Class Archive

Semester
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

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Semester Course #
Instructor
Course Area
Fall 2019

R1A/1

Reading and Composition:
Human Resources: Problems in the American Workplace

MWF 9-10

Fiction has provided a means for workers to re-imagine or even escape their everyday issues from the dawn of the labor movement to the heyday of the tech startup. Across a long history of media about work—including the muckraking of Upton Sin...(read more)

Ramm, Gerard
Fall 2019

R1A/2

Reading and Composition:
Bodies and Boundaries

MWF 10-11

How are the boundaries of bodies—human and otherwise—defined? What happens when certain bodies cross boundaries meant to contain or exclude them? How does a body transform its own boundaries or interact with other bodies beyond and with...(read more)

Ding, Katherine
Fall 2019

R1A/3

Reading and Composition:
Inscribing Fear: Written Horror, Living Flesh, and the Cultures that Produce Both

MWF 11-12

The horror genre—whose very purpose is to let us experience that which frightens, startles, or disgusts through a fictional lens—is capable of inciting a wide range of visceral responses. What will be the particular focus of this class,...(read more)

Tomasula y Garcia, Alba
Fall 2019

R1A/4

Reading and Composition:
(Un)Belonging Bodies & Citizenship

MWF 12-1

Our bodies—even if we might claim them as our own—are far from neutral, as they carry embedded signals, texts, and even silences that reflect our multiple social positionings. This course explores narratives of embodiment, considering h...(read more)

Cho, Jennifer
Fall 2019

R1A/5

Reading and Composition:
Theorizing Race and Space in Asian American Studies

MWF 1-2

How does an understanding of space and the built environment inflect our understanding of ethnicized forms of belonging? My course charts the development of Asian American identity and literature through four sites in the Bay Area: Angel Island, th...(read more)

Su, Amanda Jennifer
Fall 2019

R1A/6

Reading and Composition:
(Un)Belonging Bodies & Citizenship

MWF 1-2

Our bodies—even if we might claim them as our own—are far from neutral, as they carry embedded signals, texts, and even silences that reflect our multiple social positionings. This course explores narratives of embodiment, considering h...(read more)

Cho, Jennifer
Fall 2019

R1A/7

Reading and Composition:
Energy Fictions

MWF 2-3

This course explores literary and scientific perspectives on energy and its fictions from the early 19th century to the present, from the origins of carbon modernity and petroculture in the age of steam to contemporary 21st-century attempts to reck...(read more)

Barbour, Andrew John
Fall 2019

R1A/8

Reading and Composition:
Identity as Performance

MW 5-6:30

"All the world's a stage, And all the men and women merely players."—As You Like It, Act II sc. VII

We often hear people say that actions speak louder than words. We express our identities, who we are(read more)

Ghosh, Srijani
Fall 2019

R1B/1

Reading and Composition:
Gothic Trash

MWF 9-10

Gothic horror has never gone out of style. From the ominous castles of Horace Walpole and Ann Radcliffe in the eighteenth century to contemporary TV hits such as American Horror Story or The Haunting of Hill House&n...(read more)

Hobbs, Katherine
Fall 2019

R1B/2

Reading and Composition:
Some Hard-Boiled Detectives

MWF 10-11

"It is not a very fragrant world, but it is the world you live in. . . ." So Raymond Chandler characterizes the world out of joint painted by "the realist in murder." The tradition of hard-boiled detective fiction offers (arguab...(read more)

O'Brien, Garreth
Fall 2019

R1B/3

Reading and Composition:
Novel Spaces: Contemporary Fiction and the Internet

MWF 10-11

In 1981, Kraftwerk released their landmark album Computer World. Since the time they recorded it, politicians, economists and journalists have suggested that the digitization of society would change everything, producing a world of in...(read more)

D'Silva, Eliot
Fall 2019

R1B/4

Reading and Composition:
Reading and Writing in the Digital Age

MWF 11-12

(Note the changes in the instructor and content of this section of English R1B as of early June.)

In this course, we will survey the production, consumption, and study of literary texts in the digital age. Starting with a unit on writers&...(read more)

Zeavin, Hannah
Fall 2019

R1B/5

Reading and Composition:
The Monstrous Renaissance

MWF 11-12

This class ventures into Renaissance texts in search of the many monsters that dwell there. We will encounter eerily human beasts, snaky-haired Gorgons, monstrous births, and fierce cannibals. We will get to know those monsters through critical ana...(read more)

Rice, Sarah Sands
Fall 2019

R1B/6

Reading and Composition:
Drama and Disability

MWF 12-1

It is a critical truism that the disabled body is always already a theatrical body—alternatively passing and masquerading. This course will interrogate the terms of this truism by examining how both disability and theatre have been historical...(read more)

Drawdy, Miles
Fall 2019

R1B/7

Reading and Composition:
The Literature of Aotearoa/New Zealand

MWF 12-1

This course will focus first and foremost on the practice of academic writing and the skills needed to research, plan, draft and revise writing at a college level. More specifically, it stages the problem of scholarly research through an encounter ...(read more)

Sutton, Emily
Fall 2019

R1B/8

Reading and Composition:
On Happiness

MWF 12-1

In contemporary popular culture, "happiness" is often pictured as an object just beyond our reach. We try to organize our future life-paths to be "happy," tend to collectively agree that happiness is a worthwhile pursuit, and de...(read more)

Ritland, Laura
Fall 2019

R1B/9

Reading and Composition:
The Information Society

MWF 1-2

What is an information society? How do we read and think in a world of information? Numerous publications in recent years, both inside and outside the academy, have identified the late twentieth and twenty-first centures as an age of information, a...(read more)

Hinojosa, Bernardo S.
Fall 2019

R1B/10

Reading and Composition

MWF 1-2

For details about this section of Reading and Composition, please check this listing again in June.

...(read more)
No instructor assigned yet.
Fall 2019

R1B/11

Reading and Composition:
Re-Visioning the 1960s

MWF 1-2

This Reading and Composition course will explore selected works of literature, music, and visual art produced during the 1960s. Our theme places emphasis on the relationship between artistic experimentation and the emancipatory social movements of ...(read more)

Koerner, Michelle
Fall 2019

R1B/12

Reading and Composition:
Re-Visioning the 1960s

MWF 2-3

This Reading and Composition course will explore selected works of literature, music, and visual art produced during the 1960s. Our theme places emphasis on the relationship between artistic experimentation and the emancipatory social movements of ...(read more)

Koerner, Michelle
Fall 2019

R1B/13

Reading and Composition

This section of English R1B has been canceled (7/2/19).

...(read more)
No instructor assigned yet.
Fall 2019

R1B/14

Reading and Composition:
(Im)personal Essays

MW 5-6:30

What does it mean to give your writing "personality"? In this course we will consider varying kinds of nonfiction (travel writing, reportage, Netflix comedy specials, autobiographical games, autotheory, and the classic "personal essa...(read more)

Khan, Mehak Faisal
Fall 2019

R1B/15

Reading and Composition:
Don't Go There! Fairy Tales

TTh 8-9:30

There is almost nothing more familiar than a fairy tale, yet they all address unfamiliarity, danger, and risk. For children, young women and everyone else, the world is full of mysterious knowledge and dreadful ordeals. So how do fairy tales c...(read more)

Baker-Gibbs, Ariel
Fall 2019

R1B/16

Reading and Composition:
Queer I

TTh 5-6:30

This course asks how writers use the stories of individual lives to negotiate what it means to be "queer," in the widest possible sense of the term. Most of what we read will be pieces written by authors describing their own lived experie...(read more)

Stevenson, Max
Spring 2019

R1A/1

Reading and Composition:
Reformations, Luther to Marx

MWF 9-10

This course will provide an introduction to the literary and artistic culture of the Protestant Reformation, focusing on the century and a half between Luther's 95 Theses and the Restoration of the monarchy in England (1660)....(read more)

Walton, Alex
Spring 2019

R1A/2

Reading and Composition:
Fiction's Swarm

MWF 10-11

The perceived divide between humans and other animals has been defined as one of the most important frameworks under which our thoughts and behaviors are constructed. Yet literature—from its earliest examples to today's offerings—is...(read more)

Tomasula y Garcia, Alba
Spring 2019

R1A/3

Reading and Composition:
Not Another Love Song: Poetic Cultures Medieval and Modern

MWF 11-12

We all know what poetry is, right? At least in the popular imagination, it’s emotionally charged, personal and intimate, the heartfelt expression of Angst, Love, and the poet’s True Feelings. But in many ways that view of poetry as...(read more)

Stevenson, Max
Spring 2019

R1A/5

Reading and Composition:
Crazy Rich Asians? Minority Models in the Literature of the Asian Diaspora

MWF 1-2

Taking the meteoric success of Crazy Rich Asians as a cultural phenomenon as its point of departure, this course studies and interrogates the enduring myths and persistent stereotypes that inflect the history of Asian racial formation in a...(read more)

Chiang, Cheng-Chai
Spring 2019

R1A/6

Reading and Composition:
Modernism's Apocrypha

MWF 1-2

This course teaches critical analysis and college-level writing skills through existent works of literature and art that deal with inexistent, unverifiable, or otherwise unreadable texts. The figure of the apocryphal book, or invented author, will ...(read more)

Cohan, Nathan
Spring 2019

R1A/7

Reading and Composition:
Creation Stories of the Premodern World

MW 5-6:30

How did the world as we know it come into being? Was there anything else before it? Who made it the way it is, and did they do it on purpose? For at least as long as humans have written stories, we have speculated about origins.

Towards a...(read more)

Homans-Turnbull, Marian
Spring 2019

R1B/1

Reading and Composition:
Memoir

MWF 9-10

What constitutes the “I” of a first-person narrative? How does it alternately designate an individual, a collectivity, or even a historical consciousness? In this class, we’ll be considering the shapes that these questions take ac...(read more)

Su, Amanda Jennifer
Spring 2019

R1B/2

Reading and Composition:
The Sword and the Screen: New Tricks with Old Texts

MWF 9-10

The difficulty with epics is that they're... well, epic. Beowulf goes hunting Grendel, and 3000 lines of poetry later he's still fighting; Arthur pulls Excalibur out of the stone, starts sending knights on quests, and keeps sending...(read more)

Clark, Amy
Spring 2019

R1B/3

Reading and Composition:
Machines Made of Words

MWF 10-11

"A poem is a small (or large) machine made of words." — William Carlos Williams
"A book is a machine to think with." — I. A. Richards

In this course, we will explore the relationship between lit...(read more)

Forbes-Macphail, Imogen
Spring 2019

R1B/4

Reading and Composition:
Berkeley Literature

MWF 10-11

This section of English R1B studies fiction set in Berkeley, California. We will also look south to Oakland and west to San Francisco, cities whose histories and populations are bound up with our own. We will set our readings in context by con...(read more)

Hobson, Jacob
Spring 2019

R1B/5

Reading and Composition:
Living Pasts: Cultural Memory and Historical Narrative

MWF 11-12

This course explores what it means to encounter seemingly "dead" pasts, often traumatic, through artistic and cultural productions and how, through that encounter, such pasts are relived and reimagined. Together we will exa...(read more)

Cho, Jennifer
Spring 2019

R1B/6

Reading and Composition:
Unreliable Friends

MWF 11-12

This course examines how texts can mislead us. Literary critic Wayne Booth famously accounts for how readers can come to develop a "friendship with books." In our course, we will explore the complexities of these friendships—how som...(read more)

Catchings, Alex
Spring 2019

R1B/7

Reading and Composition:
Fake/News: New Journalism, the War on Truth, and Democracy in Peril

MWF 12-1

"New Journalism" has always been a slippery term. But this literary movement from the 1960s and '70s, that rejected notions of journalistic objectivity in favor of political and cultural commitment, and malaise in favor of "gonzo...(read more)

Cruz, Frank Eugene
Spring 2019

R1B/8

Reading and Composition:
Prison Sentences: Reading Mass Incarceration

MWF 12-1

This section of Reading and Composition is designed to both exercise your active reading skills and to empower you to write compelling, well-informed, and well-organized expository prose and research-based essays. Over the course of the semester we...(read more)

Koerner, Michelle
Spring 2019

R1B/9

Reading and Composition:
Berkeley Literature

MWF 12-1

This section of English R1B studies fiction set in Berkeley, California. We will also look south to Oakland and west to San Francisco, cities whose histories and populations are bound up with our own. We will set our readings in context by con...(read more)

Hobson, Jacob
Spring 2019

R1B/10

Reading and Composition:
Style and Being Singular

MWF 1-2

“My being charming, Harriet, is not quite enough to induce me to marry; I must find other people charming—one other person at least.”
– Emma Wodehouse (Jane Austen)
“Other people are quite dreadful. The o...(read more)

Eisenberg, Emma C.
Spring 2019

R1B/11

Reading and Composition:
Varieties of Confession in American Poetry

MWF 1-2

This course will cover a body of American poetry generally written between 1950 and 1970, with particular emphasis on the works of Robert Lowell, Sylvia Plath, Anne Sexton, John Berryman, and Elizabeth Bishop. Topics of study will include: the rela...(read more)

Swensen, Dana
Spring 2019

R1B/12

Reading and Composition:
The Crisis in Humanities

MWF 2-3

Note the changes in instructor, topic, book list, and course description of this section of English R1B (as of Nov. 27).

