Announcement of Classes: Fall 2010

The Announcement of Classes is available one week before Tele-Bears begins every semester. Creative Writing and (for fall) Honors Course applications are available at the same time in the racks outside of 322 Wheeler Hall.
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

R1A/3

Keeping it Real?: Racial & Queer Passing in American Literature

MWF 11-12

“I had a literature rather than a personality, a set of fictions about myself.”      -  Kafka Was the Rage by Anatole BroyardThis course intends to explore the “art” of racial passing and masquerade in American literature and culture through a diverse...(read more) Martínez, Rosa

R1A/6

Putting It Together

MWF 2-3

In this course we will be reading texts composed of multiple narratives told by a variety of speakers and writers. We will examine the various rhetorical strategies employed by these narratives in and of themselves and in relation to the whole. Questi...(read more) Knox, Marisa Palacios
Knox, Marisa

R1A/16

Early American Literature of Crime and Punishment

MWF 12-1

In this course we will examine the role of crime, moral transgression, exposure, and punishment in the creation of U.S. American identity. If in public rituals of accusation, trial, confession, and punishment, the state simultaneously affirms and over...(read more) Goodwin, Peter
Goodwin, Peter

R1A/17

Early American Literature of Crime and Punishment

MWF 2-3

In this course we will examine the role of crime, moral transgression, exposure, and punishment in the creation of U.S. American identity. If in public rituals of accusation, trial, confession, and punishment, the state simultaneously affirms and over...(read more) Goodwin, Peter
Goodwin, Peter

R1A/19

The Rhetoric of Rants

MWF 1-2

The art of arguing while furious is actually a very difficult rhetorical task.  This class will read the works of master debaters from medieval Europe to twenty-first century America.  Using their work as primary sources and as inspirations, we’re goi...(read more) Lankin, Andrea A
Lankin, Andrea

R1A/20

The Power of I: Literary Constructions of the Self

MW 4-5:30

What are the different ways that we come to understand first person narration?  How are different selves created and chosen through texts and textual choices?  How do issues of memory and claims to authenticity affect the way that we read different k...(read more) Bednarska, Dominika
Bednarska, Dominika

R1B/3

Free Speech and You

MWF 1-2

This is the United States, and you hear people across the political spectrum talking about free speech.  You read something offensive or you hear something stupid, and perhaps you resent the fact that you had to be exposed to these words.  You find yo...(read more) Hausman, Blake M.
Hausman, Blake

R1B/8

Literature and Experiment

TTh 9:30-11:00

What does it mean to call a novel (or a painting or film) “experimental”? What is the relationship between literary experiment and the kinds of experiment that occur in the natural and social sciences? In attempting to answer these questions, this cou...(read more) Bernes, Jasper
Clinton, Daniel Patrick
Patnaik, Sangina
Bernes, Jasper
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

24/1

Freshman Seminar:
Shakespeare's Hamlet

W 2-4 (9/1-10/20 only)

Hamlet is perhaps the greatest, the most challenging, and at times the most frustrating play in the English language. In this course we will concentrate intensively on the text (which will be the only assigned reading). We’ll consider questions of in...(read more) Paley, Morton D.
Paley, Morton

24/2

Freshman Seminar:
Reading Walden Carefully

Thurs. 4-5

We will read Thoreau's Walden in small chunks, probably about thirty pages per week. This will allow us time to dwell upon the complexities of a book that is much more mysterious than those who have read the book casually, or those who have only hear...(read more) Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell

24/3

Freshman Seminar:
This section has been cancelled

This section has been canceled.  ...(read more) Tracy, Robert
Tracy, Robert

31AC/1

Literature of American Cultures:
Immigration, Ethnicity, and the Popular Imagination

MWF 1-2

Why, in United States culture, are the varieties of blackness understood differently from the varieties of whiteness? Why are categories of Asian identities parsed differently from either? And how do the histories of immigration to the US produce thes...(read more) Ellis, Nadia
Ellis, Nadia

