English 203

Graduate Readings: The Turn to Language and the Writing of Everyday Life


Section Semester Instructor Time Location Course Areas
2 Fall 2008 Hejinian, Lyn
Hejinian, Lyn
MW 1:30-3 301 Wheeler

Other Readings and Media

"Benjamin, W: The Arcades Project, Harvard University Press, 0-674-00802-2; Coultas, B: A Handmade Museum, Coffee House, 978-1-56689-143-1; De Certeau, M: The Practice of Everyday Life, University of California Press, 0-520-23699-8; Freud, S: The Psychopathology of Everyday Life, Penguin, 0-14-118403-5; Goldsmith, K: The Weather, Make Now Press, 0-9743554-2-9; Gordon, N and Sullivan, G: Swoon, Granary Books, 1-887123-54-7; Grenier, R: A Day at the Beach, Segue, 0-937804-14-2; Lefebvre, H: Everyday Life in the Modern World, Transaction Publishers, 0-87855-972-8; Mathews, H: 20 Lines a Day, Dalkey Archive Press, 1-56478-168-2; Mayer, B: Midwinter Day, New Directions, 0-8112-1406-0; Oppen, G: Selected Prose, Daybooks, and Papers, Univ. of California Press, 0-520-23579-7; Silliman, R: Tjanting, Salt Publishing, 1-876857-19-6; Weiner, H: Spoke, Sun and Moon, 978-0-940650-26-8; Williams, W.C.: Imaginations, New Directions, 0-8112-0229-1; Wittgenstein, L: Remarks on Colour John Wiley & Sons, 0-631-11641-9; Wolf, C: One Day a Year, 1960-2000, Europa Editions, 1-933372-22-2; Zolf, R: Human Resources, Coach House, 1-55245-182-8; A reader including works by Amiri Baraka, Barrett Watten, Lorine Niedecker, Marianne Moore, Theodor Adorno, and others will also be required.

"

Description

This seminar will undertake a critical reading of, and participation in, some possibilities (or impossibilities) of 20th/21st century �realism�; it will query, from an array of perspectives, problems of representation, referentiality, literary historiography, spectatorship, etc., with reference to a range of theoretical works read in parallel with the some recent (and largely �experimental�) literary texts. In addition to the readings, each student will be required to undertake a daily writing project of his or her own that is capable of querying its own language and the character of dailiness, as a subjective site and as an objective realm of experience.

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