"It started as a budget issue," a provost said recently, explaining his college's decisi...(read more)

Viragh, Atti
Spring 2019

R1B/13

Reading and Composition:
Situated Narratives: Finding a Sense of Place in the Novel

MWF 2-3

Place is experienced in a variety of ways: as a material force we encounter daily, as an active and constitutive relationship, as a haunting and inescapable memory or feeling. This course will consider the narrative and affective strategies us...(read more)

Artiz, Ernest T.
Spring 2019

R1B/14

Reading and Composition:
Literary and Scientific Knowledge

MW 5-6:30

How can literature and science advance our knowledge of the material world? Materialism has often been a point of confluence between literature and science, even the core premise for any relation between literary and scienti...(read more)

Barbour, Andrew John
Spring 2019

R1B/15

Reading and Composition:
Who's to Blame? Agency and Determinism in the 19th-Century Crime Novel

MW 5-6:30

The sentencing of criminals has long raised questions of responsibility and blame, nature and nurture, and these questions have only become more pressing in our contemporary political environment. This course will address questions of agency and de...(read more)

Mittnacht, Veronica Vizuet
Spring 2019

R1B/16

Reading and Composition:
Something Resolutely Indefinable: The African-American Novel, the Individual, and Sociological Thought

TTh 12:30-2

This class will consider how a series of important 20th-century African-American novels confront questions of individual identity, categrization, social definition. To this end, we shall attend to the complex connection between the tradition of bla...(read more)

Creasy, CFS
Summer 2019

R1A/1

Reading and Composition:
Global Bookworm: Am I a Cosmopolitan Yet?

TuWTh 9:30-12

This course investigates how books (and book selection) allow us to form individual conceptions of what is “global.” We will read texts that represent an array of perspectives on identity, national allegiance, and global travel, maintai...(read more)

Catchings, Alex
Summer 2019

R1A/2

Reading and Composition:
Monster Culture in Print and Film

TuWTh 1-3:30

The 19th century saw the publication of several landmark monster novels, birthing a genre that would achieve a similarly widespread popularity in the films of the 1980s and 1990s. This course will examine three monsters of Victorian literature&mdas...(read more)

Mittnacht, Veronica Vizuet
Summer 2019

R1A/3

Reading and Composition:
Mere Humanism

MTuTh 2-4

This course will evaluate the role that 'Humanism' has played across a transhistorical spectrum and a diverse generic range (we will read prose, drama, poetry across roughly five centuries). While the first half of the course will solidify ...(read more)

Swensen, Dana
Summer 2019

R1B/1

Reading and Composition:
Riddle Me This: Puzzles, Puns, and Palimpsests

TuWTh 1-3:30

"Have you guessed the riddle yet?" the Hatter said, turning to Alice again.

"No, I give it up," Alice replied. "What's the answer?"

"I haven't the slightest idea," said the Hatter....(read more)

Clark, Amy
Summer 2019

R1B/2

Reading and Composition:
The Literature of Climate Change

TuWTh 9:30-12

This course explores literary, scientific, and postcolonial perspectives on ecological crisis on a global scale from early-19th-century ecological writing to contemporary climate fiction. Tracing the emergence of a planetary ecological consciousnes...(read more)

Barbour, Andrew John
Summer 2019

R1B/3

Reading and Composition:
Bodies in Motion: Refugee Experience and Contemporary Fiction

MTuTh 12-2

"But there were unspoken conditions to our acceptance, and that was the secret we were meant to glean on our own: we had to be grateful," writes Dina Nayeri of her family's experience seeking asylum in the United States in "The U...(read more)

Wyman-McCarthy, Timothy
Fall 2018

R1A/1

Reading and Composition:
Party Time

MWF 9-10

This course broadly explores the concept of “party temporalities.” By examining parties as they appear across a range of subgenres and mediums (novels, short stories, plays, film, TV, pop songs), we will think critically about the relat...(read more)

Hu, Jane
Fall 2018

R1A/2

Reading and Composition:
Persona and Personality in the English Essay

MWF 10-11

This course will move rapidly through time, navigating the dense and heterogeneous terrains of the essay as a form in English. From the wondrous and choppy syntactical shores of Renaissance prose (Francis Bacon, Erasmus and Mont...(read more)

Swensen, Dana
Fall 2018

R1A/3

Reading and Composition:
No Laughing Matter

MWF 11-12

Can comedy be an effective vehicle for social criticism? Or does “having a sense of humor” make social life easier only by helping us ignore life’s more unpleasant aspects? We will consider these questions while reading texts from...(read more)

Eisenberg, Emma C.
Fall 2018

R1A/4

Reading and Composition:
Something Resolutely Indefinable: The African-American Novel, the Individual, and Sociological Thought

MWF 12-1

This class will consider how a series of important 20th-century African-American novels confront questions of individual identity, categorization, social definiition. To this end, we shall attend to the complex connection between the tradition of b...(read more)

Creasy, CFS
Fall 2018

R1A/5

Reading and Composition:
Materialist Aesthetics

MWF 1-2

Materialism has often been a shared premise and point of confluence between literature and science, even the precondition for any relation between literary and scientific practice. If since the 18th century, aesthetics in the expanded sen...(read more)

Barbour, Andrew John
Fall 2018

R1A/6

Reading and Composition:
Pre-Raphaelite Art and Literature

MWF 1-2

This course examines the relationship between literature and art through the lives and works of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood — a revolutionary artistic movement of the mid-nineteenth century — and those in their circle. In addition to...(read more)

Forbes-Macphail, Imogen
Fall 2018

R1A/7

Reading and Composition:
The Personal Essay

MWF 2-3

The personal essay and the lyric poem share many qualities: aside from the (not insignificant!) fact that they’re short, they affect both personal intimacy and a supposedly equally intimate relationship to the truth. But the essay is far less...(read more)

Stevenson, Max
Fall 2018

R1A/8

Reading and Composition:
Cold War Literature and Culture

MW 5-6:30

This course explores literature and culture from the Cold War era. Topics we will focus on include: how literature represents the threat of nuclear confrontation between global superpowers; the rise (and weaponization) of pop and mass culture; poet...(read more)

Gaydos, Rebecca
Fall 2018

R1A/9

Reading & Composition:
Identity as Performance

MWF 9-10

"All the world's a stage, And all the men and women merely players."—As You Like It, Act II Sc. VII

We often hear people say that actions speak louder than words. We express our identities, who we are, ...(read more)

Ghosh, Srijani
Fall 2018

R1A/10

Reading & Composition:
Cold War Literature and Culture

MWF 1-2

This course explores literature and culture from the Cold War era. Topics we will focus on include: how literature represents the threat of nuclear confrontation between global superpowers; the rise (and weaponization) of pop and mass culture; poet...(read more)

Gaydos, Rebecca
Fall 2018

R1B/1

Reading and Composition:
The Marriage Plot and Its Afterlife

MWF 9-10

The marriage plot novel is seen as a thing of the past, but its influence very much lives on today in our movies, our music, and our notions of romance. This course will examine a series of genre-defining marriage plot novels from the 19th century,...(read more)

Mittnacht, Veronica Vizuet
Fall 2018

R1B/2

Reading and Composition:
Comic Relief

MWF 10-11

In this course, we’ll consider the varied uses of comic relief in literature and popular culture, from the therapeutic effects of frivolity to the ingenuity with which comic intelligence brings what has been interpretively foreclosed into sta...(read more)

Chiang, Cheng-Chai
Fall 2018

R1B/3

Reading and Composition:
Utopian and Dystopian Fictions

MWF 10-11

What would it be like to live in a perfect world? What could be worse than the world we live in?

This course will trace attempts to answer these questions—and investigate why they have proven so compelling—in English ...(read more)

Homans-Turnbull, Marian
Fall 2018

R1B/4

Reading and Composition:
Staging Desire: Sex and Sexuality in Renaissance Drama

MWF 11-12

The drama of Shakespeare and his contemporaries offers a fascinating site for the analysis of gender and sexuality as historical and theoretical constructs, rather than as the timeless and universal ‘facts’ of human experience which the...(read more)

Scott, Mark JR
Fall 2018

R1B/5

Reading and Composition:
Started From the Bottom: Masculinity, the American Dream, and the Myth of Starting Over from Horatio Alger to Jay-Z

MWF 11-12

The texts for this course consider the roots and routes of the American Dream and the figure of the “self-made man” in the American cultural imagination over the past 150 years. From American literature to contemporary politics to popul...(read more)

Cruz, Frank Eugene
Fall 2018

R1B/6

Reading and Composition:
Stories of Exile and Dislocation

MWF 12-1

This course turns to the experience of exile and its plural representations in texts drawing from the post-Enlightenment to contemporary periods. To open up our line of inquiry, we will reflect upon the following questions: How might exile be ...(read more)

Cho, Jennifer
Fall 2018

R1B/7

Reading and Composition:
Nature on the Page

MWF 12-1

In this course, we will examine how relationships between humans and nature are represented; what histories, perceptions, and biases inform such representations; and what the real-world consequences of particular representations may be. We will rea...(read more)

Tomasula y Garcia, Alba
Fall 2018

R1B/8

Reading and Composition:
Conspiracy and Detection

MWF 12-1

This course teaches critical analysis and research skills through their doubles: forensic detection and conspiracy theory. We will therefore consider the disciplinary demands of academic writing in tandem with indisciplined forms of knowledge-produ...(read more)

Cohan, Nathan
Fall 2018

R1B/9

Reading and Composition:
Romantic Self / Romantic Others

MWF 1-2

What shocks the virtuous philosopher delights the chameleon poet... A poet is the most unpoetical of anything in existence, because he has no identity—he is continually in for and filling some other body.—John Keats, Letter to Richard W...(read more)

O'Connor, Megan
Fall 2018

R1B/10

Reading and Composition:
Tricksters and Transformations in the Old, Weird America

MWF 1-2

In this course, we'll examine how authors have imagined and re-imagined the carnivalesque aspects of American life. We'll read stories about con-men, tricksters, wandering ghosts, seducers, conjurers, and other rhetorical magicians. In addi...(read more)

McWilliams, Ryan
Fall 2018

R1B/11

Reading and Composition:
The Feeling of Labor

MWF 1-2

This course will take up the changing ways in which work and labor have been depicted in literature and other arts as conditions and conceptions of labor have transformed over time, from subsistence labor to post-industrial prod...(read more)

Walton, Alex
Fall 2018

R1B/12

Reading and Composition:
Riddle Me This: Puzzles, Puns, and Palimpsests

MWF 2-3

"Have you guessed the riddle yet?" the Hatter said, turning to Alice again.

"No, I give it up," Alice replied. "What's the answer?"

"I haven't the slightest idea,&...(read more)

Clark, Amy
Fall 2018

R1B/13

Reading and Composition:
Re-Visioning the "Sixties"

MWF 2-3

This reading and composition course will explore selected works of literature, music, and visual art produced during the 1960s. Placing emphasis on the relationship between artistic experimentation and social movements of the era, we will ask how i...(read more)

Koerner, Michelle
Fall 2018

R1B/14

Reading and Composition:
When Reading Goes Wrong

MW 5-6:30

Every day, we're called upon to make hundreds of interpretive judgments based on things we read, see, or hear. But what happens when we misjudge one of these texts, or when we're unable to judge it at all? Besides being a common element in ...(read more)

Bauer, Mark
Fall 2018

R1B/15

Reading and Composition:
Decadent Poetry

MW 5-6:30

“The ballads teem with imagination, they palpitate with emotion. We read them with laughter and tears; the metres throb in our pulses, the cunningly-ordered words tingle with life; and if this be not poetry, what is?” So wrote the ...(read more)

Viragh, Atti
Fall 2018

R1B/16

Reading and Composition:
Books with Pictures

Note new time: MWF 3-4

This course studies books with pictures in them, although we will occasionally ditch the books altogether to look at pictures in the Berkeley Art Museum and to watch moving pictures. We will study the relationship between image and text in a variet...(read more)

Hobson, Jacob
Fall 2018

R1B/17

Reading & Composition:
Stories of Exile and Dislocation

MWF 1-2

This course turns to the experience of exile and its plural representations in texts drawing from the post-Enlightenment to contemporary periods. To open up our line of inquiry, we will reflect upon the following questions: How might exile be a sel...(read more)

Cho, Jennifer
Fall 2018

R1B/18

Reading & Composition:
When Reading Goes Wrong

MWF 8-9

Every day, we're called upon to make hundreds of interpretive judgments based on things we read, see, or hear. But what happens when we misjudge one of these texts, or when we're unable to judge it at all? Besides being a common element in ...(read more)

Bauer, Mark
Fall 2018

R1B/19

Reading & Composition:
Re-Visioning the "Sixties"

MWF 12-1

This reading and composition course will explore selected works of literature, music, and visual art produced during the 1960s. Placing emphasis on the relationship between artistic experimentation and social movements of the era, we will ask how i...(read more)

Koerner, Michelle
Spring 2018

R1A/1

Reading and Composition:
Making Heirs and Heirlooms

MWF 10-11

W.B. Yeats once wondered, "Did that play of mine send out / Certain men the English shot?" But in a poem in honor of Yeats, W.H. Auden famously assured us that "poetry makes nothing happen," while Paul Muldoon put it more to the...(read more)

Lorden, Jennifer A.
Spring 2018

R1A/2

Reading and Composition:
Nostalgic Notions: Feeling How the Past Persists in the Present

MWF 11-12

Nostalgia is an oft-felt, but seldom understood feeling. Originally a medical designation for a form of home-sickness, in the present nostalgia connotes a more general longing for the past. We experience some form of nostalgia in the inte...(read more)