45A/1

Literature in English: Through Milton

MW 12-1 + discussion sections F 12-1

This course will focus on the central works of the early English literary tradition, beginning with Beowulf and ending with Paradise Lost. We will examine the texts in light of the cultures in which they were produced, asking ourselves why these work...(read more) Nolan, Maura
Nolan, Maura

45A/2

Literature in English: Through Milton

MW 4-5 + discussion sections F 4-5

This class introduces students to the production of poetic narrative in English through the close study of major works in that tradition: the Canterbury Tales, The Faerie Queene, Doctor Faustus, Donne's lyrics, and Paradise Lost. Each of these texts r...(read more) Landreth, David
Landreth, David

45B/1

Literature in English: Late 17th- Through Mid-19th Centuries

MW 10-11 + discussion sections F 10-11

As we read works produced in a period of often tumultuous change, we shall consider those works as zones of contact, reflecting and sometimes negotiating conflict. In a world of expanding global commerce (imports like tea suddenly become commonplace i...(read more) Sorensen, Janet
Sorensen, Janet

45B/2

Literature in English: Late 17th- Through Mid-19th Centuries

MW 3-4 + discussion sections F 3-4

Readings in English, Scottish, Irish and North American poetry, prose fiction and autobiography from 1688 through 1848: a century and a half that sees the formation of a new, multinational British state with the political incorporation of Scotland and...(read more) Duncan, Ian
Duncan, Ian

45C/1

Literature in English: Mid 19th- Through the 20th Century

MW 1-2 + discussion sections F 1-2

This course will focus on the formal consequences of the social and cultural revolutions of the early twentieth century. We will examine the changes in narrative strategy and voice and the transformations of poetic syntax and diction that have come to...(read more) Abel, Elizabeth
Abel, Elizabeth

45C/2

Literature in English: Mid 19th- Through the 20th Century

MW 12-1 + discussion sections F 12-1

This survey course of literature in English from the mid-nineteenth century to the present will consider a variety of literary forms and movements in their historical and cultural contexts. We’ll examine the literature of colonization and imperialism ...(read more) Wong, Hertha D. Sweet
Wong, Hertha Sweet

C77/1

Introduction to Environmental Studies

TTh 12:30-2 + 1 - 1/2 hours discussion section per week

This is a team-taught introduction to environmental studies. The team consists of a professor of environmental science, a professor of English, and three graduate student instructors working in the field. The aim of the course is to give students the ...(read more) Hass, Robert L.
Hass, Robert and Sposito, Gary

80K/1

Children’s Literature

MWF 2-3

Children's Literature is a complex subject of intersecting concerns. Ideas about childhood and about what is good or bad for children rub up against commercial interests and the interests of educators and parents, not to mention those of the (supposed...(read more) Wright, Katharine E.
Wright, Katharine

84/1

Sophomore Seminar:
Utopian & Dystopian Movies

Tues. 6-9 P.M.

We will mainly be viewing and discussing Utopian and anti-Utopian movies. Depending on the intended majors of those enrolled, we may use other kinds of visual material as well, from architecture, city planning, world's fairs, etc. We will not be deali...(read more) Starr, George A.
Starr, George

84/2

Sophomore Seminar:
High Culture / Low Culture: Postmodernism and the Films of the Coen Brothers

W 2-5

We will concentrate on the high and low cultural elements in the noir comedies of the Coen brothers, discussing their use of Hollywood genres, parodies of classic conventions, and representation of arbitrariness. We will also read some fiction and att...(read more) Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia

84/3

Sophomore Seminar:
The Monster in the Mirror: Frankenstein & Dracula

W 2-3

We will read B. Stoker’s Dracula and M. Shelley’s Frankenstein, together with some film versions of these two archetypal horror tales, appreciating them as mirror opposites of each other, and investigating what they have to tell us abou...(read more) Loewinsohn, Ron
Loewinsohn, Ron

84/4

Sophomore Seminar:
Socrates as a Cultural Icon

F 12-2

Socrates has often been compared to Jesus, an enigmatic yet somehow unmistakable figure who left nothing in writing yet decisively influenced the mind of his own and later ages. In the first weeks of the course we will read and discuss Aristophanes' c...(read more) Coolidge, John S.
Coolidge, John
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

