Announcement of Classes: Spring 2022

Course #
Instructor
Course Area

R1A/1

Reading and Composition:
Poetics from the Global South

MWF 9-10

This course will focus a range of poetries written in English from what we might broadly call the Global South. Its aim is essentially comparative, tracking similarities and differences – thematic, generic, and stylistic – among this large and diverse...(read more) Dunsker, Leo

R1A/2

Reading and Composition:
Animals and Other People

MWF 10-11

"How knoweth he by the vertue of his understanding the inward and secret motion of beasts...when I am playing with my cat, who knows whether she has more sport in dallying with me than I have in gaming her." Michel de Montaigne, An Apology for Ray...(read more) Bircea, Jason

R1A/3

Reading and Composition:
Transpacific Poetry

MWF 11-12

This course focuses on poetry written during the twentieth century across the Pacific Ocean, with a large part of the texts emerging from North America, East and Southeast Asia, and Oceania. Though these works emerge from a variety of national context...(read more) Choi, 최 Lindsay || Lindsay Chloe

R1A/4

Reading and Composition

MWF 12-1

In this Rhetoric and Composition course, we will explore what it means to “enunciate” ethnic and queer positionality in LGBT and Latinx/Chicanx works. We will explore course materials with an eye to the “slipperiness” of clear enunciation and identity...(read more) Trevino, Jason Benjamin

R1A/5

Reading and Composition:
Asian American Women Writers Across Genre

MWF 1-2

What do writings by Asian American* women** have to tell us about emotional labor, transnational intimacies, and hope? This question serves as the organizing frame for our semester's exploratory journey of critical thinking. We will do our best to ...(read more) Kao, Libby

R1A/6

Reading and Composition:
Voyage to the Moon

MWF 8-9

On July 20, 1969, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landed the Apollo Lunar Module Eagle on the moon at 1:17 pm, Pacific Time. The moon landing seemed like the very definition of modernity: using cutting-edge technology to cross the boundary between Eart...(read more) Serrano, Joseph

R1A/7

Reading and Composition:
Whose Civil War?

MWF 2-3

This class will explore the many legacies of the American Civil War. Starting with journalistic accounts and poetry from the war itself, and moving forward into novels and films, we'll think through how successive generations of writers from different...(read more) Warren, Noah

R1A/8

Reading and Composition:
Sexual Ethics in Feminism and Fiction

MWF 3-4

In this class, we'll read English fiction of the 18th and 19th centuries alongside American feminist writing of the late 20th century to look for answers to the following questions: Can sex be ethical—perhaps even good? Is desire ever sympathetic or b...(read more) Nyiri, Jesse

R1B/1

Reading and Composition:
Sensational Transformations

MWF 9-10

We may think we’re past the Victorian era, but even a cursory look at our contemporary pop culture tells us otherwise. BBC keeps churning out successful period pieces. Sherlock Holmes and Dracula just won’t die. Jane Eyre is constantly recycled in new...(read more) Hobbs, Katherine

R1B/2

Reading and Composition:
Sick

MWF 10-11

This course teaches reading, writing, and researching skills through a survey of sickness as a bodily and social condition and as a literary resource and mode. Students will practice formal analysis of texts in a variety of media including fiction, me...(read more) Cohan, Nathan

R1B/3

Reading and Composition:
The Poetry of California

MWF 10-11

Poetry won’t give you the news, as William Carlos Williams said, and it won’t tell you how to avoid traffic in Los Angeles or where to find the best burritos in the Mission. But it can offer a profound glimpse into the spirit—or spirits—of a place. Ca...(read more) Nathan, Jesse

R1B/4

Reading and Composition:
The Poetry of California

MWF 11-12

Poetry won’t give you the news, as William Carlos Williams said, and it won’t tell you how to avoid traffic in Los Angeles or where to find the best burritos in the Mission. But it can offer a profound glimpse into the spirit—or spirits—of a place. Ca...(read more) Nathan, Jesse

