Announcement of Classes: Spring 2019

Course #
Instructor
Course Area

R1A/1

Reading and Composition:
Reformations, Luther to Marx

MWF 9-10

This course will provide an introduction to the literary and artistic culture of the Protestant Reformation, focusing on the century and a half between Luther's 95 Theses and the Restoration of the monarchy in England (1660)....(read more)

Walton, Alex

R1A/2

Reading and Composition:
Fiction's Swarm

MWF 10-11

The perceived divide between humans and other animals has been defined as one of the most important frameworks under which our thoughts and behaviors are constructed. Yet literature—from its earliest examples to today's offerings—is...(read more)

Tomasula y Garcia, Alba

R1A/3

Reading and Composition:
Not Another Love Song: Poetic Cultures Medieval and Modern

MWF 11-12

We all know what poetry is, right? At least in the popular imagination, it’s emotionally charged, personal and intimate, the heartfelt expression of Angst, Love, and the poet’s True Feelings. But in many ways that view of poetry as...(read more)

Stevenson, Max

R1A/5

Reading and Composition:
Crazy Rich Asians? Minority Models in the Literature of the Asian Diaspora

MWF 1-2

Taking the meteoric success of Crazy Rich Asians as a cultural phenomenon as its point of departure, this course studies and interrogates the enduring myths and persistent stereotypes that inflect the history of Asian racial formation in a...(read more)

Chiang, Cheng-Chai

R1A/6

Reading and Composition:
Modernism's Apocrypha

MWF 1-2

This course teaches critical analysis and college-level writing skills through existent works of literature and art that deal with inexistent, unverifiable, or otherwise unreadable texts. The figure of the apocryphal book, or invented author, will ...(read more)

Cohan, Nathan

R1A/7

Reading and Composition:
Creation Stories of the Premodern World

MW 5-6:30

How did the world as we know it come into being? Was there anything else before it? Who made it the way it is, and did they do it on purpose? For at least as long as humans have written stories, we have speculated about origins.

Towards a...(read more)

Homans-Turnbull, Marian

R1B/1

Reading and Composition:
Memoir

MWF 9-10

What constitutes the “I” of a first-person narrative? How does it alternately designate an individual, a collectivity, or even a historical consciousness? In this class, we’ll be considering the shapes that these questions take ac...(read more)

Su, Amanda Jennifer

R1B/2

Reading and Composition:
The Sword and the Screen: New Tricks with Old Texts

MWF 9-10

The difficulty with epics is that they're... well, epic. Beowulf goes hunting Grendel, and 3000 lines of poetry later he's still fighting; Arthur pulls Excalibur out of the stone, starts sending knights on quests, and keeps sending...(read more)

Clark, Amy

R1B/3

Reading and Composition:
Machines Made of Words

MWF 10-11

"A poem is a small (or large) machine made of words." — William Carlos Williams
"A book is a machine to think with." — I. A. Richards

In this course, we will explore the relationship between lit...(read more)

Forbes-Macphail, Imogen

R1B/4

Reading and Composition:
Berkeley Literature

MWF 10-11

This section of English R1B studies fiction set in Berkeley, California. We will also look south to Oakland and west to San Francisco, cities whose histories and populations are bound up with our own. We will set our readings in context by con...(read more)

Hobson, Jacob

R1B/5

Reading and Composition:
Living Pasts: Cultural Memory and Historical Narrative

MWF 11-12

This course explores what it means to encounter seemingly "dead" pasts, often traumatic, through artistic and cultural productions and how, through that encounter, such pasts are relived and reimagined. Together we will exa...(read more)

Cho, Jennifer

R1B/6

Reading and Composition:
Unreliable Friends

MWF 11-12

This course examines how texts can mislead us. Literary critic Wayne Booth famously accounts for how readers can come to develop a "friendship with books." In our course, we will explore the complexities of these friendships—how som...(read more)

Catchings, Alex

R1B/7

Reading and Composition:
Fake/News: New Journalism, the War on Truth, and Democracy in Peril

MWF 12-1

"New Journalism" has always been a slippery term. But this literary movement from the 1960s and '70s, that rejected notions of journalistic objectivity in favor of political and cultural commitment, and malaise in favor of "gonzo...(read more)

Cruz, Frank Eugene

R1B/8

Reading and Composition:
Prison Sentences: Reading Mass Incarceration

MWF 12-1

This section of Reading and Composition is designed to both exercise your active reading skills and to empower you to write compelling, well-informed, and well-organized expository prose and research-based essays. Over the course of the semester we...(read more)

Koerner, Michelle

R1B/9

Reading and Composition:
Berkeley Literature

MWF 12-1

This section of English R1B studies fiction set in Berkeley, California. We will also look south to Oakland and west to San Francisco, cities whose histories and populations are bound up with our own. We will set our readings in context by con...(read more)

Hobson, Jacob

R1B/10

Reading and Composition:
Style and Being Singular

MWF 1-2

“My being charming, Harriet, is not quite enough to induce me to marry; I must find other people charming—one other person at least.”
– Emma Wodehouse (Jane Austen)
“Other people are quite dreadful. The o...(read more)

Eisenberg, Emma C.

