Announcement of Classes: Spring 2010

The Announcement of Classes is available one week before Tele-Bears begins every semester. Creative Writing and (for fall) Honors Course applications are available at the same time in the racks outside of 322 Wheeler Hall.
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

R1A/3

The Power of I: Literary Constructions of the Self

MWF 2-3

What are the different ways that we come to understand first person narration?  How are different selves created and chosen through texts and textual choices?  How do issues of memory and claims to authenticity affe...(read more) Bednarska, D.

R1A/9

American Elegy

MWF 3-4

In this class, we will study the American elegy, following its development from the 17th-century to the present.  Reading poems in conjunction with essays in literary criticism and cultural history, we will ask the followi...(read more) Auclair, Tracy

R1B/4

Green Reading

MWF 11-12

In this class, you will become ecologically literate, and learn to write clear argumentative prose. You will learn to identify birds and trees, and keep a journal to practice writing about the environment. As exemplars, we will look at how other write...(read more) Legere, Charles
Legere, Charles

R1B/6

Holiday Literature

MWF 12-1

Holidays find much common ground with literature.  In their ways, both exist outside of time and place by means of their inherent, if relative, universality.  Thanksgiving is not celebrated around the globe, just as...(read more) Drosdick, Alan

R1B/8

T.B.A.

T.B.A.

Instructor, time, and location to be announced.

No one will be able to enroll in this section until it has been finalized, which might not be until November or so.

...(read more)
T.B.A.

R1B/10

Learning and Constraint

MWF 3-4

This class will try to stimulate reflection on what learning is, and what its relation is to different kinds of constraint. The pressure of this question (learning) and this theme (constraint) will be everywhere brought to bear on the task of this cou...(read more) Weiner, Joshua J
Weiner, Joshua

R1B/16

Conspiracy Fiction

MWF 12-1

In his essay “The Paranoid Style in American Politics,” Richard Hofstadter identifies the distinguishing feature of a conspiracy theory not in “the absence of verifiable facts,” but rather in the “curious leap in imaginat...(read more) Seidel, Matthew

R1B/17

Skeletons in the Closet

TTh 2-3:30

The plot of many works of fiction is often that of a secret being gradually revealed to the reader. This course will examine texts in which characters conceal things from each other, from the most mundane motives to the darkest Gothic sins of the past...(read more) Knox, Marisa Palacios
Knox, Marisa

R1B/18

America in the Thirties

TTh 3:30-5:00

                               &n...(read more)

Pugh, Megan
Pugh, Megan
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

24/1

Freshman Seminar: Reading Walden Carefully

Thurs. 2-3

We will read Thoreau's Walden in small chunks, probably about thirty pages per week.  This will allow us time to dwell upon the complexities of a book that is much more mysterious than those who have read the bo...(read more)

Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell

43B/1

Introduction to the Writing of Verse

MW 3-4:30

A workshop course intended for students who have recently begun to write verse or who have not previously taken a course in creative writing.

To be considered for admission to this class, please submit 5 photocopied pages of your poems,...(read more)
Chen, Christopher
Chen, Christopher

45A/1

Literature in English: Through Milton

MW 1-2 + Discussion F 1-2

We will study the changing nature of creative writing "through" Milton, Spenser and Chaucer, but the point is to introduce many voices rather than studying just three authors. 45 is a lower-division course, the pre-required gateway to the English maj...(read more) Turner, James Grantham
Turner, James

45A/2

Literature in English: Through Milton

MW 3-4 + Discussion F 3-4

This course will focus on the central works of the early English literary tradition, beginning with Beowulf and ending with Paradise Lost. We will examine the texts in light of the cultures in which they were produced, asking ourselves why these work...(read more) Nolan, Maura
Nolan, Maura

45B/1

Literature in English:
Late 17th - Through Mid -19th Centuries

MW 12-1 + Discussion F 12-1

This is a course in a few major works of English and American literature from the end of the 17th-century through the first half of the 19th-century. We will work our way from Puritanism through the Enlightenment and into Romanticism. There are major...(read more) Hutson, Richard
Hutson, Richard