R1B/5

Reading and Composition:
Dreaming on Paper: Exceptional Mental States and the Written Word

MWF 11-12

What do we mean when we say that a text is “dreamlike?” We often appeal to this description when the text with which we are engaging is strange, experimental, or transgresses normative expectations. And yet to compare a novel, a film, or a painting to...(read more) Furcall, Dylan

R1B/6

Reading and Composition:
Silence

MWF 12-1

How do writers have words to describe silence? How does silence evade speech while also being produced by it? How does silence seek expression in language, metaphors and images? This course tracks the ways in which writers and artists have employed si...(read more) D'Silva, Eliot

R1B/11

Reading and Composition:
Petrofiction and Climate Fiction

MWF 1-2

In 1992, Amitav Ghosh observed that, despite the ubiquity of petroleum in our lives, oil has “produced scarcely a single [literary] work of note.” And in 2006, commenting on the destruction caused by fossil fuels, Ghosh added that “climate change ...(read more) Beckett, Balthazar I.

R1B/12

Reading and Composition:
Fictions of Time, Space, Memory

MWF 2-3

Does literature speculate, or theorize?  How does the history of the novel shadow – or shape – an idea of reality that modern science takes as given?  Does the existence of fictional worlds alter the material one that we inhabit?  How does memory comp...(read more) Vinyard Boyle, Elizabeth

R1B/14

Reading and Composition:
Passing Narratives

TTh 8-9:30

This course will focus on passing narratives, stories, in which, a character is perceived as belonging to a racial or ethnic group different from their own. In particular, we will direct our attention to a series of twentieth-century texts that explor...(read more) Elias, Gabrielle

R1B/15

Reading and Composition:
Genres of Dispossession

TTh 5-6:30

How did capitalism begin? There is so much at stake in this question – above all, perhaps, some clues as to what capitalism really is and how it will end. While many have presumed that capitalism arose naturally and inevitably, and that it represents ...(read more) Geary, Christopher

R1B/16

Reading and Composition:
Rewriting Epic

TTh 5-6:30

“Bro!” So begins a recent translation of Beowulf. Not with a solemn “So.” or an exclamatory “Listen!”, but rather with a playful invitation to reconsider the epic from a feminist standpoint, as a “bro story.” In this course, we’ll take this invitation...(read more) Ripplinger, Michelle

R1B/17

Reading and Composition:
Petrofiction and Climate Fiction

MWF 8-9

In 1992, Amitav Ghosh observed that, despite the ubiquity of petroleum in our lives, oil has “produced scarcely a single [literary] work of note.” And in 2006, commenting on the destruction caused by fossil fuels, Ghosh added that “climate change ...(read more) Beckett, Balthazar I.

R1B/18

Reading and Composition:
Writing Modern Egypt

TuTh 3:30-5

Egyptians often refer to their nation as أم الدنيا, the “mother of the world.” And Egypt has historically featured prominently in the western imaginary—from the legend of the Library of Alexandria to Napoleon’s invasion to the exploits of nineteen...(read more) Beckett, Balthazar I.
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

17/1

Shakespeare

MWF 9-10

English 17 is an introduction to the study of Shakespeare; incoming transfer students, future majors, and non-majors are especially welcome. Shakespeare’s poems and plays are relentlessly unsettling, sublimely beautiful, deeply moving, rigorously b...(read more) Arnold, Oliver

20/1

Modern British and American Literature:
Post-Apocalyptic Fiction

TTh 5-6:30

Apocalyptic stories have been told for centuries, even millenia. But novels, movies, and other forms of media that imagine the end of the world—and what comes after that—seem to have inundated us (floods!) in recent times... and that was even before C...(read more) Snyder, Katherine

24/1

Freshman Sophomore Seminar Program:
World Art Cinema: Some Parables of Repetition

W 1-3

We will watch and discuss three masterworks of world art cinema: Akira Kurosawa’s Rashomon (Japan, 1950), Pier-Paolo Pasolini’s Teorema (Italy, 1968), and Abbas Kiarostami’s Taste of Cherry (Iran, 1997). Each is a kind of parable of repetition, involv...(read more) Miller, D.A.