104/1

Introduction to Old English

TTh 12:30-2

Canst þu þis gewrit understandan? Want to? “Introduction to Old English” will give you the tools to read a wide variety of writings from among the earliest recorded texts in the English language. What is there to read? We will look ...(read more) O'Brien O'Keeffe, Katherine
O'Brien O'Keeffe, Katherine

105/1

Anglo-Saxon England

TTh 3:30-5

Who were the Angelcynn? What were the English like before they were “English”? The name “Anglo-Saxon England” is a relatively modern term to designate peoples and kingdoms that, across several centuries before the Norman Conquest, knew themselves by ...(read more) O'Brien O'Keeffe, Katherine
O'Brien O'Keeffe, Katherine

110/1

Medieval Literature

TTh 2-3:30

This course provides a tour of otherworld visions and journeys in the literature of medieval Britain. After looking at some foundational texts from antiquity that influenced writers up to the present day, we’ll examine the geography of the afte...(read more) Thornbury, Emily V.
Thornbury, Emily

114A/1

English Drama to 1603

TTh 9:30-11

Focusing primarily on civic performances of the late fourteenth century, especially the Chester cycle plays, which survive to us in sixteenth-century transcriptions, this course aims to recontextualize the "new" productions of Shakespeare and Marlowe,...(read more) Miller, Jennifer
Miller, Jennifer

117A/1

Shakespeare

note new time: TTh 11-12:30

Shakespeare’s poems and plays are relentlessly unsettling, crazy beautiful, deeply moving, penetratingly intelligent, and compulsively meaningful: they complicate everything, they simplify nothing, and for 400 years, they have been a touchstone—indeed...(read more) Arnold, Oliver
Arnold, Oliver

117S/1

Shakespeare

note new time: MW 11-12 + discussion sections F 11-12

This will be an introduction to close reading of Shakespeare that will address all of his genres and periods, at least after 1596.  I know very little about race, class, or gender and care even less.  I am interested primarily in unabashedly celebrati...(read more) Altieri, Charles F.
Altieri, Charles

118/1

Milton

TTh 12:30-2

A survey of John Milton’s career, a life-long effort to unite intellectual, political, and artistic experimentation. There will be two short papers and a final exam.This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major....(read more) Picciotto, Joanna M
Picciotto, Joanna

120/1

Literature of the Later 18th Century

TTh 2-3:30

A sampling of writings in English from the doom-filled last years of Pope to the stirrings of Revolution and abolitionism. Texts have been included from the Irish, Scots, African, and English diasporas, and from verse satire, drama, criticism, autobi...(read more) Turner, James Grantham
Turner, James

125D/1

The 20th-Century Novel

MWF 12-1

This course is a general survey of the 20th century novel. The novel is the quintessential form of expression of modernity and modern subjectivity. In this survey of key works of the century, we will explore the novel form as it is framed by these thr...(read more) Jones, Donna V.
Jones, Donna

130A/1

American Literature: Before 1800

MWF 12-1

This course will survey the literatures of early America, from the tracts that envisioned British colonization to the novels written in the after-shocks of the American Revolution. Although our focus is on Anglophone texts, we will consider colonial A...(read more) Donegan, Kathleen
Donegan, Kathleen

130D/1

American Literature: 1900-1945

MWF 11-12

A survey of American literature tracing the literary response to the emerging shape of modern life in the first decades of the twentieth century. We will read across a range of genres and styles to assess the particular influence of modernism and oth...(read more) Goble, Mark
Goble, Mark

131/1

American Poetry

TTh 12:30-2

This survey of U.S. poetries will begin with Dickinson and Whitman and then move through both expatriate and stateside modernisms, the Harlem Renaissance, the Objectivists, the New York School, and Language Poetry, on our way to the contemporary. Poet...(read more) O'Brien, Geoffrey G.
O'Brien, Geoffrey

