Announcement of Classes: Fall 2010

The Announcement of Classes is available one week before Tele-Bears begins every semester. Creative Writing and (for fall) Honors Course applications are available at the same time in the racks outside of 322 Wheeler Hall.


Keeping it Real?: Racial & Queer Passing in American Literature

English R1A

Section: 3
Instructor: Martínez, Rosa
Time: MWF 11-12
Location: 222 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca, Naufragios (1542); William and Ellen Craft, Running a Thousand Miles for Freedom (1860); Joseph Harris, Rewriting (2006); Nella Larsen, Passing (1929); Mark Twain, Pudd’nhead Wilson (1894); a course reader containing critical readings. 

Description

“I had a literature rather than a personality, a set of fictions about myself.”
      -  Kafka Was the Rage by Anatole Broyard

This course intends to explore the “art” of racial passing and masquerade in American literature and culture through a diverse sample of American novels and short stories, such as traditional narratives of black-to-white passing, which is historically prevalent particularly in African-American literature, and other modes of passing, for instance gender and ethnic ambiguity as well as posing and the “closeting” of one’s sexuality. What are the connections or disjunctions between “closeting,” posing, and crossing the gender or color line? By focusing on the trope of the passing figure, we will ask how people and imagined characters negotiate their identity in various and varying social spaces and also, how authors disclose the frailty of social order regarding sexuality, race and the body to make alliances in unimagined ways. Venturing out of the closet as another and as they please, these passing figures are, indeed, queer. Yet what are the personal costs in relinquishing a disfavored identity for a favored one?

This course intends to hone your reading and writing skills, and will focus on helping you make thoughtful questioning and “interesting use of the texts you read in the essays you write.” Through a gradual process of outlining, rewriting and revising, you will produce 32 pages of written work (including brief response papers and three 3-4 page argumentative essays).


Putting It Together

English R1A

Section: 6
Instructor: Knox, Marisa Palacios
Knox, Marisa
Time: MWF 2-3
Location: 222 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Mary Shelley, Frankenstein; Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights; Bram Stoker, Dracula; William Faulkner, As I Lay Dying; Diana Hacker, Rules for Writers

Description

In this course we will be reading texts composed of multiple narratives told by a variety of speakers and writers. We will examine the various rhetorical strategies employed by these narratives in and of themselves and in relation to the whole. Questions of voice, perspective, and the nature of authority and authorship, as well as the role of the reader in the process of interpretation, will be explored throughout the semester.

Students in turn will continuously work on developing their own writing skills toward clear exposition and argumentation. Through classroom attention to issues of grammar, syntax, structure, and style as well as peer editing and extensive revision processes for three of four required essays (increasing in length from two to four pages), this course should prepare students to articulate their ideas fluently and coherently in writing.


Early American Literature of Crime and Punishment

English R1A

Section: 16
Instructor: Goodwin, Peter
Goodwin, Peter
Time: MWF 12-1
Location: 385 LeConte


Other Readings and Media

William Bradford, Of Plymouth Plantation (selections); Cotton Mather, Wonders of the Invisible World (selections on the Salem witch trials); Michael Wigglesworth, "Day of Doom"; Jonathan Edwards, "Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God"; Nat Turner, Confessions; Edgar Allan Poe, selected tales; Henry David Thoreau, Civil Disobedience; Nathaniel Hawthorne, selected tales; Harriet Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl; David Walker, Appeal; Rebecca Harding Davis, Life in the Iron Mills; Herman Melville, Billy Budd; Michel Foucault, Discipline and Punish (selections); Myra C. Glenn, Campaigns against Corporal Punishment: Prisoners, Sailors, Women, and Children in Antebellum America (selections); Saidiya Hartman, Scenes of Subjection (selections).

Description

In this course we will examine the role of crime, moral transgression, exposure, and punishment in the creation of U.S. American identity. If in public rituals of accusation, trial, confession, and punishment, the state simultaneously affirms and overpowers the agency of the accused, then the criminal might be viewed as both the exemplar and the antithesis of the American subject. But how do criminal acts and their punishments operate differently on different types of "subjects"? How, for example, is the shipboard flogging of a sailor like and unlike the plantation flogging of a pregnant slave—and who is the subject being interpellated in these different "scenes of subjection"?

The primary aim of this course is to develop your expertise in writing persuasively, clearly, and precisely about literature. With that in mind, the readings are chosen to help you formulate your own arguments about crime and punishment and their representation in American literature. You will learn how to construct strong sentences and paragraphs, develop thesis statements, organize textual evidence, and make forceful interpretive arguments—essential skills for all types of college and professional writing.


Early American Literature of Crime and Punishment

English R1A

Section: 17
Instructor: Goodwin, Peter
Goodwin, Peter
Time: MWF 2-3
Location: 206 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

William Bradford, Of Plymouth Plantation (selections); Cotton Mather, Wonders of the Invisible World (selections on the Salem witch trials); Michael Wigglesworth, "Day of Doom"; Jonathan Edwards, "Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God"; Nat Turner, Confessions; Edgar Allan Poe, selected tales; Henry David Thoreau, Civil Disobedience; Nathaniel Hawthorne, selected tales; Harriet Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl; David Walker, Appeal; Rebecca Harding Davis, Life in the Iron Mills; Herman Melville, Billy Budd; Michel Foucault, Discipline and Punish (selections); Myra C. Glenn, Campaigns against Corporal Punishment: Prisoners, Sailors, Women, and Children in Antebellum America (selections); Saidiya Hartman, Scenes of Subjection (selections).

Description

In this course we will examine the role of crime, moral transgression, exposure, and punishment in the creation of U.S. American identity. If in public rituals of accusation, trial, confession, and punishment, the state simultaneously affirms and overpowers the agency of the accused, then the criminal might be viewed as both the exemplar and the antithesis of the American subject. But how do criminal acts and their punishments operate differently on different types of "subjects"? How, for example, is the shipboard flogging of a sailor like and unlike the plantation flogging of a pregnant slave—and who is the subject being interpellated in these different "scenes of subjection"?

The primary aim of this course is to develop your expertise in writing persuasively, clearly, and precisely about literature. With that in mind, the readings are chosen to help you formulate your own arguments about crime and punishment and their representation in American literature. You will learn how to construct strong sentences and paragraphs, develop thesis statements, organize textual evidence, and make forceful interpretive arguments—essential skills for all types of college and professional writing.


The Rhetoric of Rants

English R1A

Section: 19
Instructor: Lankin, Andrea A
Lankin, Andrea
Time: MWF 1-2
Location: 222 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Betty Radice, ed., trans., The Letters of Abelard and Heloise; Richard A. Lanham, A Handlist of Rhetorical Terms, 2nd ed.; Diana Hacker, Rules for Writers, Sixth ed.; e-reserves containing Wulfstan, "The Sermon of the Wolf to the English," Jonathan Edwards, “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God,” Jonathan Swift, “A Modest Proposal,” Virginia Woolf, “A Room of One’s Own,” George Orwell, “Politics and the English Language” and Judy Grahn, “A Woman is Talking to Death,” as well as a variety of newspaper articles, blog posts, and other recent essays.

Description

The art of arguing while furious is actually a very difficult rhetorical task.  This class will read the works of master debaters from medieval Europe to twenty-first century America.  Using their work as primary sources and as inspirations, we’re going to learn how to produce two different kinds of writing, neutral scholarly prose and persuasive argument. Thus the class will consider the mechanics of writing both as part of the Reading and Composition requirements and as a theoretical project surrounding the class readings. We will also learn how to recognize underlying claims, unspoken assumptions, and ways of supporting claims in argumentative prose. By the end of the class, all students should be confident readers and writers of political discourse, able to participate fully in societal debates. Students will write and revise 32 pages of prose over the course of the class.


The Power of I: Literary Constructions of the Self

English R1A

Section: 20
Instructor: Bednarska, Dominika
Bednarska, Dominika
Time: MW 4-5:30
Location: 206 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Book List: Mary Karr, The Liar’s Club; Eli Clare, Exile & Pride; Harry G. Frankfurt, On Bullshit; Jamaica Kincaid, My Brother; Jeanette Winterson, Written on the Body; Diane Hacker, Rules for Writers; David Henry Hwang, M Butterfly; Thea Hillman, Intersex (for lack of a better word).

Description

What are the different ways that we come to understand first person narration?  How are different selves created and chosen through texts and textual choices?  How do issues of memory and claims to authenticity affect the way that we read different kinds of texts?  This course will focus on how the self is constructed in literary non-fiction but will also incorporate fiction, poetry and drama.  We will examine how different choices made by the author construct specific understandings of who the author (or narrator) is and the story which they are telling.  The first half of the course will focus on memory and the self and the second half on authenticity in relation to identity and the body.  

This course is aimed at developing reading and writing skills in a variety of genres. Students will learn and practice strategies for all stages of the writing process, from prewriting to revision, and also work on grammar, syntax, and style.
 


Free Speech and You

English R1B

Section: 3
Instructor: Hausman, Blake M.
Hausman, Blake
Time: MWF 1-2
Location: 225 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

The U.S. Constitution; Anthony Lewis, Freedom for the Thought We Hate; Allen Ginsberg, Howl; George Orwell, “Politics and the English Language”; Manufacturing Consent (film); Amy Goodman, selections from Breaking the Sound Barrier; additional essays and short pieces.

Description

This is the United States, and you hear people across the political spectrum talking about free speech.  You read something offensive or you hear something stupid, and perhaps you resent the fact that you had to be exposed to these words.  You find yourself viewing art or listening to music with heretical implications, and you hear people debating the logic and limits of free speech.  Here at Berkeley, you might buy a latte or a sandwich at the Free Speech Movement Café, and perhaps you contemplate the significance of these words.  You read about corporations and large conglomerates that describe their political contributions as expressions of free speech, and perhaps you feel compelled to make an argument of your own.  

We’ll read the U.S. Constitution and analyze the changing contexts and receptions of the First Amendment across the centuries.  We’ll read Ginsberg’s Howl, and we’ll discuss the poem’s role in shaping our contemporary sense of the First Amendment and literature.  George Orwell, Mario Savio, Noam Chomsky, Amy Goodman, and others will comment on the freedoms of thought and expression that we seem to revere, even in an age when ready-made slogans and pre-packaged sound bites threaten to stifle our abilities to think and express ourselves freely.


Literature and Experiment

English R1B

Section: 8
Instructor: Bernes, Jasper
Clinton, Daniel Patrick
Patnaik, Sangina
Bernes, Jasper
Time: TTh 9:30-11:00
Location: 225 Wheeler

No course details available at this time.

Freshman Seminar: Shakespeare's Hamlet

English 24

Section: 1
Instructor: Paley, Morton D.
Paley, Morton
Time: W 2-4 (9/1-10/20 only)
Location: L45 Unit III, on Durant betw. Telegraph & Dana


Other Readings and Media

Shakespeare: Hamlet

Description

Hamlet is perhaps the greatest, the most challenging, and at times the most frustrating play in the English language. In this course we will concentrate intensively on the text (which will be the only assigned reading). We’ll consider questions of interpretation, motivation, staging, and poetics, among others. Some questions we’ll address are:

Does Hamlet think the flesh is “sullied” or “solid”?

Did Gertrude know about Claudius’ murder of old Hamlet?

When Hamlet tells Ophelia “get thee to a nunnery,” does he mean a brothel?

Is Polonius’ advice to Laertes sage or silly?

Does Hamlet delay? Does he have an Oedipus complex? How old is he?

How do we go about answering questions like these?

The only requisite for enrollment is that you be a freshman. No previous knowledge of Shakespeare is expected.

During the course of our half-semester, each of you will do a short (10-15 minute) seminar presentation (or, if you wish, a 20-30 minute presentation in collaboration with another student). There’ll be a list of possible subjects for you to choose from, and we’ll have a conference beforehand. Then you’ll do a 1-page write-up of what you presented, and I’ll return it to you with written comments. By meeting six you’ll write a short (1500-word) essay. It may grow out of your initial presentation, or be on an entirely different subject. There will be ample time for you to confer with me on this. I’ll return your essay with my comments at meeting seven.

This 1-unit course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.


Freshman Seminar: Reading Walden Carefully

English 24

Section: 2
Instructor: Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell
Time: Thurs. 4-5
Location: 201 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Thoreau, H.D.: Walden

Description

We will read Thoreau's Walden in small chunks, probably about thirty pages per week. This will allow us time to dwell upon the complexities of a book that is much more mysterious than those who have read the book casually, or those who have only heard about it, realize. We will also try to work some with online versions of the books, using the wordsearch command to identify words such as "woodchuck" or "dimple" that reappear frequently, in order to speculate on patterns Thoreau is trying to establish. Regular attendance and participation, along with a loose five-page essay at the end, are required.