R1B/11

Reading and Composition:
Varieties of Confession in American Poetry

MWF 1-2

This course will cover a body of American poetry generally written between 1950 and 1970, with particular emphasis on the works of Robert Lowell, Sylvia Plath, Anne Sexton, John Berryman, and Elizabeth Bishop. Topics of study will include: the rela...(read more)

Swensen, Dana

R1B/12

Reading and Composition:
The Crisis in Humanities

MWF 2-3

Note the changes in instructor, topic, book list, and course description of this section of English R1B (as of Nov. 27).

"It started as a budget issue," a provost said recently, explaining his college's decisi...(read more)

Viragh, Atti

R1B/13

Reading and Composition:
Situated Narratives: Finding a Sense of Place in the Novel

MWF 2-3

Place is experienced in a variety of ways: as a material force we encounter daily, as an active and constitutive relationship, as a haunting and inescapable memory or feeling. This course will consider the narrative and affective strategies us...(read more)

Artiz, Ernest T.

R1B/14

Reading and Composition:
Literary and Scientific Knowledge

MW 5-6:30

How can literature and science advance our knowledge of the material world? Materialism has often been a point of confluence between literature and science, even the core premise for any relation between literary and scienti...(read more)

Barbour, Andrew John

R1B/15

Reading and Composition:
Who's to Blame? Agency and Determinism in the 19th-Century Crime Novel

MW 5-6:30

The sentencing of criminals has long raised questions of responsibility and blame, nature and nurture, and these questions have only become more pressing in our contemporary political environment. This course will address questions of agency and de...(read more)

Mittnacht, Veronica Vizuet

R1B/16

Reading and Composition:
Something Resolutely Indefinable: The African-American Novel, the Individual, and Sociological Thought

TTh 12:30-2

This class will consider how a series of important 20th-century African-American novels confront questions of individual identity, categrization, social definition. To this end, we shall attend to the complex connection between the tradition of bla...(read more)

Creasy, CFS

20/1

Modern British and American Literature:
Post-Apocalypse Now

MW 1:30-3

Apocalyptic stories have been told for centuries, even millenia. But novels, movies, and other forms of media that imagine the end of the world—and what comes after that—seem to have inundated us (floods!) in recent times....(read more)

Snyder, Katherine

24/1

Freshman Seminar:
Emily Dickinson

M 1-2

We will read and discuss extraordinary poems by Emily Dickinson.

This 1-unit course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.

...(read more)
Wagner, Bryan

26/1

Introduction to the Study of Poetry:
The Reading of Poetry

TTh 5-6:30

How can we become more appreciative, alert readers of poetry and at the same time better writers of prose? How do poems use language differently than other forms of expression? How do they know how to say things without actually saying th...(read more)

Francois, Anne-Lise

43B/1

Introduction to the Writing of Verse

TTh 11-12:30

Even if it's written in solitude, poetry is a highly social form of art. A poet may speak to their reader, to their city, to their government, to their time. They may write to their friends or fellow poets, or they may write to, with, or agains...(read more)

Wilson, Mary

45A/1

Literature in English: Through Milton

Lectures MW 1-2 in 3 LeConte + one hour of discussion section per week in various locations (sec. 101: F 1-2; sec. 102: F 1-2; sec. 103: F 2-3; sec. 104: F 2-3; sec. 105: Thurs. 11-12; sec. 106: Thurs. 2-3)

English 45A introduces students to the foundations of literary writing in Britain, from the early Middle Ages to the Renaissance and English Civil War. This semester I'd like to focus on how that foundational narrative—the story of how Br...(read more)

Landreth, David

45B/1

Literature in English: Late-17th Through Mid-19th Centuries

Lectures MW 11-12 in 3 LeConte + one hour of discussion section per week in various locations (sec. 101: F 9-10; sec. 102: F 9-10; sec. 103: F 11-12; sec. 104: F 11-12; sec. 105: Thurs. 9-10; sec. 106: Thurs. 10-11)

Readings in English, Scottish, Irish and North American prose fiction, autobiography, and poetry from 1688 through 1848: a century and a half that sees the formation of a new, multinational British state with the political incorporation of Scotland...(read more)

Duncan, Ian

45C/1

Literature in English: Mid-19th Through the 20th Century

Lectures MW 2-3 in 159 Mulford + one hour of discussion section per week in various locations (sec. 101: F 9-10; sec. 102: F 12-1; sec. 103: F 12-1; sec. 104: F 2-3; sec. 105: Thurs. 9-10; sec. 106: Thurs. 10-11)

This course examines radical changes and unexpected continuities in literature in English from 1850 to (almost) the present.  We will read poetry and fiction from Britain, Ireland, North America and Africa in order to explore a range of litera...(read more)