Artiz, Ernest T.
Spring 2018

R1A/3

Reading and Composition:
Image and Text

MWF 12-1

Note the revised course description:

This class will explore the relationship between image and text in poetry, novels, and the graphic novel.  We'll ask both questions of formal genre—how do images inflect, augment, or com...(read more)

Lesser, Madeline
Spring 2018

R1A/4

Reading and Composition:
Transpacific Routes and Asian America

MWF 1-2

The field of Asian American literature has long been contested: what are the dialogues that have shaped the unstable definition of “Asian American,” and how might we think about Asian American literature as more than an additive categor...(read more)

Choi, Jeehyun
Spring 2018

R1A/5

Reading and Composition:
Stranger than Fiction: Metafiction

MWF 2-3

In this course, we’ll be reading, thinking, and writing about metafiction: fiction about fiction. Frame narratives, dream visions, plays-within-plays: these are just a few examples of the metafictional techniques that can be found in...(read more)

Ripplinger, Michelle
Spring 2018

R1A/6

Reading and Composition:
The Muslim-American Experience

MW 5-6:30

"Why can't I have my interpretation where I'm just nice and eat pork? For you guys, religion has this cultural value. It's not like that for me. It's people calling me terrorist and getting pulled out of...(read more)

Rajabzadeh, Shokoofeh
Spring 2018

R1A/7

Reading and Composition:
The Sound of Modern American Literature

TTh 8-9:30

How can we best listen to literature? How is literature like or unlike a conversation, a piece of music, or the cacophony of a city street? This course will examine a vast swath of twentieth-century American poetry and prose in order to probe the w...(read more)

Neal, Allison
Spring 2018

R1B/1

Reading and Composition:
Nature Poetry Before and After the Industrial Revolution

MWF 9-10

Beginning in the mid-eighteenth century and continuing into the mid-nineteenth, the Industrial Revolution fundamentally altered individuals' relationships to and conceptions of labor, family, subjectivity, religious belief, and nature. The Indu...(read more)

Heimlich, Timothy
Spring 2018

R1B/2

Reading and Composition:
The Booker Prize, Literary Speculation, and the Global Anglophone Novel

MWF 10-11

In 1968, Booker McConnell Ltd, “an international company dealing in sugar, rum, mining machinery, and James Bond,” established the Man Booker Prize for Fiction: a £5,000 literary prize to be awarded to a British Commonwealth, Iris...(read more)

Hu, Jane
Spring 2018

R1B/3

Reading and Composition:
The Essay as Genre

MWF 11-12

Building on the skills students have acquired in R1A, this course will continue to develop reading, writing, and research skills. To this end, you will write and revise one shorter argumentative essay (4-5 pages) and one longer research paper (8-10...(read more)

Levesque, Raina
Spring 2018

R1B/4

Reading and Composition:
Blank Generation: The Changing Arts in 1970s New York City

MWF 12-1

In the decade of urban decay, energy crisis, deindustrialization, and Watergate, artists of all stripes were thrown back on their own resources, seeking the means and reasons for continuing the avant-garde's project of cultural revolution after...(read more)

Alexander, Edward Sterling
Spring 2018

R1B/5

Reading and Composition:
Memory & the Nation

MWF 12-1

Note the changes in the instructor, topic, book list, and course description for this section of English R1B (as of Jan. 10).

This course examines narratives of cultural and historical trauma that attempt to represent what cannot be repre...(read more)

Cho, Jennifer
Spring 2018

R1B/6

Reading and Composition:
Memory & the Nation

MWF 1-2

This course examines narratives of cultural and historical trauma that attempt to represent what cannot be represented. Clinically defined, trauma is an occurrence that misses psychic registration and returns as a series of haunting symptoms, and w...(read more)

Cho, Jennifer
Spring 2018

R1B/7

Reading and Composition:
Media Fictions / Fictional Medias

MWF 1-2

Note the changes in instructor, topic, book list, and course description.

What does it mean to be mediated? According to the OED, the word "media" comes from the Latin medium, for "middle, center, intermediary.&quo...(read more)

Wilson, Mary
Spring 2018

R1B/8

Reading and Composition:
Sympathy and Identification "After" the Affective Turn

MWF 2-3

In recent years, certain sectors of the humanities have been undergoing an "affective turn." Put broadly, scholars from diverse fields are challenging an older model of the self as the repository of deep, private feelings ("interiori...(read more)

Ding, Katherine
Spring 2018

R1B/9

Reading and Composition:
Writing the American City, 1900 to today

TTh 8-9:30

The American city is an incredibly complex and dynamic organism—and the subject of a great body of literature, both fiction and non-fiction. This course will trace and critically engage how American urban development has been written about fr...(read more)

Beckett, Balthazar I.
Spring 2018

R1B/10

Reading and Composition:
Tricksters and Transformations in the Old, Weird America

TTh 5-6:30

In this course, we'll examine how authors have imagined and re-imagined the carnivalesque aspects of American life. We'll read stories about con-men, tricksters, wandering ghosts, seducers, conjurers, and other rhetorical magicians. In addi...(read more)

McWilliams, Ryan
Spring 2018

R1B/11

Reading and Composition:
Life Writing

TTh 5-6:30

Life writing seems self-explanatory as writing that is about one’s life, but what does that mean, exactly? How does a life become literature, and why should literature, the province of the imagination, be made to present a real life?  Th...(read more)

Bauer, Mark
Spring 2018

R1B/12

Reading and Composition:
Music and Noise

MWF 9-10

The word "noise" came from the Latin word "nausea" or "seasickness," before it developed in Middle English to mean "quarreling." "Music," on the other hand, came from the Greek word "mousa&quot...(read more)

Stancek, Claire Marie
Spring 2018

R1B/13

Reading and Composition:
Started from the Bottom: Masculinity, the American Dream, and the Myth of Starting Over from Jay Gatsby to Jay Z

MWF 10-11

The texts for this course consider the figure of the "self-made man" and his function in the American cultural imagination. From his representation in American literature to his representation in contemporary popular culture and politics,...(read more)

Cruz, Frank Eugene
Spring 2018

R1B/14

Reading and Composition:
Gender and Culture: Psychological and Literary Perspectives on Social Hierarchy

MWF 12-1

The anthropologists Rosaldo, Lamphere, and Bamberger note, "all contemporary societies are to some extent male-dominated, and ... sexual asymmetry is presently a universal fact of human social life" (Woman, Culture, and Socie...(read more)

Carr, Jessica
Spring 2018

R1B/15

Reading and Composition:
Nature Poetry and the Nature of Poetry

MWF 1-2

Reading a number of texts from different genres, time periods, and literary traditions, we will think about how and why poetry has represented and reflected upon nonhuman nature since at least the classical period. In doing so, we will also ask our...(read more)

Greenwald, Jordan
Spring 2018

R1B/16

Reading and Composition:
Modern Literature Between Past and Future

MWF 2-3

This course explores what it means to be modern. We will investigate modern historical consciousness in modern literature and thought, roughly from 1850 forward, with special attention to how each text we read figures the past, prese...(read more)

O'Rourke, Emily
Spring 2018

R1B/17

Reading and Composition:
Translating Poetry: Imitation and Interpretation

Note new time: MW 11-12:30

Translating a poem is somewhat like solving a puzzle, but also somewhat like writing a poem.  If the rhyme, meter, and rhythm of a poem are rooted in the sounds of the language in which it was composed, how do translators decide to render thes...(read more)

Thow, Diana
Spring 2018

R1B/18

Reading and Composition:
On Lives Unlived: Frustration, Hope, and the Novel

Note new time: MW 12-1:30

Roads untaken, opportunities unpursued, the people we might have known, and the losses of what might have been – what are the potentials and pitfalls locked within fictions of alternate realities? Why does our knowledge of what could...(read more)

Xin, Wendy Veronica
Spring 2018

R1B/19

Reading and Composition:
Re-Visioning the Sixties

MWF 2-3

This reading and composition course will explore selected works of literature, music, and visual art produced during the 1960s. Placing emphasis on the relationship between artistic experimentation and emancipatory social movements (both in the Uni...(read more)

Koerner, Michelle
Spring 2018

R1B/20

Reading and Composition:
Meaning in Modern and Contemporary American Literature

MWF 2-3

In this course, students will learn the skills of analysis and argumentation. As we learn in-depth techniques to improve our critical reading and writing strategies, the course's theme will look at the role meaning plays in d...(read more)

Clancy, Brian
Spring 2018

R1B/21

Reading & Composition:
Identity as Performance

MWF 11-12

We often hear people say that actions speak louder than words. We express our identities, who we are, through our actions, our performances, our lived experiences amidst the context and structures within which we operate. We connect w...(read more)

Ghosh, Srijani
Spring 2018

R1B/22

Reading & Composition:
Modernism, Perception, and the Reader

MWF 1-2

In this course, you will learn how to write a paper using the skills of analysis and argumentation. As we learn techniques to improve our critical reading and writing strategies, the course theme will largely examine the role perception plays withi...(read more)

Clancy, Brian
Summer 2018

R1A/1

Reading & Composition:
What Have I Done?

TuWTh 9:30-12

This course will examine the problematic interactions between experience, action, and knowledge. Focusing primarily on the second half of the 19th and the first half of the 20th century, we will read mostly narrative...(read more)

Creasy, CFS
Summer 2018

R1A/2

Reading & Composition:
The Marriage Plot: Agency and Choice in the 19th Century

TWTh 1-3:30

Womens’ rights and choices have been a national conversation for over a century now; but when did that conversation begin? In this course, we will examine womens’ choices in Victorian novels and discuss how the tensions between social, ...(read more)

Mittnacht, Veronica Vizuet
Summer 2018

R1A/3

Reading & Composition:
Black on White/White on White

MTuTh 2-4

What do we gain from learning about White privilege and experience from the perspective of both ethnic-minority and White writers and thinkers? What do these different perspectives reveal about the contours of racial privilege in the contemporary U...(read more)

Johnston, Taylor
Summer 2018

R1B/1

Reading & Composition:
Choice Cuts: Writing about Food

TuWTh 1-3:30

Our course begins with Terry Eagleton’s assertion that “food looks like an object but is actually a relationship, and the same is true of literary works” and moves to consider that relationship in texts as varied as medieval ...(read more)

Stevenson, Max
Summer 2018

R1B/2

Reading & Composition:
Bay Area Poetry

TuWTh 9:30-12

This course studies Bay Area poetry, where many of the threads of twentieth-century American poetry intersect. Bay Area poetry allows us to consider the history of avant-garde movements in the 20th century, and how they align with t...(read more)

Benjamin, Daniel
Summer 2018

R1B/3

Reading & Composition:
Masculinity, The American Dream, and The Myth of Starting Over from Jay Gatsby to Jay-Z

MTuTh 12-2

The texts for this course consider the figure of the “self-made man” and his function in the American cultural imagination. From his representation in American literature to his representation in contemporary popular culture and politic...(read more)

Cruz, Frank Eugene
Fall 2017

R1A/1

Reading and Composition:
Eating Bodies

MWF 9-10

In this course we will collectively re-think what we think we know about eating bodies. We will build and share nuanced analyses of the many meanings of food, practices of eating, and bodies who eat, as well as bodies who eat other bodies...(read more)

Diaz, Rosalind
Fall 2017

R1A/2

Reading and Composition:
The Dust Bowl and the American Cultural Imagination

MWF 11-12

In this course, we will explore the aesthetic forms and social locations of the Dust Bowl and consider the ways in which these forms and locations have echoed in the American cultural imagination since the Great Depression. We will develop your pra...(read more)

Cruz, Frank Eugene
Fall 2017

R1A/7

Reading and Composition:
Image and Text

TTh 9:30-11

This class will look at a variety of works that combine image and text to tell stories. How, we will ask, do words and images play with, against, or off of one another when we read these hybrid texts? How has their combination helped authors altern...(read more)

Clark, Rebecca
Fall 2017

R1B/1

Reading and Composition:
Re-Visioning the 1960s

MWF 10-11

Note the changes in instructor, topic, book list and course description for this section of English R1B (as of Aug 30).

This reading and composition course will explore selected works of literature, music, and visual art produced...(read more)

Koerner, Michelle
Fall 2017

R1B/2

Reading and Composition:
Blank Generation: The Changing Arts in 1970s New York City

MWF 11-12

In the decade of urban decay, energy crisis, deindustrialization, and Watergate, artists of all stripes were thrown back on their own resources, seeking the means and reasons for continuing the avant-garde’s project of cultural revolution aft...(read more)

Alexander, Edward Sterling
Fall 2017

R1B/3

Reading and Composition:
The Cultural Lives of Higher Education

MWF 12-1

The purpose, nature, and structure of higher education in the West are currently undergoing dramatic revision. Tuition is rising steadily at both private and public institutions, as public support for teaching and research shifts; concerns and hope...(read more)

Greer, Erin
Fall 2017

R1B/5

Reading and Composition:
Endings

MWF 2-3

What’s in an ending?  In this class, we will explore literature about endings: personal endings (elegiac forms), national endings (the end of an era), and apocalyptic endings (the end of the world).  In addition, we will focus ...(read more)

Lesser, Madeline
Fall 2017

R1B/6

Reading and Composition:
Writing Cuban-America

MWF 3-4

The history of Cubans living in the US is a complicated one, caught between the US’s imperialist wars of the late-19th and early-20th centuries and the Cold War machinations of the first and second worlds. This...(read more)

Artiz, Ernest T.
Fall 2017

R1B/7

Reading and Composition:
After Empires

MW 5-6:30

In this course, we will investigate how literature and literary criticism from the 1950s to today has responded to various forms of imperialism, focusing on how the concerns of "postcolonial" texts change according to ...(read more)

Choi, Jeehyun
Fall 2017

R1B/8

Reading and Composition:
Re-Visioning the 1960s

MW 5-6:30

Note the changes in instructor, topic, book list and course description for this section of English R1B (as of Aug 30).

