Announcement of Classes: Fall 2019

Course #
Instructor
Course Area

R1A/1

Reading and Composition:
Human Resources: Problems in the American Workplace

MWF 9-10

Fiction has provided a means for workers to re-imagine or even escape their everyday issues from the dawn of the labor movement to the heyday of the tech startup. Across a long history of media about work—including the muckraking of Upton Sin...(read more)

Ramm, Gerard

R1A/2

Reading and Composition:
Bodies and Boundaries

MWF 10-11

How are the boundaries of bodies—human and otherwise—defined? What happens when certain bodies cross boundaries meant to contain or exclude them? How does a body transform its own boundaries or interact with other bodies beyond and with...(read more)

Ding, Katherine

R1A/3

Reading and Composition:
Inscribing Fear: Written Horror, Living Flesh, and the Cultures that Produce Both

MWF 11-12

The horror genre—whose very purpose is to let us experience that which frightens, startles, or disgusts through a fictional lens—is capable of inciting a wide range of visceral responses. What will be the particular focus of this class,...(read more)

Tomasula y Garcia, Alba

R1A/4

Reading and Composition:
Theorizing Race and Space in Asian American Studies

MWF 12-1

How does an understanding of space and the built environment inflect our understanding of ethnicized forms of belonging? My course charts the development of Asian American indentity and literature through four sites in the Bay Area: Angel Island, t...(read more)

Su, Amanda Jennifer

R1A/5

Reading and Composition

MWF 1-2

For details about this section of Reading and Composition, please check this listing again in June.

...(read more)
No instructor assigned yet.

R1A/6

Reading and Composition

MWF 1-2

For details about this section of Reading and Composition, please check this listing again in June.

...(read more)
No instructor assigned yet.

R1A/7

Reading and Composition:
Energy Fictions

MWF 2-3

This course explores literary and scientific perspectives on energy and its fictions from the early 19th century to the present, from the origins of carbon modernity and petroculture in the age of steam to contemporary 21st-century attempts to reck...(read more)

Barbour, Andrew John

R1A/8

Reading and Composition

MW 5-6:30

For details about this section of Reading and Composition, please check this listing again in June.

...(read more)
No instructor assigned yet.

R1B/1

Reading and Composition:
Gothic Trash

MWF 9-10

Gothic horror has never gone out of style. From the ominous castles of Horace Walpole and Ann Radcliffe in the eighteenth century to contemporary TV hits such as American Horror Story or The Haunting of Hill House&n...(read more)

Hobbs, Katherine

R1B/2

Reading and Composition:
Some Hard-Boiled Detectives

MWF 10-11

"It is not a very fragrant world, but it is the world you live in. . . ." So Raymond Chandler characterizes the world out of joint painted by "the realist in murder." The tradition of hard-boiled detective fiction offers (arguab...(read more)

O'Brien, Garreth

R1B/3

Reading and Composition:
Novel Spaces: Contemporary Fiction and the Internet

MWF 10-11

In 1981, Kraftwerk released their landmark album Computer World. Since the time they recorded it, politicians, economists and journalists have suggested that the digitization of society would change everything, producing a world of in...(read more)

D'Silva, Eliot

R1B/4

Reading and Composition:
Fake/News: New Journalism, the War on Truth, and Democracy in Peril

MWF 11-12

 "New Journalism" has always been a slippery term. But this literary movement from the 1960s and '70s, that rejected notions of journalistic objectivity in favor of political and cultural commitment, and malaise in favor of &quot...(read more)

Cruz, Frank Eugene

R1B/5

Reading and Composition:
The Monstrous Renaissance

MWF 11-12

This class ventures into Renaissance texts in search of the many monsters that dwell there. We will encounter eerily human beasts, snaky-haired Gorgons, monstrous births, and fierce cannibals. We will get to know those monsters through critical ana...(read more)

Rice, Sarah Sands

R1B/6

Reading and Composition:
Drama and Disability

MWF 12-1

It is a critical truism that the disabled body is always already a theatrical body—alternatively passing and masquerading. This course will interrogate the terms of this truism by examining how both disability and theatre have been historical...(read more)

Drawdy, Miles

R1B/7

Reading and Composition:
The Literature of Aotearoa/New Zealand

MWF 12-1

This course will focus first and foremost on the practice of academic writing and the skills needed to research, plan, draft and revise writing at a college level. More specifically, it stages the problem of scholarly research through an encounter ...(read more)

Sutton, Emily

R1B/8

Reading and Composition:
On Happiness

MWF 12-1

In contemporary popular culture, "happiness" is often pictured as an object just beyond our reach. We try to organize our future life-paths to be "happy," tend to collectively agree that happiness is a worthwhile pursuit, and de...(read more)

Ritland, Laura

R1B/9

Reading and Composition:
The Information Society

MWF 1-2

What is an information society? How do we read and think in a world of information? Numerous publications in recent years, both inside and outside the academy, have identified the late twentieth and twenty-first centures as an age of information, a...(read more)

Hinojosa, Bernardo S.