This 1-unit course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.


Freshman Seminar: This section has been cancelled

English 24

Section: 3
Instructor: Tracy, Robert
Tracy, Robert
Time:
Location:


Other Readings and Media


Description

This section has been canceled. 


Literature of American Cultures: Immigration, Ethnicity, and the Popular Imagination

English 31AC

Section: 1
Instructor: Ellis, Nadia
Ellis, Nadia
Time: MWF 1-2
Location: 213 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Diaz, J.:  The Brief, Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao; Everett, P.:  Erasure; Lee, C. R:  Native Speaker; Lethem, Jonathan:  The Fortress of Solitude

 Films:  Do the Right Thing (1989); In America (2002); The Wire (episodes from Season 3)(2004); Harold and Kumar Go to White Castle (2004)

Description

Why, in United States culture, are the varieties of blackness understood differently from the varieties of whiteness? Why are categories of Asian identities parsed differently from either? And how do the histories of immigration to the US produce these conflictual and confounding categorical modes? Contemporary fiction, film, and music allow us to think about immigration and its production of modern racial ideas in the United States, and to explore how these ideas become a part of the popular imagination. We will read literary fiction that deals in genres (comic books, detective novels), watch films and television shows that stage racial encounter (in moods of greater or lesser seriousness), and study musicians and comedians whose astute readings of race often reflect those most commonly, if unconsciously, held.  If all goes well, we will eventually alight upon the question of what the hero of Chang-Rae Lee’s quietly magisterial novel Native Speaker has in common with KRS-1.

Reader and B-Space page will include work by Jhumpa Lahiri, Amy Tan, Paule Marshall, Colson Whitehead, Malcolm Gladwell, David Simon, Mae Ngai, Noel Ignatiev, Nell Irvin Painter, Blackstar, KRS-1, and Dave Chapelle.

This course satisfies UC Berkeley's American Cultures requirement.


Literature in English: Through Milton

English 45A

Section: 1
Instructor: Nolan, Maura
Nolan, Maura
Time: MW 12-1 + discussion sections F 12-1
Location: 2 LeConte


Other Readings and Media

Donaldson, E., ed.: Beowulf; Heaney, S., ed.: Beowulf; Mann, J., ed.: Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales; Marlowe, C.: Dr. Faustus; Dickson, D., ed.: Poetry of John Donne; Milton, J.: Paradise Lost

Description

This course will focus on the central works of the early English literary tradition, beginning with Beowulf and ending with Paradise Lost. We will examine the texts in light of the cultures in which they were produced, asking ourselves why these works were written when they were written, and what the unfamiliar cultures of the Middle Ages and Renaissance have to say to us now. We will also focus on developing reading skills and on understanding the literary tradition as a set of interrelated texts and problems that recur over the course of centuries. We will examine these works as formal artifacts as well as historical documents. Students will work on close readings, on literary language, and on understanding generic distinctions as they functioned in the past and function now.

NOTE: This class will meet for the first time on Monday, August 30; discussion sections will not be held on Friday the 27th.


Literature in English: Through Milton

English 45A

Section: 2
Instructor: Landreth, David
Landreth, David
Time: MW 4-5 + discussion sections F 4-5
Location: 106 Stanley


Other Readings and Media

Chaucer, G: Canterbury Tales; Donne, J: John Donne's Poetry; Marlowe, C: Doctor Faustus; Milton, J: Paradise Lost; Spenser, E: The Faerie Queene, Book One

Description

This class introduces students to the production of poetic narrative in English through the close study of major works in that tradition: the Canterbury Tales, The Faerie Queene, Doctor Faustus, Donne's lyrics, and Paradise Lost. Each of these texts reflects differently on the ambition of poetry to encompass the range of a culture’s experience. We will focus particularly on the relationships of different genres to different kinds of knowledge, to see how different ways of expressing things make possible new things to express, as English culture and English poetry transform each other from the fourteenth to the seventeenth centuries.

NOTE: This class will meet for the first time on Monday, August 30; discussion sections will not be held on Friday the 27th. 


Literature in English: Late 17th- Through Mid-19th Centuries

English 45B

Section: 1
Instructor: Sorensen, Janet
Sorensen, Janet
Time: MW 10-11 + discussion sections F 10-11
Location: 159 Mulford


Other Readings and Media

Behn, A.: Oroonoko; Pope, A.: The Rape of the Lock; Montagu, Elizabeth Mary Wortley: Selected Poems; Defoe, D.: Moll Flanders; Johnson, Samuel: Selected Works; Equiano, O.: The Interesting Narrative of the Live; Wheatley, P.: Selected Poems; Jefferson, T.: Selected Works; Wordsworth, W. and Coleridge, S.: Lyrical Ballads; Austen, J.: Emma

Description

As we read works produced in a period of often tumultuous change, we shall consider those works as zones of contact, reflecting and sometimes negotiating conflict. In a world of expanding global commerce (imports like tea suddenly become commonplace in England), political revolution (English, French, American), and changing conceptions of what it means to be a man or woman (a new medical discourse wants to view them as categorically distinct), increasingly available printed texts become sites of contestation—including debates about what constitutes “proper” language itself. We shall think about the ways in which separate groups—British and African, masters and slaves, slave owners and abolitionists, arch capitalists and devout religious thinkers, Republicans and Conservatives, and men and women—use writing to devise ongoing relationships with each other, often under conditions of inequality. Throughout we shall be especially attuned to formal choices—from linguistic register to generic conventions—and how writers deploy these to incorporate opposition, resist authority or authorize themselves. Requirements will include two papers, a mid-term, a final, and occasional quizzes.

NOTE: This class will meet for the first time on Monday, August 30; discussion sections will not be held on Friday the 27th. 


Literature in English: Late 17th- Through Mid-19th Centuries

English 45B

Section: 2
Instructor: Duncan, Ian
Duncan, Ian
Time: MW 3-4 + discussion sections F 3-4
Location: 141 McCone


Other Readings and Media

Rowlandson, M.: Narrative of the Captivity; Behn, A.: Oroonoko; Defoe, D.: Robinson Crusoe; Swift, J.: Gulliver’s Travels; Wordsworth, J. & J., eds.: The Penguin Book of Romantic Poetry; Austen, J.: Persuasion; Melville, H.: Benito Cereno; Equiano, O.: Narrative of the Life; Douglass, F.: Narrative of the Life; Scott, W.: Rob Roy

Description

Readings in English, Scottish, Irish and North American poetry, prose fiction and autobiography from 1688 through 1848: a century and a half that sees the formation of a new, multinational British state with the political incorporation of Scotland and then Ireland, the global expansion of an overseas empire, and the revolt of the North American colonies. Our readings will explore the relations between home and the world in writings preoccupied with journeys outward and back, real and imaginary—not all of which are undertaken voluntarily.

NOTE: This class will meet for the first time on Monday, August 30; discussion sections will not be held on Friday the 27th. 


Literature in English: Mid 19th- Through the 20th Century

English 45C

Section: 1
Instructor: Abel, Elizabeth
Abel, Elizabeth
Time: MW 1-2 + discussion sections F 1-2
Location: 3 LeConte


Other Readings and Media

Conrad, J.: Heart of Darkness; Faulkner, W.: The Sound and the Fury; Hurston, Z.: Their Eyes Were Watching God; James, H.: Turn of the Screw; Joyce, J.: Dubliners; Rhys, J.: Wide Sargasso Sea; Woolf, V.: To the Lighthouse; a course reader of selected poetry and essays

Description

This course will focus on the formal consequences of the social and cultural revolutions of the early twentieth century. We will examine the changes in narrative strategy and voice and the transformations of poetic syntax and diction that have come to be known as "modernism" and will trace their reverberations through the later twentieth century. We will also analyze the pressures brought to bear on formal innovation by different national traditions and histories of colonialism, racism, and feminism.

NOTE: This class will meet for the first time on Monday, August 30; discussion sections will not be held on Friday the 27th. 


Literature in English: Mid 19th- Through the 20th Century

English 45C

Section: 2
Instructor: Wong, Hertha D. Sweet
Wong, Hertha Sweet
Time: MW 12-1 + discussion sections F 12-1
Location: 390 Hearst Mining


Other Readings and Media

Achebe, C.: Things Fall Apart; Conrad, J.: Heart of Darkness; Morrison, T.: Beloved; Silko, L.: Ceremony; Spiegelman, A.: Maus (2 volumes); Shammas, A.: Arabesques; and Woolf, V.: Mrs. Dalloway.

Description

This survey course of literature in English from the mid-nineteenth century to the present will consider a variety of literary forms and movements in their historical and cultural contexts. We’ll examine the literature of colonization and imperialism and the counter literature that it inspires. We’ll study literary experimentation and recurrent transcultural themes: the relationship between past and present, surviving historical trauma, translating orality into print, and the influence of notions of race, ethnicity, class, nationality, and gender on subject formation. We’ll read Irish and English texts, Native American and European American texts, African American and African English texts, yet challenge the simplistic binary dualisms these categories suggest. We’ll also practice lots of close reading. There will be two 5-to-7-page essays, a midterm, and a final examination.

NOTE: This class will meet for the first time on Monday, August 30; discussion sections will not be held on Friday the 27th. 


Introduction to Environmental Studies

English C77

Section: 1
Instructor: Hass, Robert L.
Hass, Robert and Sposito, Gary
Time: TTh 12:30-2 + 1 - 1/2 hours discussion section per week
Location: 100 GPB


Other Readings and Media

The required books for the course will be available exclusively at Analog Books, located just one block up Euclid Avenue from the North Gate entrance to the Berkeley campus. The Course Reader, Introduction to Environmental Studies, will be available exclusively from Copy Central, 2483 Hearst Avenue, right across the street from the North Gate entrance. There will also be a required environmental science textbook (possibly provided as an eBook).

Description

This is a team-taught introduction to environmental studies. The team consists of a professor of environmental science, a professor of English, and three graduate student instructors working in the field. The aim of the course is to give students the basic science of the environment, an introduction to environmental literature, philosophy, and policy issues, and analytic tools to evaluate a range of environmental problems. The course requires some time spent outdoors in observation as well as a lot of reading and writing.

This course is cross-listed with E.S.P.M. C12.


Children’s Literature

English 80K

Section: 1
Instructor: Wright, Katharine E.
Wright, Katharine
Time: MWF 2-3
Location: Note new location: 159 Mulford


Other Readings and Media

Potter, B.: Complete Adventures of Peter Rabbit; MacDonald, G.: The Princess & the Goblin; Barrie, J.: Peter Pan; Nesbit, E.: The Railway Children; Curtis, C.: Elijah of Buxton; Cormier, R.: The Chocolate War; Ryan, P. Munoz: Esperanza Rising; Yolen, J.: The Devil's Arithmetic; Farmer, N.: The House of the Scorpion

Description

Children's Literature is a complex subject of intersecting concerns. Ideas about childhood and about what is good or bad for children rub up against commercial interests and the interests of educators and parents, not to mention those of the (supposed) child reader. The study of children's literature is thus an active field of inquiry in academics, drawing on cultural studies, educational theory and literary analysis.

This class will concern itself with:

1. the cultural dynamics around a literature named after its supposed audience

2. an overview of the history of literature for children

3. the literary features of these texts

4. the field itself and the critical work being done within it

We will be reading folktales and fables, novels from the Victorian to the current era, picture books and young adult titles. We will also be examining literary criticism on these subjects. The reading will at times be heavy. Class format will include lectures, small group work, and student presentations. Three short papers will be required and two exams.

The book list at this point is only tentative: do not buy books until the final list is announced on bSpace.


Sophomore Seminar: Utopian & Dystopian Movies

English 84

Section: 1
Instructor: Starr, George A.
Starr, George
Time: Tues. 6-9 P.M.
Location: 300 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

See below.

Description

We will mainly be viewing and discussing Utopian and anti-Utopian movies. Depending on the intended majors of those enrolled, we may use other kinds of visual material as well, from architecture, city planning, world's fairs, etc. We will not be dealing with literary Utopias or Dystopias, but some theoretical and sociological background reading will be recommended.

This 2-unit course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.


Sophomore Seminar: High Culture / Low Culture: Postmodernism and the Films of the Coen Brothers

English 84

Section: 2
Instructor: Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia
Time: W 2-5
Location: 300 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Lahiri, Jhumpa: Interpreter of Maladies; Bould, Mark: Film Noir

Description

We will concentrate on the high and low cultural elements in the noir comedies of the Coen brothers, discussing their use of Hollywood genres, parodies of classic conventions, and representation of arbitrariness. We will also read some fiction and attend PFA and Cal Performances.

