Announcement of Classes: Fall 2010

The Announcement of Classes is available one week before Tele-Bears begins every semester. Creative Writing and (for fall) Honors Course applications are available at the same time in the racks outside of 322 Wheeler Hall.


Keeping it Real?: Racial & Queer Passing in American Literature

English R1A

Section: 3
Instructor: Martínez, Rosa
Time: MWF 11-12
Location: 222 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca, Naufragios (1542); William and Ellen Craft, Running a Thousand Miles for Freedom (1860); Joseph Harris, Rewriting (2006); Nella Larsen, Passing (1929); Mark Twain, Pudd’nhead Wilson (1894); a course reader containing critical readings. 

Description

“I had a literature rather than a personality, a set of fictions about myself.”
      -  Kafka Was the Rage by Anatole Broyard

This course intends to explore the “art” of racial passing and masquerade in American literature and culture through a diverse sample of American novels and short stories, such as traditional narratives of black-to-white passing, which is historically prevalent particularly in African-American literature, and other modes of passing, for instance gender and ethnic ambiguity as well as posing and the “closeting” of one’s sexuality. What are the connections or disjunctions between “closeting,” posing, and crossing the gender or color line? By focusing on the trope of the passing figure, we will ask how people and imagined characters negotiate their identity in various and varying social spaces and also, how authors disclose the frailty of social order regarding sexuality, race and the body to make alliances in unimagined ways. Venturing out of the closet as another and as they please, these passing figures are, indeed, queer. Yet what are the personal costs in relinquishing a disfavored identity for a favored one?

This course intends to hone your reading and writing skills, and will focus on helping you make thoughtful questioning and “interesting use of the texts you read in the essays you write.” Through a gradual process of outlining, rewriting and revising, you will produce 32 pages of written work (including brief response papers and three 3-4 page argumentative essays).


Putting It Together

English R1A

Section: 6
Instructor: Knox, Marisa Palacios
Knox, Marisa
Time: MWF 2-3
Location: 222 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Mary Shelley, Frankenstein; Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights; Bram Stoker, Dracula; William Faulkner, As I Lay Dying; Diana Hacker, Rules for Writers

Description

In this course we will be reading texts composed of multiple narratives told by a variety of speakers and writers. We will examine the various rhetorical strategies employed by these narratives in and of themselves and in relation to the whole. Questions of voice, perspective, and the nature of authority and authorship, as well as the role of the reader in the process of interpretation, will be explored throughout the semester.

Students in turn will continuously work on developing their own writing skills toward clear exposition and argumentation. Through classroom attention to issues of grammar, syntax, structure, and style as well as peer editing and extensive revision processes for three of four required essays (increasing in length from two to four pages), this course should prepare students to articulate their ideas fluently and coherently in writing.


Early American Literature of Crime and Punishment

English R1A

Section: 16
Instructor: Goodwin, Peter
Goodwin, Peter
Time: MWF 12-1
Location: 385 LeConte


Other Readings and Media

William Bradford, Of Plymouth Plantation (selections); Cotton Mather, Wonders of the Invisible World (selections on the Salem witch trials); Michael Wigglesworth, "Day of Doom"; Jonathan Edwards, "Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God"; Nat Turner, Confessions; Edgar Allan Poe, selected tales; Henry David Thoreau, Civil Disobedience; Nathaniel Hawthorne, selected tales; Harriet Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl; David Walker, Appeal; Rebecca Harding Davis, Life in the Iron Mills; Herman Melville, Billy Budd; Michel Foucault, Discipline and Punish (selections); Myra C. Glenn, Campaigns against Corporal Punishment: Prisoners, Sailors, Women, and Children in Antebellum America (selections); Saidiya Hartman, Scenes of Subjection (selections).

Description

In this course we will examine the role of crime, moral transgression, exposure, and punishment in the creation of U.S. American identity. If in public rituals of accusation, trial, confession, and punishment, the state simultaneously affirms and overpowers the agency of the accused, then the criminal might be viewed as both the exemplar and the antithesis of the American subject. But how do criminal acts and their punishments operate differently on different types of "subjects"? How, for example, is the shipboard flogging of a sailor like and unlike the plantation flogging of a pregnant slave—and who is the subject being interpellated in these different "scenes of subjection"?

The primary aim of this course is to develop your expertise in writing persuasively, clearly, and precisely about literature. With that in mind, the readings are chosen to help you formulate your own arguments about crime and punishment and their representation in American literature. You will learn how to construct strong sentences and paragraphs, develop thesis statements, organize textual evidence, and make forceful interpretive arguments—essential skills for all types of college and professional writing.


Early American Literature of Crime and Punishment

English R1A

Section: 17
Instructor: Goodwin, Peter
Goodwin, Peter
Time: MWF 2-3
Location: 206 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

William Bradford, Of Plymouth Plantation (selections); Cotton Mather, Wonders of the Invisible World (selections on the Salem witch trials); Michael Wigglesworth, "Day of Doom"; Jonathan Edwards, "Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God"; Nat Turner, Confessions; Edgar Allan Poe, selected tales; Henry David Thoreau, Civil Disobedience; Nathaniel Hawthorne, selected tales; Harriet Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl; David Walker, Appeal; Rebecca Harding Davis, Life in the Iron Mills; Herman Melville, Billy Budd; Michel Foucault, Discipline and Punish (selections); Myra C. Glenn, Campaigns against Corporal Punishment: Prisoners, Sailors, Women, and Children in Antebellum America (selections); Saidiya Hartman, Scenes of Subjection (selections).

