Announcement of Classes: Summer 2020

There are no special instructions for Summer 2020 English Department courses, other than to note in which session each course is offered.

The following courses are offered in Session A (May 26 - July 2):  English R1B section 1, R1B section 3, 117S, and 133T.

The following courses are offered in Session C (June 22 - August 13):  English R1B section 2, R1B section 4, 125E, 143A section 1, 143A section 2, 166 section 1, 166 section 2, and 166 section 3.

The following courses are offered in Session D (July 7 - August 13):  English R1A section 1, R1A section 2, 166AC, 180Z, and 198BC.


Shakespeare

English 117S

Section: 1
Session: A
Instructor: Marno, David
Time: TWTh 5-7:30
Location:


Description

This course focuses on a selection of Shakespeare’s works that includes some of the best-known plays (Midsummer, Lear) as well as some of the less known but fascinating works (Troilus and Cressida, Cymbeline). We’ll consider various performances of the plays, and devote at least one meeting to the sonnets.

This course satisfies the Shakespeare requirement for UC Berkeley English majors.


The Contemporary Novel: Character and Collectivity

English 125E

Section: 1
Session: C
Instructor: Bernes, Jasper
Time: TWTh 12-2
Location:


Book List

Atwood, Margaret: Oryx and Crake; Beatty, Paul: The Sellout; Jemisin, N. K.: The Fifth Season; Lim, Eugene: Dear Cyborg

Description

What options are there for novelists who want to tell the story of the many rather than the story of the one? If history represents the actions of millions of people, how does literature represent these collective histories?  Contemporary society forces these kinds of questions on its chroniclers, inasmuch as it offers extremes of isolation and social atomization alongside new forms of collectivity (in protest movements, on the internet, and elsewhere). In this course, we will look at 21st-century novelists who have risen to the challenges of representation posed by recent history, resuscitating old forms, inventing new ones, or blowing up the novel altogether.


Topics in African American Literature and Culture: Humor and the Neo-Slave Narrative

English 133T

Section: 1
Session: A
Instructor: Catchings, Alex
Time: TWTh 1-3:30
Location:


Description

A course exploring how the 19th-century slave narrative was reworked in the 20th century by novelists Ishmael Reed, Charles Johnson, and Paul Beatty into a humorous (or at least tragicomic) critique of American race relations after the 1960s.


Short Fiction

English 143A

Section: 1
Session: C
Instructor: Walter, David
Time: TTh 2-5
Location:


Description

This course is a laboratory for student writers to work on short stories or, if appropriate, chapters from longer fictional projects. Over the eight weeks, we will help you discover your own methods for building worlds, developing characters, structuring plots, and crafting scenes. In the process, we will probe the divisions between genres, discuss strategies for publishing or selling your work, and invite guest authors to share their insights on craft.

Note that while for the fall and spring semesters admission to 143A requires an application process, no application is needed to register for the summer version of the course.


Short Fiction

English 143A

Section: 2
Session:
Instructor: Walter, David
Time: TTh 9-12
Location:


Description

This course is a laboratory for student writers to work on short stories or, if appropriate, chapters from longer fictional projects. Over the eight weeks, we will help you discover your own methods for building worlds, developing characters, structuring plots, and crafting scenes. In the process, we will probe the divisions between genres, discuss strategies for publishing or selling your work, and invite guest authors to share their insights on craft.

Note that while for the fall and spring semesters admission to 143A requires an application process, no application is needed to register for the summer version of the course.


Special Topics: Medieval Fantasy from Tolkien to Game of Thrones

English 166

Section: 1
Session: C
Instructor: Stevenson, Max
Time: MW 2-5
Location:


Description

Writers in the 20th and 21st centuries have continually looked to the Middle Ages — or, more to the point, to their idea of the Middle Ages — when constructing epic narratives in fantastic worlds. In this course we’ll ask what it is about the medieval that writers of fantasy find so useful, as well as consider what aspects of the medieval — especially race, gender, and sexuality — their accounts ignore. We’ll read both the medieval literature that modern fantasy draws on and works by (this is a likely list, but subject to change) J.R.R. Tolkien, George R.R. Martin, and Kazuo Ishiguro, as well as view film and television adaptations.


Special Topics: Global Catastrophe and Modern Literature

English 166

Section: 2
Session: C
Instructor: Nathan, Jesse
Time: TTh 2-5
Location:


Description

Global crisis defined the first part of the twentieth century. Pandemic illness and catastrophic economic collapse, along with World War after World War, meant it was a time rife with ethnic, racial, imperial, and political tensions, and a time also of mass displacement and personal upheaval. All of which this class takes as its starting point and backdrop for a focus upon some of the great works of literature produced in the English-speaking world during that tumultuous time.