This 2-unit course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.


Sophomore Seminar: The Monster in the Mirror: Frankenstein & Dracula

English 84

Section: 3
Instructor: Loewinsohn, Ron
Loewinsohn, Ron
Time: W 2-3
Location: 204 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Shelley, M.: Frankenstein; Stoker, B.: Dracula

Description

We will read B. Stoker’s Dracula and M. Shelley’s Frankenstein, together with some film versions of these two archetypal horror tales, appreciating them as mirror opposites of each other, and investigating what they have to tell us about human agency, responsibility and denial.

This 1-unit course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.


Sophomore Seminar: Socrates as a Cultural Icon

English 84

Section: 4
Instructor: Coolidge, John S.
Coolidge, John
Time: F 12-2
Location: 205 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

See below.

Description

Socrates has often been compared to Jesus, an enigmatic yet somehow unmistakable figure who left nothing in writing yet decisively influenced the mind of his own and later ages. In the first weeks of the course we will read and discuss Aristophanes' comic send-up of Socrates in Clouds and the Platonic dialogues purporting to tell the story of Socrates' trial and death (Euthyphro, Apology of Socrates, Crito, and selections from Phaedo), attempting to (a) trace the original construction of the Socratic icon, and (b) briefly note its relevance to present-day “issues” such as generational conflict, science vs. religion, free speech, academic freedom, self and society, etc. After that class sessions will consist of team presentations, prepared in consultation with the instructor, on contemporary controversies involving some of these issues. The object is to provoke lively debate. The course is intended to appeal especially to students who are desirous of getting in on the intellectual conversation of our time and curious about its cultural antecedents.

This 2-unit course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.


Introduction to Old English

English 104

Section: 1
Instructor: O'Brien O'Keeffe, Katherine
O'Brien O'Keeffe, Katherine
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 229 Dwinelle


Other Readings and Media

Marsden, R.: The Cambridge Old English Reader

Description

Canst þu þis gewrit understandan? Want to? “Introduction to Old English” will give you the tools to read a wide variety of writings from among the earliest recorded texts in the English language. What is there to read? We will look at some of the best kept secrets in (Old) English: short heroic poems, accounts of war, poems of meditation and elegies, history, saints’ lives, and romance and get a taste of the curious (recipes, charms, prognostications) as well as the humorous (riddles). To complement our work with these Old English texts we’ll be using on-line and library resources to learn about the material culture of Anglo-Saxon England. While we work on language in the beginning of the course we will also be reading and discussing the texts. Once you are up and running with the language, the rest of the course will provide practical experience in reading and discussing Old English works on a range of topics: the portrayal of monsters, saints, and heroes, cultural identity and the problem of the Vikings, the composition of Old English poetry, the search for Anglo-Saxon paganism. In-class discussion will cover questions of cultural difference, translation, subjectivity, and otherness. We will also experiment with deciphering the texts as they appear in their manuscripts.

No prior experience with Old or Middle English is necessary for this course.

Required work: Mid-term assessment, final examination, daily class participation, short paper, one or two in-class reports.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


Anglo-Saxon England

English 105

Section: 1
Instructor: O'Brien O'Keeffe, Katherine
O'Brien O'Keeffe, Katherine
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: Note new location: 215 Dwinelle


Other Readings and Media

Bede: Ecclesiastical History of the English People; Campbell, J.: The Anglo-Saxons; Crossley-Holland, K.: The Anglo-Saxon World; Liuzza, R., ed.: Beowulf; Keynes, S. and Lapidge, M.: Alfred the Great; Webb, J. F. and Farmer, D.H., eds.: The Age of Bede; additional reading on electronic reserve

Description

Who were the Angelcynn? What were the English like before they were “English”? The name “Anglo-Saxon England” is a relatively modern term to designate peoples and kingdoms that, across several centuries before the Norman Conquest, knew themselves by various other names. The names “England,” “English,” and “Anglo-Saxon” are thus terms that mark a history of contest over lands and identities and a narrative about modern England.

In this course we will read a wide range of texts from Anglo-Saxon England in order to explore both the writings and the intellectual world of the Angelcynn (a.k.a. Angli) and the ways in which they came to know themselves as “English” (Englisc). Our texts will include chronicle and history, epic and elegy, saints’ lives and riddles, and samplings of the curious (recipes, charms, prognostications). We will consider the role of writing itself as a new technology in England and discuss how that new technology changed both history and culture. Course materials will include visual images, both of manuscript pages and of artifacts — ornaments, weapons, grave goods. We will ask ourselves what such objects reveal about the culture that created them and think through the relationship between visual images and written text . Certain historical events will be very important to us. The invasion of England by Viking marauders and the Viking colonization of the land had profound effects on English culture. So did the Christianization of the Anglo-Saxons, an ongoing process throughout the period. Co-existing uneasily with Christianity was the heroic culture of the Anglo-Saxons, the world of warriors and battle, weapons and armor. We will explore what it meant to be a hero in the Anglo-Saxon world, and ask ourselves if being a hero and being a Christian at the same time was possible. Women in Anglo-Saxon England weren’t just “cup-bearers” and “peace-weavers,” though it might seem that way in heroic narratives. The lives of female saints were often constructed using a heroic model, and women played other important roles in English culture as well.

If you are interested in Old English poetry, we will be spending a large part of the semester reading Beowulf and other Old English poems. We will compare translations, examine the original, and experiment with the Old English alliterative mode. You will hear Old English read aloud, and have the chance to read it aloud yourself.

As part of our explorations, we will investigate the ways writing as a technology impacted their culture and will use various artifacts (for example, images of manuscript pages and their illustrations, ornaments, weapons, grave goods) to help visualize their world. We will interrogate claims about Christianity and paganism and the ways in which these ideas were deployed in constructing identity and in defending against colonization by Viking marauders. We will explore notions of gender, and the ways in which constructions of the heroic found their way into lives of saints, both male and female. And we will have the opportunity to experiment with Old English poetry as it looked and as it sounded.

No prior knowledge of Old English or of Anglo-Saxon history is required; all texts will be in translation.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


Medieval Literature

English 110

Section: 1
Instructor: Thornbury, Emily V.
Thornbury, Emily
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 110 Barrows


Other Readings and Media

Treharne, E., ed.: Old and Middle English, c.890–c.1450; Gardiner, E., ed.: Visions of Heaven & Hell before Dante; Borroff, M., trans.: Sir Gawain and the Green Knight/Patience/Pearl; Davies, S., trans.: The Mabinogion; a course pack

Description

This course provides a tour of otherworld visions and journeys in the literature of medieval Britain. After looking at some foundational texts from antiquity that influenced writers up to the present day, we’ll examine the geography of the afterlife (heaven, hell, and purgatory), with a particular eye toward understanding how these transcendent realms reflected the more immediate concerns of medieval authors. We’ll consider the physical connection of these places to the normal world, as well as the moral connection they have to human lives; we’ll also look at texts that depict other, less transcendent worlds existing alongside our own. After taking this course, students will know how to find the airport nearest to Purgatory, and what to do if they end up in the fairies’ country: they’ll also be able to analyze the classic motifs and meanings of otherworldly vision literature.

No prior study of medieval literature is necessary. We will read most Middle English texts in the original, while texts in other languages (Old English, Latin, Old French, Middle Welsh) will be available in translation.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


English Drama to 1603

English 114A

Section: 1
Instructor: Miller, Jennifer
Miller, Jennifer
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 210 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

The materials for this course will be available in photocopied readers.

Description

Focusing primarily on civic performances of the late fourteenth century, especially the Chester cycle plays, which survive to us in sixteenth-century transcriptions, this course aims to recontextualize the "new" productions of Shakespeare and Marlowe, for instance, in a long and self-conscious tradition of stage incarnation in England, a tradition to which Renaissance dramatists were minutely and radically responding.  The course will also consider the extent to which this response may be inflecting the surviving records of dramatic performance in earlier England, constraining our access to a distinctly medieval articulation of dramatic possibility and purpose.  Of particular interest will be the ethics of impersonation, the suspension of (dis)belief, and ways in which the cypher of English Jewry (the Jews were expelled from England in 1290) was obsessively encoded throughout the period as a means of meditating on the dangerous, and miraculous, potentialities of drama's absent palpabilities.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


Shakespeare

English 117A

Section: 1
Instructor: Arnold, Oliver
Arnold, Oliver
Time: note new time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: note new location: 3 LeConte


Other Readings and Media

This course will focus on the first half of Shakespeare's career.

Recommended: Greenblatt, S., ed.: The Norton Shakespeare (2nd edition)

If you already own a good single-volume edition of the plays (for example, The Riverside Shakespeare or The Arden Shakespeare), don’t feel at all obliged to buy The Norton Shakespeare.

Description

Shakespeare’s poems and plays are relentlessly unsettling, crazy beautiful, deeply moving, penetratingly intelligent, and compulsively meaningful: they complicate everything, they simplify nothing, and for 400 years, they have been a touchstone—indeed, something like an obsession—for literary artists from Milton to Goethe to George Eliot to Joyce to Brecht to Zukofsky to Sarah Kane and for philosophers and theorists from Hegel to Marx to Freud to Derrida to Lacan to Zizeck. We will be especially concerned with five large issues: compassion; political representation and its discontents; the nature of identity and subjectivity; colonialism; and the relation between the ways Shakespeare’s plays make meaning and the ways they produce emotional experience.


Shakespeare

English 117S

Section: 1
Instructor: Altieri, Charles F.
Altieri, Charles
Time: note new time: MW 11-12 + discussion sections F 11-12
Location: note new location: 2 LeConte


Other Readings and Media

Shakespeare, W.:  Richard II, Midsummer Night's Dream, Twelfth Night, Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, All's Well That Ends Well, Measure for Measure, Macbeth, The Winter's Tale, The Tempest

Description

This will be an introduction to close reading of Shakespeare that will address all of his genres and periods, at least after 1596.  I know very little about race, class, or gender and care even less.  I am interested primarily in unabashedly celebrating Shakespeare’s various forms of genius by tracing how complex, engaging, and intelligent the plays are about human passions.  We will read roughly a play a week, with some taking two weeks.  There will two papers, a mid-term, and a final, and attendance will be required.

NOTE: This class will meet for the first time on Monday, August 30; discussion sections will not be held on Friday the 27th. 


Milton

English 118

Section: 1
Instructor: Picciotto, Joanna M
Picciotto, Joanna
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 110 Barrows


Other Readings and Media

Milton, J: The Riverside Milton

Description

A survey of John Milton’s career, a life-long effort to unite intellectual, political, and artistic experimentation. There will be two short papers and a final exam.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


Literature of the Later 18th Century

English 120

Section: 1
Instructor: Turner, James Grantham
Turner, James
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 122 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Pope, A.: The Dunciad; Haywood, E.: Fantomina; Richardson, S.: Pamela; Fielding, H.: Shamela, Joseph Andrews; Johnson, S.: Rasselas; Boswell, J.: London Journal; Gray, T.: Elegy; Goldsmith, O.: She Stoops to Conquer, Deserted Village; Wheatley, P.: Selected Poems; Sterne, L.: Sentimental Journey; Jefferson, T.: Declaration of Independence; Crabbe, G.: The Village; Equiano, O.: Life of Gustavus Vassa; Wollstonecraft, M.: Vindication of the Rights of Woman; Blake, W.: The Marriage of Heaven and Hell; shorter texts available in a reader or the Norton Anthology of English Literature, Vol. I.

Description

A sampling of writings in English from the doom-filled last years of Pope to the stirrings of Revolution and abolitionism. Texts have been included from the Irish, Scots, African, and English diasporas, and from verse satire, drama, criticism, autobiography, and novels both epistolary and narrative. Central issues are sex and gender, slavery, the country and the city, and the relationship of "high" and "low" in literature and culture. Key texts include Samuel Richardson's controversial best-seller Pamela, Laurence Sterne's experimental Sentimental Journey, the Declaration of Independence by Thomas Jefferson (his original version, not the one adopted by the USA), and the autobiography of Olaudah Equiano, an African prince tricked into slavery. The course will climax with the radical feminist Mary Wollstonecraft and the mystic revolutionary William Blake, in full color.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


The 20th-Century Novel

English 125D

Section: 1
Instructor: Jones, Donna V.
Jones, Donna
Time: MWF 12-1
Location: Note new room: 166 Barrows


Other Readings and Media

Émile Zola, La Bête Humaine; Theodor Dreiser, Sister Carrie; Virginia Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway; Chinua Achebe, Things Fall Apart; William Gibson, Neuromancer; Kazuo Ishiguro, Never Let Me Go

Description

This course is a general survey of the 20th century novel. The novel is the quintessential form of expression of modernity and modern subjectivity. In this survey of key works of the century, we will explore the novel form as it is framed by these three thematics-- history, modernism and empire. These are some questions we will address: how have the vicissitudes of modernity led to a re-direction of historical narration within the novel; how has modernist aesthetic experimentation re-shaped the very form of the novel; and lastly how has the phenomenon of imperialism, the asymmetrical relations of power between center and periphery, widened the scope of fictive milieu.