C136/1

Topics in American Studies:
Literature and History of Mexican American Farm Workers

TTh 11-12:30

In this course we will study the social movements, political aspirations, and literary expressions of Mexican American farm workers in the U.S. during the twentieth century, focusing on the period from 1930 to 1990. The methodological approach will be...(read more) Gonzalez, Marcial
Gonzalez, Marcial

137T/1

Topics in Chicana/o Literature and Culture:
The Literature of the Chicano Movement

MWF 2-3

We will survey the literary and cultural production of the Chicano/a Movement during the 1960s through the 1980s. This was a particularly fertile period during which the civil rights movement fomented a cultural florescence within the Chicano communi...(read more) Padilla, Genaro M.
Padilla, Genaro

139/1

The Cultures of English:
Writing Diaspora

MW 4-5:30

This course will examine how literary art narrates the experience of diaspora and confronts its shaping histories of displacement, migration, and resettlement. We will read contemporary narratives addressing two prominent modern instances of diaspora ...(read more) Premnath, Gautam
Premnath, Gautam

141/1

Modes of Writing (Exposition, Fiction, Verse, etc.):
"Race," (Creative) Writing, and Difference

TTh 3:30-5

This course is an inquiry into the ways that race is constructed in literary texts and a look-by-doing at our own practices as people engaged in creative writing. The purpose of writing in this course is, broadly stated, to engage public language on o...(read more) Giscombe, Cecil S.
Giscombe, Cecil

143B/1

Verse:
Instructive Mysteries

M 3-6

"A poem is a small (or large) machine made of words" --William Carlos Williams How do poems work? To that question there are at least as many answers as there are poems. Often poets have the experience of writing intuitively, moving through the dark...(read more) Zapruder, Matthew J
Zapruder, Matthew

143B/2

Verse

TTh 11-12:30

In this course you will conduct a progressive series of experiments in which you will explore some of the fundamental options for writing poetry today—aperture, partition, closure; rhythmic sound patterning; sentence & line; stanza; short &...(read more) Shoptaw, John
Shoptaw, John

143N/1

Prose Nonfiction

TTh 2-3:30

This course will offer students — in a workshop setting — the opportunity to read, discuss, and practice writing the major forms and styles of nonfiction prose, with special attention to understanding, appreciating — and practicin...(read more) McQuade, Donald
McQuade, Donald

143T/1

Poetry Translation Workshop

TTh 9:30-11

This is a practical workshop for students wishing to work at translating poetry into English, so students need to have at least an intermediate knowledge of the language they wish to translate from. The class works like a poetry writing workshop: stud...(read more) Hass, Robert L.
Hass, Robert

161/1

Introduction to Literary Theory:
The Theory Monster

MW 4-5:30

At the close of “Structure, Sign and Play in the Discourse of the Human Sciences,” Jacques Derrida takes recourse to the language of monstrosity in his account of the loss of a stable center for human discourse: “the as yet unnamable which is proclai...(read more) Serpell, C. Namwali
Serpell, Namwali

166/1

Special Topics:
Postwar British Drama

MWF 3-4

A survey of the post-war renaissance of British dramatic writing, concentrating on the decades after the tumultuous year of 1956, when the Suez Crisis abroad and the emergence of the 'Angry Young Men' at home demonstrated the extent to which both coun...(read more) Blanton, C. D.
Blanton, Dan

166/2

Special Topics:
Vladimir Nabokov

TTh 9:30-11

We will study the work of Nabokov as a novelist on two continents over a period of nearly sixty years. The course will be structured (more or less) chronologically and evenly divided between novels translated from Russian and written in English. Aft...(read more) Naiman, Eric

166/3

Special Topics:
Engaging the Play—Being the Player

TTh 12:30-2

The course will explore inventive ways of engaging the theater text. Students will read from a selection of plays and be expected to give presentations analyzing theme, story, as well as intention of playwright. This will be followed with students p...(read more) Gotanda, Philip Kan
Gotanda, Philip Kan