Flynn, Catherine

80K/1

Children's Literature

TTh 9:30-11

This course has two principal aims: (1) to provide an overview of the history of children's literature in English; (2) to introduce students to the major generic, political, aesthetic, and philosophical questions such literature has posed. Amon...(read more)

Creasy, CFS

84/1

Sophomore Seminar:
High Culture / Low Culture: Woody Allen

Note new time: W 6:30-9:30 PM

We will examine the films and writings of Woody Allen in terms of themes, narration, comic and visual inventiveness, and ideology. The course will also include consideration of cultural contexts and events at Cal Performances and the Pacific Film A...(read more)

Bader, Julia

107/1

The Bible as Literature

TTh 3:30-5

In this class, we will read a selection of biblical texts as literature; that is, we will read them in many ways but not as divine revelation.  We will take up traditional literary questions of form, style, and structure, but we will also lear...(read more)

Goldsmith, Steven

111/1

Chaucer:
Canterbury Tales

MW 5-6:30

In the late fourteenth century, Geoffrey Chaucer created a fictional pilgrimage in which travelers competed with one another to tell a tale “of best sentence and moost solaas”—meaning, a tale that best combines moral seriousness w...(read more)

Nolan, Maura

114A/1

English Drama to 1603

TTh 12:30-2

For more information on this course, please contact Professor Miller at j_miller@berkeley.edu.

This class satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

...(read more)
Miller, Jennifer

115A/1

The English Renaissance (through the 16th Century)

TTh 3:30-5

In this course, we follow how English authors from Thomas More to John Donne participated in the grand cultural project of the Renaissance, defined by the belief that consuming and producing culture would elevate human beings above ...(read more)

Marno, David

115B/1

The English Renaissance (17th Century)

MWF 1-2

A survey of England's "century of revolution," focusing on relationships between literature, religion, and politics. Readings will be made available electronically and in an optional reader.

This class satisfies the pre...(read more)

Picciotto, Joanna M

117S/1

Shakespeare

Lectures MW 12-1 in 2060 Valley LSB + one hour of discussion section per week in various locations (sec. 101: F 10-11; sec. 102: F 12-1; sec. 103: Thurs. 1-2; sec. 104: Thurs. 3-4; sec. 105: Thurs. 4-5; sec. 106: Thurs. 4-5)

Shakespeare’s poems and plays are relentlessly unsettling, sublimely beautiful, deeply moving, rigorously brilliant, and compulsively meaningful: they complicate everything, they simplify nothing, and for 400 years, they have been a touchston...(read more)

Arnold, Oliver

119/1

Literature of the Restoration and the Early 18th Century

TTh 11-12:30

In this course we shall read a variety of texts that sought to represent strange new worlds—or invited readers to see their own world as strange—from Royal Society publications describing microscopic worlds to popular voyage accounts re...(read more)

Sorensen, Janet

121/1

The Romantic Period:
Romantic Voices

MWF 2-3

Romanticism has long been identified with democratic revolutions of the late 18th century, and the social demand that every citizen have a “voice” in the constitution of community and law.  In this survey of li...(read more)

Langan, Celeste

125C/1

The European Novel:
Lost Illusions

Thurs. 2-5

In his 1917 essay, “Science as a Vocation,” the sociologist Max Weber writes, “The fate of our times is characterized by rationalization and intellectualization and, above all, by the ‘disenchantment of the world.’ Pre...(read more)

Puckett, Kent

130A/1

American Literature: Before 1800

TTh 12:30-2

This course provides a survey of English-language American literature to 1800. We will explore a wide range of texts from narratives of colonial settlement through the literature of the American Revolution, the Constitutional Convention, and the ea...(read more)

Tamarkin, Elisa

130C/1

American Literature: 1865-1900

TTh 5-6:30

A survey of U.S. literature after the Civil War, with special attention to the rise of literary realism.  We will consider art’s response to what Mark Twain described as “The Gilded Age” of economic expansion, big business, a...(read more)

Tamarkin, Elisa

131/1

American Poetry

TTh 3:30-5

This survey of U.S. poetries will begin with 17th- and 18th-century poems by two women, Anne Bradstreet and Phyllis Wheatley, move to another (19th-century) pairing in Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson, and then touch down in expatriate and statesid...(read more)

O'Brien, Geoffrey G.

132/1

American Novel

TTh 12:30-2

This course is a survey of major American novels from the late-nineteenth century to the present, with a focus on realism, naturalism, and modernism. Rather than trace a single history of the novel in this period, we will explore a range of genres ...(read more)

Goble, Mark

133B/1

African American Literature and Culture Since 1917:
African American Fiction

MWF 2-3

This course will examine some major 20th and 21st century African American novels and autobiographies.  This is a vast terrain to cover and so the chosen texts do not adequately represent the diversity and ...(read more)

JanMohamed, Abdul R.

133T/1

Topics in African American Literature and Culture:
The Novel and the Idea of Black Culture

MWF 11-12

For much of the last century, black writers have crafted modern works of literary art from the materials of black culture—Ralph Ellison and James Weldon Johnson found inspiration in jazz and other musical forms, James Baldwin reworked the bla...(read more)

Best, Stephen M.