American Literature: Before 1800

English 130A

Section: 1
Instructor: Donegan, Kathleen
Donegan, Kathleen
Time: MWF 12-1
Location: Note new room: 180 Tan


Other Readings and Media

Bradford, W.: Of Plymouth Plantation; Rowlandson, M.: The Sovereignty and Goodness of God; Williams, R.: A Key into the Language of America; Franklin, B.: The Autobiography and Other Writings; Equiano, O.: The Interesting Narrative; Jefferson, T.: Notes on the State of Virginia; Crevecoeur, H.: Letters from an American Farmer; Brown, C.: Wieland, or The Transformation; Foster, H.: The Coquette

Description

This course will survey the literatures of early America, from the tracts that envisioned British colonization to the novels written in the after-shocks of the American Revolution. Although our focus is on Anglophone texts, we will consider colonial America as a place of encounter—a place where diversity was a given, negotiation was a necessity, and transformation was inescapable. Our topics will include contact and settlement, “translations” of native culture, religious and social formations, captivity narratives, natural history, print culture, cosmopolitanism, the Atlantic slave trade, the writing of revolution, and the contested ideals of the new republic. We will also explore the exceptional richness of form and genre in early American literature: promotional tracts, histories, lyric poetry, phrasebooks and dictionaries, sermons, autobiographies, science writing, protest literature, and the novel. Throughout, we will pay special attention to how writing operated to forge new models of the self that could withstand and absorb the tumult of colonial life. Authors will include Bradford, Bradstreet, Rowlandson, Franklin, Equiano, Jefferson, and the early American novelists Charles Brockden Brown and Hannah Webster Foster.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


American Literature: 1900-1945

English 130D

Section: 1
Instructor: Goble, Mark
Goble, Mark
Time: MWF 11-12
Location: Note new room: 141 McCone


Other Readings and Media

Larsen, N.: Quicksand and Passing; Norris, F.:  McTeague; Wharton, E.:  The Age of Innocence; Eliot, T. S.:  The Waste Land; Hemingway, E.: The Sun Also Rises; Fitzgerald, F. S.: The Great Gatsby; Cather, W.:  The Professor's House; Faulkner, W.: As I Lay Dying; West, N.: Miss Lonelyhearts and Day of the Locust; Wright, R.: Native Son

Description

A survey of American literature tracing the literary response to the emerging shape of modern life in the first decades of the twentieth century. We will read across a range of genres and styles to assess the particular influence of modernism and other experimental modes on the writing of the period, while also exploring the significance that realism and naturalism continued to hold for many U. S. authors. We will be specifically concerned with how writers addressed such topics as national identity and racial difference; new psychologies of consciousness, emotion, and sexuality; “high” modernism and popular culture; class and cosmopolitanism; and the literary response to new mediums of information and entertainment.


American Poetry

English 131

Section: 1
Instructor: O'Brien, Geoffrey G.
O'Brien, Geoffrey
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 2 LeConte


Other Readings and Media

A course reader

Description

This survey of U.S. poetries will begin with Dickinson and Whitman and then move through both expatriate and stateside modernisms, the Harlem Renaissance, the Objectivists, the New York School, and Language Poetry, on our way to the contemporary. Poets considered will include Dunbar, Eliot, Pound, Stein, Toomer, Williams, Stevens, Hughes, Zukofsky, Olson, Oppen, Rukeyser, Niedecker, O’Hara, Ashbery, Ginsberg, Guest, Duncan, Spicer, Palmer, Hejinian, Hass and several other contemporaries. Along that route we’ll consider who and what counts as a poetic subject; renovations and dissipations of conventional form and meter; fragmentation and citationality; the task and materials of the long poem. Primary and secondary readings will be drawn from a large Course Reader. There will be two essays and a final exam.


Topics in American Studies: Literature and History of Mexican American Farm Workers

English C136

Section: 1
Instructor: Gonzalez, Marcial
Gonzalez, Marcial
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: Note new location: 170 Barrows


Other Readings and Media

Castillo Guilbault, R.: Farmworker's Daughter: Growing Up Mexican in America; Treviño Hart, E.: Barefoot Heart: Stories of a Migrant Girl; Moraga, C.: Watsonville: Some Place Not Here; Rivera, T.: The Complete Works of Tomás Rivera; Soto, G.: Jesse; Viramontes, H.: Under the Feet of Jesus; Galarza, E.: Farm Workers and Agri-business in California, 1947-1960; González, G.: Consuls and Labor Organizing: Imperial Politics in the American Southwest; Shaw, R.: Beyond the Fields: Cesar Chavez, the UFW, and the Struggle for Justice in the 21st Century; Weber, D.: Dark Sweat, White Gold: California Farm Workers, Cotton and the New Deal

Description

In this course we will study the social movements, political aspirations, and literary expressions of Mexican American farm workers in the U.S. during the twentieth century, focusing on the period from 1930 to 1990. The methodological approach will be interdisciplinary as our reading list will include both history and literature. We will also watch films and examine photographs. The social movements of Mexican farm workers in the U.S. hold a symbolically significant place in Chicano history and literature. We will strive to understand these movements not as romanticized stories of the downtrodden, but as narratives of class conflict and strategic class positioning in both local and global settings. The stories of farm worker struggles in the U.S. link Chicano history to the profit needs of transnational agricultural corporations, immigration law, state repression, racialization, and class power—in short, to the building of empire and global capitalism. The works studied in this course document or dramatize these links from various perspectives. The amount of reading will be substantial. Required assignments will include a midterm, a class presentation, and two papers.

This course is cross-listed with American Studies C111E.


Topics in Chicana/o Literature and Culture: The Literature of the Chicano Movement

English 137T

Section: 1
Instructor: Padilla, Genaro M.
Padilla, Genaro
Time: MWF 2-3
Location: 156 Dwinelle


Other Readings and Media

Among the authors we will read are Jose Antonio Villarreal (Pocho, 1959), Rodolfo ‘Corky’ Gonzales (“I am Joaquin,” 1967), Tomas Rivera (…y no se lo trago la tierra/…and the earth did not swallow him, 1971), Rudolfo Anaya (Bless me, Ultima, 1972), Oscar Zeta Acosta (The Revolt of the Cockroach People, 1972), Ana Castillo (The Mixquiahuala Letters, 1986), Arturo Islas (The Rain God, 1984); the various poems of Bernice Zamora, Lorna Dee Cervantes, Ricardo Sanchez, Evangelina Vigil, Alurista, Angela de Hoyos, Gary Soto; and we will also study the drama of Luis Valdez and El Teatro Campesino, especially “Zoot Suit.”

Description

We will survey the literary and cultural production of the Chicano/a Movement during the 1960s through the 1980s. This was a particularly fertile period during which the civil rights movement fomented a cultural florescence within the Chicano community that led to publication/performance of politically spirited and unifying poetry, drama, short fiction and the novel. We will study the historical and political backgrounds of this period and press these up against the literary formations of a literature that articulates resistance to the U.S. hegemony just as it often restates the patriarchal, homophobic, and nationalist problematic that confronted the Chicano community. We will think about social and political content, of course, but I also want to look at the formation of a distinct aesthetics—experiments with language and form and audience. This course is open to all English majors interested in questions of race, ethnicity, gender, and the varieties of literary form—in other words, I invite any student to join us.

Course Requirements:

30%: sustained in-class contribution and group projects/presentations. At the beginning of class, I will clarify how this will work and then over the course of the semester I will issue three graded progress reports on in-class work to each of you

30%: mid-term paper of 6 pages (hopefully based on topic drawn from group projects)

40%: final essay of 8 pages based on topics of your own choosing, but covering at least three writers.


The Cultures of English: Writing Diaspora

English 139

Section: 1
Instructor: Premnath, Gautam
Premnath, Gautam
Time: MW 4-5:30
Location: Note new room: 130 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Lovelace, E.: Salt; NourbeSe Philip, M.: Zong!; Dabydeen, D.: Turner: New and Selected Poems; Naipaul, V.: A House for Mr. Biswas; Naipaul, V.: An Area of Darkness; Ghosh, A.: Sea of Poppies; Coovadia, I.: The Wedding; Danticat, E.: The Dew Breaker; Collins, M.: Angel; Espinet, R.: The Swinging Bridge

Description

This course will examine how literary art narrates the experience of diaspora and confronts its shaping histories of displacement, migration, and resettlement. We will read contemporary narratives addressing two prominent modern instances of diaspora experience, originating respectively in the forcible resettlement of African peoples in the Americas via the Atlantic slave trade; and the dispersal of Indian indentured laborers to plantation societies around the world in the wake of abolition. We’ll consider how works of literature bring to the surface stories and experiences often submerged or obscured by official histories, and trace the protean workings of memory in these narratives. And we’ll address the correlation between efforts to maintain and forge ties to ancestral culture and attempts to chart new cultural trajectories. The course will conclude by considering patterns of rivalry, hostility, solidarity, and cross-fertilization between African- and Indian-descended diasporic communities in the contemporary Caribbean.

Note: I have listed a probable booklist for the course; a finalized list will be announced on the first day of class. The texts by Lovelace, Naipaul (A House for Mr. Biswas), and Ghosh will definitely be required. The booklist will be supplemented by a substantial course packet.


Modes of Writing (Exposition, Fiction, Verse, etc.): "Race," (Creative) Writing, and Difference

English 141

Section: 1
Instructor: Giscombe, Cecil S.
Giscombe, Cecil
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 103 Moffitt


Other Readings and Media

We’ll likely read Michael Ondaatje’s Running in the Family and Audre Lorde’s Zami; we’ll read essays and stories by James Baldwin, Tess Schlesinger, Richard Ford, Jean Toomer. We’ll lean on Philip Lopate’s Art of the Personal Essay.

Description

This course is an inquiry into the ways that race is constructed in literary texts and a look-by-doing at our own practices as people engaged in creative writing.

The purpose of writing in this course is, broadly stated, to engage public language on one hand and personal (meaning specific) observations and experiences on the other. The purpose of writing is not to come up with answers to the truly vexing problems of racism and economic and political disparity. The purpose here is to pursue consciousness. How one refers to race (one’s own as well as the races of others) is of paramount importance; the fact that there are ways in which American cultural institutions typically quantify and refer to race is of at least equal importance.

The writing vehicle will be, for the greatest part, the personal essay. It’s a peculiar form related to fiction and to autobiography and to poetry.

Writing assignments will be broad; that is, they will allow for a variety of responses.

The book list is tentative. Students should come to class before buying books.

This course is open to English majors only.


Verse: Instructive Mysteries

English 143B

Section: 1
Instructor: Zapruder, Matthew J
Zapruder, Matthew
Time: M 3-6
Location: 263 Dwinelle


Other Readings and Media

Texts will include a variety of contemporary poetry books, as well as essays and other supplementary materials. Students will receive a list of required texts on the first day of class. In addition to weekly course meetings, students will have the opportunity to attend readings and discussions with poets at the Josephine Miles House or in other locations.

Description

"A poem is a small (or large) machine made of words" --William Carlos Williams

How do poems work? To that question there are at least as many answers as there are poems. Often poets have the experience of writing intuitively, moving through the darkness to accomplish strange and marvelous effects without any planning or premeditation. And then comes the desire to do it again. By carefully thinking and talking together about how poems move from word to word, idea to idea, sound to sound, we can deepen our understanding of poetry, not to mention life.

This course is designed to help you deepen your understanding of what you are doing in your own poetry; to give you many different strategies for writing more poems (as well as revising); and to respectfully illuminate, as far as is possible, some of the great varieties of workings of poems. As one of the goals of this class is to keep you regularly writing, each week I will give you a writing exercise. I will also assign some helpful and excellent reading. Class meetings will be divided between discussing some of the results of these writing exercises, as well as weekly readings of poetry, essays, and other materials. Class discussions will focus primarily on exploration of the choices a writer has made: how the small (or large) machine of the poem is working, what it is doing, what the poem seems to be trying to accomplish, and what further possibilities for writing and understanding it opens.

