptations of Atwood's novel for radio, opera, ballet, film, and a concept album by indie band Lakes of Canada. Seminar members will participate through lively in-class discussion, weekly bCourses posts, conversation starters, and culminating creative response projects in a medium of your choice.

The class will meet weekly for the first seven weeks of the semester (August 28 to October 9).

This 1-unit course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.


Literature in English: Through Milton

English 45A

Section: 1
Instructor: Arnold, Oliver
Time: Lectures MW 1-2 + one hour of discussion section per week (sec. 101: F 1-2; sec. 102: F 2-3; sec. 103: F 1-2; sec. 105: Thurs. 2-3; sec. 106: Thurs. 4-5; sec. 107: Thurs. 2-3; sec. 108: Thurs. 4-5)
Location: Lectures:101 Morgan; disc. secs. in different locations


Book List

Behn, Aphra: Oroonoko, The Rover, and Other Works; Greenblatt, Stephen: The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Volume 1

Description

This course will introduce students to Chaucer, Spenser, Marlowe, Donne, and Milton; to literary history as a mode of inquiry; and to the analysis of the way literature makes meaning, produces emotional experience, and shapes the way human beings think about desire, commerce, liberty, God, power, the environment, subjectivity, empire, justice, death, and science.  We will study how a literary text emerges out of the author's reading of his or her predecessors and in relation to contemporary political, religious, social, and scientific discourses and events.

If you purchase the Norton Anthology at the UC bookstore, it will be bundled with a free copy of the Norton Critical Edition of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales.


Literature in English: Late-17th Through Mid-19th Centuries

English 45B

Section: 1
Instructor: Sorensen, Janet
Time: Lectures: MW 9-10 + one hour of discussion section per week (sec. 101: F 9-10; sec. 102: F 10-11; sec. 104: F 12-1; sec. 105: F 9-10; sec. 107: Th 9-10; sec 108: Th 11-12; sec. 109: Th 9-10; sec. 110: Th 11-12)
Location: Lectures: note new location: 277 Cory; disc. secs. in different locations


Book List

Austen, Jane: Emma; Behn, Aphra: Oroonoko; Defoe, Daniel: Moll Flanders; Equiano, Olaudah: The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano or Gustavus Vassa, the African, Written by Himself; Pope, Alexander: The Rape of the Lock and Other Major Writings; Wordsworth, William: Lyrical Ballads

Description

As we read works produced in a period of tumultuous change, we shall consider those works as zones of contact, reflecting and sometimes negotiating conflict. In a world of expanding global commerce (imports like tea suddenly becoming commonplace in England), political revolution (English, American, French), and changing conceptions of what it means to be a man or woman (a new medical discourse viewing them as categorically distinct), increasingly available printed texts become sites of contestation—including debates about what constitutes “proper” language and Literature itself. We shall think about the ways in which separate groups—British and African, masters and slaves, slave owners and abolitionists, arch capitalists and devout religious thinkers, Republicans and Conservatives, men and women—use writing to devise ongoing relationships with each other, often under conditions of inequality. Throughout we shall be especially attuned to formal choices—from linguistic register to generic conventions and innovations—and how writers deploy these to incorporate opposition, resist authority or authorize themselves. Requirements will include two papers, a mid-term exam, a final exam, and reading quizzes.


Literature in English: Mid-19th Through the 20th Century

English 45C

Section: 1
Instructor: Goble, Mark
Time: Lectures: MW 12-1 + one hour of discussion section per week (sec. 102: F 12-1; sec. 103: F 9-10; sec. 104: F 1-2; sec. 105: F 12-1; sec. 107: Thurs. 1-2; sec. 108: Thurs. 2-3; sec. 109: Thurs. 1-2; sec. 110: Thurs. 2-3)
Location: Lectures: 120 Latimer; disc. secs. in different locations


Description

This course examines a range of British and American texts from the period with an emphasis on literary history and its social and political contexts. We will focus on the emergence, development, and legacy of modernism as a set of formal innovations that help us see how literature operates as a means of cultural response in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We will also consider modernism alongside other literary modes and styles (realism, naturalism, postmodernism) that pursue different strategies for representing the experience of the world—and for finding a place for literature within it. Particular attention will be paid to close reading and questions of literary form even as we think about such larger issues as the relationship between reading and entertainment, the changing status of art in respect to new technologies of information and representation, and the challenges to traditional conceptions of the self that are posed by new languages of psychological, national, and racial identity.

Featured authors will include Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Henry James, James Conrad, T. S. Eliot, Virginia Woolf, William Faulkner, and Toni Morrison.


Sophomore Seminar: The Coen Brothers

English 84

Section: 1
Instructor: Bader, Julia
Time: Mon. 12-3
Location: 300 Wheeler


Description

We will concentrate on the high and low cultural elements in the noir comedies of the Coen brothers, discussing their use of Hollywood genres, parodies of classic conventions, and representation of arbitrariness.  We will also read some fiction and attend events at the Pacific Film Archive and Cal Performances.

This 2-unit course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.