134/1

Contemporary Literature:
Poetry in the Twenty-First Century

Lectures MW 9-10 in 56 Barrows + one hour of discussion section per week in different locations (sec. 102: F 10-11; sec. 104: F 1-2)

Rather than attempt to assemble a predictive canon of twenty-first century poetry (so far), this course will broadly consider the place and significance of poetry in the contemporary world.  This will mean looking at some of the key figures an...(read more)

Falci, Eric

135AC/1

Literature of American Cultures:
Race, Class, & Disability in American Cultures: American Foundlings

Lectures MW 10-11 in 141 McCone + one hour of discussion section per week in different locations (sec. 101: F 10-11; sec. 102: F 12-1)

To start with, a general overview. This course will analyze the categories of “disability,” “race” and “ethnicity” critically. My aim in the class is to set up situations in which we can think about several of th...(read more)

Schweik, Susan

C136/1

Topics in American Studies:
Harlem Renaissance

MW 5-6:30

The Harlem Renaissance was a cultural movement of black artists and writers in the 1920s. Centered in the Harlem neighborhood in Manhattan, the movement extended outward through international collaboration. We will be reading works by writers inclu...(read more)

Wagner, Bryan

C136/2

Topics in American Studies:
Noir: Films, Fiction, Criticism

TTh 3:30-5

A city no worse than others, a city rich and vigorous and full of pride, a city lost and beaten and full of emptiness. It all depends on where you sit and what your own private score is. I didn't have one. I didn't care.&rdq...(read more)

Moran, Kathleen and Greil Marcus

137T/1

Topics in Chicana/o Literature and Culture:
Workers and Rebels in U. S. Latinx Novels

MWF 11-12

This course will focus on representations of workers and rebels in U.S. Latinx novels. We will investigate the ways in which the issues of work and political activism are central themes in much U.S. Latinx literature. The formal features and themat...(read more)

Gonzalez, Marcial

141/1

Modes of Writing (Exposition, Fiction, Verse, etc.):
Writing Fiction and Poetry

MW 5-6:30

This course will introduce students to the study of creative writing—fiction and poetry (with a brief dip into playwriting). Students will learn to talk critically about these forms and begin to feel comfortable and confident writing within t...(read more)

Chandra, Melanie Abrams

143A/1

Short Fiction

TTh 11-12:30

A short fiction workshop. Over the course of the semester, each student will write and revise two stories. Each participant in the workshop will edit student-written stories and will write a formal critique of each manuscript. Students are req...(read more)

Chandra, Vikram

143A/2

Short Fiction

W 3-6

A fiction workshop in which students will be expected to turn in material approximately every third week, to be edited and discussed in class.

Emphasis will be upon editing and revising. Quality rather than quantity is the ideal, but each...(read more)

Oates, Joyce Carol

143B/1

Verse

MW 9-10:30

A writing and literature course in which students will become familiar with trends in 20th- and 21st-century poetry. The selected poetry will be linked to developments in the other arts. Students will write poems based upon models offered by establ...(read more)

Reed, Ishmael S.

143B/2

Verse

TTh 9:30-11

In this course you will conduct a progressive series of explorations in which you will try some of the fundamental options for writing poetry today (or any day)—aperture and closure; rhythmic sound patterning; sentence and line; short and lon...(read more)

Shoptaw, John

143B/3

Verse

TTh 12:30-2

This is a workshop class. Students will be submitting drafts of new poems weekly, reading lots of poetry, reading and critiquing each other's new work, so regular attendance and participation is mandatory.

Only continuing UC Berkeley ...(read more)

Hass, Robert L.

143D/1

Expository and Critical Writing :
The Art of the Critical Essay

TTh 11-12:30

This course in the critical essay is designed for students who are writing a thesis-length research paper. For the first weeks of class, we will explore and share our own experiences, processes, obstacles and goal...(read more)

Donegan, Kathleen

143N/1

Prose Nonfiction

M 3-6

Much of American literature has had to do with a sense of motion. Note the journeys, e.g., in the best known texts of Melville and Twain. But note also that Harlemite Langston Hughes' autobiography, The Big Sea, begins on a boat a...(read more)

Giscombe, Cecil S.

165/1

Special Topics:
Global Tudors

This seminar challenges us to look back to a time before England's colonial period and consider how people of the 16th century began to perceive of themselves as part of a truly global world. The class will begin by thinking about what the conc...(read more)

Honig, Elizabeth

165/2

Special Topics:
21st-Century U. S. Poetry

M 2-5

In this course we’ll review the U.S. poetry of the present, reading representative poems from the last 15 years or so in relation to a number of formal concerns, poetic subjects, and debates within the social field (and its media), including:...(read more)

O'Brien, Geoffrey G.