45B/2

Literature in English: Late 17th - Through Mid -19th Centuries

MW 3-4 + Discussion F 3-4

Readings in English, Scottish, Irish and North American prose narrative and poetry from 1688 through 1848: a century and a half that sees the formation of a new, multinational British state with the political incorporation of Scotland and then Ireland...(read more) Duncan, Ian
Duncan, Ian

45C/1

Literature in English: Mid 19th -Through the 20th Century

MW 10-11 + Discussion F 10-11

A broad survey of the period that witnessed the arrival of English as a fully global literary language, with Anglophone empires (both political and cultural) centered on both sides of the Atlantic and spread around the world. We will concentrate on t...(read more) Blanton, C. D.
Blanton, Dan

45C/2

Literature in English: Mid 19th -Through the 20th Century

MW 2-3 + Discussion F 2-3

This course will survey British, Irish, and American literature from the mid-nineteenth century through the mid-twentieth. We will try to evoke some of the key aesthetic, cultural, and socio-political trends that characterized the movements of mod...(read more)

Falci, Eric
Falci, Eric

R50/1

Freshman and Sophomore Studies:
Literary Frauds

TTh 11-12:30

Western literary history, especially since the eighteenth century, is full of impostors and forgeries. Since Chatterton purported to “discover” a fifteenth-century poet and his contemporary Macpherson faked an ancient Celtic epic, there ha...(read more) Naumovska, Slavica
Naumovska, Slavica

R50/2

Freshman and Sophomore Studies:
Forms of Minority Writing

TTh 2-3:30

This course will explore the formal interests and strategies of minority authors. “Minority” here is taken not in the U.S. ethnic sense of the word but broadly, and the authors we will examine represent diverse arenas of world literature....(read more) Townsend, Sarah
Townsend, Sarah

84/1

Sophomore Seminar:
High Culture / Low Culture: Food in Film

M 2-5

We will discuss some short stories, view some films on food and its relation to family, ethnicity and sexuality, as well as attend some Cal Performances events.

This 2-unit course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required...(read more)
Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

111/1

Chaucer

MWF 2-3

Please contact Jennifer Miller at j_miller@berkeley.edu for more information about this course.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major....(read more)
Miller, Jennifer
Miller, Jennifer

117B/1

Shakespeare

TTh 2-3:30

This course treats the second half of Shakespeare's career, focusing on some of the major tragedies, the so-called "problem plays," and the later comedies/romances. Our general approach will be to read each text closely and with attention to the soci...(read more) Nishimura, Kimiko
Nishimura, Kimiko

117S/1

Shakespeare

MW 11-12 + Discussion F 11-12

This class is a single-semester introduction to the scope of Shakespeare’s dramatic career. Our readings will range across different genres, from early plays to late, and from some of the greatest hits to some more unfamiliar—even disqui...(read more) Landreth, David
Landreth, David

118/1

Milton

TTh 9:30-11

Arguably the most influential and famous (sometimes infamous) literary figure of the 17th Century, John Milton has too often been represented to our own present as the mainstay of an entrenched canon, a “required” author. However, as we fo...(read more) Goodman, Kevis
Goodman, Kevis

119/1

The Augustan Age:
Literature of the Restoration and the Early 18th Century

TTh 3:30-5

We will explore the relationship between literature and everyday life in the first half of the eighteenth century. Areas of emphasis include popular periodical literature, the early novel, and the writings of Alexander Pope and Jonathan Swift. In addi...(read more) Picciotto, Joanna M
Picciotto, Joanna

121/1

Romantic Period

TTh 9:30-11

Romanticism is a term as difficult to define as it is persistent. We will read British Romanticism as a set of diverse, sometimes contradictory responses to an overarching question: what is the role of literature in a rapidly modernizing world? Britis...(read more) Goldsmith, Steven
Goldsmith, Steven

125A/1

The English Novel (Defoe through Austen)

MWF 2-3

A survey of early fiction, much of which pretended to be anything but. Most of it, published anonymously, purported to be a true "History," "Expedition," or the like, about "Things as They Are." We will consider at the outset why these works so strenu...(read more) Starr, George A.
Starr, George