R1B/10

Reading and Composition

MWF 1-2

For details about this section of Reading and Composition, please check this listing again in June.

...(read more)
No instructor assigned yet.

R1B/11

Reading and Composition

MWF 1-2

For details about this section of Reading and Composition, please check this listing again in June.

...(read more)
No instructor assigned yet.

R1B/12

Reading and Composition

MWF 2-3

For details about this section of Reading and Composition, please check this listing again in June.

...(read more)
No instructor assigned yet.

R1B/13

Reading and Composition

MW 5-6:30

For details about this section of Reading and Composition, please check this listing again in June.

...(read more)
No instructor assigned yet.

R1B/14

Reading and Composition:
(Im)personal Essays

MW 5-6:30

What does it mean to give your writing "personality"? In this course we will consider varying kinds of nonfiction (travel writing, reportage, Netflix comedy specials, autobiographical games, autotheory, and the classic "personal essa...(read more)

Khan, Mehak Faisal

R1B/15

Reading and Composition:
Don't Go There! Fairy Tales

TTh 8-9:30

There is almost nothing more familiar than a fairy tale, yet they all address unfamiliarity, danger, and risk. For children, young women and everyone else, the world is full of mysterious knowledge and dreadful ordeals. So how do fairy tales c...(read more)

Baker-Gibbs, Ariel

R1B/16

Reading and Composition:
Queer I

TTh 5-6:30

This course asks how writers use the stories of individual lives to negotiate what it means to be "queer," in the widest possible sense of the term. Most of what we read will be pieces written by authors describing their own lived experie...(read more)

Stevenson, Max

17/1

Shakespeare

Lectures MW 11-12 in 106 Stanley + one hour of discussion section per week in various locations (sec. 101: F 9-10; sec. 102: F 9-10; sec. 103: F 11-12; sec. 104: F 11-12)

English 17 offers an introduction to the study of Shakespeare that is intended for students new to the Berkeley English Department. Incoming transfer students, future majors, and non-majors are especially welcome.

The premise o...(read more)

Landreth, David

20/1

Modern British and American Literature:
The Handmaid's Tale in Adaptation

TTh 12:30-2

With the advent of the Trump presidency (2016-present), Margaret Atwood’s dystopian, feminist masterpiece, The Handmaid’s Tale, has gained new relevance. And with the popular and critical success of its Hulu TV series adaptatio...(read more)

Snyder, Katherine

24/1

Freshman Seminar:
Walt Whitman

Tues. 2-3

We will read and discuss extraordinary poems by Walt Whitman.

This 1-unit course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.

...(read more)
Wagner, Bryan

24/2

Freshman Seminar:
Here Here in Tommy Orange's There There

Tues. 12:30-1:30

Tommy Orange's story cycle, There There, depicts the lives of contemporary indigenous people in Oakland, California. Shaped by a transgenerational trauma, Orange's characters nonetheless survive. Countering romantic stereotype...(read more)

Wong, Hertha D. Sweet

31AC/1

Literature of American Cultures:
Growing Up Funny

MWF 9-10

America, we are told, is a nation of immigrants—of people from other lands who travel here and “become” American. That's a tall order. But what of those who can never quite belong—the misfits, outliers and strangers in t...(read more)

Saha, Poulomi

43A/1

Introduction to the Writing of Short Fiction

TTh 12:30-2

(Note: This course was added on April 26.)