24/2

Freshman Seminar:
Emily Dickinson

W 2-3

  We will be reading and discussing extraordinary poems by Emily Dickinson.     ...(read more) Wagner, Bryan

43A/1

Introduction to the Writing of Short Fiction

TTh 9:30-11

This is an introductory workshop that focuses on writing and revising short fiction. We will also read published short stories to see how writers handle the essentials of voice, character, setting, structure, point of view, conflict, and the use of la...(read more) Rowland, Amy

43B/1

Introduction to the Writing of Verse

MW 12:30-2

"There is no greater fallacy going than that art is expression" (Robert Frost) This introductory workshop will ask: what is poetry if it is not (or not only) self-expression? We will write, workshop and revise our own poems and we will study a vari...(read more) Laser, Jessica

45A/1

Literature in English: Through Milton

MW 12-1 + one hour of discussion section per week (sec. 101: F 9-10; sec. 102: F 10-11; sec. 103: F 12-1; sec. 104: Th 10-11)

This is a story of discovering, then forgetting, then discovering again the fact that a particular language can be used not only for communication but also for creation. At the beginning of our story Caedmon, a shepherd, is called upon in his dream to...(read more) Marno, David

45B/1

Literature in English: Late-17th through Mid-19th Centuries

MW 4-5 + one hour of discussion section per week (sec. 101: F 9-10; sec. 102: F 10-11; sec. 103, F 11-12; sec. 104: F 12-1, sec. 105: F 1-2, sec. 106: F 2-3)

This course is an introduction to British and American literature from the eighteenth through the mid-nineteenth century. We'll read works from that period (by Swift, Franklin, Equiano, Wordsworth, Austen, Brontë, Melville, Eliot, Douglass, Dickinson,...(read more) Puckett, Kent

45C/1

Literature in English: MId-19th through the 20th Century

MW 2-3 + one hour of discussion section per week (sec. 101: F 12-1; sec. 102: F 1-2; sec. 103: F 2-3; sec. 104: F 3-4; sec. 105: F 4-5; sec. 106: F 11-12)

This course will examine different examples of British, Irish, American, and global Anglophone literature from the middle of the 19th century through the middle of the 20th. Moving across a number of genres and movements, we will focus on the ways nov...(read more) Gang, Joshua

53/1

Asian American Literature and Culture:
Voice, Text, Image

TTh 6:30 - 8

Professor Leong's course is listed both as English 53 and as Asian American Studies (ASAMST) 20C. It is the same course (same time, same room; slightly different title). If you cannot enroll directly in English 53, you can enroll via ASAMST 20C. All s...(read more) Leong, Andrew Way

80K/1

Children's Literature:
Bad Seed: Monstrosity, Horror, and the Inhuman in Children’s Literature

TTh 2-3:30

From cannibalistic witches to sadistic parents to dystopian hellscapes, children's literature is rife with terrifying figures and dark themes. This class will look at the forms of monstrosity, deviance, and horror that appear in a variety of texts and...(read more) Saha, Poulomi

84/1

Sophomore Seminar:
Film Noir and Neo-Noir

F 12-2

An analysis of some classic American crime films and some recent examples of the genre. THIS IS AN ONLINE SYNCHRONOUS COURSE.  ...(read more) Bader, Julia

90/1

Practices of Literary Study

TTh 2-3:30

How do poems use language differently than other forms of oral or written expression? We'll explore how people have answered this question, and try to come up with some answers of our own. Readings will be made available on the coursesite and in a rea...(read more) Picciotto, Joanna M

90/2

Practices of Literary Study:
Where Did the Realist Novel Come From?