165/3

Special Topics:
John Milton's Last Poems

MW 5-6:30

Four years after publishing the first edition of Paradise Lost, Milton came out with a volume called Paradise Regain’d...to which is added, Samson Agonistes. We will spend the semester carefully reading these poems...(read more)

Picciotto, Joanna M

165/4

Special Topics:
The Art of Writing: The Visible Made Verbal

W 3-6

Audio Description is a set of practices that seeks to make visual media—the fine arts, theatrical performance, dance, film and video—accessible to people who are blind and visually impaired.  In theater and film, brief descriptions...(read more)

Kleege, Georgina

165/5

Special Topics:
Note: See English 165 section 6

On October 16 we canceled this section of English 165 because we ended up doubling the size of English 165 section 6 (on the same topic) instead. So if you are interested in this topic, please enroll in English 165 section 6.  Professors Danne...(read more)

Danner, Mark

165/6

Special Topics:
Nabokov and Naipaul

TTh 3:30-5

This is a team-taught course on two of the most controversial novelists of the 20th century and—some critics think—two of the greatest. Vladimir Nabokov (1899-1977) was a Russian emigre who wrote novels in both Russian and English,...(read more)

Hass, Robert L.
Danner, Mark

165/7

Special Topics:
The Materialist Epic

TTh 12:30-2

“We live our everyday lives surrounded by, immersed in, matter . . . Our existence depends from one moment to the next . . . on our own hazily understood bodily and cellular reactions and on pitiless cosmic motions, on the material artifacts ...(read more)

Goldsmith, Steven

165/8

Special Topics:
American Humor

Tues. 5-8:30 (incl. 1/2 hr. break)

In this course short 19th- and 20th-century writings available electronically, by such authors as G. W. Harris, J. J. Hooper, Mark Twain, F. P. Dunne, G. Ade, R. Lardner, J. Thurber and the like, will be read and discussed, wi...(read more)

Starr, George A.
Bader, Julia

165/9

Special Topics:
The 1890s

Thurs. 5-8

What difference does a date make? What is it about the numerical end of a century that encourages feelings of apocalypse, degeneration, or renewal? This course will consider texts written in and around the 1890s, a decade characterized by its inten...(read more)

Puckett, Kent

166/1

Special Topics:
Gothic

MWF 2-3

In the eighteenth century, Gothic was a historical category (the “Dark” or “Middle” Ages, between the fall of Rome and the Renaissance) and then an ethnic one (the Germanic peoples who overthrew classical civilization). It&r...(read more)

Duncan, Ian

166/2

Special Topics:
Marxism and Literature

MWF 2-3

In the early 1990s, the Marxist literary theorist Fredric Jameson responded to critics who were at once proclaiming the emergence of a capitalist “new world order” and asserting the death of Marxism.  Jameson wrote: “It does ...(read more)

Gonzalez, Marcial

166/4

Special Topics:
Poetry and Prose of Race and Social Class

TTh 2-3:30

One of the ideas behind this course offering is that poetry and essays (life-writing, creative nonfiction, "essaying," etc.) have similar aims or field-marks—both are literary vehicles of exploration and documentation; both value ex...(read more)

Giscombe, Cecil S.

166/5

Special Topics:
Asian American Literature - World, Nation, Locality

MWF 1-2

This class provides a foundation for reading Asian American literature at three levels of scale: world, nation, and locality. At the world scale, we will discuss the political origins of the phrase “Asian American” in the late 1960...(read more)

Leong, Andrew Way

166/6

Special Topics:
Realism, Then and Now

MW 5-6:30

This course explores the relationship between life and literature, with a focus on the following types of questions: How have novelists and poets—as well as filmmakers, television producers, and Instagram aficionados—attempted to repres...(read more)

Cordes Selbin, Jesse

166/7

Special Topics:
Anton Chekhov

MWF 3-4

Anton Chekhov’s (1860-1904) prominence in the English-speaking world is comparable only to Shakespeare’s place in Russian culture. This course is devoted to Chekhov’s fictional and dramatic writing, and to the lasting influence of...(read more)

Muza, Anna

170/1

Literature and the Arts:
Rhythm, Riot, Revolution

TTh 11-12:30

What allows language to inspire change? To what extent is the power of a word rooted in its perception as sound and rhythm, shaped and reshaped by the individual histories and trainings of those who hear it? In this class, we will break down some o...(read more)

Gaydos, Rebecca

172/1

Literature and Psychology:
Literatures of the Self

MW 9-10:30

In this course, we will survey literatures of the self and their history from antiquity to the present. We will attend to the writing of the self in its many genres and forms: the diary, the autobiography, the poem, the novel, the memoir, the case ...(read more)

Zeavin, Hannah

173/1

The Language and Literature of Films:
Postcolonial Film

MWF 10-11

This course will examine a series of films that focus on the nature and structure of Western colonialism and (post)colonialism.  We will study the different forms of colonialism, as depicted from various perspectives, as well as the social, po...(read more)

JanMohamed, Abdul R.