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the study of short fiction—to explore the elements that make up the genre, and to enable students to talk critically about short stories a...(read more)

Chandra, Melanie Abrams

45A/1

Literature in English: Through Milton

Lectures MW 12-1 in 159 Mulford + one hour of discussion section per week in various locations (sec. 101: F 11-12; sec. 102: F 11-12; sec. 103: F 12-1; sec. 104: F 12-1; sec. 105: Th 1-2; sec. 106: Th 1-2; sec. 107: Th 2-3; sec. 108: Th 2-3)

What is the English literary tradition? Where did it come from? What are its distinctive habits, questions, styles, obsessions? This course will answer these and other questions by focusing on five key writers from the Middle Ages and the Renaissan...(read more)

Nolan, Maura

45B/1

Literature in English: Late-17th Through Mid-19th Centuries

Lectures MW 2-3 in 101 Morgan + one hour of discussion section per week in various locations (sec. 101: F 1-2; sec. 102: F 1-2; sec. 103: F 2-3; sec. 104: F 2-3; sec. 105: Th 9-10; sec. 106: Th 9-10; sec. 107: Th 10-11; sec. 108: Th 10-11)

Do written words cause revolutions, and how might literature aid, absorb, or elude transformations of the social world? This course surveys the revolutionary middle of literary history in English, from 1688 to1848: a period dr...(read more)

Goldstein, Amanda Jo

45C/1

Literature in English: Mid-19th Through the 20th Century

Lectures MW 10-11 in 159 Mulford + one hour of discussion section per week in various locations (sec. 101: F 9-10; sec. 102: F 9-10; sec. 103: F 10-11; sec. 104: F 10-11; sec. 105: Th 11-12; sec. 106: Th 11-12; sec. 107: Th 1-2; sec. 108: Th 1-2)

This course will survey British, American, and global Anglophone literature from the end of the 19th century through the beginning of the 21st. Moving across a number of genres and movements, this course will examine the ...(read more)

Gang, Joshua

53/1

Asian American Literature and Culture:
Voice, Text, Image

MWF 1-2

This is a brand-new lecture and discussion course that provides a survey of early to contemporary Asian American literary and cultural production. We'll study the broad range of forms that have served as vehicles of Asian American pol...(read more)

Leong, Andrew Way

84/1

Sophomore Seminar:
The Coen Brothers

Tues. 9-12

We will concentrate on the high and low cultural elements in the noir comedies of the Coen brothers, discusing their use of Hollywood genres, parodies of classic conventions, and representation of arbitrariness. We will also read some fiction and a...(read more)

Bader, Julia

111/1

Chaucer

MWF 2-3

For more information on this course, please contact Professor Miller at j_miller@berkeley.edu.

This class satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

...(read more)
Miller, Jennifer

115A/1

The English Renaissance (through the 16th Century)

MWF 12-1

For more information on this course, please contact Professor Miller at j_miller@berkeley.edu.

This class satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

...(read more)
Miller, Jennifer

117B/1

Shakespeare

TTh 9:30-11

When the Globe Theatre opened in 1599, Shakespeare was 35, and he had written eight comedies and eight history plays but just two tragedies (Titus Andronicus and Romeo and Juliet).  After 1599, Shakespeare reinvented himself ...(read more)

Arnold, Oliver

118/1

Milton

TTh 11-12:30

Intensive reading in the poetry and prose of John Milton (1608-1674), written during a period of dramatic historical change, and including the most influential single poem in the English language, Paradise Lost. Our goal is to get under th...(read more)

Turner, James Grantham

120/1

Literature of the Later 18th Century

W 3-6

We’ll investigate the relationship of literature to other arts in the period, particularly painting and landscape design. Our focus will be on engagements with “nature,” understood as the non-human world and the ground of culture....(read more)

Picciotto, Joanna M

122/1

The Victorian Period

TTh 9:30-11

The Victorian period (1837 - 1901) is a notoriously arbitrary periodic designation, tied to the reign of one particular woman, Victoria Alexandrina Hanover, otherwise known as Queen Victoria I. The period is not self-evidently defined by any generi...(read more)

Lavery, Grace

125D/1

The 20th-Century Novel

MWF 11-12

This course is a survey of the 20th-century novel. The novel is the quintessential form of expression of modernity and modern subjectivity. In this survey of key works of the century, we will explore the novel form as it is framed by these three th...(read more)

Jones, Donna V.

128/1

Modern Drama

MW 3-4:30

This course will trace the theater's itinerary as form and idea across the twentieth century, attending to the stage as both a writerly medium and a space that contests received literary ideas. We will begin in the Euro...(read more)

Blanton, C. D.