In this course, students will encounter major works of British and U.S. prose and poetry (from James Joyce and Gertrude Stein to Langston Hughes, Virginia Woolf, Jean Toomer, T.S. Eliot, and others) of the so-called modern era. Taking a transatlantic look at innovative writing in the early 20th century meant to challenge readers in both form and theme, we will unpack what makes a modernist text modernist, what some of the intellectual roots of the movement may be, and what kinds of meanings have been ascribed to it – both in its moment and in our time.

We'll read key works—fiction and poetry—by James Joyce, William Faulkner, Willa Cather, Virginia Woolf, Ernest Hemingway, Katherine Mansfield, Langston Hughes, T.S. Eliot, William Carlos Williams, Robert Frost, Jean Toomer, Sterling Brown, Gertrude Stein, Charles Reznikoff, W.H. Auden, and others.


Special Topics: The Broadway Musical

English 166

Section: 3
Session: C
Instructor: Drawdy, Miles
Time: MW 2-5
Location:


Description

A survey of the Broadway musical from Ira Gershwin to Lin Manuel-Miranda, this course will investigate the musical's claim to being the quintessential American art form. Organized around texts and institutions which are explicitly engaged with questions of politics and history, this course will ask how a genre so notoriously infuriating and geographically isolated has come to have such an impressive cultural footprint. We will read and watch selected musicals of the 20th century before examining how recent offerings (e.g. The Drowsy ChaperoneHamilton) explicitly reflect upon Broadway's role in constructing an idea of America in the public imagination.


Special Topics in American Cultures: Race and Ethnicity in Classical Hollywood Cinema

English 166AC

Section: 1
Session: D
Instructor: Wagner, Bryan
Time: TWTh 3-5:30
Location:


Description

An introduction to critical thinking about race and ethnicity, focused on films produced in Hollywood between the 1920s and 1960s. Themes include law and violence, kinship and miscegenation, captivity and rescue, passing and racial impersonation. Weekly writing, one essay, one group presentation, and one exam.

Films: Broken Blossoms; Within Our Gates; Body and Soul; The Sheik; The Jazz Singer; Bordertown; Salt of the Earth; The Searchers; The Exiles; Touch of Evil; Imitation of Life; Shadows; West Side Story; El Norte; Chan Is Missing; Do the Right Thing

All texts are available as PDFs.

This course satisfies the American Cultures requirement for UC Berkeley students.


Science Fiction: A Survey of Science Fiction from E.T.A. Hoffman to N.K. Jemisin

English 180Z

Section: 1
Session: D
Instructor: Jones, Donna V.
Time: TWTh 9:30-12
Location:


Description

This course will examine in depth the history of speculative fiction and its engagement with the themes and topics of the new life sciences, representation of cloning, ecological dystopias, hybrid life-forms, genetic engineering dystopias. While science is the thematic point of departure of speculative fiction, the concerns of this course will be the literary. How do literary encounters with the projected realities of the new biology revise our conceptions of the subject? There is much in the science fiction canon that addresses the pressing issues of our current turbulent moment of pandemic and resurgent racism. Pertinent works have been added to the syllabus.

Novels: Ursula LeGuin, The Dispossessed; Victor La Valle, The Ballad of Black Tom; N.K. Jemisin, The Fifth Season; Ahmed Saadawi, Frankenstein in Baghdad

Films: The Andromeda Strain28 Days Later; Get Out 


Berkeley Connect: Transfer Connect

English 198BC

Section: 1
Session: D
Instructor: Flynn, Catherine
Time: Wed. 5-7:30 PM
Location:


Description

Berkeley Connect is a mentoring program, offered through various academic departments, that helps students build intellectual community. During the summer, Berkeley Connect focuses on familiarizing newly-arrived students with the research university environment, and helping them begin to imagine their path to a discovery experience during their time at Berkeley. Over the course of the session, enrolled students participate in regular small-group discussions facilitated by a graduate student mentor, following a faculty-directed curriculum; meet with their graduate student mentor for one-on-one academic advising; attend special events featuring faculty and/or alumni; and go on field trips to campus resources. Berkeley Connect helps students meet peers with common interests and experiences, feel better prepared to approach professors, increase their sense of belonging, and increase their confidence that they can succeed at UC Berkeley.

In the summer, 198BC is known as "Transfer Connect" and is open only to new, incoming junior transfer students participating in the Transfer Edge program. Transfer Connect is open to all Transfer Edge participants regardless of major; the graduate student mentors are drawn from a variety of departments.


Berkeley Connect: Transfer Connect

English 198BC

Section: 2
Session: D
Instructor: Flynn, Catherine
Time: Wed. 5-7:30 PM
Location:


Description

Berkeley Connect is a mentoring program, offered through various academic departments, that helps students build intellectual community. During the summer, Berkeley Connect focuses on familiarizing newly-arrived students with the research university environment, and helping them begin to imagine their path to a discovery experience during their time at Berkeley. Over the course of the session, enrolled students participate in regular small-group discussions facilitated by a graduate student mentor, following a faculty-directed curriculum; meet with their graduate student mentor for one-on-one academic advising; attend special events featuring faculty and/or alumni; and go on field trips to campus resources. Berkeley Connect helps students meet peers with common interests and experiences, feel better prepared to approach professors, increase their sense of belonging, and increase their confidence that they can succeed at UC Berkeley.

