Announcement of Classes: Fall 2010

The Announcement of Classes is available one week before Tele-Bears begins every semester. Creative Writing and (for fall) Honors Course applications are available at the same time in the racks outside of 322 Wheeler Hall.


Graduate Courses

Graduate students from other departments and exceptionally well-prepared undergraduates are welcome in English graduate courses (except for English 200 and 375) insofar as limitations of class size allow. Graduate courses are usually limited to 15 students; courses numbered 250 are usually limited to 10.

When demand for a graduate course exceeds the maximum enrollment limit, the instructor will determine priorities for enrollment and inform students of his/her decisions at the second class meeting. Prior enrollment does not guarantee a place in a graduate course that turns out to be oversubscribed on the first day of class; fortunately, this situation does not arise very often.


Problems in the Study of Literature

English 200

Section: 1
Instructor: Blanton, C. D.
Blanton, Dan
Time: MW 12-1:30
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

A course reader.

Description

Approaches to literary study, including textual analysis, scholarly methodology and bibliography, critical theory and practice.


Problems in the Study of Literature

English 200

Section: 2
Instructor: Puckett, Kent
Puckett, Kent
Time: MW 12-1:30
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Leitch, V.: The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism; a course reader

Description

Approaches to literary study, including textual analysis, scholarly methodology and bibliography, critical theory and practice.


Topics in the History of the English Language

English 201B

Section: 1
Instructor: Hanson, Kristin
Hanson, Kristin
Time:
Location:


Description

This course has been canceled.


Graduate Readings: Pastoral/Animal Studies

English 203

Section: 1
Instructor: Francois, Anne-Lise
Francois, Anne-Lise
Time: MW 10:30-12
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Primary readings by Berger, Carroll, Dreyer, DuBois, G. Eliot, Hardy, Jewett, Marvell, O’Hara, Rousseau, Schiller, Shakespeare, Virgil, Walcott, Wordsworth.

Description

A wide-ranging exploration of pastoral modes from Virgil’s rewriting of Theocritus to contemporary imitations less of rural life per se than of lives deemed somehow “poor” or “simple.” Drawing on Empson’s sense of pastoral as a complex encounter between “high” and “low” persons and as an aesthetic privileging of the weak and socially powerless, we will seek to challenge and complicate the still prevalent notion limiting pastoral to an idealization of “country” ways of life; we will inquire instead about what Alpers following Fletcher calls the “ideas of human strength relative to [the] world” encoded in pastoral modes. Topics will include: the legacy of Romantic primitivism for contemporary environmental discourse; pastoral as ritual gift-exchange and the role of transmission in so-called traditional communities; scenes of native informants turned courtiers disguised as shepherds; animal imaginaries; figures of the poor, the simple, the common(s) and everyday in contemporary discourse theorizing an alternative modernity (De Certeau, Negri, Rancière). The course will also be an occasion to explore the limits of genre-based literary criticism and to address, in particular, the relation of genre to mode.


Graduate Readings: Prospectus Workshop

English 203

Section: 2
Instructor: Abel, Elizabeth
Abel, Elizabeth
Time: W 3-6
Location: 301 Wheeler


Description

This will be a hands-on writing workshop intended to facilitate and accelerate the transition from qualifying exams to prospectus conference, from prospectus conference to first dissertation chapter, and from the status of student to scholar. The workshop will provide a collaborative critical community in which to try out successive versions of your dissertation project and to learn how your peers are constructing theirs. Weekly writing assignments will structure points of entry into these projects. Beginning with exercises to galvanize your thinking, the assignments will map increasingly onto the specific components of the prospectus. We will also review a range of prospectuses from the past to demystify the genre and to gain a better understanding of its form and function. The goal is to insure that by the end of the semester, every member of the workshop will have submitted a prospectus to his or her committee. For students who complete a draft of the prospectus early in the semester, we will reserve time to consider it fully and to structure assignments relevant to the writing of the first chapter (including the question of which chapter should be written first). We will also discuss the dissertation in relation to the job market, conference papers, scholarly journals, and publishable articles.