130B/1

American Literature: 1800-1865

TTh 12:30-2

We will read the extraordinary fiction, poetry, essays, and speeches of this period, including works by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Edgar Allan Poe, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, Fanny Fern, Herman Me...(read more)

Otter, Samuel

130D/1

American Literature: 1900-1945:
Class, Race, Critique, Rewound

MW 5-6:30

This course is a retrospective or "rewound" survey of American literature and criticism from 1945 to 1900. We'll begin in the 1940s, working our way back in time, not only through key works in prose and poetry, but also through c...(read more)

Leong, Andrew Way

134/1

Contemporary Literature

Lectures MW 12-1 in 141 McCone + one hour of discussion section per week in various locations (sec. 101: F 10-11; sec. 102: F 12-1; sec. 103: Th 11-12; sec. 104: Th 1-2)

In this course we will look at examples of very recently published literary works across a range of genres. We’ll explore some of the many ways that writerly innovation is challenging aesthetic norms (including those of “the novel,&rdqu...(read more)

Falci, Eric
Hejinian, Lyn

C136/1

Special Topics:
Harlem Renaissance

TTh 3:30-5

The Harlem Renaissance was a cultural movement of black artists and writers in the 1920s. Centered in the Harlem neighborhood in Manhattan, the movement extended outward through international collaboration. We will be reading works by writers inclu...(read more)

Wagner, Bryan

137B/1

Chicana/o Literature and Culture Since 1910:
Chicanx Novels

TTh 11-12:30

This course will focus on the study of Chicanx novels. The themes and formal features in these novels have been influenced to a large degree by a broad range of social experiences: living in the borderlands of culture, language, and nationality; gr...(read more)

Gonzalez, Marcial

141/1

Modes of Writing (Exposition, Fiction, Verse, etc.)

TTh 9:30-11

This course will introduce students to the study of creative writing—fiction and poetry (with a brief dip into playwriting). Students will learn to talk critically about these forms and begin to feel comfortable and confident writing within t...(read more)

Chandra, Melanie Abrams

143A/1

Short Fiction

TTh 12:30-2

A short fiction workshop with a focus on the craft of writing. In this course, we will be readers, writers, and editors of short fiction. We'll read a range of published short stories in order to discover the technical ways in which a short sto...(read more)

McFarlane, Fiona

143A/2

Short Fiction

MW 10:30-12

A short fiction workshop. Over the course of the semester, each student will write and revise two stories. Each participant in the workshop will edit student-written stories and will write a formal critique of each manuscript. Students are required...(read more)

Chandra, Vikram

143B/1

Verse

MW 12-1:30

The question is whether or not poetry can be more than a series of successful gestures, as F. Scott Fitzgerald put it rather long ago, or arrive at something other than the statement or restatement of an emotional truth or idea. Can poetry int...(read more)

Giscombe, Cecil S.

143N/1

Prose Nonfiction:
Creative Nonfiction: Our Culture, Our Lives

TTh 11-12:30

This course is a creative nonfiction workshop in which you'll learn to write about many different types of art and culture, from TV and film to music and the built environment, while developing your own voice as a writer and reflecting on what ...(read more)

Saul, Scott

143N/2

Prose Nonfiction:
Food Writing

TTh 3:30-5

This is a creative nonfiction writing workshop focused on the topic of food.  Food writing encompasses more than snooty restaurant reviews or poetic descriptions of the taste of wine, coffee, and chocolate.  Food writing can include memoi...(read more)

Kleege, Georgina

161/1

Introduction to Literary Theory

TTh 12:30-2

In this course we will study how literary theory developed as a field in the twentieth century, even as it regularly drew its principles, methods, and inspiration from other academic disciplines and social discourses.  Our focus will be on the...(read more)

Hale, Dorothy J.

165/1

Special Topics:
Utopian and (mostly) Dystopian Movies

W 5-8:30 PM

Most utopian and dystopian authors are more concerned with persuading readers of the merits of their ideas than with the "merely" literary qualities of their writing. Although utopian writing has sometimes made converts, inspiring readers...(read more)

Starr, George A.