176/1

Literature and Popular Culture:
The Sitcom

Lectures MW 3-4 + one hour of discussion section per week in various locations (sec. 101: F 2-3; section 102: F 3-4; sec. 103: Thurs. 10-11; sec. 104: Thurs. 11-12; sec. 105: Thurs. 12-1; sec. 106: Thurs. 12-1; sec. 107: F 11-12; sec. 108: F 10-11)

The television situation comedy has been one of the most durable, wide-ranging, and successful genres of  popular  culture  of  all  time.  Its  narrative  forms  (such  as  the  &ldq...(read more)

Lavery, Grace

180E/1

The Epic: Imagined Communities and the Classical Epic

TTh 5-6:30

I am  convinced that the classical epic is crucial for a literary education whatever field you specialize in—for the profound encounters it offers, for the intensity and vivacity of the memorable scenes the works construct, and...(read more)

Altieri, Charles F.

180N/1

The Novel

This course has been canceled (Jan. 7, 2019).

...(read more)
No instructor assigned yet.

180Z/1

Science Fiction

MWF 12-1

This course will examine in depth the history of speculative fiction and its engagement with the thematics and topoi of the new life sciences—representation of cloning, ecological dystopias, hybrid life-forms, genetic engineering dystopias. W...(read more)

Jones, Donna V.

190/1

Research Seminar:
Flann O'Brien and Irish Literature

MW 10:30-12

In this seminar, we will explore the comic, satirical, and genre-crossing writings of Flann O’Brien/Myles na gCopaleen/Brian O’Nolan. We will examine him as an heir to modernist innovation, starting with his novels and moving on to his ...(read more)

Flynn, Catherine

190/2

Research Seminar:
Transsexual Literatures and Cultures

MW 12-1:30

Trans people are not a novelty. A desire to change sex, or else the fact of an individual whose sex has changed, is depicted in some of the most canonical texts of the literary canon: from the Metaphorphoses of Ovid, through the cross-identificatio...(read more)

Lavery, Grace

190/3

Research Seminar:
James / Baldwin

MW 5-6:30

James Baldwin never made a secret of the importance of Henry James to his creative life.  The numerous quotations, echoes, and nods to James sprinkled throughout Baldwin’s writings all but directly invite us to think of James as we read ...(read more)

Best, Stephen M.

190/5

Research Seminar:
California Books and Movies Since World War I

Thurs. 5-8:30 (incl. 1/2 hr. break)

Besides reading and discussing some fiction and poetry with Western settings, and essays that attempt to identify or explain distinctive regional characteristics, this course will consider various movies shaped by and shaping conceptions of Califor...(read more)

Starr, George A.
Bader, Julia

190/6

Research Seminar:
Carnal Knowledge in Medieval and Early Modern Literature

TTh 9:30-11

Medieval feminist scholar Carolyn Dinshaw has argued that the body is "a field on which issues of representation and interpretation are literally and metaphorically played out" ("Eunuch Hermeneutics," 27). This re...(read more)

Miller, Jasmin

190/7

Research Seminar

 This section of English 190 was canceled on November 2.

...(read more)
Stancek, Claire Marie

190/8

Research Seminar:
Edgar Allan Poe

TTh 12:30-2

Two essays (seven pages and thirteen pages) will be required, along with regular attendance and participation in discussion.

Please read the paragraph about English 190 on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes fo...(read more)

Breitwieser, Mitchell

190/9

Research Seminar:
Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln

TTh 12:30-2

We will read works by Douglass, Lincoln, their contemporaries, and their modern interpreters, taking up issues of literature, biography, politics, race, gender, and style and also debates about slavery, Civil War, and Reconstruction, then and now. ...(read more)

Otter, Samuel

190/10

Research Seminar:
Emily Dickinson

TTh 2-3:30

This seminar will provide you with a sustained reading course in the poetry of Emily Dickinson, my favorite poet.  We’ll begin with her early poetry, and trace her evolution into the singular poet we read today, with particular attention...(read more)

Shoptaw, John

190/11

Research Seminar:
Willa Cather

TTh 3:30-5

Two essays (seven pages and thirteen pages) will be required, along with regular attendance and participation in discussion.

Please read the paragraph about English 190 on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes fo...(read more)

Breitwieser, Mitchell

190/13

Research Seminar:
Sixties Cinema

TTh 5-6:30

British and American cinema experienced a renaissance in the 1960s, when it arguably surpassed the literature of its time in artistic ambition and achievement.  We’ll be exploring a wide range of film genres and topics throughout the per...(read more)

Knapp, Jeffrey

H195B/1

Honors Course

TTh 3:30-5

This course is a continuation of H195A section 1, taught by Janet Sorensen in Fall 2018. No new students will be admitted. No new application needs to be submitted. Prof. Sorensen will give out permission codes in class in November.

No ne...(read more)

Sorensen, Janet

H195B/2

Honors Course

MW 5-6:30

This course is a continuation of H195A section 2, taught by Elizabeth Abel in Fall 2018. No new students will be admitted. No new application needs to be submitted. Prof. Abel will give out permission codes in class in November.