This reading and composition course will explore selected works of literature, music, and visual art produced...(read more)

Koerner, Michelle
Fall 2017

R1B/9

Reading and Composition:
Technophobia

TTh 8-9:30

Science fiction often investigates how technology affects human drives and desires. Insofar as thought experiments with non-human forms of intelligence and artificial life are major tropes of the genre, representations of computers and robots in fi...(read more)

Barbour, Andrew John
Fall 2017

R1B/10

Reading and Composition:
Narratives of Enlightenment

TTh 9:30-11

This class explores what it means to be wise, enlightened, or educated. While it will offer no definitive answers to those enormous questions, it will look at how writers in a number of traditions have offered their own answers and written compelli...(read more)

Wilson, Evan
Fall 2017

R1B/11

Reading and Composition:
University Life

TTh 11-12:30

How have British and American writers formed their work around and inside the university? How does reading and writing literature fit into university life? How do we know whether a piece of fiction or poetry is "academic" or "anti-ac...(read more)

Neal, Allison
Fall 2017

R1B/12

Reading and Composition:
The Undiscovered Country

TTh 12:30-2

Note the changes in instructor, topic, book list, and course description for this section of English R1B (as of May 30).

The experience of death is one of the most difficult, yet most urgent, to imaginatively represent in literatur...(read more)

Lorden, Jennifer A.
Fall 2017

R1B/13

Reading and Composition:
Visions of the World

TTh 2-3:30

“To see the Earth as it truly is, small and blue and beautiful in that eternal silence where it floats, is to see ourselves as riders on the Earth together.” – Archibald MacLeish, comment on the “Earthrise” after t...(read more)

Rajabzadeh, Shokoofeh
Fall 2017

R1B/14

Reading and Composition:
GLBT and Queer Chicanx/Latinx Literature and Cultural Work

TTh 3:30-5

In this course, we will read and write about Chicanx/Latinx literatures and cultural productions that explore GLBT and queer themes. In our approaches to the course materials, we will consider the notion of the queer, GLBT, and Chicano text.&n...(read more)

Trevino, Jason Benjamin
Fall 2017

R1B/15

Reading and Composition:
Genre Trouble

TTh 5-6:30

This course will examine the complex relationships between gender and literary genre. What social and historical forces have, at various points in time, caused certain genres to be marginalized as “women’s writing” or “...(read more)

Ripplinger, Michelle
Spring 2017

R1A/1

Reading and Composition:
The Great Depression, The Great Recession, and The "Grapes of Wrath" Narrative

MWF 10-11

Please note the changes in the instructor, topic, book list, and course description of this section of English R1A (as of early December).

In this course, we will read, analyze, and interpret various artistic responses to the Great...(read more)

Cruz, Frank Eugene
Spring 2017

R1A/2

Reading and Composition:
Theater and Magic in Shakespeare’s England

MWF 12-1

Like our 16th- and 17th-century ancestors, in the 21st century we remain fascinated by the supernatural. Yet while witches, wizards, and werewolves abound in the movies and TV shows of today, we have (for the most ...(read more)

Scott, Mark JR
Spring 2017

R1A/3

Reading and Composition:
Literatures of the African Diaspora

MWF 1-2

Please note the changes in the instructor, topic, book list, and course description of this section of English R1A (as of January 13).

The course material addresses the writings of the African diaspora in a broader definition of ...(read more)

Nanda, Aparajita
Spring 2017

R1A/4

Reading and Composition:
Girls: Feminism, the Feminine, and Fictions after 1945

MWF 2-3

This course focuses on texts of young womanhood, examining the place of female adolescence in the cultural imagination. It also seeks to interrogate the term “girl” – its fungible application across childhood, adolescence, and ad...(read more)

Fleishman, Kathryn
Spring 2017

R1A/5

Reading and Composition:
Morality: Psychological Explanations and Literary Explorations

MWF 3-4

Note the changes in instructor, topic, book list, and course description (as of Dec. 15).

Is homicide ever morally justifiable? . . .  Is lying? Is it moral or immoral to lie to a murderer in pursuit of a victim? Humanity has ...(read more)

Carr, Jessica
Spring 2017

R1A/6

Reading and Composition:
Reading Other People's Letters

TTh 8-9:30

“Oh no, no! the letter had much rather be all your own. You will express yourself very properly I am sure. There is no danger of you not being intelligible, which is the first thing.” – Jane Austen, Emma(read more)

Gaston, Lise
Spring 2017

R1A/7

Reading and Composition:
Mission Creep: Writing in Wartime

TTh 5-6:30

Please note the changes in the instructor, topic, course description, and book list of this section of English R1A (as of 11/4/16).

We're still fighting "The Forever War." We've learned to live with it. But how do...(read more)

Larner-Lewis, Jonathan
Spring 2017

R1B/1

Reading and Composition:
Gay, Innocent, and Heartless

MWF 11-12

The last words of Peter Pan allude to an endless cycle in which children become adults, adults produce more children, and the cycle goes on and on “so long as children are gay and innocent and heartless.” If we should pause ov...(read more)

Callender, Brandon
Spring 2017

R1B/2

Reading and Composition:
Raising the Dead: Time, Memory, & History in Nineteenth-Century America

MWF 12-1

This course will explore the ghosts, corpses, graveyards, and living dead of nineteenth-century American literature. Through an array of fiction, poetry, cultural history, and criticism (as well as potential field trips to local cemeteries), we wi...(read more)

Bondy, Katherine Isabel
Spring 2017

R1B/3

Reading and Composition:
Evidence of Things Not Seen

MWF 12-1

The biblical book of Hebrews famously defines faith as “the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen” (11:1, KJV). But in eighteenth-century Europe and North America, “unseen” things were as m...(read more)

de Stefano, Jason
Spring 2017

R1B/4

Reading and Composition:
The Self and Lyric Form

MWF 12-1

The journey to self is a theme that we can all relate to and, perhaps for this reason, one that has been explored by many poets and philosophers from many cultures and traditions. Yet, writing about self often seems much like lifting a cup of water...(read more)

Tchetgen, Pierre
Spring 2017

R1B/5

Reading and Composition:
Friends and Fiends: Imagining the Social in the British Romantic Period

MWF 1-2

Since the nineteenth century, the popular image of Romanticism has been that of the solitary genius. Typically poised atop some cloud-capped mountain or madly penning his verse in candlelight, this lone figure appears as a testament to the soverei...(read more)

Ahmed, Adam
Spring 2017

R1B/6

Reading and Composition:
Writing and Rights: Literature and the Fight Against Oppression in Nineteenth-Century America

MWF 1-2

"The artist . . . is the holiest reformer of them all, for she is creating."—Paulina Wright Davis, The Una, 1853

"Polemics . . . are not likely to be epics. They are likely to be pamphlets, even when they are d...(read more)

Sirianni, Lucy
Spring 2017

R1B/7

Reading and Composition

MWF 2-3

This section of English R1B has been canceled.

...(read more)
No instructor assigned yet.
Spring 2017

R1B/8

Reading and Composition

MWF 2-3

This section of English R1B has been canceled.

...(read more)
No instructor assigned yet.
Spring 2017

R1B/9

Reading and Composition

MWF 2-3

This section has been canceled.

...(read more)
No instructor assigned yet.
Spring 2017

R1B/10

Reading and Composition

MWF 3-4

This section of English R1B has been canceled.

...(read more)
No instructor assigned yet.
Spring 2017

R1B/11

Reading and Composition

MWF 3-4

This section has been canceled.

...(read more)
No instructor assigned yet.
Spring 2017

R1B/12

Reading and Composition

MWF 3-4

This section has been canceled.

...(read more)
No instructor assigned yet.
Spring 2017

R1B/13

Reading and Composition

MW 5-6:30

This section has been canceled.

...(read more)
No instructor assigned yet.
Spring 2017

R1B/14

Reading and Composition:
Investigating Fiction

MW 5-6:30

“The distortion of a text is not unlike a murder. The difficulty lies not in the execution of the deed but in the doing away with the traces.” —Sigmund Freud, Moses and Monotheism

Freud suggests that murder myster...(read more)

Magarik, Raphael
Spring 2017

R1B/15

Reading and Composition:
Senses of Magic

TTh 8-9:30

In one common sense, we use the word “magic” to refer to the extraordinary, the otherworldly or the supernatural.  We associate this sense of “magic” with the belief that one can gain control over external events throu...(read more)

Alexander, Edward Sterling
Spring 2017

R1B/16

Reading and Composition:
Manufactured Monsters

TTh 8-9:30

This course investigates monsters—from the stitched-together creatures of The Island of Dr. Moreau (1896) to present-day vampires, werewolves, body snatchers, and other frightening creatures of lore and lit...(read more)

Diaz, Rosalind
Spring 2017

R1B/17

Reading and Composition:
Walking America

TTh 5-6:30

With beauty before me, may I walk  
With beauty behind me, may I walk  
With beauty above me, may I walk
With beauty below me, may I walk
With beauty all around me, may I wal...(read more)

Gillis, Brian
Spring 2017

R1B/18

Reading and Composition

TTh 5-6:30

This section of English R1B has been canceled.

...(read more)
No instructor assigned yet.
Summer 2017

N1A/1

Reading & Composition:
Sound Counsel

MW 12-2

(Note the changes in instructor, topic, book list, and course description for this class as of March 29.)

In his essay "The Storyteller," Walter Benjamin writes, "The storyteller is a man who has counsel for his re...(read more)

Young, Rosetta
Summer 2017

N1B/1

Reading & Composition:
Senses of Magic

TTh 2-4

One common sense of the term "magic" is that the word pertains to the extraordinary, the otherworldly or the supernatural. We associate it with the belief that one can gain control over external events through special means that defy logi...(read more)

Alexander, Edward Sterling
Summer 2017

R1A/1

Reading & Composition:
Perpetual Decadence

MTuW 1:00-3:30

Please note the changes in the instructor, topic, book list, and course description for this section of English R1A (as of April 14).

Discourses of decadence (etymologically, de- down + cadere&nbs...(read more)

Creasy, CFS
Summer 2017

R1A/2

Reading & Composition:
Electoral Fictions

TuWTh 1:00-3:30

In modern democracies, voting is the primary way in which the average citizen participates in politics. Throughout history and around the world, however, elections have been plagued by corruption and propaganda, racism and sexism. This course explo...(read more)

Mansky, Joseph
Summer 2017

R1B/1

Reading & Composition:
Black Radical Thought, From David Walker to Kendrick Lamar

MTuW 2:00-4:30

(Note the changes in instructor, topic, book list, and course description for this class as of March 29.)

In this course, we'll consider the origins and concerns of a radical African American intellectual tradition. Working w...(read more)

Muhammad, Ismail
Summer 2017

R1B/2

Reading & Composition:
The Undiscovered Country

MTuW 2:00-4:30

Please note the changes in the instructor, topic, book list, and course description for this section of English R1B (as of April 14). 

The experience of death is one of the most difficult, yet most urgent, to imaginatively r...(read more)

Lorden, Jennifer A.
Fall 2016

R1A/1

Reading and Composition:
Issues

MWF 9-10

Note the change in instructor, topic, book list, and course description for this section of English R1A (as of May 20).

How bad are things, really? This class puts problems of past and present up for debate. We take as our starting point th...(read more)

Ling, Jessica
Fall 2016

R1A/2

Reading and Composition:
The Fugitive

MWF 10-11

Run. Now. Don’t look back. (Wait, come back.) This class will consider the American fugitive. What does it mean for someone to escape some form of imprisonment without being able to lawfully reenter society? Does it mean they sneak in? Take ...(read more)

Johnson, Sarah Jessica
Fall 2016

R1A/3

Reading and Composition

This section of English R1A has been canceled.

...(read more)
No instructor assigned yet.
Fall 2016

R1A/4

Reading and Composition:
Reading Ads: They'll Tell You What You Want, What You Really Really Want

MWF 12-1

Think of something that you want right now, at this very moment. Now tell me why you want it. Are you sure? Do you really want it, or do you want to want it? Or does someone else want you to want it? How do you know that your des...(read more)

Ehrlinspiel, Hannah Kathryn
Fall 2016

R1A/5

Reading and Composition:
The Self and Lyric Form

MWF 1-2

 "I longed to be that thing, / The pure, sensuous form," writes Theodore Roethke, in a poem about watching a young snake glide out of the shadows. American poets from a wide variety of backgrounds...(read more)

Viragh, Atti
Fall 2016

R1A/6

Reading and Composition:
Wild Women in America

MWF 2-3

Wild women come in all shapes and sizes: spiritual prophets, melancholic captives, alleged witches, radical reformers, reclusive poets, cunning runaways, intimate rivals, and meditative drifters are just some of the alluring, often challenging, fi...(read more)

Bondy, Katherine Isabel
Fall 2016

R1A/7

Reading and Composition:
Forms of Humiliation

MWF 3-4

What do bullying, body-shaming, and bashing do to one’s experience of language and the world? Often, scenes of humiliation involve an encounter between some private ideal we have of ourselves and our public reception. But what is humiliation...(read more)

Callender, Brandon
Fall 2016

R1A/8

Reading and Composition:
The Essay and American Life

TTh 8-9:30

Note the change in instructor, topic, book list, and course description for this section of English R1A (as of May 10).