165/2

Special Topics:
The Pleasures of Allegory

MWF 12-1

If you want to understand both how stories are put together and how we experience stories, allegory is not a bad place to start. Broadly speaking, an allegory is a story that demands to be read on more than one level. One version of this&mdash...(read more)

Wilson, Evan

166/1

Special Topics:
Getting Global: Literature & Film of an Expanding & Unequal World

MWF 12-1

This is a course about literature and cinema in our increasingly global world. We will look at some of the most exciting pieces of fiction and film, most of them centered on the theme of travel and human relationships forged across continents.&nbsp...(read more)

Saha, Poulomi

166/2

Special Topics:
Literature in the Century of Film

MWF 1-2

This course examines various intersections between literature and visual media in the twentieth century, with a particular focus on texts concerned with film and its cultural influence. We will read novels, stories, poetry, and essays which not onl...(read more)

Goble, Mark

166/3

Special Topics:
Writing as Social Practice

MW 3-4:30

One of the ideas behind this course offering is that poetry and essays (life-writing, creative nonfiction, "essaying," etc.) have similar aims or field-marks—both are literary vehicles of exploration and documentation; both value ex...(read more)

Giscombe, Cecil S.

166/4

Special Topics:
Literatures of the Asian Diaspora in America

TTh 9:30-11

This aim of this survey is two-fold: First, to interrogate the concept of nationhood and, particularly, what it means to be American.  Focusing on writings by and about peoples of Asian descent across the twentieth century and into the twenty-...(read more)

Lee, Steven S.

166/5

Special Topics:
Seeing Is Believing: Early Realist Painting and Writing

TTh 9:30-11

Seventeenth-century Dutch painting, with its mirror-like copies of everyday objects, and early English prose fiction, with its claims to represent true stories, invited viewers and readers to believe that their representations credibly copied the r...(read more)

Sorensen, Janet

166/7

Special Topics:
Charles Dickens

TTh 2-3:30

Close readings of several of Charles Dickens's major works.

...(read more)
Breitwieser, Mitchell

166/8

Special Topics:
Green Thought in a Green Shade

TTh 2-3:30

The natural world and the non-urban environment have inspired writers and artists, especially in the 17th and 18th centuries, but they have also provoked intense critical d...(read more)

Turner, James Grantham

166/9

Special Topics:
New Orleans

TTh 5-6:30

We will be thinking about the culture and history of New Orleans as represented in fiction, folklore, and documentary cinema. We will also engage with the current controversy over monuments and memorialization in the c...(read more)

Wagner, Bryan

166/11

Special Topics:
The Works of Vladimir Nabokov

TTh 11-12:30

We will study the work of Nabokov as a novelist on two continents over a period of nearly sixty years. The course will be structured (more or less) chronologically and divided between novels translated from Russian and written in English. After beg...(read more)

Naiman, Eric

166AC/1

Special Topics in American Cultures:
Race and Revision in Early America

Lectures MW 1-2 in 50 Birge + one hour of discussion section per week in various locations (sec. 101: F 1-2; sec. 102: F 2-3; sec. 103: Th 9-10; sec. 104: Th 10-11; sec. 105: Th 2-3; sec. 106: Th 4-5)

In this course, we will read both historical and literary texts to explore how racial categories came into being in New World cultures, and how these categories were tested, inhabited, and re-imagined by the people they sought to define. Our s...(read more)

Donegan, Kathleen

175/1

Literature and Disability

TTh 3:30-5

This course will allow students to explore theories and representations of disability.  We’ll wonder whether it’s possible to develop an inclusive, common “theory” adequate to vario...(read more)

Langan, Celeste

177/1

Literature and Philosophy

MWF 1-2

This class will be organized around two questions that have been of perennial concern to literary writers and philosophers: who are we? How should we live? We’ll read a wide range of texts that respond to these questions in different way...(read more)

Zhang, Dora

180C/1

Comedy

TTh 12:30-2

Comedy is a distraction. It is a distraction from serious matters, from what really matters. It is a crowd-pleaser (as you like it) without any substance (much ado about nothing). And yet as theorists of comedy have often...(read more)

Marno, David

180H/1

The Short Story

MWF 2-3

The lyf so short, the crafte so longe to lerne… -- Chaucer

This course will investigate how authors craft stories, so that both non-writers and writers may gain a new perspective on reading stories. In thinking of short stories as ...(read more)

Chandra, Vikram

190/1

Research Seminar:
Creative Sentences

MW 9-10:30

Samuel Taylor Coleridge once praised a sentence of his own, noting that it was 241 words long and that the main verb didn’t appear until the 216th word. Is that wait for a verb too long? Gertrude Stein wrote this sentence: “Very little ...(read more)

Hejinian, Lyn
Falci, Eric

190/2

Research Seminar:
Shakespeare and Company

MW 1:30-3

In this research seminar, we'll be considering Shakespeare, his playwriting rivals, his actorly partners, and their audiences as participants in the burgeoning entertainment industry of early modern London. We'll attend to the conditions an...(read more)