Description

In this course we will examine the role of crime, moral transgression, exposure, and punishment in the creation of U.S. American identity. If in public rituals of accusation, trial, confession, and punishment, the state simultaneously affirms and overpowers the agency of the accused, then the criminal might be viewed as both the exemplar and the antithesis of the American subject. But how do criminal acts and their punishments operate differently on different types of "subjects"? How, for example, is the shipboard flogging of a sailor like and unlike the plantation flogging of a pregnant slave—and who is the subject being interpellated in these different "scenes of subjection"?

The primary aim of this course is to develop your expertise in writing persuasively, clearly, and precisely about literature. With that in mind, the readings are chosen to help you formulate your own arguments about crime and punishment and their representation in American literature. You will learn how to construct strong sentences and paragraphs, develop thesis statements, organize textual evidence, and make forceful interpretive arguments—essential skills for all types of college and professional writing.


The Rhetoric of Rants

English R1A

Section: 19
Instructor: Lankin, Andrea A
Lankin, Andrea
Time: MWF 1-2
Location: 222 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Betty Radice, ed., trans., The Letters of Abelard and Heloise; Richard A. Lanham, A Handlist of Rhetorical Terms, 2nd ed.; Diana Hacker, Rules for Writers, Sixth ed.; e-reserves containing Wulfstan, "The Sermon of the Wolf to the English," Jonathan Edwards, “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God,” Jonathan Swift, “A Modest Proposal,” Virginia Woolf, “A Room of One’s Own,” George Orwell, “Politics and the English Language” and Judy Grahn, “A Woman is Talking to Death,” as well as a variety of newspaper articles, blog posts, and other recent essays.

Description

The art of arguing while furious is actually a very difficult rhetorical task.  This class will read the works of master debaters from medieval Europe to twenty-first century America.  Using their work as primary sources and as inspirations, we’re going to learn how to produce two different kinds of writing, neutral scholarly prose and persuasive argument. Thus the class will consider the mechanics of writing both as part of the Reading and Composition requirements and as a theoretical project surrounding the class readings. We will also learn how to recognize underlying claims, unspoken assumptions, and ways of supporting claims in argumentative prose. By the end of the class, all students should be confident readers and writers of political discourse, able to participate fully in societal debates. Students will write and revise 32 pages of prose over the course of the class.


The Power of I: Literary Constructions of the Self

English R1A

Section: 20
Instructor: Bednarska, Dominika
Bednarska, Dominika
Time: MW 4-5:30
Location: 206 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Book List: Mary Karr, The Liar’s Club; Eli Clare, Exile & Pride; Harry G. Frankfurt, On Bullshit; Jamaica Kincaid, My Brother; Jeanette Winterson, Written on the Body; Diane Hacker, Rules for Writers; David Henry Hwang, M Butterfly; Thea Hillman, Intersex (for lack of a better word).

Description

What are the different ways that we come to understand first person narration?  How are different selves created and chosen through texts and textual choices?  How do issues of memory and claims to authenticity affect the way that we read different kinds of texts?  This course will focus on how the self is constructed in literary non-fiction but will also incorporate fiction, poetry and drama.  We will examine how different choices made by the author construct specific understandings of who the author (or narrator) is and the story which they are telling.  The first half of the course will focus on memory and the self and the second half on authenticity in relation to identity and the body.  

This course is aimed at developing reading and writing skills in a variety of genres. Students will learn and practice strategies for all stages of the writing process, from prewriting to revision, and also work on grammar, syntax, and style.
 


Free Speech and You

English R1B

Section: 3
Instructor: Hausman, Blake M.
Hausman, Blake
Time: MWF 1-2
Location: 225 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

The U.S. Constitution; Anthony Lewis, Freedom for the Thought We Hate; Allen Ginsberg, Howl; George Orwell, “Politics and the English Language”; Manufacturing Consent (film); Amy Goodman, selections from Breaking the Sound Barrier; additional essays and short pieces.

Description

This is the United States, and you hear people across the political spectrum talking about free speech.  You read something offensive or you hear something stupid, and perhaps you resent the fact that you had to be exposed to these words.  You find yourself viewing art or listening to music with heretical implications, and you hear people debating the logic and limits of free speech.  Here at Berkeley, you might buy a latte or a sandwich at the Free Speech Movement Café, and perhaps you contemplate the significance of these words.  You read about corporations and large conglomerates that describe their political contributions as expressions of free speech, and perhaps you feel compelled to make an argument of your own.  

We’ll read the U.S. Constitution and analyze the changing contexts and receptions of the First Amendment across the centuries.  We’ll read Ginsberg’s Howl, and we’ll discuss the poem’s role in shaping our contemporary sense of the First Amendment and literature.  George Orwell, Mario Savio, Noam Chomsky, Amy Goodman, and others will comment on the freedoms of thought and expression that we seem to revere, even in an age when ready-made slogans and pre-packaged sound bites threaten to stifle our abilities to think and express ourselves freely.


Literature and Experiment

English R1B

Section: 8
Instructor: Bernes, Jasper
Clinton, Daniel Patrick
Patnaik, Sangina
Bernes, Jasper
Time: TTh 9:30-11:00
Location: 225 Wheeler

No course details available at this time.