TTh 3:30-5

Before the literary form we now think of as the realist novel took critical shape as an aesthetic entity in the nineteenth century, a wide range of very interesting and new forms of prose fiction in eighteenth-century Britain (works we now call novels...(read more) Sorensen, Janet

90/4

Practices of Literary Study:
Shakespeare

MW 9:30-11

“‘A sad tale’s best for winter,’ but for spring a comedy is better.”  Focusing on three of Shakespeare’s most engaging plays—The Comedy of Errors, The Tragedy of King Lear, and The Winter’s Tale—which all concern divisions in a family (sometimes hilar...(read more) Altman, Joel B.
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

100/1

The Seminar on Criticism:
Henry James and His Admirers

TTh 11-12:30

For over a century, Henry James (1843-1916) has been regarded as a writer’s writer.  Hailed as the “Master” within his lifetime by the many who prized his narrative art as well as his professionalism, James found new fans in each subsequent generation...(read more) Hale, Dorothy J.

100/3

The Seminar on Criticism:
Approaching Walden

TTh 3:30-5

Our seminar will take up Thoreau’s challenge to read Walden as deliberately as it was written.  We will work through the book slowly over the course of the semester, while learning how best to approach it, and the environment in which it was written, ...(read more) Tamarkin, Elisa

100/4

The Seminar on Criticism:
Histories of Writing

TuTh 9:30-11

In this seminar of literary criticism, we will explore some of the stories that have been told about writing as a technology of reproduction, dissemination, circulation, amplification, preservation, and citation. While writing commonly refers to the o...(read more) Francois, Anne-Lise

100/5

The Seminar on Criticism:
Indigenous Autobiography

MWF 12-1

As we develop our critical reading and writing skills, we will examine a wide range of Native American personal narratives, from pre-contact pictographic narratives painted on animal hides and later drawn in ledgerbooks to nineteenth-century as-told-t...(read more) Wong, Hertha D. Sweet

100/7

The Seminar on Criticism:
In the Wake of Moby-Dick

TTh 5-6:30

We will read Moby-Dick slowly and scrupulously, immersing ourselves in Melville’s extraordinary prose and assessing the book’s literary, historical, and biographical contexts; the 20th- and 21st-century critical traditions it has generated; narrative ...(read more) Otter, Samuel

111/1

Chaucer

MWF 1-2

For more information about this class, please contact Jennifer Miller at j_miller@berkeley.edu. ...(read more) Miller, Jennifer

117B/1

Shakespeare:
Later Works

MW 10-11 + one discussion section per week (sec. 101: F 12-1; sec. 102: F 1-2)

This class offers an in-depth study of the second half of Shakespeare's career, featuring the major tragedies alongside later comedies and tragicomedies. We'll read ten of those plays together: Julius Caesar, Hamlet, Twelfth Night, Othello, Measure fo...(read more) Landreth, David

125A/1

The English Novel (Defoe through Scott)

TTh 12:30-2

The period from which our reading draws has been credited with the “rise of the novel”—the emergence of the then new genre, the “novel,” so familiar to us today. While critics have qualified and revised that claim, the texts we’ll read do experiment w...(read more) Sorensen, Janet

125C/1

The European Novel

MWF 10-11

In The Theory of the Novel the critic Georg Lukacs writes, “The novel form is, like no other, an expression of transcendental homelessness.” This course will survey the history of the European novel in the context of “rootlessness” and “estrangement”—...(read more) Creasy, CFS

125E/1

The Contemporary Novel:
Screens, Pages, and Visual Rhetoric in Contemporary Fiction

MWF 11-12

A study from the Global Web Index reveals that internet users aged sixteen to sixty-four averaged 6 hours and 43 minutes online per day in 2019. This amounts to 102 full days of screentime per person. If people are spending nearly a third of their liv...(read more) Catchings, Alex

130A/1

American Literature: Before 1800

TTh 11-12:30

A survey of English-language American literature to 1800. We will read a wide range of texts from narratives of colonial settlement through the literature of the American Revolution, the Constitutional Convention, and the early republic. Topics to be ...(read more) Tamarkin, Elisa