Landreth, David

190/3

Research Seminar:
American Transcendentalism

TTh 9:30-11

We will immerse ourselves in the literary, political, philosophical, and aesthetic thought of the influential mid-nineteenth-century movement in the United States known as Transcendentalism. We will read fiction, essays, autobiographies, and poems ...(read more)

Otter, Samuel

190/4

Research Seminar:
Cli Fi (Climate Change Fiction)

TTh 9:30-11

How do we imagine the unimaginable? When it comes to global climate change, we have for the most part avoided imagining it altogether. But contemporary fiction writers are increasingly turning their gaze, and ours, toward the impact and meanings of...(read more)

Snyder, Katherine

190/5

Research Seminar:
The Urban Postcolonial

TTh 11-12:30

An intensive research seminar exploring the relationship between urban landscapes and postcolonial literary cultures. Readings in theories of postcoloniality and diaspora as well as studies in city planning and architecture will accompany...(read more)

Ellis, Nadia

190/6

Research Seminar:
Literature on Trial: Romanticism, Law, Justice

TTh 11-12:30

This course will introduce students to “law and literature” studies, focusing on the way literature imagines the relation between law and justice.  We’ll concentrate on literature of the ...(read more)

Langan, Celeste

190/8

Research Seminar:
Ideology

TTh 2-3:30

This research seminar will focus on how the concept of ideology historically has been employed by literary and cultural critics. During the first half of the semester, the reading material will include major theoretical statements on the meaning an...(read more)

Gonzalez, Marcial

190/10

Research Seminar:
Inventing Nature and Constructing Race

TTh 3:30-5

Scholars have recently argued that race and nature were "invented" around the turn of the nineteenth century. We'll begin by unpacking their counterintuitive arguments: what does it mean to argue that fundamental conceptual categories...(read more)

McWilliams, Ryan

H195A/1

Honors Course

MW 3:30-5

(read more)

Goble, Mark

H195A/2

Honors Course

TTh 11-12:30

H195A/B is a two-semester seminar that lays the groundwork for and guides you through the completion a 40-60 page Honors thesis on a subject of your choice. The first semester offers an inquiry into critical approaches, research methods, and theore...(read more)

Abel, Elizabeth

200/1

Problems in the Study of Literature

MW 10:30-12

Approaches to literary study, including textual analysis, scholarly methodology and bibliography, critical theory and practice.

Enrollment is limited to entering doctoral students in the English program.

This course satisfi...(read more)

Goldstein, Amanda Jo

203/1

Graduate Readings:
On Interpretation

MW 12-1:30

The last several decades have heard repeated, even rhythmic, calls to dispense with ‘interpretation’ as the model and indispensable methodological instrument of reading and critical reason, even within intellectual disciplines seemingly...(read more)

Blanton, C. D.

203/2

Graduate Readings:
Prospectus Workshop

Tues. 2-5

This will be a hands-on writing workshop intended to facilitate and accelerate the transition from qualifying exams to prospectus conference, from prospectus conference to first dissertation chapter, and from the status of student to that of schola...(read more)

Abel, Elizabeth

203/3

Graduate Readings:
Aesthetics and Politics: Kant and Beyond

TTh 12:30-2

As an introduction to the political possibilities, problems, and questions raised by Kantian aesthetics, this class will navigate between two quotations: 1) Schiller: “If man is ever to solve that problem of politics in practice he will have ...(read more)

Goldsmith, Steven

212/1

Readings in Middle English

M 3-6

This course will survey Middle English literature, excluding Chaucer, beginning with the earliest Middle English texts and ending with Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. We will focus on language, translation, and close reading to start, leading up t...(read more)

Nolan, Maura

246F/1

Graduate Proseminar: The Later-Eighteenth Century

W 3-6

The later eighteenth century has presented literary historians with more than the usual challenges to periodization and organization by author, movement, or genre. The years between (roughly) 1740-1800 witnessed the proliferation of new genres in v...(read more)

Goodman, Kevis

246K/1

Literature in English, 1900-1945

MW 1:30-3

In this seminar, we will read a wide range of British and American novels from the first half of the twentieth century focusing on the intersections between modernism and theories of modernity. While we will pay considerable attention to modernism&...(read more)

Jones, Donna V.