To be considered for admission to this course, please submit 5 photocopied pages of your poetry, along with an application form, to Professor Zapruder's mailbox in 322 Wheeler BY 4:00 P.M., TUESDAY, APRIL 20, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses!


Verse

English 143B

Section: 2
Instructor: Shoptaw, John
Shoptaw, John
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Ramazani, Jahan, ed.: The Norton Anthology of Modern & Contemporary Poetry

Description

In this course you will conduct a progressive series of experiments in which you will explore some of the fundamental options for writing poetry today—aperture, partition, closure; rhythmic sound patterning; sentence & line; stanza; short & long-lined poems; image & figure; graphics & textual space; cultural translation; poetic forms (haibun, villanelle, sestina, pantoum, ghazal, etc.); the first, second, third, and no person (persona, address, drama, narrative, description); prose poetry. Our emphasis will be placed on recent possibilities, but with an eye & ear always to renovating traditions. I have no “house style” and only one precept: you can do anything, if you can do it. You will write a poem a week, and we’ll discuss five or so in rotation (I’ll respond to every poem you write). On alternate days, we’ll discuss recent illustrative poems drawn from our course reader. If the past is any guarantee, it will be delightful.

To be considered for admission to this course, please submit 5 photocopied pages of your poetry, along with an application form, to Professor Shoptaw's mailbox in 322 Wheeler BY 4:00 P.M., TUESDAY, APRIL 20, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses!


Prose Nonfiction

English 143N

Section: 1
Instructor: McQuade, Donald
McQuade, Donald
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 301 Wheeler


Description

This course will offer students — in a workshop setting — the opportunity to read, discuss, and practice writing the major forms and styles of nonfiction prose, with special attention to understanding, appreciating — and practicing — the essay as a literary genre. Students will express their understanding of this literary form in a series of well-crafted essays. The primary texts in this writing workshop will be the participants’ own prose. Additional readings will be drawn from modern and contemporary essayists.

To be considered for admission to this class, please submit 8-12 photocopied pages of your writing. (I am especially interested in reading your creative nonfiction, and please do not submit your academic prose.) Kindly submit your writing sample, along with an application form, to Professor McQuade's mailbox in 322 Wheeler BY 4:00 P.M., TUESDAY, APRIL 20, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses!


Poetry Translation Workshop

English 143T

Section: 1
Instructor: Hass, Robert L.
Hass, Robert
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

A course reader

Description

This is a practical workshop for students wishing to work at translating poetry into English, so students need to have at least an intermediate knowledge of the language they wish to translate from. The class works like a poetry writing workshop: students bring to class the original poem they are translating, a word-for-word trot, and their translation and the class discusses the work. There are also readings in translation and translation theory.

Admission will be by permission of the instructor, based on (1) three pages of your own translations of poems into English, as well as the corresponding pages in the original language, (2) a one-paragraph statement of your interest in translation, and (3) an application form; all of the above is to be submitted to Professor Hass’s mailbox in 322 Wheeler, BY 4:00 P.M., TUESDAY, APRIL 20, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses!


Introduction to Literary Theory: The Theory Monster

English 161

Section: 1
Instructor: Serpell, C. Namwali
Serpell, Namwali
Time: MW 4-5:30
Location: 9 Lewis


Other Readings and Media

Stevenson, R.: The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde; James, H.: The Turn of the Screw; Barthes, R.: S/Z; Muller, J.P. and Richardson, W. J.: The Purloined Poe; Leitch, V. et al.: The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism

Description

At the close of “Structure, Sign and Play in the Discourse of the Human Sciences,” Jacques Derrida takes recourse to the language of monstrosity in his account of the loss of a stable center for human discourse: “the as yet unnamable which is proclaiming itself and which can do so, as is necessary whenever a birth is in the offing, only under the species of the non-species, in the formless, mute, infant, and terrifying form of monstrosity.” This course begins with the premise that the collection of texts that goes under the dread name “theory” is best considered in just this way: as a nascent, monstrous assemblage. Like Frankenstein’s monster, theory too is a composite of parts, suturing together disparate bodies of knowledge. It too is belated, “always already” dead, condemned to look back toward its origins even as it attempts to destroy them. Theory, too, is self-regarding, peering at its seams, racked with revulsion at the face it presents to itself in the mirror. Through this two-way lens of monstrosity, we will gaze at theory and let it gaze back. The goal is to learn to apply theory to the practice of literary analysis. We will respond to three monstrous short stories (Honoré de Balzac’s “Sarrasine,” Edgar Allen Poe’s “The Purloined Letter,” and Franz Kafka’s “In the Penal Colony”); two Gothic novellas (Robert Louis Stevenson’s The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and Henry James’ The Turn of the Screw); and two horrifying films (Alien and The Others). Each of these texts will work as a central hub around which various theories revolve. Along the way, we will encounter monsters, ghosts, aliens, medusas, and wolfmen. I recommend that you read the literary texts (available online) and watch the films (available at the library) on your own before the course begins—there will be time allotted for them but the theoretical reading (up to 60 pages per week) is very intensive. Three 3-page papers; a take-home final.


Special Topics: Postwar British Drama

English 166

Section: 1
Instructor: Blanton, C. D.
Blanton, Dan
Time: MWF 3-4
Location: 122 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Possible texts include: Beckett, S.: Waiting for Godot (1953; 1955); Endgame (1957); Bond, E.: Saved (1965); Lear (1971); Brenton, H.: The Romans in Britain (1980); Churchill, C.: Cloud Nine (1979);Top Girls (1982); Serious Money (1987); Friel, B.: Translations (1980); Hare, D.: Plenty (1978); Kane, S.: Blasted (1995); Orton, J.: Loot (1965); What the Butler Saw (1969); Osborne, J.: Look Back in Anger (1956); The Entertainer (1957); Pinter, H.: The Birthday Party (1958); The Caretaker (1960); The Homecoming (1965); Betrayal (1978); Stoppard, T.: Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead (1966); Travesties (1974); Arcadia (1993)

Description

A survey of the post-war renaissance of British dramatic writing, concentrating on the decades after the tumultuous year of 1956, when the Suez Crisis abroad and the emergence of the 'Angry Young Men' at home demonstrated the extent to which both country and world had changed. We will begin by exploring a few of the theatrical ideas that inform the period generally (Brecht's 'epic theatre', Beckett's 'absurdism', Artaud's 'cruelty'), before turning to kitchen-sink realism (John Osborne et al.) and the work of the 1960s generation (Harold Pinter, Tom Stoppard, Edward Bond, Joe Orton). Later works by Caryl Churchill, David Hare, Howard Brenton, Brian Friel, and Sarah Kane will take us through the crises of the 1970s, into the Thatcher era, and beyond.

In addition to our regular reading, we will also grapple (on film and/or video, where possible) with some of the period's landmark stagings and performances—of these plays obviously, but also (occasionally) of older works revived and reimagined in the process.


Special Topics: Vladimir Nabokov

English 166

Section: 2
Instructor: Naiman, Eric
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 213 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Nabokov, Vladimir: The Defense, Laughter in the Dark, Despair, Lolita, Pnin, Pale Fire

Description

We will study the work of Nabokov as a novelist on two continents over a period of nearly sixty years. The course will be structured (more or less) chronologically and evenly divided between novels translated from Russian and written in English. After beginning with Nabokov’s third novel and two short stories, we will examine some of the fiction of his European period, before turning our attention to Lolita and Pnin. Competing interpretations of Nabokov will be considered, but our emphasis will be on metafiction, the theme of perversity and Nabokov's cultivation of a perverse reader.

Since Nabokov was prolific and this course is comprehensive, students should expect to devote a considerable amount of time to reading and should come to class prepared to discuss the assigned texts. Participants in the class should anticipate reading 200 pages per week. Written work will consist of two papers (5 to 10 pages) on topics to be chosen in consultation with the professor. Penalties will be assessed for late papers. There will be a midterm and a final examination.

This course is cross-listed with Slavic 134F.


Special Topics: Engaging the Play—Being the Player

English 166

Section: 3
Instructor: Gotanda, Philip Kan
Gotanda, Philip Kan
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 130 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Nottage, L.: Fabulation Or, The Re-Education of Undine; Ruhl, S.: Dead Man’s Cell Phone; Cruz, N.: Anna In The Tropics; Gotanda, P.: No More Cherry Blossoms; Gotanda, P.: Yankee Dawg You Die; Vogel, P.: How I Learned To Drive; Hwang, D. H.: Yellow Face; Parks, S.: TOPDOG/UNDERDOG; Mamet, D.: Oleanna; Wallace, N.: One Flea Spare. Not yet published: Gotanda, P.: Love In American Times, I Dream Of Chang And Eng, A Fist Of Roses

Description

The course will explore inventive ways of engaging the theater text.

Students will read from a selection of plays and be expected to give presentations analyzing theme, story, as well as intention of playwright. This will be followed with students participating in the actual rehearsing and in-class performing of the discussed plays. This experiencing of the theater process will give insight as to how theater text spoken aloud, put on its feet, performed, can afford another kind of "reading" of what is written on page. The material to be covered will be drawn from contemporary American plays with an emphasis on Asian American themes and Professor Gotanda’s works. It is preferred that students not have a performance background. Grading will be determined by commitment to participation, not “expertise” of performance. Classes will be conducted to allow for a friendly, comfortable, performing environment. Study will be supplemented by students investigating the on-going rehearsal of I Dream of Chang and Eng, a campus production of Professor Gotanda’s newest work. It is being presented by the Theater, Dance, Performance Studies Department. The vantage point of Professor Gotanda as a playwright working in contemporary American theater will lend a living, in the field, dynamic to the class.


Special Topics in American Cultures

English 166AC

Section: 1
Instructor: Wagner, Bryan
Wagner, Bryan
Time: TTh 2-3:30, + film screenings Mondays 7-10 P.M., 160 Kroeber
Location: Note new room: 145 Dwinelle


Other Readings and Media

Films: The Jazz Singer (Alan Crosland, 1927); The Bitter Tea of General Yen (Frank Capra, 1933); Home of the Brave (Mark Robson, 1949); The Searchers (John Ford, 1956); Touch of Evil (Orson Welles, 1958); Imitation of Life (Douglas Sirk., 1959); West Side Story (Robert Wise, 1961); Night of the Living Dead (George Romero, 1968); The Godfather (Francis Ford Coppola, 1972); Enter the Dragon (Robert Clouse, 1973); El Norte (Gregory Nava, 1983); Do the Right Thing (Spike Lee, 1989)

Description

An introduction to critical thinking about race and ethnicity, focused on a select group of films produced in the United States between the 1920s and 1980s. Major themes include law and violence, kinship and miscegenation, passing and racial impersonation. Each film is paired with a related reading in theory or applied criticism. There will be weekly writing assignments, two short essays, a midterm and final examination.

This course satisfies UC Berkeley's American Cultures requirement.


Literature and History

English 174

Section: 1
Instructor: Miller, Jennifer
Miller, Jennifer
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 223 Dwinelle


Other Readings and Media

The materials for this course will be available in a photocopied reader and online at http://eebo.chadwyck.com/home.

Description

This course will interrogate the binary implied in its rubric--the distinction between literature and history--by considering the ways in which literary remains constitute the pieces with which we may begin to puzzle out a fully embodied past and by revealing history as, not a static set of "facts," but a creative process--a mode of human activity--susceptible to and participating in the same dynamic of interpretation as literature engenders and requires.  Through readings of Spenser's Faerie Queene (in particular, Book II) in relation to other contemporary documents available through Early English Books Online, we will develop a method for approaching a past in which the binary of "history" and "literature" cannot and did not hold, a past which imagined us as an interpreting audience of the myriad, vibrant phenomena of its lived experience projected in a continuum to our own present day.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.


The Novel

English 180N

Section: 1
Instructor: Serpell, C. Namwali
Serpell, Namwali
Time: MWF 1-2 (note new time)
Location: 105 North Gate (note new location)


Other Readings and Media

Wharton, E.: The House of Mirth; Johnson, J.W.: The Autobiography of An Ex-Coloured Man; Fitzgerald, F.S.: The Great Gatsby; Faulkner, W.: The Sound and the Fury; West, N.: The Day of the Locust; Nabokov, V.: Lolita; Pynchon, T.: The Crying of Lot 49; DeLillo, D.: White Noise; Morrison, T.: Beloved; McCarthy, C.: Blood Meridian

Description

A survey of the American novel since 1900: its forms, patterns, techniques, ideas, cultural context, and intertextuality. Special attention will be paid to questions of aesthetics, epistemology, and ethics—what is beautiful? how do we know? what ought we do?—in the American milieu as it develops in the twentieth century. Average 250 pages reading per week. Two papers (5-8 pages); ID midterm and final.