Graduate Readings: The Writing of Everyday Life

English 203

Section: 3
Instructor: Hejinian, Lyn
Hejinian, Lyn
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Barthes, R.: Mythologies; Benjamin, W: The Arcades Project; Bowe, J et al.: Gig: Americans Talk About Their Jobs; Brainard, J.: I Remember; Cobb, A.: Green-Wood; Debord, G.: The Society of the Spectacle; De Certeau, M: The Practice of Everyday Life; Durand, M.: Traffic & Weather; Gladman, R.: Newcomer Can’t Swim; Highmore, B.: The Everyday Life Reader; Jameson, F: Postmodernism, or, The Cultural Logic of Late Capitalism; Lefebvre, H.: The Production of Space; Powell, D.A. and David Trinidad: By Myself; Spahr, J.: This Connection of Everyone With Lungs; Wittgenstein, L.: On Certainty

Description

This seminar will undertake a critical reading of, and participation in, some possibilities (or impossibilities) of contemporary realisms and realities. It will query, from an array of perspectives, problems of representation, referentiality, historical awareness, resistance, spectatorship, etc., with reference to a range of theoretical works read in parallel with some recent (and largely “experimental”) literary texts. In addition to the readings, each student will be required to undertake a daily writing project of his or her own that is capable of querying its own language and the character of dailiness, within the contexts of postmodern subjectivity, cultural possibility, and ubiquitous, “late,” capitalism.


Graduate Readings: American Enlightenment & Revolution

English 203

Section: 4
Instructor: Tamarkin, Elisa
Tamarkin, Elisa
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 223 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Primary readings will include texts by Franklin, Edwards, Jefferson, Paine, Hamilton,  Wheatley, Equiano, Crèvecoeur, P. Oliver, S. Rowson, H. Foster, W. H. Brown, C. B. Brown, R. Tyler, W. Irving, as well as Locke, Hume, Kant, Burke, A. Smith, Priestley, and Gibbon.

Description

This course broadly surveys the cultural history of the Enlightenment in eighteenth-century America.  In readings of literary, political, religious and scientific texts alongside visual culture of the period, we will look at the Revolution's impact on the Atlantic world and at intersections and exchanges between the American Enlightenment and its European counterparts.  Topics to be discussed include the wages of a revolutionary war, ideas of secularism and faith, the language of rights and representation, definitions of liberty and loyalty, the emergence of nationalism and cosmopolitanism, philosophies of race, and the place of feeling in the age of reason.  We will engage with critical and interpretive contexts for print culture and the early American book trade, for neoclassicism and romanticism, for the rise of the novel in America, and for new cultural expressions of the public, the private, and the individual.  Throughout the course, we will also look at materials and methods for literary-historical research in this period and at both the practical experience and theoretical implications of different approaches to the archive.


Old English

English 205A

Section: 1
Instructor: See below
Time: See below
Location: See below


Description

This course will not be offered in 2010-2011, but English Department graduate students may take the undergraduate equivalent, English 104 (Introduction to Old English), in its place; see the listing for that course in this Announcement of Classes. Note also that English 205B will be offered in Spring 2011.


Shakespeare

English 217

Section: 1
Instructor: Landreth, David
Landreth, David
Time: MW 1:30-3
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Shakespeare, W: The Riverside Shakespeare

Description

This class is an introduction to the criticism of Shakespeare at the graduate level. I've decided to perform that introduction this semester by following the development of Shakespeare criticism into a professional practice, tracing the reception history of the plays since their first performances. I'm particularly interested in the recursiveness of that history—its circularity and anachronicity—and in the way that the solecistic charge of anachronism has been deployed both against the playwright and against his critics within that history. So we'll be focusing on a dozen or so plays and poems that thematize the difficult relations of chronology to memory and futurity, probably including Othello, the sonnets, Titus, Julius Caesar, As You Like It, Hamlet, and Winter's Tale.