130B/1

American Literature: 1800-1865

TTh 2-3:30

We will take up the remarkable fiction, poetry, and essays of this period, including works by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Edgar Allan Poe, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, Fanny Fern, Herman Melville, Walt ...(read more) Otter, Samuel

C136/1

Topics in American Studies:
Harlem Renaissance

MW 12-2

This course explores the social, cultural, political, and personal awakenings in the literature, art, and music of the Negro Renaissance or the New Negro Movement, now commonly known as the Harlem Renaissance. This is remembered as a time (roughly 191...(read more) Wagner, Bryan

137T/1

Topics in Chicano Literature and Culture:
Riding Chicanx Literature’s First Wave and Beyond, c/s

MW 5-6:30

“The student of Chicano literature will look back at this group and this first period as the foundation of whatever is to come, even if only as the generation against whom those to come rebel. The best of the best will survive—but then survival is an ...(read more) Reyes, Robert L

141/1

Modes of Writing (Exposition, Fiction, Verse, etc.)

TTh 3:30-5

This course will introduce students to the study of creative writing—fiction and poetry. Students will learn to talk critically about these forms and begin to feel comfortable and confident writing within these genres. Students will write a variety of...(read more) Abrams, Melanie

143A/1

Short Fiction

TTh 11-12:30

The aim of this course is to explore the genre of short fiction—to discuss the elements that make up the short story, to talk critically about short stories, and to become comfortable and confident with the writing of them.  Students will write two sh...(read more) Abrams, Melanie

143A/2

Short Fiction

TTh 11-12:30

A short fiction workshop. Over the course of the semester, each student will write and revise two stories. Each participant in the workshop will edit student-written stories and will write a formal critique of each manuscript. Students will also take ...(read more) Chandra, Vikram

143B/1

Verse

MW 2-3:30

In this course you will conduct a progressive series of explorations in which you will try some of the fundamental options for writing poetry today (or any day) — aperture and closure; rhythmic sound patterning; sentence and line (verse); short and lo...(read more) Shoptaw, John

143B/2

Verse

MW 3:30-5

In this class we will read as writers and write as readers, explore some of the larger mysteries and technical fine points of poetry, and how one is often to be found in the other. Course readings covering a range of 20th and 21st-century poetry will ...(read more) Solie, Karen

143C/1

Long Narrative

MW 12:30-2

This course is for students who are interested in or already working on a novel or novella. Through creative writing exercises and reading, we’ll explore how a novel is made, including questions of structure, research, and planning; through workshops,...(read more) McFarlane, Fiona

143N/1

Prose Nonfiction:
Food Writing

MW 11-12:30

This is a creative nonfiction writing workshop focused on the topic of food.  Food writing encompasses more than snooty restaurant reviews or poetic descriptions of the taste of wine, coffee, and chocolate.  Food writing can include memoir, cultural c...(read more) Kleege, Georgina

143N/2

Prose Nonfiction

TTh 9:30-11

This course is a nonfiction workshop in which you’ll learn to write about many different types of art and culture, from TV to music and other forms of performance, while also developing your own voice and sensibility on the page as you learn to write ...(read more) Saul, Scott

143N/3

Prose Nonfiction

Friday 9-12

An upper division writing workshop, open to undergraduate and graduate students from any department who have either taken English 43-level writing seminars or have equivalent skills/experience. Drawing on narrative strategies in memoir, the diary, ...(read more) Farber, Thomas

165/1

Special Topics:
Ecopoetry and Ecopoetics

MW 5-6:30

Ecopoetry – nature poetry that is environmental and environmentalist – is an international twenty-first century movement.  But in the nature poetry and poetics of the United States it has deep and wide-spread roots.  This seminar will explore this mov...(read more) Shoptaw, John

166/1

Special Topics:
Beckett

TTh 2-3:30

The Twentieth Century offered a unique blending of advancement and atrocity, genocide and progress, and surely no single artist captured this more fully and more fearlessly than Samuel Beckett. Spanning the modernist and postmodernist eras, Beckett's ...(read more) Danner, Mark