The social theorist and cultural critic Theodor Adorno described the essay as a curious hybrid, at once more open-ended ...(read more)

de Stefano, Jason
Fall 2016

R1A/9

Reading and Composition:
The Rest is Commentary

TTh 5-6:30 PM

"The verse," writes an early interpreter of the Bible, "cries out, 'interpret me.'" Commentators often justify themselves in this way, deferentially insisting that earlier texts desire, need, and therefore authorize s...(read more)
Magarik, Raphael
Fall 2016

R1B/1

Reading and Composition:
Walking America

MWF 9-10

Note the change in instructor, topic, book list, and course description for this section of English R1B.

From Walt Whitman's walks through Manhattan to Leslie Marmon Silko's treks through the Tucson wilderness, American writers have...(read more)

Gillis, Brian
Fall 2016

R1B/2

Reading and Composition:
Literature and Popular Culture

MWF 9-10

Note the change in the instructor, topic, book list, and course description for this section of English R1B (as of May 19).

How does a poem about a road merely taken become a poem about a road less traveled? What happens when literature bec...(read more)

Le, Serena
Fall 2016

R1B/3

Reading and Composition:
Signs of the Times

MWF 10-11

Note the change in instructor, topic, book list, and course description for this section of English R1B (as of May 16).

Do you ever feel like the faster you go, the less time you have? In the nineteenth century, rapid but uneven changes mad...(read more)

Terlaak Poot, Luke
Fall 2016

R1B/4

Reading and Composition:
"One Fine Day": Diurnal Narratives of the 20th Century

MWF 11-12

Some of the most powerful stories we tell are constrained within the temporal limits of a single day. This course embraces "the day" as a significant unit of narrative time, exploring diurnal fictions as vital sites of personal reflectio...(read more)

Fleishman, Kathryn
Fall 2016

R1B/5

Reading and Composition

This section of English R1B has been canceled.

...(read more)
No instructor assigned yet.
Fall 2016

R1B/6

Reading and Composition

"Check back later for more information!"

No instructor assigned yet.
Fall 2016

R1B/7

Reading and Composition:
Lost Literature: Recovering and (re)-Discovering Hidden Texts of the Nineteenth Century

MWF 1-2

This course takes as its starting point the novel idea that academic writing is more than the frantic attempt to submit a paper on time.  In it, we will both think about and practice literary criticism as a dynamic process of discovery. ...(read more)

Sirianni, Lucy
Fall 2016

R1B/8

Reading and Composition:
Staging Desire: Sex and Sexuality in Renaissance Drama

MWF 1-2

The drama of Shakespeare and his contemporaries offers a fascinating site for the analysis of gender and sexuality as historical and theoretical constructs, rather than as the timeless and universal ‘facts’ of human experience which th...(read more)

Scott, Mark JR
Fall 2016

R1B/9

Reading and Composition

This section of English R1B has been canceled.

...(read more)
No instructor assigned yet.
Fall 2016

R1B/10

Reading and Composition:
Monomanias

MWF 2-3

Note the change in instructor, topic, book list, and course description for this section of English R1B (as of May 10).

This course will give you a framework to think (and write) more critically about the things you can't stop thinking ...(read more)

McWilliams, Ryan
Fall 2016

R1B/11

Reading and Composition

This section of English R1B has been canceled.

...(read more)
No instructor assigned yet.
Fall 2016

R1B/12

Reading and Composition:
London: Self and the City

TTh 8-9:30

“What strange phenomena we find in a great city, all we need do is stroll about with our eyes open,” exclaimed Baudelaire in Fleurs du Mal, his 1857 book of urban poetry: “Life swarms with innocent monsters.”

(read more)
Wise, Diana Catherine
Fall 2016

R1B/13

Reading and Composition:
Queer/of Color Cultural Productions

TTh 5-6:30 PM.

What meanings do the terms “queer” and “of color” carry? How do different literary and artistic genres represent the experiences of (racial, sexual, gender, or other social) minorities? What relationships can we trace betwe...(read more)

Valella, Daniel
Fall 2016

R1B/14

Reading & Composition

MWF 1-2

This section of English R1B started meeting on Wednesday, September 7. The instructor will be be able to supply more details about the course to new students when they come to class.

...(read more)
Mezur, Katherine
Fall 2016

R1B/15

Reading & Composition

MWF 2-3

This section of English R1B started meeting on Wednesday, September 7. The instructor will be be able to supply more details about the course to new students when they come to class.

...(read more)
Mezur, Katherine
Spring 2016

R1A/1

Reading and Composition:
Here, Queer, and Chicana/o

MWF 10-11

We’ve heard the slogan “We’re here, we’re queer, get used to it!”  But what weight do “here” and “queer” hold when a person identifies as Chicana/o? Does this identity change what it might...(read more)

Trevino, Jason Benjamin
Spring 2016

R1A/2

Reading and Composition:
Waking the Ghosts of Tom/ás Joad

MWF 11-12

In this course we will think about what cultural historian Michael Denning has called the "lowercase grapes of wrath narrative," which emerged during the Great Depression. In John Steinbeck's 1939 novel, this was a story about econom...(read more)

Cruz, Frank Eugene
Spring 2016

R1A/3

Reading and Composition:
Note new topic: Travel and Translation

MWF 1-2

Note new instructor, course description, and book list:
 
"If we walk far enough," Dorothy says in L. Frank Baum's The Wizard of Oz, "we shall sometime come to someplace."&nbs...(read more)
Wyatt, Gabriella
Spring 2016

R1A/4

Reading and Composition:
Characters

MWF 2-3

We tend to take it for granted that literary works have characters. But what is a character, and what is its relation to a real-world human? What are the stakes of that relationship? Our readings, which range in time from ancient Greece to almost ...(read more)

Wilson, Evan
Spring 2016

R1A/5

Reading and Composition:
The Literature of Adventure in the Eighteenth Century

TTh 9:30-11

The eighteenth century witnessed Britain’s rise to the status of world superpower.  As the newly United Kingdom expanded its colonial holdings and extended its imperial power around the globe, its writers imagined traversing that globe ...(read more)

Heimlich, Timothy
Spring 2016

R1A/6

Reading and Composition:
Work and Play

TTh 11-12:30

(read more)

Acu, Adrian Mark
Spring 2016

R1A/7

Reading and Composition:
Conversation

TTh 12:30-2

How can we best listen to literature? How is literature like or unlike a conversation? If a text is speaking to us, how might we respond? Do we believe what it tells us, and in what way? This course will examine a variety of twentieth-century Brit...(read more)

Neal, Allison
Spring 2016

R1A/8

Reading and Composition:
Nothing Doing

TTh 3:30-5

What would lead an author to create a 'leading' character who does not seem to want to move forward in life? Why might such characters attract readers, and what's so funny--or depressing--about their everyday lives? In this class we wi...(read more)

Kelly, Tyleen Louise
Spring 2016

R1B/1

Reading and Composition:
You Say You Want A Revolution*: From Independence Hall and the Bastille to Tahrir Square

MWF 9-10

Etymologically, the word “revolution” (from the Latin revolvere) signifies a “turning back.”  However, the word has come to take on quite a different meaning: the overthrow of the existing order and the birth ...(read more)

Albernaz, Joseph
Spring 2016

R1B/2

Reading and Composition:
Living Photographically

MWF 9-10

This course examines the increasingly central role of photography in capturing and constituting events in our everyday lives. We will conduct a broad survey of critical essays on photography from its inception to the present day, tracking not only...(read more)

Yoon, Irene
Spring 2016

R1B/4

Reading and Composition:
Image and Text

MWF 11-12

This class will look at a variety of works--comics, graphic novels, chidren's books, advertisements, political cartoons--that combine images with text to tell stories. How, we will ask, do words and images play with, against, or off of one a...(read more)
Clark, Rebecca
Spring 2016

R1B/5

Reading and Composition:
Black Radical Thought, From David Walker to Kendrick Lamar

MWF 12-1

In this course, we’ll consider the origins and concerns of a radical African American intellectual tradition. Working with a variety of texts, including slave narratives, poetry, music, and film, we’ll trace the debates that structure ...(read more)

Muhammad, Ismail
Spring 2016

R1B/6

Reading and Composition:
Grant Writing, Renaissance to Modern

MWF 12-1

In this class we will read a small selection of letters and poems by English Renaissance poets William Shakespeare, Edmund Spenser, Samuel Daniel, and John Donne written for the purpose of obtaining patronage. These letters and poems were typicall...(read more)

Villagrana, José
Spring 2016

R1B/7

Reading and Composition:
Queer in Nature

MWF 1-2

In this course, we will consider how we think about and how others have thought about the relationship between humans and nature, focusing in particular on ideas about human sexuality. We will read two novels which ask us to ...(read more)

Diaz, Rosalind
Spring 2016

R1B/8

Reading and Composition:
"Those Other Times Are Running Elsewhere": Contemporary British Fictions

MWF 2-3

This course explores the investment of contemporary British culture in multiple, imaginative, and alternative concepts of time, from historical novels to speculative fictions, from London’s punk rock scene to its dubstep moment, from live co...(read more)

Fleishman, Kathryn
Spring 2016

R1B/9

Reading and Composition:
Writing About Television

MW 4-5:30

Writing about television constitutes one of the most popular forms of literary criticism outside of academic circles today. TV critic Lili Loofbourow argues that episode recaps and their in-depth analysis of our favorite shows fulfill our need for...(read more)

Chamberlain, Shannon
Spring 2016

R1B/10

Reading and Composition:
Record Keeping

MW 4-5:30

This course will explore the ways in which we attempt to capture, preserve, and convey our experiences.  We will trace how these forms—or media—structure our memories, and how they may also obscure or distort past experience.&nbsp...(read more)

Lewis, Rachel Thayer
Spring 2016

R1B/11

Reading and Composition:
Modernity and Objectivity

TTh 8-9:30

“On or about December, 1910, human character changed.” With this remarkable claim, Virginia Woolf tells us that in the modern world knowledge, consciousness, and emotional experience have transformed. She implies that, somehow, human s...(read more)

Rodal, Jocelyn
Spring 2016

R1B/12

Reading and Composition:
What Is Literature?

TTh 8-9:30

In What is Literature?, Jean-Paul Sartre claims that the prose writer “is in a situation in language; he is invested with words. They are prolongations of his meanings, his pincers, his antennae, his spectacles. He manoeuve...(read more)

Ketz, Charity Corine
Spring 2016

R1B/13

Reading and Composition:
Literary Festivity

TTh 9:30-11

In this class we will look at many dimensions of a deceptively simple question: what can a party mean? We’ll study celebrations as mechanisms both of radical freedom and total social control, including the legacy of medieval Church feast-day...(read more)

Mangin, Sarah
Spring 2016

R1B/14

Reading and Composition:
Literary Cartography

TTh 11-12:30

Maps exist in the divide between reality and representation. They are metaphors of space and place, and the allure of the map is grounded in its ability to produce a controlled abstraction of distance, time, space, and location. Cartogr...(read more)

Gillis, Brian
Spring 2016

R1B/15

Reading and Composition:
Documentary Poetry and Immaterial Poetry

TTh 12:30-2

“Poetry’s not made of words,” writes Ariana Reines in her recent book Mercury (2012). This course considers that claim. Can literature be reduced to the words that make it up, or is there a surplus that a materialistic v...(read more)

Benjamin, Daniel
Spring 2016

R1B/16

Reading and Composition:
Have You Lost Your Mind? Contesting Impressions in Literature, 1873-1973

TTh 2-3:30

Virginia Woolf famously wrote that “on or about December 1910, human character changed.” In her view, the exciting and experimental works of modernism—written by authors like T.S. Eliot, James Joyce, and Woolf herself—came ...(read more)

Creasy, CFS
Spring 2016

R1B/17

Reading and Composition:
Reading and Writing the City

TTh 2-3:30

The city is many different things in literature. As a plot device, the city is often a place of danger and opportunity, a place where characters make their way or lose themselves in the attempt. As a setting, the city may be open or closed; it may...(read more)

Wilson, Mary
Spring 2016

R1B/18

Reading and Composition: Life Writing

TTh 3:30-5

Life writing seems self-explanatory as writing that is about one’s life, but what does that mean, exactly? How does a life become literature, and why should literature, the province of the imagination, be made to present a real life?  T...(read more)

Bauer, Mark
Summer 2016

N1A/1

Reading & Composition:
Conjuring Pasts

MW 2-4

This class seeks to expand the age-old idea of "literary tradition" by looking at texts that grapple with unavailable cultural pasts. Following the artist Jalal Toufic's formulation of a "withdrawal of tradition past a surpassin...(read more)

Ahmed, Adam
Summer 2016

N1B/1

Reading & Composition:
Manufactured Monsters

TTh 12-2

This course investigates monsters—from the stitched-together creatures of The Island of Dr. Moreau (1896) to present-day vampires, werewolves, body snatchers, and other frightening creatures of lore and literature. We will read two ...(read more)

