Announcement of Classes: Summer 2020

There are no special instructions for Summer 2020 English Department courses, other than to note in which session each course is offered.

The following courses are offered in Session A (May 26 - July 2):  English R1B section 1, 117S, 133T, and 141.

The following courses are offered in Session C (June 22 - August 13):  English R1B section 2, 125E, 143A, 166 section 1, 166 section 2, and 166 section 3.

The following courses are offered in Session D (July 7 - August 13):  English R1A section 1, R1A section 2, 43B, 166AC, 180Z, and 198BC; the dates for English N166 (Study Abroad) are slightly different: July 5 - August 8.


Reading and Composition: Girls, Misunderstood?: "Deviant" Women in Literature

English R1B

Section: 1
Session: A
Instructor: Ghosh, Srijani
Time: TWTh 10-12:30
Location: 233 Dwinelle


Description

Recent psychological thrillers such as The Woman in the Window and The Girl on the Train have made the figure of the unreliable female narrator-cum-protagonist very popular, and the plots of these stories are driven by the seeming mental instability of the narrator. This trope of female instability has a long literary history and has its roots in deeming women "mad" or "hysterical" when they deviate from the established sociocultural norms of a given time period or community. What drives women to madness? Is a woman mentally sound only when she exhibits "proper" feminine behavior? How does society punish a woman when it considers her an Other? This will be a reading- and writing-intensive course where we will examine short stories and novels, focusing on the way gender, class, and race contribute to the definition and treatment of mental illness.

We will focus on developing the writing, reading, research, and critical thinking skills that you will need throughout your college career. The class will build on the reading, analytical, and composition skills that you already have, and prepare you for writing longer and more complex papers, improve your research skills, and teach you to incorporate source material effectively.

Possible readings: Kate Chopin, The Awakening; Toni Morrison, The Bluest Eye; Susanna Kaysen, Girl Interrupted; Charlotte Perkins Gilman: "The Yellow Wallpaper"; chapters from: Chesler, Women and Madness; Elaine Showalter, The Female Malady

Note the change in instructor and modifications of the course content of this section of English R1B (as of February 13).


Reading and Composition: The Literature of Aotearoa/New Zealand

English R1B

Section: 2
Session: C
Instructor: Sutton, Emily
Time: TWTh 4-6
Location: 262 Dwinelle


Description

This course will focus first and foremost on the practice of academic writing and the skills needed to research, plan, draft and revise writing at a college level. More specifically, it stages the problem of scholarly research through an encounter with the culture and literature of New Zealand. We will work our way from the canonical modernism of Katherine Mansfield to the contemporary comedy of Flight of the Conchords while exploring questions of national identity and what it means to read New Zealand writing in an American context.  

The primary writing assignments for this course will be a shorter analytic essay that will build on your existing skills and a longer research essay that will focus on integrating secondary sources into your own writing. Both of these papers will be developed through a series of shorter exercises and revisions. You will be encouraged to think carefully not only about your own writing and the texts on our syllabus, but also the work of your classmates.


Introduction to the Writing of Verse

English 43B

Section: 1
Session: D
Instructor: Robinson, Jared
Time: TWTh 12-2:30
Location: 250 Dwinelle


Description

In this brief but intensive workshop we will think about poetry as a practice of making within and against "language". To this end we will be both writing and reading poetry that navigates compositional rules ranging from the rhythmic and syllabic to the psychic and ekphrastic. There is no prior experience in poetry required for this course.


Shakespeare

English 117S

Section: 1
Session: A
Instructor: Marno, David
Time: TWTh 5-7:30
Location: 182 Dwinelle


Description

This course focuses on a selection of Shakespeare’s works that includes some of the best-known plays (Midsummer, Lear) as well as some of the less known but fascinating works (Troilus and Cressida, Cymbeline). We’ll consider various performances of the plays, and devote at least one meeting to the sonnets.

This course satisfies the Shakespeare requirement for UC Berkeley English majors.


The Contemporary Novel: Character and Collectivity

English 125E

Section: 1
Session: C
Instructor: Bernes, Jasper
Time: TWTh 12-2
Location: 182 Dwinelle


Description

What options are there for novelists who want to tell the story of the many rather than the story of the one? If history represents the actions of millions of people, how does literature represent these collective histories?  Contemporary society forces these kinds of questions on its chroniclers, inasmuch as it offers extremes of isolation and social atomization alongside new forms of collectivity (in protest movements, on the internet, and elsewhere). In this course, we will look at 21st-century novelists who have risen to the challenges of representation posed by recent history, resuscitating old forms, inventing new ones, or blowing up the novel altogether.


