English 190

Research Seminar: Studies in Children's Literature


Section Semester Instructor Time Location Course Areas
15 Fall 2013 Browning, Catherine Cronquist
TTh 3:30-5 221 Wheeler

Book List

Blume, Judy: Are You There, God? It's Me, Margaret; Carroll, Lewis: Annotated Alice; Frank, Anne: Diary of a Young Girl; Pullman, Phillip: Golden Compass; Sendak, Maurice: Where the Wild Things Are; Twain, Mark: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn; Wilder, Laura: Little House on the Prairie; Zipes, Jack: Norton Anthology of Children's Literature

Description

This course will explore the history and theory of writing for children from the mid-eighteenth century through the present. We’ll read works that, in twenty-first-century terms, are considered appropriate for readers from kindergarten through ninth grade – or early childhood through the early teens – although we will also interrogate the age labeling of texts. The course will move chronologically, beginning with John Newbery’s Little Pretty Pocketbook (1744) and ending with Phillip Pullman’s Northern Lights, known in the U.S. as The Golden Compass (1995). Along the way, we’ll read children’s fantasy by Lewis Carroll, J. M. Barrie, and E. Nesbit, picture books by Kate Greenaway and Maurice Sendak, “realist” novels by Mark Twain, Laura Ingalls Wilder, Judy Blume, and Mildred D. Taylor, and children’s poetry by Robert Louis Stevenson and Pat Mora. In general, we’ll read one children’s book and one critical article each week. The reading level will not be difficult, but we will cover a lot of pages; expect to devote the same amount of time to reading for this course as you would to any upper-division English class.

We’ll approach these works for children both through our own childhood memories of those books we read when young and our contemporary adult responses. Our course will also survey the significant critical debates surrounding children’s literature, including issues of censorship, race and gender, and the balance of instruction and amusement. Throughout the semester, we’ll discuss the definition of “children’s literature” as a genre, returning regularly to this question to see how our definition might change in response to each work we read.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

Please click here for more information about enrollment in English 190.

Other Recent Sections of This Course

fall, 2022

190/1

Research Seminar: Ulysses

190/3

Research Seminar: Nineteenth Century American Ecologies

190/4

Research Seminar: Material Dickinson

190/5

Research Seminar: 1922: Modernism's Year 1

190/6

Research Seminar: Crisis and Culture: The 1930s, 1970s, and post-2008 in Comparative Perspective

190/7

Research Seminar

190/8

Research Seminar: The Work of Ursula Le Guin

190/9

Research Seminar: Modern California Books and Movies

spring, 2022

190/1

Research Seminar: Emily Dickinson

190/2

Research Seminar: Anatomy of Criticism

190/4

Research Seminar: What is Community?

190/5

Research Seminar: Repression and Resistance

190/6

Research Seminar: The Historical Novel

190/7

Research Seminar: Race and Travel: Relative Alterity in Medieval Times and Places

190/8

Research Seminar: Modern California Books and Movies

fall, 2021

190/1

Research Seminar: Beckett's Prose

190/2

Research Seminar: Literature on Trial: Romanticism, Law, Justice

190/3

Research Seminar: Sensation Novels in Victorian England

190/5

Research Seminar: Anti-Jewish Diatribe in Medieval England

190/8

Research Seminar: Utopian and Dystopian Books and Movies

190/10

Research Seminar

190/11

Research Seminar: Latinx Modernism

spring, 2021

190/1

Research Seminar: Literary Collaboration: Samuel Coleridge and William and Dorothy Wordsworth

190/2

Research Seminar: The Art of Reconstruction

190/3

Research Seminar: Fictions of Los Angeles

190/4

Research Seminar: Emily Dickinson

190/5

Research Seminar: Climate Change Fiction, or Cli-Fi

190/6

Research Seminar: Black Postcolonial Cultures: Real and Imagined Spaces

190/7

Research Seminar: Ecopoetry and Ecopoetics

190/8

Research Seminar: The Other Melville

190/9

Research Seminar: Chicanx Literature, Art and Performance

fall, 2020

190/1

Research Seminar: Utopia and Anti-Utopia

190/2

Research Seminar: Eco-crisis and Climate Refugueeism

190/3

Research Seminar: The Spy Novel

190/4

Research Seminar: Modern California Books and Movies

190/5

Research Seminar: Is It Useless to Revolt?

190/8

Research Seminar: Anatomy of Criticism

190/9

Research Seminar: James / Baldwin

190/10

Research Seminar: Medieval Sexuality

spring, 2020

190/1

Research Seminar: Ecopoetry and Ecopoetics

190/2

Research Seminar: William Faulkner’s Temporalities

190/3

Research Seminar: American Romanticism

190/4

Research Seminar: Poetry and the Virtues

190/5

Research Seminar: British Fiction Since 1945

190/6

Research Seminar: Hollywood in the Thirties

190/7

Research Seminar: Jane Austen

190/8

Research Seminar: James Joyce

190/9

Research Seminar: Victorian Versification

190/10

Research Seminar: Modern California Books and Film


Back to Semester List