Diaz, Rosalind
Fall 2015

R1A/1

Reading & Composition:
Reading and Writing the City

MWF 10-11

The city can be many different things in literature. As a plot device, the city is often a place of danger and opportunity, a place where characters make their way or lose themselves in the attempt. As setting, the city may be open or closed; it m...(read more)

Wilson, Mary
Fall 2015

R1A/2

Reading & Composition:
Marginalia

MWF 12-1

This course will begin with the request (and the requirement) that you read with pen in hand. But we'll quickly move from the idea of taking notes in the margins of material, printed pages to thinking of images, mov...(read more)

Diaz, Rosalind
Fall 2015

R1A/3

Reading & Composition:
Thinking ‘Bout Forever: Poetry and Pop Music

MWF 2-3

So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see,

(read more)

Benjamin, Daniel
Fall 2015

R1A/4

Reading & Composition:
Literature of Environmental Instability and Hazard

MW 4-5:30

Wordsworth famously wrote, “Nature never did betray/ The heart that loved her.”  What then of storms and natural disasters – moments when our environment becomes disordered, disruptive...(read more)

Lewis, Rachel Thayer
Fall 2015

R1A/5

Reading & Composition:
The Art of Persuasion

TTh 8-9:30

Every author must face the problem of what constitutes persuasive speech. From Plato and Aristotle in fourth century B.C.E. Greece to the twentieth-century philosopher Kenneth Burke, theorists have struggled to understand rhetoric: what is it? How...(read more)

Mansky, Joseph
Fall 2015

R1A/6

Reading & Composition:
We, Myself, and Why: Individuals, Communities, and Outsiders

TTh 9:30-11

“I celebrate myself, and sing myself,

And what I assume you shall assume,

For every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you”

-Walt Whitman, “Song of Myself”

 

What does it mean to...(read more)

Albernaz, Joseph
Fall 2015

R1A/7

Reading & Composition:
"Something about the light": Urban Subjectivity in Los Angeles Film and Literature

TTh 11-12:30

In this course, we’ll explore the political, economic, cultural, and social histories that have culminated in Los Angeles's distended geography, smog-filtered light, and barely connected enclaves. We’ll learn how writers and filmmakers...(read more)

Muhammad, Ismail
Fall 2015

R1A/8

Reading & Composition:
The Ick Factor

TTh 12:30-2

How does ickiness work? What makes something grotesque? Why, so often, are we also laughing? This course will examine various texts that have that special something that turns our tummies. We will look at novels, stories, and films that generate d...(read more)

Clark, Rebecca
Fall 2015

R1A/9

Reading & Composition:
Writing About Television

TTh 3:30-5

Writing about television constitutes one of the most popular forms of literary criticism outside of academic circles today. TV critic Lili Loofbourow argues that episode recaps and their in-depth analysis of our favorite shows fulfill our need for...(read more)

Chamberlain, Shannon
Fall 2015

R1B/1

Reading & Composition:
Work and Play

MWF 11-12

(Note the new instructor, topic, book list, and course description for this class:)

Work and play regulate the rhythm of living, but when was the last time you saw them represented as you experience them? Realistic novels may mention both t...(read more)

Acu, Adrian Mark
Fall 2015

R1B/2

Reading & Composition:
Nineteenth-Century Monsters

MWF 1-2

What is a monster?  Why do we fear it?  What role does it play in our conception of ourselves and our world?  Our work in this class will focus on the figure of the monster, especially as it appears in the literature of nineteenth-c...(read more)

Heimlich, Timothy
Fall 2015

R1B/3

Reading & Composition:
Post-1945 Deserts

MW 4-5:30

(Note the new instructor, topic, book list, and course description for this class:)

In this course, our primary focus will be the cultural representation of the American desert in the post-1945 period. From the first detonation of the ...(read more)

Rahimtoola, Samia Shabnam
Fall 2015

R1B/4

Reading & Composition:
Break-Ups and Other Formal Ruptures

TTh 9:30-11

While a break-up may (in theory) end a relationship, it rarely ends a novel. This course will take its cue from novels and poems that dramatize the break-up in all of its obsessive, playful, and melancholy permutations in order to get a better gli...(read more)

Neal, Allison
Fall 2015

R1B/5

Reading & Composition:
Language and Power

TTh 11-12:30

Language is a tool for expression, but also for manipulation and the exercise of power. In this class, we will be looking at a wide variety of the ways in which power makes itself felt through language, ranging from subtle and ostensibly honest pe...(read more)

Wilson, Evan
Fall 2015

R1B/6

Reading & Composition:
Houses and Homes

TTh 12:30-2

In this course, we will consider the multiple forms the house and home can take, as well as the relationship between the individual house, apartment, dorm room, etc. and its surrounding environs. We will use a range of texts to help us theori...(read more)

Young, Rosetta
Fall 2015

R1B/7

Reading & Composition:
Waking the Ghosts of Tom/ás Joad

TTh 2-3:30

(Note the new instructor, topic, book list, and course description for this class.)

In this course we will think about what cultural historian Michael Denning has called the "lowercase grapes of wrath narrative," which emerged dur...(read more)

Cruz, Frank Eugene
Fall 2015

R1B/8

Reading & Composition:
Human Variability and the Idea of Progress

TTh 3:30-5

Many of us tacitly surrender to the belief that “social progress is driven by technological innovation, which in turn follows an inevitable course.” Quite often, we encounter this idea of progress through variously coded ...(read more)

Dimitriou, Aristides
Fall 2015

R1B/9

Reading & Composition:
What Is Literature?

MWF 10-11

In What Is Literature?, Jean-Paul Sartre claims that the prose writer "is in a stuation in language; he is invested with words. They are prolongations of his meanings, his pincers, his antennae, his spectacles. He ...(read more)

Ketz, Charity Corine
Fall 2015

R1B/10

Reading & Composition:
Life Writing

MWF 12-1

Life writing seems self-explanatory as writing that is about one's life, but what does that mean, exactly? How does a life become literature, and why should literature, the province of the imagination, be made to present a real life? This cour...(read more)

Bauer, Mark
Fall 2015

R1B/11

Reading & Composition:
Under Constructions

MWF 2-3

One of the key questions that critical writers ask about literature is "how"? How does the writer build the first sentence and finally end a scene, chapter, or stanza? How are the material surroundings of the characters rendered? How can...(read more)

Kelly, Tyleen Louise
Fall 2015

R1B/12

Reading & Composition:
Modernity and Objectivity

MW 4-5:30

The early twentieth century was peculiarly preoccupied with its own modernity. While science and technology made great strides forward, two World Wars left devastation, and writers struggled to portray the tumult of a swiftly changing social lands...(read more)

Rodal, Jocelyn
Fall 2015

R1B/13

Reading & Composition:
Living Photographically

MWF 11-12

This course examines the increasingly central role of photography in capturing and constituting events in our everyday lives. We will conduct a broad survey of critical essays on photography from its inception to the present day, tracking not only...(read more)

Yoon, Irene
Spring 2015

R1A/1

Reading and Composition:
Space, Time, and Narrative in Post-1945 Literature

MWF 10-11

How does narrative register and reconfigure the coordinates of space and time? How may a literary model of space and time suggest a particular conception of history? What, then, does this concept of history indicate about the logic of “progr...(read more)

Dimitriou, Aristides
Spring 2015

R1A/2

Reading and Composition:
Innocence

MWF 12-1

What does it mean to be innocent? Is innocence simply the lack of knowledge, or the absence of experience—an immature state that is inevitably lost upon self-reflection and understanding? How do those conceptions of innocence relate...(read more)

Ding, Katherine
Spring 2015

R1A/3

Reading and Composition:
"A Reader Is a Beginner"

MWF 2-3

Each of these books explores some everyday occurrence we are familiar with, although perhaps conditioned to pass over. As we read them throughout the semester, they will ask us to rethink how we imagine spaces beyond our current conditions, and wh...(read more)

Vandeloo, David Conigliaro
Spring 2015

R1A/4

Reading and Composition:
Arthurian Legend

TTh 9:30-11

From medieval manuscripts to twentieth-century film, Arthurian legends have undergone various changes as they passed to new generations and cultures.  The content of this course will consider some of these changes, from some of the earliest E...(read more)

Crosson, Chad Gregory
Spring 2015

R1A/5

Reading and Composition:
Magical Engines

TTh 11-12:30

This introduction to college writing and argument explores texts about machines--both real and imagined--from Greece through the present day. While writing and theorizing about tools, inventions, and devices seems to have taken on special urgency ...(read more)

Mead, Christopher
Spring 2015

R1A/6

Reading and Composition:
note new topic: US Popular Song & the Problem of Authenticity

TTh 12:30-2

Note new course description (and book list and instructor):

While literary scholarship can speak freely about the death of the author, popular music must tread with caution. In popular music, performers stand in for songwriters, imploring a...(read more)

Sullivan, Khalil
Spring 2015

R1A/7

Reading and Composition:
Rebellion, Revolution, Revision

TTh 3:30-5

From the British perspective the American colonial uprising was a rebellion, an anarchical break with order. But writers such as Thomas Jefferson and Thomas Paine called it a revolution, using a term that signified an extension of natural order (a...(read more)

McWilliams, Ryan
Spring 2015

R1A/8

Reading and Composition:
Modern African American Poetry, 1940-1960

TTh 9:30-11

In this course, we will examine the "lost years" of the 1940s-1960s in African American literature and culture by critically reading and writing about the poetry and history of this period. Traditional surveys of 20th-century African Ame...(read more)

Gardezi, Nilofar
Spring 2015

R1B/1

Reading and Composition:
The Renaissance Sonnet and Epigram

MWF 9-10

When we think of Renaissance poetry, we think of love. There's more to that story, though. This class will examine two poetic forms that enjoyed immense popularity in the English Renaissance. First, the sonnet (It. ‘a little sound/song&r...(read more)

Villagrana, José
Spring 2015

R1B/2

Reading and Composition:
Unprotected Texts: Tales Told and Retold

MWF 10-11

"Beauty brings copies of itself into being. It makes us draw it, take photographs of it, or describe it to other people. Sometimes it gives rise to exact replication and other times to resemblances and still other times to things whose connec...(read more)

Hsu, Sharon
Spring 2015

R1B/3

Reading and Composition:
Drama's Function in Literature, Philosophy, and the Visual Arts

MWF 11-12

This class takes its cue from the etymological connection between theater, spectator, and theory in ancient Greek. The shared root for theater (theatron, or “place of seeing”), spectator (theōros) and theory ...(read more)

Jeziorek, Alek M
Spring 2015

R1B/4

Reading and Composition:
Lost Literature: Recovering and (Re)discovering Hidden Texts of the Nineteenth Century

MWF 12-1

This course takes as its starting point the novel idea that academic writing is more than the frantic attempt to submit a paper on time.  In it, we will both think about and pr...(read more)

Sirianni, Lucy
Spring 2015

R1B/5

Reading and Composition:
Composite-Composition

MWF 1-2

Note new course description (and topic, book list, and instructor):

Most research paper classes promote a divide between the object of study and work done by others on the object of study.  But this depiction of prim...(read more)

Acu, Adrian Mark
Spring 2015

R1B/6

Reading and Composition:
The Art of Conscience

MWF 2-3

What kind of knowledge, or science, does the conscience impart, and how does it make this knowledge manifest? What evidentiary standards apply to this kind of knowledge? This course will examine such questions through the lens of the litera...(read more)

Yu, Esther
Spring 2015

R1B/7

Reading and Composition:
Research Methods

MW 4-5:30

In this course we’ll study and apply research methods from a variety of fields. We will discover what it means to be rigorous inside and outside a humanistic context. We will look at many methods of interpretation, from rhetorical to discour...(read more)

Ramirez, Matthew Eric
Spring 2015

R1B/8

Reading and Composition:
Other Worlds

TTh 9:30-11

What does it mean to imagine another world? Is it an opportunity for unvarnished fantasy, or for critical reflection on your own society? Can you tell the truth when writing about an invented place? By way of an answer, this course considers the j...(read more)

Strub, Spencer
Spring 2015

R1B/9

Reading and Composition:
Victorian Literature of Evolution

TTh 11-12:30

This course will examine British literature related to the evolutionary theories emergent in the nineteenth century. We will read a combination of scientific writing, literary fiction, and poetry, attending both to the scientific discoveries made ...(read more)

Browning, Catherine Cronquist
Spring 2015

R1B/10

Reading and Composition:
Regions: Revising the Lay of the Land

TTh 12:30-2

Note new course description (and topic, book list, and instructor):

Region is an area ruled, from regere, 'to rule or direct'; it is an area measured and surveyed so that its boundaries depend on and change wi...(read more)

Chow, Juliana H.
Spring 2015

R1B/11

Reading and Composition:
School Stories

TTh 2-3:30

This course will survey the educational principles and strategies common in nineteenth-century Britain and the depiction of domestic and institutional education in contemporary novels. We will examine the influential educational theories of the pe...(read more)

Browning, Catherine Cronquist
Spring 2015

R1B/12

Reading and Composition:
The Rom Com: Shakespeare & Hollywood

TTh 3:30-5

What makes the genre of romantic comedy so pleasurable, when it is often critically maligned as being so formulaic? What defines a romantic comedy? What has persisted in romantic comedy throughout the centuries, from Shakespeare to 20th-century Ho...(read more)

Liu, Aileen
Summer 2015

N1A/1

Reading & Composition:
Love Songs

MW 2-4

This course takes as its object of study works of art that concern themselves with the nature of “love.”  Arguably the most popular and ubiquitous of aesthetic productions, what we will broadly be calling Love Songs are now perhap...(read more)