In the summer, 198BC is known as "Transfer Connect" and is open only to new, incoming junior transfer students participating in the Transfer Edge program. Transfer Connect is open to all Transfer Edge participants regardless of major; the graduate student mentors are drawn from a variety of departments.


Berkeley Connect: Transfer Connect

English 198BC

Section: 3
Session: D
Instructor: Flynn, Catherine
Time: Wed. 5-7:30 PM
Location:


Description

Berkeley Connect is a mentoring program, offered through various academic departments, that helps students build intellectual community. During the summer, Berkeley Connect focuses on familiarizing newly-arrived students with the research university environment, and helping them begin to imagine their path to a discovery experience during their time at Berkeley. Over the course of the session, enrolled students participate in regular small-group discussions facilitated by a graduate student mentor, following a faculty-directed curriculum; meet with their graduate student mentor for one-on-one academic advising; attend special events featuring faculty and/or alumni; and go on field trips to campus resources. Berkeley Connect helps students meet peers with common interests and experiences, feel better prepared to approach professors, increase their sense of belonging, and increase their confidence that they can succeed at UC Berkeley.

In the summer, 198BC is known as "Transfer Connect" and is open only to new, incoming junior transfer students participating in the Transfer Edge program. Transfer Connect is open to all Transfer Edge participants regardless of major; the graduate student mentors are drawn from a variety of departments.


Berkeley Connect: Transfer Connect

English 198BC

Section: 4
Session: D
Instructor: Flynn, Catherine
Time: Wed. 6-8:30 PM
Location:


Description

Berkeley Connect is a mentoring program, offered through various academic departments, that helps students build intellectual community. During the summer, Berkeley Connect focuses on familiarizing newly-arrived students with the research university environment, and helping them begin to imagine their path to a discovery experience during their time at Berkeley. Over the course of the session, enrolled students participate in regular small-group discussions facilitated by a graduate student mentor, following a faculty-directed curriculum; meet with their graduate student mentor for one-on-one academic advising; attend special events featuring faculty and/or alumni; and go on field trips to campus resources. Berkeley Connect helps students meet peers with common interests and experiences, feel better prepared to approach professors, increase their sense of belonging, and increase their confidence that they can succeed at UC Berkeley.

In the summer, 198BC is known as "Transfer Connect" and is open only to new, incoming junior transfer students participating in the Transfer Edge program. Transfer Connect is open to all Transfer Edge participants regardless of major; the graduate student mentors are drawn from a variety of departments.


Berkeley Connect: Transfer Connect

English 198BC

Section: 5
Session: D
Instructor: Flynn, Catherine
Time: Wed. 6-8:30 PM
Location:


Description

Berkeley Connect is a mentoring program, offered through various academic departments, that helps students build intellectual community. During the summer, Berkeley Connect focuses on familiarizing newly-arrived students with the research university environment, and helping them begin to imagine their path to a discovery experience during their time at Berkeley. Over the course of the session, enrolled students participate in regular small-group discussions facilitated by a graduate student mentor, following a faculty-directed curriculum; meet with their graduate student mentor for one-on-one academic advising; attend special events featuring faculty and/or alumni; and go on field trips to campus resources. Berkeley Connect helps students meet peers with common interests and experiences, feel better prepared to approach professors, increase their sense of belonging, and increase their confidence that they can succeed at UC Berkeley.

In the summer, 198BC is known as "Transfer Connect" and is open only to new, incoming junior transfer students participating in the Transfer Edge program. Transfer Connect is open to all Transfer Edge participants regardless of major; the graduate student mentors are drawn from a variety of departments.


Berkeley Connect: Transfer Connect

English 198BC

Section: 6
Session: D
Instructor: Flynn, Catherine
Time: Wed. 6-8:30 PM
Location:


Description

Berkeley Connect is a mentoring program, offered through various academic departments, that helps students build intellectual community. During the summer, Berkeley Connect focuses on familiarizing newly-arrived students with the research university environment, and helping them begin to imagine their path to a discovery experience during their time at Berkeley. Over the course of the session, enrolled students participate in regular small-group discussions facilitated by a graduate student mentor, following a faculty-directed curriculum; meet with their graduate student mentor for one-on-one academic advising; attend special events featuring faculty and/or alumni; and go on field trips to campus resources. Berkeley Connect helps students meet peers with common interests and experiences, feel better prepared to approach professors, increase their sense of belonging, and increase their confidence that they can succeed at UC Berkeley.

In the summer, 198BC is known as "Transfer Connect" and is open only to new, incoming junior transfer students participating in the Transfer Edge program. Transfer Connect is open to all Transfer Edge participants regardless of major; the graduate student mentors are drawn from a variety of departments.