166/2

Special Topics

TTh 2-3:30

We will study the work of Nabokov as a novelist on two continents over a period of nearly sixty years. The course will be structured (more or less) chronologically and divided between novels translated from Russian and written in English. After beginn...(read more) Naiman, Eric

166AC/1

Special Topics in American Cultures:
Racial Joy

TTh 9:30-11

Is happiness possible in a world of ecological catastrophe, economic inequality, and racial oppression? This course will explore recent literature by Black, Indigenous, Latinx, and Asian American writers and poets preoccupied with the nature of joy. A...(read more) Cutler, John Alba

171/1

Literature and Sexual Identity:
Gender, Sexuality, Modernism

TTh 12:30-2

This course will focus on one area of the rapidly expanding field of literature and sexual identity: the early twentieth-century literary experiments that have earned the title “modernism.” Famously “queer,” modernism’s challenges to literary and soci...(read more) Abel, Elizabeth

172/1

Literature and Psychology

MWF 10-11

Is psychology a science that deals with objective facts? Are these facts established through third-person observation and verification, or first-person experience? Is the object of psychology the neuroanatomy of the brain or the cognitive structures o...(read more) Viragh, Atti

175/1

Literature and Disability:
Helen Keller and Her Cultural Legacies

MWF 10-11

Every schoolchild knows the story of Helen Keller. We learn early that Keller became blind and deaf as a toddler, that after years without language, she was taught to sign, read and write, and eventually speak, that she was the first deafblind college...(read more) Sirianni, Lucy

176/2

Literature and Popular Culture:
The Sit-Com

MW 10:30-12

The television situation comedy has been one of the most durable, wide-ranging, and successful genres of  popular  culture  of  all  time.  Its  narrative  forms  (such  as  the  “will they/won’t  they”  romance  that depends  on  the  televisual  mod...(read more) Lavery, Grace

179/1

Literature and Linguistics

TTh 12:30-2

The medium of literature is language.  This course aims to deepen understanding of what this means through consideration of how certain literary forms can be defined as grammatical forms.  These literary forms include meter; rhyme and alliteration; sy...(read more) Hanson, Kristin

190/1

Research Seminar:
Emily Dickinson

TTh 2-3:30

In this class we’ll concentrate on just one poet, Emily Dickinson, using her work as an occasion to think about how poetry and history get made, revised, codified, brought forward, pushed aside, theorized, contested, remixed and – since this is a re...(read more) Schweik, Susan

190/2

Research Seminar:
Anatomy of Criticism

TTh 3:30-5

What is literary criticism?  All English majors and English professors do it, or try to do it; but articulating what it is, or should be, is not easy.  The question is a theoretical one, which in this course we will consider with Canadian literary cri...(read more) Hanson, Kristin

190/4

Research Seminar:
What is Community?

MW 8-9:30

Deference to the instincts of a community serves as final arbiter in much intellectual and political work: when, for example, the linguist Noam Chomsky defines a the syntax of a language as the “instincts of a native speaker.” Yet as that framing indi...(read more) Lavery, Grace

190/5

Research Seminar:
Repression and Resistance

TTh 2-3:30

In this course, we’ll analyze representations of repression and resistance in a collection of contemporary literary works, mainly novels. We’ll examine various forms of repression—physical, social, political, and psychological—represented in these wor...(read more) Gonzalez, Marcial

190/6

Research Seminar:
The Historical Novel

TTh 5-6:30

What is historical and what is fictional about the genre of historical fiction? Since the nineteenth century, this oxymoronic genre has redrawn the border between history and fiction, realism and romance. In this survey, we will begin by reading a cou...(read more) Bernes, Jasper

190/7

Research Seminar:
Race and Travel: Relative Alterity in Medieval Times and Places

MW 5-6:30

Anyone who has travelled or lived in parts of the world (including their own country) where they were visibly an outsider—by countenance, clothing or conduct—will have experienced the sometimes fearful instability of “otherness”. Contrary to common no...(read more) Miller, Jennifer

190/8

Research Seminar:
Modern California Books and Movies

MW 6:30-8

Besides reading and discussing fiction and essays that attempt to identify or explain distinctive regional characteristics, this course will include consideration of various movies shaped by and shaping conceptions of California. Writing will consist ...(read more) Starr, George A.