125D/1

The 20th -Century Novel

TTh 12:30-2

By reading one of the most significant 20th century novels in detail, the course will attempt to answer questions about the thematic concerns and formal techniques of modernism. The relationships between changing conceptions of language and desire, of...(read more) Bernstein, Michael A.
Bernstein, Michael

125E/1

The (Really) Contemporary Novel

MW 3-4 + Discussion F 3-4

We who study literature are perhaps inexorably belated. But this course aims to redefine at least one temporally muddled literary term: the “contemporary,” a period that sometimes stretches as far back as 1950 in academic parlance. I prote...(read more) Serpell, C. Namwali
Serpell, Namwali

127/1

Modern Poetry

TTh 2-3:30

This course will be devoted to studying the work of a series of major figures in modern poetry and poetics. Each of these poets—Pound, Eliot, Stein, Stevens, Loy, Moore, H.D., Williams, Hughes, Brown, Zukofsky, Niedecker, Oppen—undertak...(read more) Ronda, Margaret
Ronda, Margaret

130A/1

American Literature: Before 1800

MWF 3-4

I will lecture on the struggle to alter traditional modes of cultural understanding to account for the extraordinary circumstances of New World life as it is reflected and expressed in these books, together with the gradual emergence of novel social a...(read more) Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell

130C/1

American Literature: 1865-1900

MW 2-3 + Discussion F 2-3

A survey of U.S. literature from 1865 to the beginning of the twentieth century. We’ll begin with the texts listed above; then together we’ll choose the reading and design the syllabus for the last weeks of the course. A midterm, frequen...(read more) Schweik, Susan
Schweik, Susan

130D/1

American Literature: 1900-1945

TTh 12:30-2

A survey of American literature tracing the literary response to the emerging shape of modern life in the first decades of the twentieth century.  We will read across a range of genres and styles to assess the particular influence of modernism an...(read more) Goble, Mark
Goble, Mark

132/1

American Novel

MW 11-12 + Discussion F 11-12

A survey of major novels written in the United States between the end of slavery and the start of the Civil Rights Movement. Two essays, midterm, and final exam....(read more) Wagner, Bryan
Wagner, Bryan

133A/1

African American Literature and Culture Before 1917

TTh 2-3:30

African American expressive culture has been driven by an affinity for the oral; yet the claim for black humanity has often rested upon an assumed connection between literature and literacy. In this survey we will attempt to bridge these oral and lit...(read more) Best, Stephen M.
Best, Stephen

133T/1

Topics in African American Literature and Culture:
Literature of the African Diaspora

TTh 12:30-2

This course will survey prose of the African diaspora in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. We will consider the substance and contingencies of expressions of black global commonality and think about the relationship between politics and aesthe...(read more) Ellis, Nadia
Ellis, Nadia

133T/2

Topics in African American Literature and Culture: Introduction to African American Poetry

MW 4-5:30

An introduction to African American poetry and poetics, moving from the eighteenth century to the present....(read more) Wagner, Bryan
Wagner, Bryan

135AC/1

Literature of American Cultures:
Race and Performance in the 20th c. U.S.

TTh 12:30-2



"Race is not only real, but also illusory. Not only is it common sense; it is also common nonsense. Not only does it establish our identity; it also denies us our identity." — Howard Winant

"Each society dem...(read more)
Saul, Scott
Saul, Scott

137T/1

Topics in Chicana/o Literature and Culture:
The Politics of Chicano/a Literature and Film

MW 12:30-2

The emergence of Chicano/a literary studies as an academic discipline, along with the production of the first Chicano/a films, coincided historically with the Chicano Movement in the late 1960s and early 1970s. There is no disputing that the politica...(read more) Gonzalez, Marcial
Gonzalez, Marcial

138/1

Studies in World Literature in English:
International Literature

TTh 9:30-11

Pascal Casanova has influentially defined Paris as the “capital of the literary world,” as the center of what she calls the “world republic of letters.” Accordingly, contemporary discussions of world literature typically focus...(read more) Lee, Steven S.
Lee, Steven

139/1

The Cultures of English:
Irish Drama

TTh 11-12:30

This course concentrates on Irish Drama from the late 19th century to the present. Among the questions the course will raise: What is specific to the Irish dramatic tradition? Why were certain of the plays on the syllabus the subject of intense contr...(read more) Banfield, Ann
Banfield, Ann

141/1

Modes of Writing (Exposition, Fiction, Verse, etc.)