No new te...(read more)

Abel, Elizabeth

201A/1

Topics in the Structure of the English Language:
Introduction to Linguistics for Graduate Students in the Humanities

W 3-6

Few areas of research within the humanities are not mediated in some way by language.  Language is an object of philosophical investigation, a medium of historical record and cultural expression, the material of literature, and a metaphor for ...(read more)

Hanson, Kristin

203/1

Graduate Readings:
William Faulkner and the Historical Novel

TTh 9:30-11

(read more)

Goble, Mark

203/3

Graduate Readings:
The Queer and the Oriental

Tues. 12:30-3:30

The queer and the oriental are two figures on the wrong sides of Western philosophies of world history. Imagined as perverted deviations from, or inverted reflections of, a progress from despotic ancestral pasts to free reproductive futures, the qu...(read more)

Leong, Andrew Way

203/4

Graduate Readings:
Renaissance Drama

TTh 2-3:30

Shakespeare’s preeminence as a dramatist has often paradoxically excluded him from courses on English Renaissance drama.  We’ll be returning Shakespeare to the company of his fellow playwrights, reading (among other works) Twelf...(read more)

Knapp, Jeffrey

203/5

Graduate Readings:
Nineteenth-Century U. S. Historical Poetics

Tues. 3:30-6:30

This course will have three overlapping goals. It will provide a survey of major figures in nineteenth-century U. S. poetry. It will take stock of recent work in “Historical Poetics” by critics who have sought an alternative to what the...(read more)

Otter, Samuel

218/1

Milton

W 12-3

For better or worse, most roads in literary history lead either to or from Milton. The goal of this course is to find a way through the massive corpus of Milton's writing, to see how Milton “produces himself” in his work. You should...(read more)

Turner, James Grantham

243N/1

Prose Nonfiction Writing Workshop

W 3-6

Creative Nonfiction:  A graduate level writing workshop, open to graduate students from any department. Open also to undergraduate students from any department who have taken English 143-level writing seminars or have equivalent skills or expe...(read more)

Farber, Thomas

246C/1

Graduate Proseminars (Renaissance):
the End of Scholarism

MW 3-4:30

"Lately two gentlemen poets... had it in derision, for that I could not make my verses jet upon the stage in tragical buskins, every word filling the mouth like the faburden of Bow Bell, daring God out of heaven with that atheist Tamburlaine, ...(read more)

Landreth, David

246L/1

Graduate Pro-seminar (Literature in English, 1945 to the Present):
British Fiction Since 1945

W 9-12

This pro-seminar has two interrelated aims. The first is to survey British fiction (broadly construed) from 1945 through the present. The second is to survey that field’s major critical conversations and give students the tools to enter criti...(read more)

Gang, Joshua

250/1

Research Seminar:
Philosophical Idealizations of Art and Modernist Practices

Thurs. 12:30-3:30

This course stems from my fascination with how often major philosophers idealized art by attributing to it powers that could promise versions of redemption from practical life.  I want to read Hegel, Kant, Nietzsche, Pater, Bergson, Heidegger,...(read more)

Altieri, Charles F.

PLEASE READ CAREFULLY ALL THE PARAGRAPHS BELOW THAT APPLY TO ENGLISH COURSES IN WHICH YOU WANT TO ENROLL. SOME COURSES HAVE LIMITED ENROLLMENT AND/OR HAVE EARLY APPLICATION PROCEDURES.

ALL ENGLISH COURSES: Some courses are in such high demand that they will end up having wait lists. If you end up having to put yourself on one for an English course, please attend the first few classes, as space might open up for you after classes have started.

BERKELEY CONNECT: Would you like to get together with your peers to talk about literature and books? Are you wondering what to do with your English major once you graduate? Do you want to hear about the books that most influenced your English professors? Do you want expert advice about which courses to take? Would you like to see your favorite professors debating about a great work of literature? If so, please join Berkeley Connect!

Berkeley Connect in English fosters community in the English Department and offers a space for “serious play”: small group discussions about ideas and texts, explorations of the many riches of the Berkeley campus, visits by department faculty and distinguished alumni, and one-on-one advice on courses and graduate programs from graduate students and professors.

Individual Berkeley Connect groups (each with about 15-20 students) meet every other week for one hour of “serious play.” On the off weeks, your graduate student mentor will hold office hours so that you can talk individually about issues important to you. Some of the small group meetings will be informal discussions of a range of literary issues, while others involve visits to places around campus (such as the Berkeley Art Museum and the Bancroft Library). On other weeks we will meet as a large group to hear from distinguished alumni, or to listen to Berkeley English professors talk about their own paths into literary study or debate key books in their field with other professors.

There are no essays, papers, exams, or outside reading for Berkeley Connect, just lots of good discussion, valuable advice, and all sorts of “serious play.” Although this is not a traditional course, each participant will enroll in and earn one unit for group independent study (as English 98BC or 198BC, on a Pass/NP basis). The program is not meant to offer extra help or tutoring on things like the mechanics of paper-writing or literary analysis; rather, it aims at providing a more relaxed and fun way to make the best of your Berkeley experience.