166AC/1

Special Topics in American Cultures

TTh 2-3:30, + film screenings Mondays 7-10 P.M., 160 Kroeber

An introduction to critical thinking about race and ethnicity, focused on a select group of films produced in the United States between the 1920s and 1980s. Major themes include law and violence, kinship and miscegenation, passing and racial impersona...(read more) Wagner, Bryan
Wagner, Bryan

174/1

Literature and History

TTh 12:30-2

This course will interrogate the binary implied in its rubric--the distinction between literature and history--by considering the ways in which literary remains constitute the pieces with which we may begin to puzzle out a fully embodied past and by ...(read more) Miller, Jennifer
Miller, Jennifer

180N/1

The Novel

MWF 1-2 (note new time)

A survey of the American novel since 1900: its forms, patterns, techniques, ideas, cultural context, and intertextuality. Special attention will be paid to questions of aesthetics, epistemology, and ethics—what is beautiful? how do we know? what ought...(read more) Serpell, C. Namwali
Serpell, Namwali

190/1

Research Seminar:
Speculative Fiction and Dystopias

MW 9-10:30

This course will examine in depth the history of speculative fiction and its engagement with the thematics and topoi of the new life sciences--representation of cloning, ecological dystopias, hybrid life-forms, genetic engineering dystopias. While sci...(read more) Jones, Donna V.
Jones, Donna

190/2

Research Seminar:
Late Dickens Novels

MW 9-10:30

In this seminar we will study some of the late Dickens novels: A Tale of Two Cities, Great Expectations, Our Mutual Friend, and the unfinished The Mystery of Edwin Drood. We will spread out Our Mutual Friend—the longest of the four—over the course of ...(read more) Jordan, Joseph P
Jordan, Joseph

190/3

Research Seminar:
Alfred Hitchcock

MW 12:30-2 + film screenings Th 6-9 P.M.

Unique among Hollywood directors, Hitchcock played on two boards. As a master of entertainment who had nothing to say, he produced work as thoroughly trivial as it was utterly compelling. But thanks to the French reception of his work in the 1950s, ...(read more) Miller, D.A.
Miller, D.A.

190/4

Research Seminar:
The 1890s

M 3-6

What difference does a date make? What is it about the end of a century that encourages such strong feelings of apocalypse, degeneration or renewal? This course will consider texts written in and around the 1890s, a decade characterized by its intens...(read more) Puckett, Kent
Puckett, Kent

190/5

Research Seminar:
The Nineteenth-Century Self

MW 4-5:30

In this class, we will read the word “I” many times—in poems, novels, and memoirs. Our texts will span the nineteenth century both chronologically and tonally—from earnest self-portraiture to playful ventriloquism. In the course of the semester, we wi...(read more) Leibowitz, Karen D.
Leibowitz, Karen

190/6

Research Seminar:
Native America/Early America

MW 4-5:30

In 1705, the colonist Robert Beverley introduced his History and Present State of Virginia with the proud declaration: “I am an Indian, and don’t pretend to be exact in my Language.” What might such a proclamation have meant, with...(read more) Donegan, Kathleen
Donegan, Kathleen

190/7

(new section as of 5/6/10) Research Seminar:
Second Worlds in Shakespeare

TTh 9:30-11

Shakespeare’s plays often project stereoptic visions of worlds set apart from the geographical center of the dramatic action. These removed places, like Arden forest in As You Like It, the realm of fairies in A Midsummer Night’s Dream, or romantic Bel...(read more) Ring, Joseph
Ring, Joseph

190/10

Research Seminar:
Invasions of Britain in Medieval Literature

TTh 11-12:30

How does history become literature?By examining medieval narratives about the four great invasions of early Britain, we will try to understand how bare lists of events can be transformed into great works of art. We will begin with the Norman Conquest ...(read more) Thornbury, Emily V.
Thornbury, Emily