TTh 11-12:30

This course will introduce students to the study of creative writing – fiction, poetry, and drama. Students will learn to talk critically about these genres and begin to feel comfortable and confident with their own writing of them. Students ...(read more) Chandra, Melanie Abrams
Abrams, Melanie (a.k.a., Chandra, M.J.)

141/2

Modes of Writing (Exposition, Fiction, Verse, etc.):
“’Race,’ [Creative] Writing, and Difference”

TTh 12:30-2

This course is an inquiry into the ways that race is constructed in literary texts and a look-by-doing at our own practices as people engaged in creative writing.

The purpose of writing in this course is, broadly stated, to engage public l...(read more)
Giscombe, Cecil S.
Giscombe, Cecil

143A/1

Short Fiction

MW 1:30-3

This class will be conducted as a writing workshop where students will submit and discuss their own short fiction. We will also closely examine the work of published writers in the anthology. Students will complete 3 short writing assignments approx...(read more) Kleege, Georgina
Kleege, Georgina

143B/1

Verse

TTh 11-12:30

In this course you will conduct a progressive series of experiments in which you will explore some of the fundamental options for writing poetry today—aperture, partition, closure; rhythmic sound patterning; sentence & line; stanza; short & lon...(read more) Shoptaw, John
Shoptaw, John

143B/2

Verse:
Advanced Poetry Writing Workshop

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

In this advanced poetry workshop, we will not only deepen our own writing practices, but also become increasingly familiar with the wide range of poetry-making materials and strategies. To this end, we will treat this course both as a workshop, where ...(read more) Fisher, Jessica
Fisher, Jessica

143N/1

Prose Nonfiction:
The Personal Essay

Tues. 3:30-6:30

This workshop course concentrates on the form, theory and practice of creative nonfiction, particularly on the personal essay. Workshop participants are required to write a minimum of 45 pages of original non-fictional narrative during the semester.(read more) Mukherjee, Bharati
Mukherjee, Bharati\n(a.k.a. Blaise, B.)

152/1

Women Writers

MWF 11-12

Please contact Jennifer Miller at j_miller@berkeley.edu for more information about this course.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major....(read more)
Miller, Jennifer
Miller, Jennifer

165/1

Special Topics:
Short Story Modern Masters: Joyce, Hemingway, Kafka, Borges

MWF 1-2

The Reading and writing assignments--linked with the lectures and class discussions--are intended to develop students’ ability to analyze, understand, and interpret four great masters of the short story: Joyce, Hemingway, Kafka, and Borges. (Th...(read more) Campion, John
Campion, John

165/2

Special Topics:
Narrating Absence: Not-Knowing in Literary Analysis

MW 4-5:30

Critical reading usually involves reading “between the lines” of a literary text, picking up on the implications of its manifest content. In this course, however, we will focus on reading what is altogether missing: for example, the lack ...(read more) Clowes, Erika
Clowes, Erika

165AC/1

Special Topics in American Cultures:
Mixed Fictions

MW 4-5:30

This course examines U.S. fiction in the last century for which mixing works both as cultural theme—ethnic, racial, and class mixtures—and as literary form—genre, style, and narrative mixtures. The course will triangulate African-...(read more) Serpell, C. Namwali
Serpell, Namwali

166/1

Special Topics:
Studies in Literature and Environment

MWF 10-11

What does literature have to teach us about contemporary debates on genetic engineering, food politics, toxic pollution, global warming, e-waste, species extinction and the “death of the planetÃ&...(read more)

Francois, Anne-Lise
Francois, Anne-Lise

166/2

Special Topics:
American Regionalism

MWF 1-2

What makes a work of literature characteristically “American”? This question is complicated by the variety of distinct geographical and cultural landscapes that make up the country. In some ways, the representation of place in American r...(read more) Clowes, Erika
Clowes, Erika