Research Seminar: Speculative Fiction and Dystopias

English 190

Section: 1
Instructor: Jones, Donna V.
Jones, Donna
Time: MW 9-10:30
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

E.T.A Hoffman, The Sandman; H.G Wells, The Island of Doctor Moreau; Karel Capek, R.U.R; Kazuo Ishiguro, Never Let Me Go; P.D James, Children of Men; China Mielville, Perdido Street Station; Octavia Butler, Parable of the Sower; Philip K. Dick, Do Androids Dream Electric Sheep

Description

This course will examine in depth the history of speculative fiction and its engagement with the thematics and topoi of the new life sciences--representation of cloning, ecological dystopias, hybrid life-forms, genetic engineering dystopias. While science is the thematic point of departure of speculative fiction, the concerns of this course will be the literary. How does literature's encounter with the projected realities of the new biology revise our conceptions of the subject? Could there be a Leopold Bloom of the genetically engineered, a subject whose interior voice is the free-flowing expression of experience? Behind the endless removes of social, material and technological mediation lie the construction of a flesh and blood body, separated from itself through the workings of consciousness. If indeed the post/modern subject requires a psychic space shaped by the authenticity of 'being', a consciousness deeply rooted in the human experience, then how do we represent that being whose point of origin is the artificial, the inauthentic? These are some of the questions to be addressed in this course. You may of course bring others.

English 190 replaced English 100 and 150 as of Fall '09. English majors may fulfill the seminar requirement for the major by taking one section of English 190 (or by having taken either English 100 or English 150 before Fall '09). Please read the paragraph on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in, or wait-listing for, this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Late Dickens Novels

English 190

Section: 2
Instructor: Jordan, Joseph P
Jordan, Joseph
Time: MW 9-10:30
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Charles Dickens:  A Tale of Two Cities, Great Expectations, Our Mutual Friend, The Mystery of Edwin Drood.  A course reader.

Description

In this seminar we will study some of the late Dickens novels: A Tale of Two Cities, Great Expectations, Our Mutual Friend, and the unfinished The Mystery of Edwin Drood. We will spread out Our Mutual Friend—the longest of the four—over the course of the term, so as to approximate the experience of reading a serialized novel over a period of months. Concurrently, we will move chronologically through the other three, spending more time on Great Expectations than on the other two. 

Part of the thrill of reading Dickens novels is that they give us an incredible array of things to think about. The seminar will focus some on the instructor’s primary interest in the novels: their dependence on complex, layered patterning that makes them feel, paradoxically, simultaneously sprawling and tight. We will also engage with a diverse selection of other kinds of criticism on the novels. What about Dickens late novels, in particular, makes them ready to be co-opted by so many different, sometimes mutually exclusive, theoretical schools?

English 190 replaced English 100 and 150 as of Fall '09. English majors may fulfill the seminar requirement for the major by taking one section of English 190 (or by having taken either English 100 or English 150 before Fall '09). Please read the paragraph on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in, or wait-listing for, this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Alfred Hitchcock

English 190

Section: 3
Instructor: Miller, D.A.
Miller, D.A.
Time: MW 12:30-2 + film screenings Th 6-9 P.M.
Location: 300 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Spoto, D.: The Art of Alfred Hitchcock; Truffaut, F.: Hitchcock; a course reader.

Description

Unique among Hollywood directors, Hitchcock played on two boards. As a master of entertainment who had nothing to say, he produced work as thoroughly trivial as it was utterly compelling. But thanks to the French reception of his work in the 1950s, Hitchcock also came to be considered a master of art, the Auteur par excellence. If his films had nothing to say, they hardly needed to; in their unparalleled formal originality, they distilled the pure essence of cinema itself. The course will focus on this dialectic between entertainment and art, between saying nothing and being everything. We shall pay particular attention to a Style that is, on the one hand, commodified as a “touch” that all can recognize, and, on the other, recessed in strange, inconsequential, gibberish-making details that, far from courting recognition, seem to defy it.

Please note that students will be expected to attend weekly film screenings, Thursdays 6-9 P.M., in 300 Wheeler.

English 190 replaced English 100 and 150 as of Fall '09. English majors may fulfill the seminar requirement for the major by taking one section of English 190 (or by having taken either English 100 or English 150 before Fall '09). Please read the paragraph on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in, or wait-listing for, this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: The 1890s

English 190

Section: 4
Instructor: Puckett, Kent
Puckett, Kent
Time: M 3-6
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

See below.

Description

What difference does a date make? What is it about the end of a century that encourages such strong feelings of apocalypse, degeneration or renewal? This course will consider texts written in and around the 1890s, a decade characterized by its intense self-consciousness about what it meant to live through the last days of the nineteenth century. We’ll read novels, poems, philosophy, works of psychology, sociology, history, and aesthetics in order to think about some of the period’s key political, social, and cultural questions. We’ll also examine ways in which particular literary strategies and aesthetic movements—Decadence, Aestheticism, etc.—emerged to respond to these questions. While reading works by Michael Field, Sigmund Freud, Thomas Hardy, Walter Pater, Olive Schreiner, Bram Stoker, Oscar Wilde, W.B. Yeats, and others, we will explore the relations between literary culture and—among other things—sex and sexology, feminism, photography, race theory and imperialism, spiritualism, degeneration, and the look of history from what seemed to some to be the end of all things.

English 190 replaced English 100 and 150 as of Fall '09. English majors may fulfill the seminar requirement for the major by taking one section of English 190 (or by having taken either English 100 or English 150 before Fall '09). Please read the paragraph on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in, or wait-listing for, this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: The Nineteenth-Century Self

English 190

Section: 5
Instructor: Leibowitz, Karen D.
Leibowitz, Karen
Time: MW 4-5:30
Location: 109 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Our readings will be grouped under three broad rubrics: “Lyric Subjectivity” (Romantic poets, Arnold, Hopkins), “Autobiographical Self-Fashioning” (Mill, Butler), and “Doubtful Authority” (Collins, James). These topics, however, are only starting points for our discussions, which will also cover the historical context in which our readings were produced and their relation to literary tradition.

Description

In this class, we will read the word “I” many times—in poems, novels, and memoirs. Our texts will span the nineteenth century both chronologically and tonally—from earnest self-portraiture to playful ventriloquism. In the course of the semester, we will explore the ways that nineteenth-century authors used the first person to represent selfhood, self-knowledge, and self-deception. Using the first person as a lens through which to view narrative structures, we will also develop a vocabulary for discussing literary works and rhetorical choices.

This section of English 190 is now open to Letters and Science juniors and seniors with majors other than English.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Native America/Early America

English 190

Section: 6
Instructor: Donegan, Kathleen
Donegan, Kathleen
Time: MW 4-5:30
Location: 103 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Harriot, T.: A Briefe and True Report of the New Found Land of Virginia; Rowlandson, M.: The Sovereignty and Goodness of God; Williams, R.: A Key into the Language of America; Apess, W.: A Son of the Forest; Cooper, J. F.: The Last of the Mohicans; Black Hawk: Life of Black Hawk; Sedgwick, C.M.: Hope Leslie; Jemison, M.: A Narrative of the Life of Mrs. Mary Jemison

Description

In 1705, the colonist Robert Beverley introduced his History and Present State of Virginia with the proud declaration: “I am an Indian, and don’t pretend to be exact in my Language.” What might such a proclamation have meant, with its complicated invocations of nativity, authenticity, identity, language, authority, place, and difference? With these kind of questions in mind, the seminar will explore the deeply contested cultural terrain that existed between Early America and Native America from the beginnings of English colonization to the era of Indian Removal. Historical and literary representations of the “Indian” powerfully expressed how “American” traits passed between native inhabitants and creolized colonists, and at what cost. Readings will include a wide range of narratives and counter-narratives: early ethnographies, phrase books, captivity narratives, laws and letters, prophecies and petitions, memoirs, sermons, and novels. We will think about the ambiguity and brutality of racial categories; literacy and the reconstruction of oral cultures; religious modes of conversion and resistance; land possession and the mythic “frontier"; the racialization of a National Self; the rhetoric of historical inevitability; and how all these messy processes were concretized, romanticized, or repressed in historical retrospect. Authors will include Thomas Harriot, Mary Rowlandson, Roger Williams, William Apess, James Fenimore Cooper, Catherine Maria Sedgwick, Black Hawk, Handsome Lake and others. Students will read widely in both primary and secondary literature, and will write two short papers and a final research paper.

This section of English 190 satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

English 190 replaced English 100 and 150 as of Fall '09. English majors may fulfill the seminar requirement for the major by taking one section of English 190 (or by having taken either English 100 or English 150 before Fall '09). Please read the paragraph on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in, or wait-listing for, this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


(new section as of 5/6/10) Research Seminar: Second Worlds in Shakespeare

English 190

Section: 7
Instructor: Ring, Joseph
Ring, Joseph
Time: TTh 9:30-11
Location: 109 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

More, T.: Utopia; Shakespeare, W.: Antony and Cleopatra, As You Like It, Henry IV, Part I, The Merchant of Venice, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Othello, Pericles, The Tempest, and The Winter’s Tale

Description

Shakespeare’s plays often project stereoptic visions of worlds set apart from the geographical center of the dramatic action. These removed places, like Arden forest in As You Like It, the realm of fairies in A Midsummer Night’s Dream, or romantic Belmont in The Merchant of Venice, for example, are, among other things, spaces of exile, fantasy, or promise—sometimes all at once. In later plays, remote geographies frequently appear as non-European locales that represent the exotic, sensual, mysterious, and dangerous, like Egypt in Antony and Cleopatra, Cyprus in Othello, and the south Mediterranean and Caribbean in The Tempest. But these exotic places also offer a doubled perspective on the European worlds from which they are set apart, either as contrasting other or as reflecting mirror. As a prelude to our study of Shakespeare, we will first read selections from Homer’s Odyssey, several essays by Montaigne, and Thomas More’s Utopia. We will then explore peripheral worlds in a number of Shakespeare’s plays, and the critical views that their distance from the center affords.

English 190 replaced English 100 and 150 as of Fall '09. English majors may fulfill the seminar requirement for the major by taking one section of English 190 (or by having taken either English 100 or English 150 before Fall '09). Please read the paragraph on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in, or wait-listing for, this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Invasions of Britain in Medieval Literature

English 190

Section: 10
Instructor: Thornbury, Emily V.
Thornbury, Emily
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 224 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Treharne, E., ed.: Old and Middle English, c.890–c.1450; Bede: The Ecclesiastical History of the English People; Geoffrey of Monmouth: The History of the Kings of Britain; Swanton, M. J., ed.: The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle; Burgess, G. S., trans.: The History of the Norman People: Wace’s Roman de Rou; a course pack

Description

How does history become literature?

By examining medieval narratives about the four great invasions of early Britain, we will try to understand how bare lists of events can be transformed into great works of art. We will begin with the Norman Conquest and work backward in time through the successive invasions of the Vikings, Saxons, and Romans: in each case, we will try to understand how the ‘future’ affects the portrayal of the past. Throughout the course, we’ll consider major questions of form and purpose—such as the lines between history, counter-history, and propaganda; how writers might give their inventions the “flavor of history”; and the literary appeal of peripheral characters. Important themes will include ideas of nationhood, justice, and fate: others will no doubt be suggested by students’ interests.

No prior work with medieval literature is necessary. Middle English texts will be read in the original; those in Old English, Old French, and Latin will be available in translation.

This section of English 190 satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

This section of English 190 is now open to Letters and Science juniors and seniors with majors other than English.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar

English 190

Section: 11
Instructor: Bishop, John
Time:
Location:


Description

This section of English 190 has been canceled.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Cultures of 19th-Century U.S. Poetry

English 190

Section: 12
Instructor: Beam, Dorri
Beam, Dorri
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: note new room: 109 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

See below.

Description

Poetry enjoyed extraordinary popularity and pervasiveness in 19th-century America. In this class, we will encounter the variety of poetic output from the period while also taking the opportunity to study the social life of a literary form by thinking about how a literary form moves in, is shaped by, and shapes its cultural context. What made poetry such a viable cultural currency in this time and place? What kinds of communities were forged through the circulation of poetry? How did poetry function as a form through which to shape and transmit responses to slavery, war, the death of child, or uncodifiable sexual desires? How does repetition, rhythm, sound, or voice aid poetic transmission? What were the poetic cultures that poets like Poe, Whitman, and Dickinson entered and negotiated, each in their own way?