Topics in African American Literature and Culture: Humor and the Neo-Slave Narrative

English 133T

Section: 1
Session: A
Instructor: Catchings, Alex
Time: TWTh 1-3:30
Location: 223 Dwinelle


Description

A course exploring how the 19th-century slave narrative was reworked in the 20th century by novelists Ishmael Reed, Charles Johnson, and Paul Beatty into a humorous (or at least tragicomic) critique of American race relations after the 1960s.


Modes of Writing (Exposition, Fiction, Verse, etc.)

English 141

Section: 1
Session: A
Instructor: Chandra, Melanie Abrams
Time: TWTh 1-3:30
Location: 170 Barrows


Description

This course is an upper-division practicum for students who are looking to hone their skills at writing fiction and poetry in English. Please note that we will not be discussing sentence structure, grammar, or usage. Students should come to class with a solid foundation in these skills.

Course packet available at Instant Copying and Laser Printing, 2138 University Ave (between Shattuck Ave. & Walnut St.), (510) 704-9700.


Short Fiction

English 143A

Section: 1
Session: C
Instructor: Walter, David
Time: TTh 2-5
Location: 2030 Valley LSB


Description

This course is a laboratory for student writers to work on short stories or, if appropriate, chapters from longer fictional projects. Over the eight weeks, we will help you discover your own methods for building worlds, developing characters, structuring plots, and crafting scenes. In the process, we will probe the divisions between genres, discuss strategies for publishing or selling your work, and invite guest authors to share their insights on craft.

Note that while for the fall and spring semesters admission to 143A requires an application process, no application is needed to register for the summer version of the course.


Special Topics: Medieval Fantasy from Tolkien to Game of Thrones

English 166

Section: 1
Session: C
Instructor: Stevenson, Max
Time: MW 2-5
Location: 310 Hearst Mining


Description

Writers in the 20th and 21st centuries have continually looked to the Middle Ages — or, more to the point, to their idea of the Middle Ages — when constructing epic narratives in fantastic worlds. In this course we’ll ask what it is about the medieval that writers of fantasy find so useful, as well as consider what aspects of the medieval — especially race, gender, and sexuality — their accounts ignore. We’ll read both the medieval literature that modern fantasy draws on and works by (this is a likely list, but subject to change) J.R.R. Tolkien, George R.R. Martin, and Kazuo Ishiguro, as well as view film and television adaptations.


Special Topics: What Was Modernism?: A Survey

English 166

Section: 2
Session: C
Instructor: Nathan, Jesse
Time: TTh 2-5
Location: 150D Moffitt


Description

In this course, students will encounter major works of British and U.S. prose and poetry (from James Joyce and Gertrude Stein to Langston Hughes, Virginia Woolf, Jean Toomer, T.S. Eliot, and others) of the so-called modern era. Taking a transatlantic look at innovative writing in the early 20th century meant to challenge readers in both form and theme, we will unpack what makes a modernist text modernist, what some of the intellectual roots of the movement may be, and what kinds of meanings have been ascribed to it – both in its moment and in our time.

We'll read key works—fiction and poetry—by James Joyce, William Faulkner, Willa Cather, Virginia Woolf, Ernest Hemingway, Katherine Mansfield, Langston Hughes, T.S. Eliot, William Carlos Williams, Robert Frost, Jean Toomer, Sterling Brown, Gertrude Stein, Charles Reznikoff, W.H. Auden, and others.


Special Topics: The Broadway Musical

English 166

Section: 3
Session: C
Instructor: Drawdy, Miles
Time: MW 2-5
Location: B5 Hearst Field Annex


Description

A survey of the Broadway musical from Ira Gershwin to Lin Manuel-Miranda, this course will investigate the musical's claim to being the quintessential American art form. Organized around texts and institutions which are explicitly engaged with questions of politics and history, this course will ask how a genre so notoriously infuriating and geographically isolated has come to have such an impressive cultural footprint. We will read and watch selected musicals of the 20th century before examining how recent offerings (e.g. The Drowsy ChaperoneHamilton) explicitly reflect upon Broadway's role in constructing an idea of America in the public imagination.