H195B/1

Honors Course

TTh 5-6:30

The Honors Seminar is a year-long course.  In this second semester, we focus on drafting and revising a 40-60 page Honors Thesis.  The course is not open to new enrollment.  No new books are required. ...(read more) Hale, Dorothy J.

H195B/2

Honors Course

TTh 12:30-2

This course is a continuation of English H195A, taught by Scott Saul in Fall 2021. No new students will be admitted, and no new application needs to be submitted. Prof. Saul will give out permission codes in class in November. No new texts are requ...(read more) Saul, Scott

Graduate students from other departments and exceptionally well-prepared undergraduates are welcome in English graduate courses (except for English 200 and 375) when space permits. Please contact the instructor if you have questions.

Course #
Instructor
Course Area

203/1

Graduate Readings:
Marx and Marxism Today: Re-Reading the Grundrisse

Wednesday 2-5

The 1960s’ return to Marx centered on the 1857-8 manuscripts, or The Grundrisse, which were then made widely available in the West for the first time. The Grundrisse inspired diverse interpretations of Marx’s critique of political economy—ranging from...(read more) Lye, Colleen

203/2

Graduate Readings:
The Sixties

Thursday 2-5

This course surveys literature, film, and art of the 1960s with a particular focus on works from the United States that highlighted the period’s many forms of social, political, and ecological crisis, and assess the limits and possibilities of the exi...(read more) Goble, Mark

203/3

Graduate Readings:
Novel Theory, Narrative Theory, and the Sociology of the Novel

Tuesday 9-12

In this course, we will read a lot of writing about narrative and the novel for a few related reasons.  First, we’ll consider several representative texts in narratology, novel theory, and the sociology of the novel to trace out some key arguments abo...(read more) Puckett, Kent

243B/1

Poetry Writing Workshop

M 9-12

Studies in contemporary poetic cases will focus our discussions of each other's poems. ...(read more) O'Brien, Geoffrey G.

243N/1

Prose Nonfiction Writing Workshop:
Wright/Baldwin

MW 5-6:30

By the time James Baldwin died in 1987, he had, arguably, become the voice of black and queer America. As the author of numerous novels, essays, plays, and social commentaries, the Harlem-born author had managed, over his nearly forty-year career, to ...(read more) Als, Hilton

246F/1

Graduate Proseminar: The Later-Eighteenth Century

F 9-12

This survey of British writing from (roughly) 1740 through 1800 takes up decades that have presented literary historians with more than the usual challenges to periodization and organization by author, movement, or genre. We will study the proliferati...(read more) Goodman, Kevis

246H/1

Victorian Period:
Britain, Empire, "Victorian": Critical Framings

W 9-12

Taking as a starting point the fact that Britain’s nineteenth-century empire necessitates a capacious understanding of the term “Victorian,” this course will query the expansive contours of that term. What reading practices does such a commodious unde...(read more) Banerjee, Sukanya

250/1

Research Seminars:
Sensation and Participation from Chaucer to Spenser

M 2-5

The idea of pairing “sensation” with “participation” as a means of identifying an aesthetic phenomenon characteristic of the later Middle Ages and early Renaissance emerges in part from Thomas Aquinas’ account of beauty:  he argues that beauty is fu...(read more) Nolan, Maura

250/2

Research Seminars:
Idols and Ideology

T 2-5

The history of Western literary theory is often told in terms of the concept of mimesis. But there is another, equally powerful, anti-mimetic strand to this history: the critique of mimesis as a form of idolatry. In this course, we will explore this c...(read more) Kahn, Victoria