166/3

Special Topics:
The Essay: Traditions and the Individual Talent

TTh 11-12:30

This course will focus on reading — and writing about — essays on the craft of writing by a medley of historical and contemporary figures in American literature. The essays we will read provide a view of writing literature from the insid...(read more) McQuade, Donald
McQuade, Don

166/4

Special Topics:
Literary and Cinematic Cities

TTh 2-3:30

This course examines representations of the city in twentieth-century literature and film, asking how urban experience shapes modernist and postmodernist aesthetics. The course will examine the material conditions and demands of the city, but it will...(read more) Edwards, Erin E
Edwards, Erin

173/1

The Language and Literature of Films:
Film Noir

TTh 5:30-7 Films: Thurs. 7-10 pm

We will examine film noir’s relationship to “classical” Hollywood cinema, as well as its history, theory and generic markers, while analyzing in detail the major films in this area. The course will also be concerned with the social...(read more) Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia

179/1

Literature and Linguistics

MW 4-5:30

The medium of literature is language. This course will explore this relationship through a survey of literary forms defined by linguistic forms, and consideration of how these literary forms are both like and unlike forms of non-literary language. T...(read more) Hanson, Kristin
Hanson, Kristin

180H/1

Short Story

MW 4-5:30



“The lyf so short, the crafte so longe to lerne…”

-- Chaucer

This course will investigate how authors craft stories, so that both non...(read more)
Chandra, Vikram
Chandra, Vikram

180Z/1

Science Fiction:
Speculative Fiction and Dystopias

MWF 11-12

This course will examine in depth the history of speculative fiction and its engagement with the thematics and topoi of the new life sciences—representation of cloning, ecological dystopias, hybrid life-forms, genetic engineering dystopias. Whi...(read more) Jones, Donna V.
Jones, Donna

190/1

Research Seminar:
Crisis and Culture: The 1930s, 1970s, and Today in Comparative Perspective

MW 9-10:30

This seminar will investigate the relationship between culture and economics. To what extent is cultural production determined by market forces, and to what extent is it separate from these forces? Particularly during moments of crisis, how might cu...(read more) Lee, Steven S.
Lee, Steven

190/2

Research Seminar:
Comedy

MW 10:30-12

In this course we will study modern versions of the so-called “old” or romantic comedy -- comedies of courtship, marriage, and remarriage, which explore the relations between sexuality, politics, and social order. We will look at (and list...(read more) Duncan, Ian
Duncan, Ian

190/3

Research Seminar:
Emerson and Thoreau

MW 12-1:30

A close and careful reading of these two friends and writers, with an emphasis on the connection they draw between ecological experience and spiritual self-discovery. Two ten page essays will be required, as will regular attendance and participation.(read more) Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell

190/5

Research Seminar:
Literature of California and the West Since WWI

MW 4-5:30

Besides reading and discussing fiction and poetry with Western settings, and essays attempting to identify or explain distinctive regional characteristics, this course will include consideration of some movies shaped by and shaping conceptions of Cali...(read more) Starr, George A.
Starr, George

190/6

Research Seminar:
Black Rhetoric: From Douglass to Obama

TTh 9:30-11

Black rhetoric has proven by turns incendiary and inspiring of late. This course will explore the oral and rhetorical traditions of African Americans that have played a significant role in the shaping of national culture and history, i.e., work songs...(read more) Best, Stephen M.
Best, Stephen

190/7

Research Seminar:
Modernism, Postmodernism, and the Body

TTh 11-12:30

Harold Segel characterizes modernism as “the transition from an intellectual and verbal culture to one distinguished by antirationalism, anti-intellectualism, the primacy of spontaneity and intuition, the repudiation of the epistemological value...(read more) Edwards, Erin E
Edwards, Erin

190/8

Research Seminar:
American Children’s Literature

TTh 11-12:30

This course will be an inquiry into a literature often marginalized in academic discourse. We'll explore children's literature's relation to United State's culture; we'll read classic and new texts and critical writings, study award giving, and debat...(read more) Wright, Katharine E.
Wright, Katharine