Students will be engaged in studying the material textuality of poetry by examining how poems appeared and circulated in manuscripts and in their print contexts in books, newspapers, and magazines. We will also explore such cultural scenes of poetic exchange as schoolroom recitation, political occasions, literary salons, and personal letters. Relying on the web as well as anthologies, the course will examine a variety of poetry, ranging from nature poetry, to African-American poetry, to poetry of the Civil War, as well as attending to the rich archives of specific authors. Engaged seminar participation, class presentations, and a final paper are required.

This section of English 190 is now open to Letters and Science juniors and seniors with majors other than English.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Postcolonial Cinema

English 190

Section: 13
Instructor: Rubenstein, Michael
Rubenstein, Michael
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 206 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

A course reader

Films: Ray, S.: Pather Panchali, 1955; Lean, D.: Lawrence of Arabia, 1962; Pontecorvo, G.: The Battle of Algiers, 1966; Sembene, O.: Xala, 1975; Frears, S.: Sammy and Rosie Get Laid, 1987; Kassovitz, M.: La Haine, 1995; Denis, C.: Beau Travail, 1999; Haneke, M.: Caché, 1995; Meirelles, F.: City of God, 2002; Costa, P.: Colossal Youth, 2006; McQueen, S.: Hunger, 2008; Boyle, D.: Slumdog Millionaire, 2008

Description

This course examines cinematic productions originating in or concerning themselves with the former colonial territories of the European empires of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. We will cover some general film studies theories and methodologies; conduct an overview of postcolonial theory; and address critical trends in postcolonial cinema studies. A substantial reader (critical-theoretical writings by Kracauer, Benjamin, Bazin, Metz, Spivak, Shohat, Minh-ha, Rosen, Stam, Guneratne, et. al.), regular film screenings, participation in class discussion, and two 10-page research papers are required.

The film list is tentative.

This section of English 190 is now open to Letters and Science juniors and seniors with majors other than English.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: American Transcendentalism

English 190

Section: 14
Instructor: Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: note new room: 234 Dwinelle


Other Readings and Media

Emerson, Ralph Waldo: Nature and Selected Essays; Fuller, Margaret: The Essential Margaret Fuller; Thoreau, Henry David: Walden and Civil Disobedience; Whitman, Walt: Leaves of Grass: The First (1885) Edition; Hawthorne, Nathaniel: The Blithedale Romance; Buel, Lawrence, ed.: The American Transcendentalists

Description

A close look at the internal coherences and stresses of this literary movement, with an emphasis on the intellectual and affective motives for formal innovation. Two ten-page essays and regular attendance and participation will be required.

English 190 replaced English 100 and 150 as of Fall '09. English majors may fulfill the seminar requirement for the major by taking one section of English 190 (or by having taken either English 100 or English 150 before Fall '09). Please read the paragraph on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in, or wait-listing for, this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Ideology

English 190

Section: 15
Instructor: Gonzalez, Marcial
Gonzalez, Marcial
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 54 Barrows


Other Readings and Media

Eagleton, T.: Ideology: An Introduction

Description

This research seminar will focus on the concept of ideology. We will examine the manner in which ideology has been employed as a category for social analysis. But we will pay attention especially to the ways that ideology has been useful for literary criticism. Students will study critiques of ideology from various methodological perspectives: Marxism, psychoanalysis, feminism, postmodernism, and critical race theory. While much of the reading material will be theoretical, the purpose of the course is to provide students with a practical understanding of ideology as a method for literary studies.To ground our theoretical explorations, we will read and analyze several short works of fiction, including works by James Baldwin, Mahasweta Devi, Isak Dinesen, Ralph Ellison, William Faulkner, Franz Kafka, Jack London, Katherine Mansfield, Herman Melville, N. Scott Momaday, Joyce Carol Oates, Flannery O’Connor, Tomas Rivera, Juan Rulfo, Amy Tan, and Virginia Woolf. Students will be required to write a research paper.

English 190 replaced English 100 and 150 as of Fall '09. English majors may fulfill the seminar requirement for the major by taking one section of English 190 (or by having taken either English 100 or English 150 before Fall '09). Please read the paragraph on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in, or wait-listing for, this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar

English 190

Section: 16
Instructor: Premnath, Gautam
Time:
Location:


Other Readings and Media


Description

This section of English 190 has been canceled.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: When This You See—The Writings of Gertrude Stein

English 190

Section: 17
Instructor: Hejinian, Lyn
Hejinian, Lyn
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 206 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Gertrude Stein: Writings, 1903 to 1932, Vol. 1, Gertrude Stein: Writings 1932 to 1946, Vol. 2

Description

Gertrude Stein’s radical experimentation was just that — an investigation into the roots of meaning. As such, her writings vastly extended the horizons of literature and of language. And her inquiry into the relation of syntax to sense, of grammar to epistemology, has ramifications that are relevant to central questions poised before poetry and philosophy today. In this seminar we will read several of Stein’s longer works as well as a number of the shorter pieces, with attention to an array of aesthetic and epistemological issues. In addition to a large selection from the works collected in the two-volume Library of America Stein (Stein: Writings 1903-1932 and Stein: Writings 1932-1946), we will read selections from How to Write and several of Stein’s plays as well as a very few critical essays on Gertrude Stein’s work. These last will be available in a bSpace reader.

English 190 replaced English 100 and 150 as of Fall '09. English majors may fulfill the seminar requirement for the major by taking one section of English 190 (or by having taken either English 100 or English 150 before Fall '09). Please read the paragraph on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in, or wait-listing for, this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar

English 190

Section: 18
Instructor: Bishop, John
Time:
Location:


Description

This section of English 190 has been canceled. 

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: African American Poetry

English 190

Section: 19
Instructor: Wagner, Bryan
Wagner, Bryan
Time: TTh 5-6:30
Location: 103 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

A course reader.

Description

An introduction to African American poetry and poetics, moving from the eighteenth century to the present. Our reading will include critical essays as well as poems by Lucy Terry, Phillis Wheatley, Paul Laurence Dunbar, Countee Cullen, Langston Hughes, Gwendolyn Brooks, Russell Atkins, Amiri Baraka, Audre Lorde, Ed Roberson, Harryette Mullen, and Claudia Rankine. There will be weekly writing, two longer essays, a midterm, and a final group project.

This section of English 190 is now open to Letters and Science juniors and seniors with majors other than English.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Research Seminar: Women’s Films of the ‘40s & ‘50s

English 190

Section: 20
Instructor: Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia
Time: MW 5:30-7 P.M. + film screenings W 7-10 P.M.
Location: 103 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Gledhill, C.: Home is Where the Heart Is; Doane, M.: The Desire to Desire; Kaplan, E. A.: Motherhood and Representation

Description

In this course we will examine a range of examples of the genre “the woman’s film” of the 40's and 50's, emphasizing maternal, paranoid, romantic and medical discourses, issues of spectatorship, consumerism, and various “female” problems and fantasies. We will also look at feminist film theory and its conceptualization of subjectivity and desire in the cinematic apparatus.

English 190 replaced English 100 and 150 as of Fall '09. English majors may fulfill the seminar requirement for the major by taking one section of English 190 (or by having taken either English 100 or English 150 before Fall '09). Please read the paragraph on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in, or wait-listing for, this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.


Honors Course

English H195A

Section: 1
Instructor: Sorensen, Janet
Sorensen, Janet
Time: MW 1:30-3
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

See below.

Description

In the first semester of this two-semester-long course, we will familiarize ourselves with a number of critical approaches to texts and reflect a bit on the institution of criticism itself—When did the idea of Literature with a capital L emerge? What role have critics imagined Literature playing in society? How have the understandings of what constitutes good literature—and valid criticism—changed over time? These discussions will provide a background from which to identify the critical methods and stakes of our own individual projects, culminating in a 40+ page paper due at the end of the two semesters. We will read selections from a collection of critical essays, and we will read one work together—likely Jane Austen’s Emma—and review a variety of critical approaches to it. Students will prepare a précis or two of critical works, collectively identify and prepare presentations on additional critics they would like to read, develop a thesis for their own writing project on a work (or works) of their choice, and produce an annotated bibliography on relevant materials for their project.

Students who satisfactorily complete H195A-B (the Honors Course) may choose to waive the seminar requirement.

Enrollment is limited and a written application, a copy of your college transcript(s), a list of your current courses, and a photocopy of a critical paper that you wrote for another class are due BY 4:00 P.M., Tuesday, April 20; be sure to read the paragraph on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes regarding enrollment in the Honors Course!


Honors Course

English H195A

Section: 2
Instructor: Picciotto, Joanna M
Picciotto, Joanna
Time: TTh 3:30-5
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

A course reader

Description

This course is designed to facilitate the writing of a senior honors thesis. We will begin by reading across a broad range of criticism and theory. Students will refine their research interests into a workable thesis topic, complete an annotated bibliography, and begin the process of writing, revising, and presenting their work (to be completed in the spring semester).

Students who satisfactorily complete H195A-B (the Honors Course) may choose to waive the seminar requirement.

Enrollment is limited and a written application, a copy of your college transcript(s), a list of your current courses, and a photocopy of a critical paper that you wrote for another class are due BY 4:00 P.M., Tuesday, April 20; be sure to read the paragraph on page 2 of this Announcement of Classes regarding enrollment in the Honors Course!


Graduate Courses

Graduate students from other departments and exceptionally well-prepared undergraduates are welcome in English graduate courses (except for English 200 and 375) insofar as limitations of class size allow. Graduate courses are usually limited to 15 students; courses numbered 250 are usually limited to 10.

When demand for a graduate course exceeds the maximum enrollment limit, the instructor will determine priorities for enrollment and inform students of his/her decisions at the second class meeting. Prior enrollment does not guarantee a place in a graduate course that turns out to be oversubscribed on the first day of class; fortunately, this situation does not arise very often.


Problems in the Study of Literature

English 200

Section: 1
Instructor: Blanton, C. D.
Blanton, Dan
Time: MW 12-1:30
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

A course reader.

Description

Approaches to literary study, including textual analysis, scholarly methodology and bibliography, critical theory and practice.


Problems in the Study of Literature

English 200

Section: 2
Instructor: Puckett, Kent
Puckett, Kent
Time: MW 12-1:30
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Leitch, V.: The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism; a course reader

Description

Approaches to literary study, including textual analysis, scholarly methodology and bibliography, critical theory and practice.


Topics in the History of the English Language

English 201B

Section: 1
Instructor: Hanson, Kristin
Hanson, Kristin
Time:
Location:


Description

This course has been canceled.


Graduate Readings: Pastoral/Animal Studies

English 203

Section: 1
Instructor: Francois, Anne-Lise
Francois, Anne-Lise
Time: MW 10:30-12
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Primary readings by Berger, Carroll, Dreyer, DuBois, G. Eliot, Hardy, Jewett, Marvell, O’Hara, Rousseau, Schiller, Shakespeare, Virgil, Walcott, Wordsworth.

Description

A wide-ranging exploration of pastoral modes from Virgil’s rewriting of Theocritus to contemporary imitations less of rural life per se than of lives deemed somehow “poor” or “simple.” Drawing on Empson’s sense of pastoral as a complex encounter between “high” and “low” persons and as an aesthetic privileging of the weak and socially powerless, we will seek to challenge and complicate the still prevalent notion limiting pastoral to an idealization of “country” ways of life; we will inquire instead about what Alpers following Fletcher calls the “ideas of human strength relative to [the] world” encoded in pastoral modes. Topics will include: the legacy of Romantic primitivism for contemporary environmental discourse; pastoral as ritual gift-exchange and the role of transmission in so-called traditional communities; scenes of native informants turned courtiers disguised as shepherds; animal imaginaries; figures of the poor, the simple, the common(s) and everyday in contemporary discourse theorizing an alternative modernity (De Certeau, Negri, Rancière). The course will also be an occasion to explore the limits of genre-based literary criticism and to address, in particular, the relation of genre to mode.