190/11

Research Seminar

This section of English 190 has been canceled....(read more) Bishop, John

190/12

Research Seminar:
Cultures of 19th-Century U.S. Poetry

TTh 12:30-2

Poetry enjoyed extraordinary popularity and pervasiveness in 19th-century America. In this class, we will encounter the variety of poetic output from the period while also taking the opportunity to study the social life of a literary form by thinking...(read more) Beam, Dorri
Beam, Dorri

190/13

Research Seminar:
Postcolonial Cinema

TTh 12:30-2

This course examines cinematic productions originating in or concerning themselves with the former colonial territories of the European empires of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. We will cover some general film studies theories and...(read more) Rubenstein, Michael
Rubenstein, Michael

190/14

Research Seminar:
American Transcendentalism

TTh 2-3:30

A close look at the internal coherences and stresses of this literary movement, with an emphasis on the intellectual and affective motives for formal innovation. Two ten-page essays and regular attendance and participation will be required.English 190...(read more) Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell

190/15

Research Seminar:
Ideology

TTh 2-3:30

This research seminar will focus on the concept of ideology. We will examine the manner in which ideology has been employed as a category for social analysis. But we will pay attention especially to the ways that ideology has been useful for literary ...(read more) Gonzalez, Marcial
Gonzalez, Marcial

190/16

Research Seminar

This section of English 190 has been canceled....(read more) Premnath, Gautam

190/17

Research Seminar:
When This You See—The Writings of Gertrude Stein

TTh 3:30-5

Gertrude Stein’s radical experimentation was just that — an investigation into the roots of meaning. As such, her writings vastly extended the horizons of literature and of language. And her inquiry into the relation of syntax to sense, of grammar to ...(read more) Hejinian, Lyn
Hejinian, Lyn

190/18

Research Seminar

This section of English 190 has been canceled.  ...(read more) Bishop, John

190/19

Research Seminar:
African American Poetry

TTh 5-6:30

An introduction to African American poetry and poetics, moving from the eighteenth century to the present. Our reading will include critical essays as well as poems by Lucy Terry, Phillis Wheatley, Paul Laurence Dunbar, Countee Cullen, Langston Hughes...(read more) Wagner, Bryan
Wagner, Bryan

190/20

Research Seminar:
Women’s Films of the ‘40s & ‘50s

MW 5:30-7 P.M. + film screenings W 7-10 P.M.

In this course we will examine a range of examples of the genre “the woman’s film” of the 40's and 50's, emphasizing maternal, paranoid, romantic and medical discourses, issues of spectatorship, consumerism, and various “femal...(read more) Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia

H195A/1

Honors Course

MW 1:30-3

In the first semester of this two-semester-long course, we will familiarize ourselves with a number of critical approaches to texts and reflect a bit on the institution of criticism itself—When did the idea of Literature with a capital L emerge...(read more) Sorensen, Janet
Sorensen, Janet

H195A/2

Honors Course

TTh 3:30-5

This course is designed to facilitate the writing of a senior honors thesis. We will begin by reading across a broad range of criticism and theory. Students will refine their research interests into a workable thesis topic, complete an annotated bibli...(read more) Picciotto, Joanna M
Picciotto, Joanna

Graduate students from other departments and exceptionally well-prepared undergraduates are welcome in English graduate courses (except for English 200 and 375) insofar as limitations of class size allow. Graduate courses are usually limited to 15 students; courses numbered 250 are usually limited to 10.

When demand for a graduate course exceeds the maximum enrollment limit, the instructor will determine priorities for enrollment and inform students of his/her decisions at the second class meeting. Prior enrollment does not guarantee a place in a graduate course that turns out to be oversubscribed on the first day of class; fortunately, this situation does not arise very often.