I have ordered the Riverside Shakespeare at the bookstore. You may use any scholarly edition of each play, however, as convenient to you ('scholarly'= has annotations and an introduction, has a first copyright date after 1960, and says who edited the text). We will refer to the original printings in on-line facsimile as well.


Poetry Writing Workshop

English 243B

Section: 1
Instructor: Giscombe, Cecil S.
Giscombe, Cecil
Time: M 3-6
Location: 108 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Students should come to class before purchasing books. Texts will likely include work by Bernadette Mayer, Gwendolyn Brooks, Lewis Hyde (on property and eros), Kamau Brathwaite, as well as statements/ essays on poetics and examples of off-the-grid publishing projects.

Description

The point will be to write poetry in public spaces, to write with an eye toward performance/ publication. My assumption is that people entering the class will enter with projects underway and/or with a strong interest in the problems and issues of producing and discussing a public art.

Workshops, field trips, public readings, experimental alliances beyond the classroom, publication and distribution schemes, etc.

To be considered for admission to this course, please submit 5 photocopied pages of your poetry, along with an application form, to Professor Giscombe's mailbox in 322 Wheeler BY 4:00 P.M., TUESDAY, APRIL 20, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses!


Restoration and Early 18th Century

English 246E

Section: 1
Instructor: Turner, James Grantham
Turner, James
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Behn, A.: Oroonoko, The Rover, and Other Works; Bunyan, J.: Grace Abounding; Defoe, D.: Robinson Crusoe; Hammond, P.: Restoration Literature: An Anthology; Lawrence, R.: Restoration Plays; Pope, A.: Selected Poetry; Rochester, J.: Selected Works; Swift, J.: The Writings

Description

An exploration of the satire, devotional autobiography, prose fiction, letter-writing, diaries, heroic verse, drama, pornography and feminist polemic produced in England between the Restoration of Charles II (1660) and circa 1735; these will include Behn's Oroonoko, the world best-seller Robinson Crusoe, the earlier works of Pope (Rape of the Lock), selected letters of Mary Wortley Montagu describing her life in Turkey, and major writings by Swift (Tale of a Tub, Modest Proposal, Gulliver's Travels). Canonical figures like Milton, Congreve, Pope and Swift will be juxtaposed to scandalous and/or marginal authors: Bunyan, Behn, Rochester and Astell. My selections emphasize the aftermath of Civil War and Puritanism in defeat, the representation of transgressive sexuality, the search for the heroic, the encounter with the alien, the resistance to "modernity," and the change in the idea of the author as women enter the literary marketplace; many of our texts combine all of these themes. My suggestions for further reading (including J.M. Coetzee's novel Foe) may help you find alternative themes and ways of focusing on this mercurial period.


Research Seminar: Modernist Abstraction in Art and Poetry

English 250

Section: 1
Instructor: Altieri, Charles F.
Altieri, Charles
Time: W 3-6
Location: 203 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Nietszche, F.: Beyond Good and Evil; Wittgenstein, L.: Philosophical Investigations; Wittgenstein, L.: On Certainty; Eliot, T.S.: Collected Poems; Eliot, T.S.: Knowledge and Experience in the Work of F.H. Bradley; Pound, E.: Gaudier-Brzska; Pound, E.: The Cantos of Ezra Pound; Pound, E: Personae; Stevens, W.: Stevens: Collected Poetry and Prose

Description

This course will study relations between three modernist poets and some modern philosophers. We will be concerned primarily with how the philosophers help provide a perspective for interpreting and assessing what the poets can achieve by their refusals of representational ideals for their art. I will be less interested in poetry as philosophy (or philosophy as poetry) than in what we say about imaginative possibilities for writing through our concern with some philosophical texts.

When we deal with poetry there will be weekly reports and responses by sections of the class and there will be a final paper. When we deal with philosophy participants will be required to present questions and challenges.


Research Seminar

English 250

Section: 2
Instructor: Banfield, Ann
Time:
Location:


Description

This section of English 250 has been canceled.