Special Topics in American Cultures: Race and Ethnicity in Classical Hollywood Cinema

English 166AC

Section: 1
Session: D
Instructor: Wagner, Bryan
Time: TWTh 3-5:30
Location: 182 Dwinelle


Description

An introduction to critical thinking about race and ethnicity, focused on films produced in Hollywood between the 1920s and 1960s. Themes include law and violence, kinship and miscegenation, captivity and rescue, passing and racial impersonation. Weekly writing, one essay, one group presentation, and one exam.

Films: Broken Blossoms; Within Our Gates; Body and Soul; The Sheik; The Jazz Singer; Bordertown; Salt of the Earth; The Searchers; The Exiles; Touch of Evil; Imitation of Life; Shadows; West Side Story; El Norte; Chan Is Missing; Do the Right Thing

This course satisfies the American Cultures requirement for UC Berkeley students.


Special Topics: Shakespeare and Renaissance Visual Arts

English N166

Section: 1
Session: D
Instructor: Altieri, Charlie
Time: Study Abroad
Location: in London


Description

This class satisfies the Shakespeare requirement for UC Berkeley English majors.

This course is taken abroad and is offered through the Berkeley Summer Abroad program. For questions or information about participating, please go to summerabroad.berkeley.edu or email summerabroad@berkeley.edu.


Science Fiction: A Survey of Science Fiction from E.T.A. Hoffman to N.K. Jemisin

English 180Z

Section: 1
Session: D
Instructor: Jones, Donna V.
Time: TWTh 9:30-12
Location: 229 Dwinelle


Description

In this course, we will explore a wide range of science fiction literature beginning with early works depicting the enlightenment era anxieties surrounding automaton, to contemporary works of fantasy that allegorize the Anthropocene.


Berkeley Connect: Transfer Connect

English 198BC

Section: 1
Session: D
Instructor: Flynn, Catherine
Time: Wed. 5-7:30 PM
Location: 134 Dwinelle


Description

Berkeley Connect is a mentoring program, offered through various academic departments, that helps students build intellectual community. During the summer, Berkeley Connect focuses on familiarizing newly-arrived students with the research university environment, and helping them begin to imagine their path to a discovery experience during their time at Berkeley. Over the course of the session, enrolled students participate in regular small-group discussions facilitated by a graduate student mentor, following a faculty-directed curriculum; meet with their graduate student mentor for one-on-one academic advising; attend special events featuring faculty and/or alumni; and go on field trips to campus resources. Berkeley Connect helps students meet peers with common interests and experiences, feel better prepared to approach professors, increase their sense of belonging, and increase their confidence that they can succeed at UC Berkeley.

In the summer, 198BC is known as "Transfer Connect" and is open only to new, incoming junior transfer students participating in the Transfer Edge program. Transfer Connect is open to all Transfer Edge participants regardless of major; the graduate student mentors are drawn from a variety of departments.


Berkeley Connect: Transfer Connect

English 198BC

Section: 2
Session: D
Instructor: Flynn, Catherine
Time: Wed. 5-7:30 PM
Location: 189 Dwinelle


Description

Berkeley Connect is a mentoring program, offered through various academic departments, that helps students build intellectual community. During the summer, Berkeley Connect focuses on familiarizing newly-arrived students with the research university environment, and helping them begin to imagine their path to a discovery experience during their time at Berkeley. Over the course of the session, enrolled students participate in regular small-group discussions facilitated by a graduate student mentor, following a faculty-directed curriculum; meet with their graduate student mentor for one-on-one academic advising; attend special events featuring faculty and/or alumni; and go on field trips to campus resources. Berkeley Connect helps students meet peers with common interests and experiences, feel better prepared to approach professors, increase their sense of belonging, and increase their confidence that they can succeed at UC Berkeley.

In the summer, 198BC is known as "Transfer Connect" and is open only to new, incoming junior transfer students participating in the Transfer Edge program. Transfer Connect is open to all Transfer Edge participants regardless of major; the graduate student mentors are drawn from a variety of departments.