250/1

Research Seminar:
The English Department

Tues. 3:30-6:30

The English Department is one of the most curious developments in the history of human civilization. What do we study? The answer used to be, “literary texts of the English canon.” But then we questioned what belonged to the canon, what...(read more)

Marno, David

250/2

Research Seminar:
Transcendentalism

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

This course considers Transcendentalism and its legacies with particular focus on the works of Ralph Waldo Emerson from the publication of Nature (1836) through Letters and Social Aims (1875).  Following Emerson's career ...(read more)

Tamarkin, Elisa

375/1

The Teaching of Composition and Literature

Tues. 10:30-12:30

This course introduces new English Department GSIs to the theory and practice of teaching literature and writing, first for discussion sections of lecture courses, and second, for self-designed reading and co...(read more)

Serpell, C. Namwali
Sirianni, Lucy

BERKELEY CONNECT: Would you like to get together with your peers to talk about literature and books? Are you wondering what to do with your English major once you graduate? Do you want to hear about the books that most influenced your English professors? Do you want expert advice about which courses to take? Would you like to see your favorite professors debating about a great work of literature? If so, please join Berkeley Connect!

Berkeley Connect in English fosters community in the English Department and offers a space for “serious play”: small group discussions about ideas and texts, explorations of the many riches of the Berkeley campus, visits by department faculty and distinguished alumni, and one-on-one advice on courses and graduate programs from graduate students and professors.

Individual Berkeley Connect groups (each with about 15-20 students) meet every other week for one hour of “serious play.” On the off weeks, your graduate student mentor will hold office hours so that you can talk individually about issues important to you. Some of the small group meetings will be informal discussions of a range of literary issues, while others involve visits to places around campus (such as the Berkeley Art Museum and the Bancroft Library). On other weeks we will meet as a large group to hear from distinguished alumni, or to listen to Berkeley English professors talk about their own paths into literary study or debate key books in their field with other professors.

There are no essays, papers, exams, or outside reading for Berkeley Connect, just lots of good discussion, valuable advice, and all sorts of “serious play.” Although this is not a traditional course, each participant will enroll in and earn one unit for group independent study (as English 98BC or 198BC, on a Pass/NP basis). The program is not meant to offer extra help or tutoring on things like the mechanics of paper-writing or literary analysis; rather, it aims at providing a more relaxed and fun way to make the best of your Berkeley experience.

Berkeley Connect in English sections:  English 98BC sections 1-2 are intended for lower-division (freshmen and sophomore) students.  English 198BC sections 3, 4, and 6 are intended for new junior transfer students; sections 2, 5, and 7 are intended for continuing upper-division (junior and senior) students; and sections 1 and 8 are intended for both.

Though Berkeley Connect may be repeated for credit, students may enroll in no more than one section of Berkeley Connect in English in a given semester.  Moreover, a Berkeley Connect class may not be taken in more than two departments in the same semester.

DE-CAL CLASSES: All proposals for Fall 2019 De-Cal courses must be submitted at the front desk in the English Department main office (322 Wheeler) BY 4:00 P.M., THURSDAY, APRIL 25. Please note that individual faculty members may sponsor only one De-Cal course per semester. Students wishing to offer a De-Cal course must provide, to the English Department office, the following for approval: 1) a carefully completed COCI Special Studies Course Proposal Form, available at: academic-senate.berkeley.edu/committee/coci/339, for 198 classes. Students must download and complete the newest version of this form (labeled v,10.2018 in the bottom right corner) and obtain the proposed faculty sponsor’s signature on it before submitting it, along with the other necessary paperwork; 2) a copy of the fully developed syllabus of the proposed course; 3) a copy of the course description, including the criteria for passing the course; 4) a completed Unit Value Worksheet; and 5) the faculty sponsor's letter of support. (Also make sure that you have completed the training requirement for student facilitators; the Undergraduate Course Faciliator Training & Resources [UCFTR] program hosts multiple trainings across each semester.) A few days after the April 25 submission deadline, the students whose proposals have been approved by the Department Chair will be notified that they need to see Laurie Kerr, in 322 Wheeler, in order to arrange for a classroom for their course and to work out a few other details before the submission of copies of their proposals to COCI (for its final approval) and to the De-Cal office.

INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSES: These are instructor-approved courses and require a written application, available from 319 Wheeler. Applications should be signed by the instructor and returned by the student to 319 Wheeler. Students will be emailed the class number that they will use to enroll in the class on Cal Central. Often students will elect to wait until fall courses have started to apply for independent study courses.