Research Seminar: The Novel and the New Ethics

English 250

Section: 3
Instructor: Hale, Dorothy J.
Hale, Dorothy
Time: Thurs. 3:30-5:30
Location: 203 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Theoretical reading will draw from work by Trilling, Leavis, Booth, Levinas, Badiou, Derrida, Spivak, Butler, J.H. Miller, Harpham, Appiah, and Nussbaum. Novelists include H. James, Forster, Faulkner, Hurston, Murdoch, Roth, Coetzee, and Z. Smith. Although the twentieth-century novel will be our collective focus of study, students are encouraged to write their final papers on fiction from any period.

Description

In the last decade, a new call for ethical criticism has been sounded from unexpected quarters of the academy. The renewed interest in ethics is sparked by the academy’s general dissatisfaction with the disenfranchisement of individual agency (and thus individual responsibility) that is seen to be the legacy of theories that have dominated scholarship in the humanities since the 1980s: de Manian deconstruction, Foucauldian sociology, and identity politics. For many literary critics, the turn to the ethical is not just the attempt to recuperate the agency of the individual reader or author; it is also an attempt to theorize anew the positive social value of literature and literary study. But are these new ethical defenses of literature substantially different from the old ethical defenses of literature? And if they are not, do they open themselves to the kind of critique that made deconstruction, new historicism and identity politics attractive theoretical positions to begin with? In addition to asking what is new about the new ethics, this course will also ask why the positive theorization of the value of “literature” is almost exclusively defined in terms of the ethical value of novels.


The Teaching of Composition and Literature

English 302

Section: 1
Instructor: Snyder, Katherine
Snyder, Katherine
Time: Thurs. 9-11
Location: 301 Wheeler


Description

This course will explore the theory and practice of teaching literature and writing. Designed as both a critical seminar and a hands-on practicum for new college teachers, the class will cover topics such as course design; leading discussion; teaching close reading; running a section of a lecture course; responding to student papers; teaching writing (argumentation, organization, grammar, style) in the classroom; time management; grading; and the work of teaching. The course enrolls English graduate students teaching their first course as of Spring or Fall 2010.


Field Studies in Tutoring Writing (tutoring for credit through the Student Learning Center)

English 310

Section: 1
Instructor: Staff
Time: T.B.A.
Location: T.B.A.


Other Readings and Media

Meyer, E. and L. Smith: The Practical Tutor

Recommended Text: Leki, I.: Understanding ESL Writers

Description

Through seminars, discussions, and reading assignments, students are introduced to the language/writing/literacy needs of diverse college-age writers such as the developing, bi-dialectal, and non-native English-speaking (NNS) writer. The course will provide a theoretical and practical framework for tutoring and composition instruction.

The seminar will focus on various tutoring methodologies and the theories which underlie them. Students will become familiar with relevant terminology, approaches, and strategies in the fields of composition teaching and learning. New tutors will learn how to respond constructively to student writing, as well as develop and hone effective tutoring skills. By guiding others towards clarity and precision in prose, tutors will sharpen their own writing abilities. New tutors will tutor fellow Cal students in writing and/or literature courses. Tutoring occurs in the Cesar E. Chavez Student Center under the supervision of experienced writing program staff.

In order to enroll for the seminar, students must have at least sophomore standing and have completed their Reading and Composition R1A and R1B requirements.

Some requirements include: participating in a weekly training seminar and occasional workshops; reading assigned articles, videotaping a tutoring session, and becoming familiar with the resources available at the Student Learning Center; tutoring 4-6 hours per week; keeping a tutoring journal and writing a final paper; meeting periodically with both the tutor supervisor(s) and tutees' instructors.

This course meets the field study requirements for the Education minor, but it cannot be used toward fulfillment of the requirements for the English major. It must be taken P/NP. Pick up an application for a pre–enrollment interview at the Student Learning Center, Atrium, Cesar Chavez Student Center (Lower Sproul Plaza), beginning April 5. No one will be admitted after the first week of fall classes.