190/9

Research Seminar:
A Brief History of Enthusiasm

TTh 12:30-2

This course aims to follow the strange history of “enthusiasm” by tracing its manifestations in a variety of literary and historical contexts. Today, “enthusiasm” carries the generally positive meaning of “rapturous inter...(read more) Goldsmith, Steven
Goldsmith, Steven

190/10

Research Seminar:
Emily Dickinson

TTh 12:30-2

This is an intensive seminar in the poetry of Emily Dickinson. We will learn how to read (to describe and interpret) Dickinson’s poems, with pleasure and confidence, deeply and also broadly throughout her career. Topics will include early poe...(read more) Shoptaw, John
Shoptaw, John

190/11

Research Seminar:
Mark Twain

TTh 2-3:30

The seminar will read a generous selection of Mark Twain’s most important published writings. We will work our way chronologically through his life and career, beginning with his earliest extant writings and ending with Mysterious Stranger(read more) Hirst, Robert H.
Hirst, Robert

190/12

Research Seminar:
Confidence, Trust, Belief, and Faith: Questions of Self-Representation, Imaginative Authority, and Cultural Transaction in pre- and post-Civil War America

TTh 2-3:30

In the “Worship” section of The Conduct of Life (1860), Ralph Waldo Emerson observed that “Society is a masked ball, where everyone hides his real character, and reveals it by hiding. . . .” In the August 1849 issue o...(read more) McQuade, Donald
McQuade, Don

190/13

Research Seminar:
Samuel Beckett

TTh 3:30-5

This course will cover both Beckett's prose and his theater. We will address Beckett both as an Irish writer and as a figure of international writing--he is, after all, a major French writer. Special attention will be paid to Beckett's experiments w...(read more) Banfield, Ann
Banfield, Ann

190/15

Research Seminar:
Racial Passing

TTh 3:30-5

A passing narrative is an account—fiction or nonfiction—of a person or group claiming a racial or ethnic identity that she or they do not “possess.” Such narratives speak—directly, indirectly, and very uneasilyâ€â€...(read more) Giscombe, Cecil S.
Giscombe, Cecil

190/17

Research Seminar:
Alfred Hitchcock

MW 5:30-7 Films: Mon. 7-10 pm

This will be a seminar on the Hitchcock canon from the British through the American period, with emphasis on cinematic representation of gender, guilt and victimhood. Our discussions and critical readings will consider humor, censorship, socio-cultura...(read more) Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia

H195B/1

Honors Course

TTh 9:30-11

This is a continuation of section 1 of H195A, taught by Gautam Premnath in Fall 2009. No new students will be admitted. No new application form needs to be filled out. Professor Premnath will give out CECs (class entry codes) in class in November. ...(read more) Premnath, Gautam
Premnath, Gautam

H195B/2

Honors Course

MWF 11-12

This is a continuation of section 2 of H195A, taught by Professor Gonzalez in Fall 2009. No new students will be admitted. No new application form needs to be filled out. Professor Gonzalez will give out CECs (class entry codes) in class in Novembe...(read more) Gonzalez, Marcial
Gonzalez, Marcial

H195B/3

Honors Course

MW 10:30-12

This is a continuation of section 3 of H195A, taught by Professor Rubenstein in Fall 2009. No new students will be admitted. No new application form needs to be filled out. Professor Rubenstein will give out CECs (class entry codes) in class in Nov...(read more) Rubenstein, Michael
Rubenstein, Michael

Graduate students from other departments and exceptionally well-prepared undergraduates are welcome in English graduate courses (except for English 200 and 375) insofar as limitations of class size allow. Graduate courses are usually limited to 15 students; courses numbered 250 are usually limited to 10.

When demand for a graduate course exceeds the maximum enrollment limit, the instructor will determine priorities for enrollment and inform students of his/her decisions at the second class meeting. Prior enrollment does not guarantee a place in a graduate course that turns out to be oversubscribed on the first day of class; fortunately, this situation does not arise very often.