Perry, R. D.
Summer 2015

N1B/1

Reading & Composition:
Literary Festivity

TTh 12-2

What can a party mean? In this course we will ponder the significance of festivals and merry-making across diverse literary traditions. We’ll first explore the legacy of medieval Church feast-days and folk festivals as an inversion and reinf...(read more)

Mangin, Sarah
Fall 2014

R1A/1

Reading and Composition:
(Self) Portraits in (Post) Modern Literature

MWF 10-11

Our topic for this course in critical analysis and essay composition will be literary portraiture in a series of Modern, Postmodern, and Contemporary novels, poems, and cross-genre works. During the semester we will encounter a dandy whose looks n...(read more)

Klavon, Evan
Fall 2014

R1A/2

Reading and Composition:
(new topic:) "Structures of Feeling": The Individual in Modernity

MWF 12-1

Let's begin with two loose assumptions, that novels register everyday experience and that novels bear witness to large epistemic shifts. As the possibilities of individual and collective life flounder spectacularly under the pressures of moder...(read more)

Lee, Sookyoung (Soo)
Fall 2014

R1A/3

Reading and Composition:
How Taste Matters: Self-Curation, Public Identity, and the Modern Aesthetic Life

MWF 1-2

In 1862, Ruskin wrote of the state, “Economists usually speak as if there were no good in consumption absolute. So far from this being so, consumption absolute is the end, crown, and perfection of production; and wise consumption is a far mo...(read more)

Ciacciarelli, Helen
Fall 2014

R1A/4

Reading and Composition:
The First Person, Medieval to Modern

MWF 3-4

"I am large, I contain multitudes," Walt Whitman's Song of Myself admits parenthetically. This course takes Whitman's multitudes seriously, investigating change and continuity in six centuries of first-person narration. ...(read more)

Strub, Spencer
Fall 2014

R1A/5

Reading and Composition:
Temptation and Desire in Renaissance Literature

MW 4-5:30

The great English epics and dramas of the Early Modern period can’t do without temptation. Why not? What makes temptation such a generative concept? Can we define it? Is temptation just an excuse to blame devils, monsters, or women for one&r...(read more)

Villagrana, José
Fall 2014

R1A/6

Reading and Composition:
Shakespeare and Film

TTh 8-9:30

How do filmmakers translate Shakespeare from live theater to screen? How do Shakespeare’s tragedies, versus his comedies, versus his histories, lend themselves to or resist certain types of movie adaptation? Do some genres or plays work bett...(read more)

Liu, Aileen
Fall 2014

R1A/7

Reading and Composition:
The Idea of the West

TTh 9:30-11

In this course, we will examine a variety of texts in order to ask the question: what do we mean when we talk about the West? What is it that writers and ar...(read more)

Zisman, Isaac
Fall 2014

R1A/8

Reading and Composition:
The Literary Character

TTh 11-12:30

How do loose bits of textual material transform into literary characters of heft and substance? The question seems deceptively simple when referred to the poles of cultural habit or of the fluid workings of the reader’s imagination. In this ...(read more)

Yu, Esther
Fall 2014

R1A/9

Reading and Composition:
Writing and Rights: Literature and the Fight against Oppression in Nineteenth-Century America

TTh 2-3:30

"The artist ...  is the holiest reformer of them all, for she is creating."-- Paulina Wright Davis, The Una, 1854

"Polemics ...  are not likely to be epics.  They are likely to be pamphlets, even when they are ...(read more)

Sirianni, Lucy
Fall 2014

R1A/10

Reading and Composition:
Making American Literature

TTh 5-6:30

What does it take to write American literature? What in the history of the United States distinguishes the culture, texture, and style of American letters?

In this course we'll explore highly effective strategies in American literary wr...(read more)

Ramirez, Matthew Eric
Fall 2014

R1B/1

Reading and Composition:
Modern Minds

MWF 10-11

In this writing- and research-intensive course we will consider how late nineteenth and early twentieth century writers both responded to and helped shape modern  conceptions of the human mind. Our readings and discussions will focus on the b...(read more)

Abramson, Anna Jones
Fall 2014

R1B/2

Reading and Composition:
American Transience in the 20th Century

MWF 12-1

Since the imperious dream of Westward expansion, notions of American autonomy, power, and identity have often been caught up with living in motion.  But of course, motion also involves exposure: to displacement, to homelessness, to precarious...(read more)

Miller, Christopher Patrick
Fall 2014

R1B/3

Reading and Composition:
Note new topic: War, Empire, and Asian American Cultural Critique

MWF 2-3

Dubbed the "American Century," the 20th century bore witness to the rise of the United States as a global superpower, the outcome of American involvement in World War II and the Cold War. From the Philippine-American War to the Pacific W...(read more)

Lee, Amy
Fall 2014

R1B/4

Reading and Composition:
Obsession

MWF 3-4

This course will give you a framework to think (and write) more critically about the things you can’t stop thinking about anyway. Throughout the ...(read more)

McWilliams, Ryan
Fall 2014

R1B/5

Reading and Composition:
Note new topic: Theorizing the Popular Song

TTh 9:30-11

In this course we will examine recent scholarship on the emergence of the popular recording industry in the early 20th century, paying particular attention to how the demands of a capitalist marketplace (mass reproduction, advertising, and distrib...(read more)

Sullivan, Khalil
Fall 2014

R1B/6

Reading and Composition:
Sincerity & Honesty

TTh 12:30-2

What does it mean to be sincere or honest? How does one even define honesty, and how has that definition changed over time? What are the prerequisites for truth-speaking to take place? Is sincerity even possible? What is the cost of honesty, and w...(read more)

Ding, Katherine
Fall 2014

R1B/7

Reading and Composition:
Sorrow Songs: Aural Poetry in Nineteenth-Century America

TTh 3:30-5

In this introduction to college composition and research, we will develop skills of close-attention to literary texts and analytic argument through readings of songs, poems, and critical essays, and we will investigate how literary texts (or other...(read more)

Osborne, Gillian K.
Fall 2014

R1B/8

Reading and Composition :
Life Stories

MWF 1-2

This course will examine how authors born in nineteenth-century Britain shaped lived experience into nonfictional narrative, turning their own lives and the lives of those around them into stories. We’ll consider autobiography, biography, me...(read more)

Browning, Catherine Cronquist
Fall 2014

R1B/9

Reading and Composition :
Wild Child

MWF 3-4

This course will explore the literary depiction of the “wild child” and the association of childhood with “primitive,” “savage,” or “natural” conditions. We’ll consider a broad spectrum of wild...(read more)

Browning, Catherine Cronquist
Spring 2014

R1A/1

Reading & Composition:
That Way Madness Lies

MWF 9-10

Can we locate the germ of madness in a character or text? Can a mad speaker be believed or relied upon, and by what evidence? Could insane avowals infect the listener and thereby be exported or exchanged? How do we know when madness should be read...(read more)

Kelly, Tyleen Louise
Spring 2014

R1A/2

Reading & Composition:
The Afterworlds of the American Revolution, 1776-1819

MWF 1-2

In 1776, as Jefferson declared, the American colonies could no longer tolerate the yoke of English rule, and had to "throw off such Government” and “dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another.” The R...(read more)

Trocchio, Rachel
Spring 2014

R1A/4

Reading & Composition:
The Matter of Troy

TTh 9:30-11

What do we know about Troy and the Trojan War? What has anyone ever known about Troy and the Trojan War? In this course, we will read ancient, medieval, and early modern texts that will help us sketch the contours of any possible answer to this qu...(read more)

Hobson, Jacob
Spring 2014

R1A/5

Reading & Composition:
From Nature Writing to Ecopoetics

TTh 11-12:30

This course is an introduction to American environmental literature of the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries. Our focus will be on the modes of attention and composition that innovative writers have developed in response to the challenge of writing a...(read more)

Emerson, Maude
Spring 2014

R1A/6

Reading & Composition:
Life on the Inside and Outside

TTh 12:30-2

Everyone knows that thoughts occur in our heads and refer to the world “out there.”  We may also know that what we experience and refer to as “my head” is a product of what takes place “in” our actual(read more)

Alexander, Edward Sterling
Spring 2014

R1A/7

Reading & Composition:
Sympathy and the Problem of Identification

TTh 2-3:30

How does sympathy function to draw the reader into the text? How do readers navigate sympathizing with characters who are directly at odds with one another? Does sympathy require identification with the character or speaker? Is it possibl...(read more)

Ding, Katherine
Spring 2014

R1A/8

Reading & Composition:
Getting Outside Ourselves: Beyond Wilderness

TTh 3:30-5

Do birds really sing, or is the idea of “song” a human construct? If humans have altered their environments for thousands of years, what do we mean when we try to preserve “wilderness” areas? Can we truly imagine what it wo...(read more)

McWilliams, Ryan
Spring 2014

R1B/1

Reading & Composition:
How to Be Popular

MWF 9-10

Though this class unfortunately makes no promises to improve students’ own popularity (although, hey! you never know!) it will provide the opportunity to consider the problems and the pleasures of popularity in many other forms. To ...(read more)

Dumont, Alex
Spring 2014

R1B/2

Reading & Composition:
Profane Illuminations

MWF 10-11

Though Walter Benjamin coined the phrase to describe a specifically “materialistic, anthropological inspiration” that signifies “the true c...(read more)

Ahmed, Adam
Spring 2014

R1B/3

Reading & Composition:
(note new topic): Documents and Literature of the Undocumented

MWF 10-11

(note new course description):  In this class, we will study the emerging field of Undocumented Literature. Many documents—newspaper articles, academic studies, and government laws—have attempted to document the population of undo...(read more)

Huerta, Javier
Spring 2014

R1B/4

Reading & Composition:
The Way We Read Now

MWF 11-12

This course is an occasion to reflect on how—if at all—we read now. Our engagement with this famously vexed question will be twofold. We’ll first enter into debates on how print, the book, and media technologies shape our present...(read more)

Ling, Jessica
Spring 2014

R1B/5

Reading & Composition:
Defenses of Poetry

MWF 11-12

“Poetry defeats the curse which binds us to be subjected to the accident of surrounding impressions…and it purges from our inward sight the film of familiarity which obscures from us the wonder of our being….It is the faculty w...(read more)

Ketz, Charity Corine
Spring 2014

R1B/6

Reading & Composition:
Representing American Education

MWF 12-1

What, exactly, do Americans expect education to do for us as individuals, or as a society? What does it mean to “be educated”? It seems there are as many answers to these questions as there are people in this country—but how do w...(read more)

Huang, Lynn
Spring 2014

R1B/7

Reading & Composition:
Persuasion

MWF 12-1

This class is about persuasive writing—both as a genre and as a skill. Which is to say, we will follow Quintilian, who says that the best way to become eloquent is to imitate the masters. Of course, standards of eloquence have chang...(read more)

Moore, Stephanie Anne
Spring 2014

R1B/8

Reading & Composition:
Regions

MWF 1-2

Regions are hard to pin down. On a map, there are states, countries, and other political designations outlined; a region, however, is something else, something more like that black splotch of terra incognita. It is not a...(read more)

Chow, Juliana H.
Spring 2014

R1B/9

Reading & Composition:
Human Environments: Ecology, Evolution, and Literature

MWF 2-3

This course will explore the relationship between humans and their environments, considering how literature helps us to map and even construct our environments. How do we adapt to our surroundings? How do we adapt our surroundings to us? Why do we...(read more)

Cannon, Benjamin Zenas
Spring 2014

R1B/10

Reading & Composition:
Representing California

MWF 2-3

“California is a place in which a boom mentality and a sense of loss meet in uneasy suspension; in which the mind is troubled by some buried but ineradicable...(read more)

Lee, Richard Z
Spring 2014

R1B/11

Reading & Composition:
The Poetics of Honor

MWF 3-4

We tend to think of honor as the quintessence of achievement: a blanket term covering a wide range of excellences.  But why do we pursue honor when it so often fails to benefit us? The First World War is often considered to be the event that ...(read more)

Acu, Adrian Mark
Spring 2014

R1B/12

Reading & Composition:
Are There Stories?

MWF 3-4

Walter Benjamin wrote that “the art of storytelling is reaching its end,” arguing that the oral, communitarian art of storytelling encountered its first crisis in the rise of the bourgeois novel, and a second crisis in modern societies...(read more)

Greer, Erin
Spring 2014

R1B/13

Reading & Composition:
Unprotected Texts: Tales Told and Retold

MW 4-5:30

What does it mean to re-imagine a Modernist novel as a series of e-mails?  Or to put the words of a beloved Jane Austen heroine into the mouth of a teenage valley girl?  And why do so many film versions of Shakespeare's plays take pl...(read more)

Hsu, Sharon
Spring 2014

R1B/14

Reading & Composition:
Photographic Memories

MW 4-5:30

"We work in unison with movement as though it were a presentiment of the way in which life itself unfolds. But inside movement there is one moment at which the elements in motion are in balance. Photography must seize upon this moment and hol...(read more)

Yoon, Irene
Spring 2014

R1B/15

Reading & Composition:
Saints and Soldiers

TTh 8-9:30

While holy warriors have gained a bad reputation in today’s world, warrior-saints were once a flavor of holy persons popular in England from the Middle Ages up through the Early Modern period.  The lives and deeds of the martyrs, soldie...(read more)

Miller, Jasmin
Spring 2014

R1B/16

Reading & Composition:
American Beauties

TTh 9:30-11

This c...(read more)

Fleishman, Kathryn
Spring 2014

R1B/17

Reading & Composition:
The Hazards of Belief

TTh 11-12:30

It is natural to think of perception as the bedrock of belief. We watch the sun appear over the eastern horizon every morning and then, after dark, we fall asleep secure in the belief that its light will wake us again tomorrow. This is how inducti...(read more)

Langione, Matt
Spring 2014

R1B/18

Reading & Composition:
Making Heirs and Heirlooms

TTh 12:30-2

After the Irish Civil War, W.B. Yeats wondered, "Did that play of mine send out / Certain men the English shot?" But in a poem in honor of Yeats, W.H. Auden famously assured us that “poetry makes nothing happen," while Pa...(read more)

Lorden, Jennifer A.
Spring 2014

R1B/19

Reading & Composition:
Still Life: Nature and Art

TTh 3:30-5

Come forth into the light of things,

Let Nature be your teacher.