Graduate Readings: Prospectus Workshop

English 203

Section: 2
Instructor: Abel, Elizabeth
Abel, Elizabeth
Time: W 3-6
Location: 301 Wheeler


Description

This will be a hands-on writing workshop intended to facilitate and accelerate the transition from qualifying exams to prospectus conference, from prospectus conference to first dissertation chapter, and from the status of student to scholar. The workshop will provide a collaborative critical community in which to try out successive versions of your dissertation project and to learn how your peers are constructing theirs. Weekly writing assignments will structure points of entry into these projects. Beginning with exercises to galvanize your thinking, the assignments will map increasingly onto the specific components of the prospectus. We will also review a range of prospectuses from the past to demystify the genre and to gain a better understanding of its form and function. The goal is to insure that by the end of the semester, every member of the workshop will have submitted a prospectus to his or her committee. For students who complete a draft of the prospectus early in the semester, we will reserve time to consider it fully and to structure assignments relevant to the writing of the first chapter (including the question of which chapter should be written first). We will also discuss the dissertation in relation to the job market, conference papers, scholarly journals, and publishable articles.


Graduate Readings: The Writing of Everyday Life

English 203

Section: 3
Instructor: Hejinian, Lyn
Hejinian, Lyn
Time: TTh 12:30-2
Location: 301 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Barthes, R.: Mythologies; Benjamin, W: The Arcades Project; Bowe, J et al.: Gig: Americans Talk About Their Jobs; Brainard, J.: I Remember; Cobb, A.: Green-Wood; Debord, G.: The Society of the Spectacle; De Certeau, M: The Practice of Everyday Life; Durand, M.: Traffic & Weather; Gladman, R.: Newcomer Can’t Swim; Highmore, B.: The Everyday Life Reader; Jameson, F: Postmodernism, or, The Cultural Logic of Late Capitalism; Lefebvre, H.: The Production of Space; Powell, D.A. and David Trinidad: By Myself; Spahr, J.: This Connection of Everyone With Lungs; Wittgenstein, L.: On Certainty

Description

This seminar will undertake a critical reading of, and participation in, some possibilities (or impossibilities) of contemporary realisms and realities. It will query, from an array of perspectives, problems of representation, referentiality, historical awareness, resistance, spectatorship, etc., with reference to a range of theoretical works read in parallel with some recent (and largely “experimental”) literary texts. In addition to the readings, each student will be required to undertake a daily writing project of his or her own that is capable of querying its own language and the character of dailiness, within the contexts of postmodern subjectivity, cultural possibility, and ubiquitous, “late,” capitalism.


Graduate Readings: American Enlightenment & Revolution

English 203

Section: 4
Instructor: Tamarkin, Elisa
Tamarkin, Elisa
Time: TTh 2-3:30
Location: 223 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Primary readings will include texts by Franklin, Edwards, Jefferson, Paine, Hamilton,  Wheatley, Equiano, Crèvecoeur, P. Oliver, S. Rowson, H. Foster, W. H. Brown, C. B. Brown, R. Tyler, W. Irving, as well as Locke, Hume, Kant, Burke, A. Smith, Priestley, and Gibbon.

Description

This course broadly surveys the cultural history of the Enlightenment in eighteenth-century America.  In readings of literary, political, religious and scientific texts alongside visual culture of the period, we will look at the Revolution's impact on the Atlantic world and at intersections and exchanges between the American Enlightenment and its European counterparts.  Topics to be discussed include the wages of a revolutionary war, ideas of secularism and faith, the language of rights and representation, definitions of liberty and loyalty, the emergence of nationalism and cosmopolitanism, philosophies of race, and the place of feeling in the age of reason.  We will engage with critical and interpretive contexts for print culture and the early American book trade, for neoclassicism and romanticism, for the rise of the novel in America, and for new cultural expressions of the public, the private, and the individual.  Throughout the course, we will also look at materials and methods for literary-historical research in this period and at both the practical experience and theoretical implications of different approaches to the archive.


Old English

English 205A

Section: 1
Instructor: See below
Time: See below
Location: See below


Description

This course will not be offered in 2010-2011, but English Department graduate students may take the undergraduate equivalent, English 104 (Introduction to Old English), in its place; see the listing for that course in this Announcement of Classes. Note also that English 205B will be offered in Spring 2011.


Shakespeare

English 217

Section: 1
Instructor: Landreth, David
Landreth, David
Time: MW 1:30-3
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Shakespeare, W: The Riverside Shakespeare

Description

This class is an introduction to the criticism of Shakespeare at the graduate level. I've decided to perform that introduction this semester by following the development of Shakespeare criticism into a professional practice, tracing the reception history of the plays since their first performances. I'm particularly interested in the recursiveness of that history—its circularity and anachronicity—and in the way that the solecistic charge of anachronism has been deployed both against the playwright and against his critics within that history. So we'll be focusing on a dozen or so plays and poems that thematize the difficult relations of chronology to memory and futurity, probably including Othello, the sonnets, Titus, Julius Caesar, As You Like It, Hamlet, and Winter's Tale.

I have ordered the Riverside Shakespeare at the bookstore. You may use any scholarly edition of each play, however, as convenient to you ('scholarly'= has annotations and an introduction, has a first copyright date after 1960, and says who edited the text). We will refer to the original printings in on-line facsimile as well.


Poetry Writing Workshop

English 243B

Section: 1
Instructor: Giscombe, Cecil S.
Giscombe, Cecil
Time: M 3-6
Location: 108 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Students should come to class before purchasing books. Texts will likely include work by Bernadette Mayer, Gwendolyn Brooks, Lewis Hyde (on property and eros), Kamau Brathwaite, as well as statements/ essays on poetics and examples of off-the-grid publishing projects.

Description

The point will be to write poetry in public spaces, to write with an eye toward performance/ publication. My assumption is that people entering the class will enter with projects underway and/or with a strong interest in the problems and issues of producing and discussing a public art.

Workshops, field trips, public readings, experimental alliances beyond the classroom, publication and distribution schemes, etc.

To be considered for admission to this course, please submit 5 photocopied pages of your poetry, along with an application form, to Professor Giscombe's mailbox in 322 Wheeler BY 4:00 P.M., TUESDAY, APRIL 20, AT THE LATEST.

Be sure to read the paragraph concerning creative writing courses on page 1 of this Announcement of Classes for further information regarding enrollment in such courses!


Restoration and Early 18th Century

English 246E

Section: 1
Instructor: Turner, James Grantham
Turner, James
Time: TTh 11-12:30
Location: 305 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Behn, A.: Oroonoko, The Rover, and Other Works; Bunyan, J.: Grace Abounding; Defoe, D.: Robinson Crusoe; Hammond, P.: Restoration Literature: An Anthology; Lawrence, R.: Restoration Plays; Pope, A.: Selected Poetry; Rochester, J.: Selected Works; Swift, J.: The Writings

Description

An exploration of the satire, devotional autobiography, prose fiction, letter-writing, diaries, heroic verse, drama, pornography and feminist polemic produced in England between the Restoration of Charles II (1660) and circa 1735; these will include Behn's Oroonoko, the world best-seller Robinson Crusoe, the earlier works of Pope (Rape of the Lock), selected letters of Mary Wortley Montagu describing her life in Turkey, and major writings by Swift (Tale of a Tub, Modest Proposal, Gulliver's Travels). Canonical figures like Milton, Congreve, Pope and Swift will be juxtaposed to scandalous and/or marginal authors: Bunyan, Behn, Rochester and Astell. My selections emphasize the aftermath of Civil War and Puritanism in defeat, the representation of transgressive sexuality, the search for the heroic, the encounter with the alien, the resistance to "modernity," and the change in the idea of the author as women enter the literary marketplace; many of our texts combine all of these themes. My suggestions for further reading (including J.M. Coetzee's novel Foe) may help you find alternative themes and ways of focusing on this mercurial period.


Research Seminar: Modernist Abstraction in Art and Poetry

English 250

Section: 1
Instructor: Altieri, Charles F.
Altieri, Charles
Time: W 3-6
Location: 203 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Nietszche, F.: Beyond Good and Evil; Wittgenstein, L.: Philosophical Investigations; Wittgenstein, L.: On Certainty; Eliot, T.S.: Collected Poems; Eliot, T.S.: Knowledge and Experience in the Work of F.H. Bradley; Pound, E.: Gaudier-Brzska; Pound, E.: The Cantos of Ezra Pound; Pound, E: Personae; Stevens, W.: Stevens: Collected Poetry and Prose

Description

This course will study relations between three modernist poets and some modern philosophers. We will be concerned primarily with how the philosophers help provide a perspective for interpreting and assessing what the poets can achieve by their refusals of representational ideals for their art. I will be less interested in poetry as philosophy (or philosophy as poetry) than in what we say about imaginative possibilities for writing through our concern with some philosophical texts.

When we deal with poetry there will be weekly reports and responses by sections of the class and there will be a final paper. When we deal with philosophy participants will be required to present questions and challenges.


Research Seminar

English 250

Section: 2
Instructor: Banfield, Ann
Time:
Location:


Description

This section of English 250 has been canceled.


Research Seminar: The Novel and the New Ethics

English 250

Section: 3
Instructor: Hale, Dorothy J.
Hale, Dorothy
Time: Thurs. 3:30-5:30
Location: 203 Wheeler


Other Readings and Media

Theoretical reading will draw from work by Trilling, Leavis, Booth, Levinas, Badiou, Derrida, Spivak, Butler, J.H. Miller, Harpham, Appiah, and Nussbaum. Novelists include H. James, Forster, Faulkner, Hurston, Murdoch, Roth, Coetzee, and Z. Smith. Although the twentieth-century novel will be our collective focus of study, students are encouraged to write their final papers on fiction from any period.

Description

In the last decade, a new call for ethical criticism has been sounded from unexpected quarters of the academy. The renewed interest in ethics is sparked by the academy’s general dissatisfaction with the disenfranchisement of individual agency (and thus individual responsibility) that is seen to be the legacy of theories that have dominated scholarship in the humanities since the 1980s: de Manian deconstruction, Foucauldian sociology, and identity politics. For many literary critics, the turn to the ethical is not just the attempt to recuperate the agency of the individual reader or author; it is also an attempt to theorize anew the positive social value of literature and literary study. But are these new ethical defenses of literature substantially different from the old ethical defenses of literature? And if they are not, do they open themselves to the kind of critique that made deconstruction, new historicism and identity politics attractive theoretical positions to begin with? In addition to asking what is new about the new ethics, this course will also ask why the positive theorization of the value of “literature” is almost exclusively defined in terms of the ethical value of novels.


The Teaching of Composition and Literature

English 302

Section: 1
Instructor: Snyder, Katherine
Snyder, Katherine
Time: Thurs. 9-11
Location: 301 Wheeler


Description

This course will explore the theory and practice of teaching literature and writing. Designed as both a critical seminar and a hands-on practicum for new college teachers, the class will cover topics such as course design; leading discussion; teaching close reading; running a section of a lecture course; responding to student papers; teaching writing (argumentation, organization, grammar, style) in the classroom; time management; grading; and the work of teaching. The course enrolls English graduate students teaching their first course as of Spring or Fall 2010.


Field Studies in Tutoring Writing (tutoring for credit through the Student Learning Center)

English 310

Section: 1
Instructor: Staff
Time: T.B.A.
Location: T.B.A.


Other Readings and Media

Meyer, E. and L. Smith: The Practical Tutor

Recommended Text: Leki, I.: Understanding ESL Writers

Description

Through seminars, discussions, and reading assignments, students are introduced to the language/writing/literacy needs of diverse college-age writers such as the developing, bi-dialectal, and non-native English-speaking (NNS) writer. The course will provide a theoretical and practical framework for tutoring and composition instruction.

The seminar will focus on various tutoring methodologies and the theories which underlie them. Students will become familiar with relevant terminology, approaches, and strategies in the fields of composition teaching and learning. New tutors will learn how to respond constructively to student writing, as well as develop and hone effective tutoring skills. By guiding others towards clarity and precision in prose, tutors will sharpen their own writing abilities. New tutors will tutor fellow Cal students in writing and/or literature courses. Tutoring occurs in the Cesar E. Chavez Student Center under the supervision of experienced writing program staff.

In order to enroll for the seminar, students must have at least sophomore standing and have completed their Reading and Composition R1A and R1B requirements.

Some requirements include: participating in a weekly training seminar and occasional workshops; reading assigned articles, videotaping a tutoring session, and becoming familiar with the resources available at the Student Learning Center; tutoring 4-6 hours per week; keeping a tutoring journal and writing a final paper; meeting periodically with both the tutor supervisor(s) and tutees' instructors.

This course meets the field study requirements for the Education minor, but it cannot be used toward fulfillment of the requirements for the English major. It must be taken P/NP. Pick up an application for a pre–enrollment interview at the Student Learning Center, Atrium, Cesar Chavez Student Center (Lower Sproul Plaza), beginning April 5. No one will be admitted after the first week of fall classes.