Course #
Instructor
Course Area

200/1

Problems in the Study of Literature

MW 12-1:30

Approaches to literary study, including textual analysis, scholarly methodology and bibliography, critical theory and practice. ...(read more) Blanton, C. D.
Blanton, Dan

200/2

Problems in the Study of Literature

MW 12-1:30

Approaches to literary study, including textual analysis, scholarly methodology and bibliography, critical theory and practice....(read more) Puckett, Kent
Puckett, Kent

201B/1

Topics in the History of the English Language

This course has been canceled....(read more) Hanson, Kristin
Hanson, Kristin

203/1

Graduate Readings:
Pastoral/Animal Studies

MW 10:30-12

A wide-ranging exploration of pastoral modes from Virgil’s rewriting of Theocritus to contemporary imitations less of rural life per se than of lives deemed somehow “poor” or “simple.” Drawing on Empson’s sense of...(read more) Francois, Anne-Lise
Francois, Anne-Lise

203/2

Graduate Readings:
Prospectus Workshop

W 3-6

This will be a hands-on writing workshop intended to facilitate and accelerate the transition from qualifying exams to prospectus conference, from prospectus conference to first dissertation chapter, and from the status of student to scholar. The work...(read more) Abel, Elizabeth
Abel, Elizabeth

203/3

Graduate Readings:
The Writing of Everyday Life

TTh 12:30-2

This seminar will undertake a critical reading of, and participation in, some possibilities (or impossibilities) of contemporary realisms and realities. It will query, from an array of perspectives, problems of representation, referentiality, histori...(read more) Hejinian, Lyn
Hejinian, Lyn

203/4

Graduate Readings:
American Enlightenment & Revolution

TTh 2-3:30

This course broadly surveys the cultural history of the Enlightenment in eighteenth-century America.  In readings of literary, political, religious and scientific texts alongside visual culture of the period, we will look at the Revolution's impact o...(read more) Tamarkin, Elisa
Tamarkin, Elisa

205A/1

Old English

See below

This course will not be offered in 2010-2011, but English Department graduate students may take the undergraduate equivalent, English 104 (Introduction to Old English), in its place; see the listing for that course in this Announcement of Classes. No...(read more) See below

217/1

Shakespeare

MW 1:30-3

This class is an introduction to the criticism of Shakespeare at the graduate level. I've decided to perform that introduction this semester by following the development of Shakespeare criticism into a professional practice, tracing the reception hist...(read more) Landreth, David
Landreth, David

243B/1

Poetry Writing Workshop

M 3-6

The point will be to write poetry in public spaces, to write with an eye toward performance/ publication. My assumption is that people entering the class will enter with projects underway and/or with a strong interest in the problems and issues of pro...(read more) Giscombe, Cecil S.
Giscombe, Cecil

246E/1

Restoration and Early 18th Century

TTh 11-12:30

An exploration of the satire, devotional autobiography, prose fiction, letter-writing, diaries, heroic verse, drama, pornography and feminist polemic produced in England between the Restoration of Charles II (1660) and circa 1735; these will include B...(read more) Turner, James Grantham
Turner, James

250/1

Research Seminar:
Modernist Abstraction in Art and Poetry

W 3-6

This course will study relations between three modernist poets and some modern philosophers. We will be concerned primarily with how the philosophers help provide a perspective for interpreting and assessing what the poets can achieve by their refus...(read more) Altieri, Charles F.
Altieri, Charles

250/2

Research Seminar

This section of English 250 has been canceled....(read more) Banfield, Ann

250/3

Research Seminar:
The Novel and the New Ethics

Thurs. 3:30-5:30

In the last decade, a new call for ethical criticism has been sounded from unexpected quarters of the academy. The renewed interest in ethics is sparked by the academy’s general dissatisfaction with the disenfranchisement of individual agency ...(read more) Hale, Dorothy J.
Hale, Dorothy

302/1

The Teaching of Composition and Literature

Thurs. 9-11

This course will explore the theory and practice of teaching literature and writing. Designed as both a critical seminar and a hands-on practicum for new college teachers, the class will cover topics such as course design; leading discussion; teaching...(read more) Snyder, Katherine
Snyder, Katherine

310/1

Field Studies in Tutoring Writing (tutoring for credit through the Student Learning Center)

T.B.A.

Through seminars, discussions, and reading assignments, students are introduced to the language/writing/literacy needs of diverse college-age writers such as the developing, bi-dialectal, and non-native English-speaking (NNS) writer. The course will p...(read more) Staff