Berkeley Connect: Transfer Connect

English 198BC

Section: 3
Session: D
Instructor: Flynn, Catherine
Time: Wed. 5-7:30 PM
Location: 258 Dwinelle


Description

Berkeley Connect is a mentoring program, offered through various academic departments, that helps students build intellectual community. During the summer, Berkeley Connect focuses on familiarizing newly-arrived students with the research university environment, and helping them begin to imagine their path to a discovery experience during their time at Berkeley. Over the course of the session, enrolled students participate in regular small-group discussions facilitated by a graduate student mentor, following a faculty-directed curriculum; meet with their graduate student mentor for one-on-one academic advising; attend special events featuring faculty and/or alumni; and go on field trips to campus resources. Berkeley Connect helps students meet peers with common interests and experiences, feel better prepared to approach professors, increase their sense of belonging, and increase their confidence that they can succeed at UC Berkeley.

In the summer, 198BC is known as "Transfer Connect" and is open only to new, incoming junior transfer students participating in the Transfer Edge program. Transfer Connect is open to all Transfer Edge participants regardless of major; the graduate student mentors are drawn from a variety of departments.


Berkeley Connect: Transfer Connect

English 198BC

Section: 4
Session: D
Instructor: Flynn, Catherine
Time: Wed. 6-8:30 PM
Location: 259 Dwinelle


Description

Berkeley Connect is a mentoring program, offered through various academic departments, that helps students build intellectual community. During the summer, Berkeley Connect focuses on familiarizing newly-arrived students with the research university environment, and helping them begin to imagine their path to a discovery experience during their time at Berkeley. Over the course of the session, enrolled students participate in regular small-group discussions facilitated by a graduate student mentor, following a faculty-directed curriculum; meet with their graduate student mentor for one-on-one academic advising; attend special events featuring faculty and/or alumni; and go on field trips to campus resources. Berkeley Connect helps students meet peers with common interests and experiences, feel better prepared to approach professors, increase their sense of belonging, and increase their confidence that they can succeed at UC Berkeley.

In the summer, 198BC is known as "Transfer Connect" and is open only to new, incoming junior transfer students participating in the Transfer Edge program. Transfer Connect is open to all Transfer Edge participants regardless of major; the graduate student mentors are drawn from a variety of departments.


Berkeley Connect: Transfer Connect

English 198BC

Section: 5
Session: D
Instructor: Flynn, Catherine
Time: Wed. 6-8:30 PM
Location: 263 Dwinelle


Description

Berkeley Connect is a mentoring program, offered through various academic departments, that helps students build intellectual community. During the summer, Berkeley Connect focuses on familiarizing newly-arrived students with the research university environment, and helping them begin to imagine their path to a discovery experience during their time at Berkeley. Over the course of the session, enrolled students participate in regular small-group discussions facilitated by a graduate student mentor, following a faculty-directed curriculum; meet with their graduate student mentor for one-on-one academic advising; attend special events featuring faculty and/or alumni; and go on field trips to campus resources. Berkeley Connect helps students meet peers with common interests and experiences, feel better prepared to approach professors, increase their sense of belonging, and increase their confidence that they can succeed at UC Berkeley.

In the summer, 198BC is known as "Transfer Connect" and is open only to new, incoming junior transfer students participating in the Transfer Edge program. Transfer Connect is open to all Transfer Edge participants regardless of major; the graduate student mentors are drawn from a variety of departments.


Berkeley Connect: Transfer Connect

English 198BC

Section: 6
Session: D
Instructor: Flynn, Catherine
Time: Wed. 6-8:30 PM
Location: 279 Dwinelle


Description

Berkeley Connect is a mentoring program, offered through various academic departments, that helps students build intellectual community. During the summer, Berkeley Connect focuses on familiarizing newly-arrived students with the research university environment, and helping them begin to imagine their path to a discovery experience during their time at Berkeley. Over the course of the session, enrolled students participate in regular small-group discussions facilitated by a graduate student mentor, following a faculty-directed curriculum; meet with their graduate student mentor for one-on-one academic advising; attend special events featuring faculty and/or alumni; and go on field trips to campus resources. Berkeley Connect helps students meet peers with common interests and experiences, feel better prepared to approach professors, increase their sense of belonging, and increase their confidence that they can succeed at UC Berkeley.

In the summer, 198BC is known as "Transfer Connect" and is open only to new, incoming junior transfer students participating in the Transfer Edge program. Transfer Connect is open to all Transfer Edge participants regardless of major; the graduate student mentors are drawn from a variety of departments.