Berkeley Connect in English sections:  English 98BC sections 1-2 are intended for lower-division (freshmen and sophomore) students.  English 198BC sections 1, 2, 4, and 5 are intended for upper-division (junior and senior) students, while English 198BC sections 3 and 6 are intended for new (spring) junior transfer students as well as other juniors and seniors.

ENGLISH 43B (Introduction to the Writing of Verse):  This lower-division writing workshop, unlike the other writing workshops being offered this semester, does not require an application or writing sample from prospective students in order to be considered for admission.  Instead, students will  enroll directly, and all the seats in the class will be (at least initially) reserved for freshmen and sophomores. 

UPPER-DIVISION AND GRADUATE-LEVEL CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP COURSES (English 143A, 143B, 143D, 143N, and 243N): These are instructor-approved courses, and enrollment is limited.  Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligible to apply.  Only upper-division students should apply for 143A, 143B, 143D, and 143N; graduate students and (in exceptional cases) upper-division students may apply for 243N.  In order to be considered for admission to any of these courses, you must electronically submit a writing sample AND an application form, using the link on the corresponding class entry on this "Announcement of Classes," BY 11 P.M., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 25, AT THE LATEST.  (If you are applying for more than one of these classes, you will need to submit an application and the corresponding writing sample for each of the classes/sections you are applying for.)  The instructors will review the writing samples and applications, and the class lists will be posted on the bulletin board in the hall just across from the entrance to the English Department main office (322 Wheeler Hall) on Thursday, November 1. Please come on or shortly after Thursday, November 1, to see if your name is on the class list for the section(s) you applied for; please check in person, as this information is NOT available over the phone. ONLY STUDENTS ON THESE CLASS LISTS WILL BE ADMITTED TO THE CORRESPONDING CLASSES, AND EACH ADMITTED STUDENT WILL NEED TO OBTAIN HIS/HER INDIVIDUAL PERMISSION CODE FROM THE INSTRUCTOR AT THE FIRST CLASS MEETING. NO ONE WILL THEREFORE BE ABLE TO ACTUALLY ENROLL IN THESE PARTICULAR CLASSES BEFORE THESE CLASSES START MEETING IN THE SPRING.

ENGLISH 190 (RESEARCH SEMINAR): English 190 is intended mainly for senior and junior English majors. During at least Phase I of enrollment, only majors who will be in their fourth or third year as of Spring '19 will be able to enroll directly into most sections of this course; upper-division students who intend to major in English and have taken some courses that will count towards the major but who have not yet declared (as well as non-majors) will need to put themselves on the wait list of the section they are interested in taking, and they will be admitted if and when there is still room for them. Due to space limitations (maximum enrollment is normally 18 students per section), students may initially enroll in or wait-list themselves for only one section of English 190. However, if it turns out that some sections still have room in them late in Phase I and during Phase II of enrollment, we may loosen the restrictions for admission to sections of 190 that are not yet full.

ENGLISH H195B (HONORS COURSE): This course is open only to students who are enrolled in a Fall 2018 English H195A section. Your H195A instructor will give each of you a permission code for H195B in class sometime in November.

DE-CAL CLASSES: All proposals for Spring 2019 DE-Cal courses must be submitted to the work-study student at the front desk of the English Department main office (322 Wheeler Hall) BY 4:00 P.M., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 25. Please note that individual faculty members may sponsor only one DE-Cal course per semester. Students wishing to offer a DE-Cal course must provide, to the English Department office, the following for approval: (1) a carefully completed COCI Special Studies Course Proposal Form for 98 and 198, available at: http://academic-senate.berkeley.edu. (Click "Committees", then "COCI," and scroll down to "Committee Resources" and click "Student-Facilitated Course Information" and select "Required Documents.") Students must download and complete the newest version of this form and obtain the proposed faculty sponsor’s signature on it before submitting it, along with the other necessary paperwork: (2) a copy of the fully developed syllabus of the proposed course; (3) a copy of the course description, including the criteria for passing the course; (4) a completed Unit Value Worksheet; and (5) the faculty sponsor's letter of support. A few days after the October 25 submission deadline, the students whose proposals have been approved by the Department Chair will be notified that they need to see Laurie Kerr, in 322 Wheeler, in order to arrange for a classroom for their course and to work out a few other details before the submission of copies of their approved proposals to COCI (for its final approval) and to the DE-Cal Office.

INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSES: These are instructor-approved courses and require a written petition, available from the front desk in the English Department's advising office (319 Wheeler). Completed petitions should be signed by the instructor and returned by the student to the "undergraduate petitions" drop box on the same counter as the rack containing the blank petition forms. Students will subsequently be emailed the Class Number that they will use to actually enroll in the class. Often students will elect to wait until spring courses have started to apply for independent study courses.