Course #
Instructor
Course Area

203/1

Research Seminars:
Visuality, Textuality, and Cultural Memory

W 3-6

Probing what has been called the “visual turn” in literary studies, this course will scrutinize the interplay between verbal and visual modes of representation in a range of philosophical, literary, and visual texts. We will ask how and wh...(read more) Abel, Elizabeth
Abel, Elizabeth

203/2

Graduate Readings:
Poetic Meter

MW 1:30-3

This course will provide a basic introduction to the major meters of the modern English poetic tradition from the perspective of a theory of meter rooted in generative linguistics. Taking the strict iambic pentameter of Shakespeare's Sonnets, the loo...(read more) Hanson, Kristin
Hanson, Kristin

203/3

Graduate Readings:
Poetry, Theater, and Visual Culture in the Renaissance

TTh 2-3:30

This course will be structured as a scholarly detective story, driven by a question that has never been satisfactorily answered: how did “that rare Italian master, Julio Romano”—prized pupil of Raphael; designer of sexually explicit...(read more) Altman, Joel B.
Altman, Joel

203/4

Graduate Readings:
Queer/Of Color

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

This seminar is dedicated to the intersection between queer theory and “minority” literatures and cultures. We will take as our starting point the critique of queer theory’s ethnocentrism most potently embodied in Cathy Cohenâ€â„...(read more) Ellis, Nadia
Ellis, Nadia

243B/1

Poetry Writing Workshop

W 3-6

Topics in poetics raised by theorists (Barthes, Bourdieu, Deleuze, Glissant, Riffaterre) and practitioners (Alcalay, Joron, Mackey, Palmer, Spahr et al.) will focus our discussion of each other’s poetry.

To be considered for adm...(read more)
O'Brien, Geoffrey G.
O'Brien, Geoffrey

243N/1

Prose Nonfiction Writing Workshop:
Rooms and Lives

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

Rooms and lives: a creative or literary nonfiction graduate workshop open to students from any department. Drawing on narrative strategies found in memoir, the diary, travel writing, and fiction, students will have workshopped in class three 10-20 pag...(read more) Farber, Thomas
Farber, Thomas

246I/1

American Literature to 1855

TTh 11-12:30

A survey of U.S. literature in the decades before the Civil War with special attention to narratives of race and nation, the development of American romanticism, and cultures of poetry in the U.S....(read more) Beam, Dorri
Beam, Dorri

246K/1

Literature in English, 1900-1945

TTh 9:30-11

This course surveys a range of Anglo-American texts from the first half of the twentieth-century—with a strong emphasis on US figures—that explore different versions of a modernist fascination with media aesthetics.  Working with an e...(read more) Goble, Mark
Goble, Mark

250/1

Research Seminars:
Mass Entertainment

M 3-6

We will examine the theory and practice of mass entertainment during two comparable moments of major innovation in mass entertainment: the construction of permanent theaters in sixteenth-century London, and the invention of talking pictures in twentie...(read more) Knapp, Jeffrey
Knapp, Jeffrey

250/2

Research Seminars:
Theories of the World and World Literature from Goethe to the Present

T 3:30 - 6:30

The intensification of globalization in the past decade has led to a renewed interest in reinventing Goethe’s project of world literature. Recent discussions of the topic, however, have taken the normative significance of ‘the worldâ€...(read more) Cheah, Pheng

250/3

Research Seminars:
Agents [and Others] in Anglo-Saxon England

Tues. 3:30-6:30

This course will investigate questions of agency and identity (particularly religious identity) in the textual world of Anglo-Saxon England. As part of our investigations, we will begin with some early medieval engagements of predestination and free w...(read more) O'Brien O'Keeffe, Katherine
O'Brien O'Keeffe, Katherine

250/5

Research Seminars:
Wordsworth and Coleridge in Collaboration: Poetry, Human Science, & Romantic Aesthetics

F 10:30-1:30

This course will offer an intensive reading of the major poetry and prose written by William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge, whose remarkable literary collaboration, friendship, and conflict (should) dispel old truisms about the solitary Roman...(read more) Goodman, Kevis
Goodman, Kevis

310/1

Field Studies in Tutoring Writing

T.B.A.

Through seminars, discussions, and reading assignments, students are introduced to the language/writing/literacy needs of diverse college-age writers such as the developing, bi-dialectal, and non-native English-speaking (NNS) writer. The course will p...(read more) Staff