—William Wordsworth, “The Tables Turned”

(read more)

Stancek, Claire Marie
Spring 2014

R1B/20

Reading & Composition:
Reader's Block

TTh 3:30-5

This course takes its title from David Markson’s novel—which itself takes its title from some experience we have all probably felt some time or another. Yet such a ubiquitous feeling is difficult to come to terms with. The intensity of...(read more)

Vandeloo, David Conigliaro
Spring 2014

R1B/21

Reading & Composition:
On the Case

TTh 5-6:30

Do we gain a new perspective when we represent something as a "case"? How do we narrate the development and confines of a case? Is a case intended to showcase the unusual or extraordinary or, perhaps conversely, the typical or the real? ...(read more)

Cordes Selbin, Jesse
Spring 2014

R1B/22

Reading & Composition:
Shakespeare and Film

TTh 5-6:30

Since the earliest days of silent film, William Shakespeare's works have been adapted on screen hundreds of times in diverse settings, from fascist Italy to the Wild West, medieval Japan to the undiscovered planet of Altair IV.  In this c...(read more)

Bahr, Stephanie M
Summer 2014

N1A/1

Reading and Composition:
Awakening

MW 2-4

This shaking keeps me steady. I should know.
What falls away is always. And is near.
I wake to sleep, and take my waking slow.
I learn by going where I have to go.
   – Theodore Roethke, from “The ...(read more)

Blevins, Jeffrey
Summer 2014

N1B/1

Reading and Composition:
(Note new topic:) Pop Truth

TTh 12-2

NOTE NEW COURSE DESCRIPTION (and the instructor and texts have also changed):

In his “Proverbs of Hell,” from The Marriage of Heaven and Hell, William Blake writes, “Truth can never be told so as to be understood,...(read more)

Ahmed, Adam
Fall 2013

R1A/1

Reading and Composition:
On Campus: Fictions of College Life

MWF 9-10

What would it mean to imagine our own lives at university as part of an invented universe? The fictional possibilities of the college...(read more)

Fleishman, Kathryn
Fall 2013

R1A/3

Reading and Composition:
Narratives We Live By

MWF 11-12

How does narrative shape our experience of ourselves and the world around us? In what ways do established narratives inflect the choices we make? What possibilities does narrative offer for a more active reworking of our world? In this class, we&r...(read more)

Cordes Selbin, Jesse
Fall 2013

R1A/4

Reading and Composition:
Gossip

MWF 1-2

Gossip, according to Roland Barthes, constitutes “murder by language”—which, although extreme, is hardly a surprising condemnation. From Soren Kierkegaard’s dismissal of gossip as “idle talk,” to one contemporar...(read more)

Stancek, Claire Marie
Fall 2013

R1A/5

Reading and Composition:
Narrative, Narration, Narrators

MWF 2-3

In this course, we will read a series of texts that highlight, question, or vex their own status as narratives.  Along the way, we will encounter frame narratives that do not seem to fit the stories they enclose or that fail to close at all, ...(read more)

Hsu, Sharon
Fall 2013

R1A/6

Reading and Composition:
Gods and Monsters

MWF 3-4

This course is a study of the nature of greatness. We will discuss the strained relationship between greatness and goodness, and the relationship between goodnes...(read more)

Lorden, Jennifer A.
Fall 2013

R1A/8

Reading and Composition:
The Demands of Beauty

MW 4-5:30

Channeling Dante’s insight that “beauty awakens the soul to act,” Ralph Waldo Emerson once wrote that the love of beauty begins with appreciation—the cultivation of taste—and culminates in the creation of a work of ar...(read more)

Langione, Matt
Fall 2013

R1A/10

Reading and Composition:
A Meet and Happy Conversation

TTh 9:30-11

In Doctrine and Discipline of Divorce, John Milton writes that “a meet and happy conversation is the chiefest and noblest end of marriage.” This course will explore the ethical, romantic, and philosophical implications of this...(read more)

Greer, Erin
Fall 2013

R1A/11

Reading and Composition:
Saints and Soldiers

TTh 11-12:30

While holy warriors have gained a bad reputation in today’s world, warrior-saints were once a flavor of holy persons quite popular in England from the Middle Ages up through the Early Modern period.  Though not all are canonized (offici...(read more)

Miller, Jasmin
Fall 2013

R1A/12

Reading and Composition:
War In Words: Literature of the Great War

TTh 12:30-2

During World War 1, combatant poets wrote poetry directly from the trenches and even circulated literary publications while bursting shells and gunfire threatened sudden death at any moment. This co-incidence between exploding shells and explosive...(read more)

Abramson, Anna Jones
Fall 2013

R1A/13

Reading and Composition:
Transmission, Tradition, Translation

TTh 2-3:30

How, and to what extent, can one person’s experiences be transmitted to another person?  What would it mean for a made object to enable an encounter in which the perspectives and concerns unique to someone in profoundly distant circumst...(read more)

Alexander, Edward Sterling
Fall 2013

R1A/14

Reading and Composition:
The Way We Read Now

TTh 3:30-5

This course is an occasion to reflect on how--if at all--we read now. Our engagement with this famously vexed question will be twofold. We'll first consider what we read, entering into contemporary debates on how digital and media tec...(read more)

Ling, Jessica
Fall 2013

R1A/15

Reading and Composition:
Boundaries and Borders

TTh 5-6:30

What is “race”? This class explores the concept of race, racial identity, and the fictions of racial difference as authored by history and science, power and dominance, culture and social standing. We will focus on exploring the permea...(read more)

Seeger, Andrea Yolande
Fall 2013

R1B/1

Reading and Composition:
The Really Quite Contemporary

MWF 9-10

In this course we will investigate our reals, some [real]isms, and maybe even realityism in contemporary prose and poetry.  We will look at works of contemporary fiction and poetry—and also at television and film— that both insist...(read more)

Gregory, Jane
Fall 2013

R1B/2

Reading and Composition:
The Conscience

MWF 10-11

This course explores how writers and philosophers have grappled with notions of the “conscience” throughout western literature. Far from being a static, universal or unchanging concept, “the conscience” has a long, dynamic,...(read more)

Ding, Katherine
Fall 2013

R1B/3

Reading and Composition:
The Afterworlds of the American Revolution, 1776-1819

Note new time: TTh 3:30-5

In 1776, as Jefferson declared, the American Colonies could no longer tolerate the yoke of English rule, and must “throw off such Government” and “dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another.” The Re...(read more)

Trocchio, Rachel
Fall 2013

R1B/5

Reading and Composition:
Bloodfeud

MWF 1-2

Blood, guts, violence, bravery, cowardice, obligation, and various combinations of the above will be the focus of this course. We will study medieval and modern accounts of feud in a variety of genres (including heroic poetry, sagas, grammatical t...(read more)

Hobson, Jacob
Fall 2013

R1B/7

Reading and Composition:
What's Serious About What's Funny?

MW 4-5:30

"Comedy proceeds out of suffering.  Usually someone else's."--Joseph Gelmis

"Comedy is in long shot, tragedy in close-up."--Charlie Chaplin

In this course we will consider a series of formal and historica...(read more)

Beck, Rachel
Fall 2013

R1B/8

Reading and Composition:
note new topic: Vaudeville Blues and the Harlem Renaissance

TTh 8-9:30

Karl Miller's text Segregating Sound offers readings of previously unavailable record label archival material that gives us a revised reading of the U.S. popular recording industry and its marketing of racial categories and hierarchie...(read more)

Sullivan, Khalil
Fall 2013

R1B/9

Reading and Composition:
Suspension, Uselessness

TTh 9:30-11

I mean Negative Capability, that is when man is capable of being in uncertainties, Mysteries, doubts, without any irritable reaching after fact & reason.

- John Keats

As an R&C course, th...(read more)

O'Connor, Megan
Fall 2013

R1B/10

Reading and Composition:
Profane Illuminations

TTh 11-12:30

Though Walter Benjamin coined the phrase to describe a specifically “materialistic, anthropological inspiration” that signifies “the true creative overcoming of religious illumination,” the profane illuminations this class ...(read more)

Ahmed, Adam
Fall 2013

R1B/11

Reading and Composition:
note new topic: Novel/Nation

TTh 12:30-2

This course is a study of the relationship between two modern social forms: the novel and the nation. As historian Benedict Anderson has shown, the rise of the nation has an intimate, if not mutually constitutive, relation to the rise of the novel...(read more)

Nadal, Paul
Fall 2013

R1B/12

Reading and Composition:
note new topic: When Reading Goes Wrong

TTh 2-3:30

Every day, we're called upon to make hundreds of interpretive judgments based on things we read, see, or hear.  But what happens when we misjudge a text, or when we're unable to judge it at all?  Depictions of failed readings are...(read more)

Bauer, Mark
Fall 2013

R1B/14

Reading and Composition:
note new topic: The Bonds of Taste

TTh 5-6:30

What does it mean to cultivate "good taste" for oneself? What sorts of social relationships happen when we judge someone else's taste or recognize through their appreciations a kindred spirit? How is taste learned and taught? How doe...(read more)

Weiner, Joshua J
Weiner, Joshua
Spring 2013

R1A/1

Reading and Composition:
Black and Yellow: Contemporary African American and Asian American Writing

MWF 10-11

Regrettably, despite the title, this course is not about Wiz Khalifa or the city of Pittsburgh. But channeling Mr. Khalifa, we too will aim to "know what it is" by way of developing thinking habits that "do it big." Specificall...(read more)

Lee, Seulghee
Spring 2013

R1A/2

Reading and Composition:
How to Read "How to Read Poetry"

MWF 1-2

1. The class title is not a typo.

2. Poetry is often considered to be the least self-explanatory form of literature.

3. Expositions on poetry often offer only limited aid.

Though one must accept the first two point...(read more)

Acu, Adrian Mark
Spring 2013

R1A/3

Reading and Composition:
The Bonds of Taste

MWF 2-3

What does it mean to cultivate “good taste” for oneself? What sorts of social relationships happen when we judge someone else’s taste or recognize through their appreciations a kindred spirit? How is taste learned and taught? Our...(read more)

Weiner, Joshua J
Spring 2013

R1A/4

Reading and Composition:
Lies, Damned Lies, and Statistics: Representations of Numbers in 19th-Century Literature

MW 4-5:30

“In this life we want nothing but Facts, sir, nothing but Facts,” Thomas Gradgrind infamously insists in Charles Dickens’ novel Hard Times. “Facts” accumulated in the 19th century as never before. ...(read more)

Kolb, Margaret
Spring 2013

R1A/5

Reading and Composition:
Big Novels

TTh 8-9:30

Around the mid-nineteenth century, novels--like the British populace that wrote them--began to increase in size. Those peculiar and numerous Victorians were as famous for their queen as they were for their massive, unwieldy novels. In this class, ...(read more)

Ling, Jessica
Spring 2013

R1A/6

Reading and Composition:
note new topic: Autobiography

MWF 12-1

James Frey’s memoir A Million Little Pieces, which chronicled the author’s horrific past, created a sensation among readers for its gripping treatment of addiction. But the book caused a far greater sensation when The Smoking ...(read more)

Beck, Rachel
Spring 2013

R1A/7

Reading and Composition:
Special Friends

TTh 11-12:30

This course will examine theories and depictions of friendship in a variety of philosophical and literary texts. What makes for a good friend? What circumstances are necessary for friendship to exist? What responsibilities does a friend have to an...(read more)

Shelley, Jonathan
Spring 2013

R1A/8

Reading and Composition:
"Work Hard, Play Hard": Work, Leisure, the Victorians and Us

TTh 12:30-2

Work hard, play hard: it's the Berkeley way of life. 

But why do we work so hard? To get a job? To make money? To earn some leisure time? To give our lives meaning? We can shed light on all of these questions and many possible answ...(read more)

Larner-Lewis, Jonathan
Spring 2013

R1A/9

Reading and Composition:
Adventures of the Unheroic: A Hero’s Journey in Fourteenth-Century Poetry

TTh 2-3:30

Narrow escapes, displays of prowess, and confrontations that end in triumph tend to typify the heroic in popular culture, whether in action films or graphic novels.  Although some contributions to these genres may at times complicate this por...(read more)

Crosson, Chad Gregory
Spring 2013

R1A/10

Reading and Composition:
Aspiring Minds and Expelling Bodies: A Brief Survey of Satire

TTh 3:30-5

As the first course in the Reading and Composition series, this class will work to develop your ability to read and write critically. To that end, this class requires that you write several short essays of increasing length and sophistication as w...(read more)

Jeziorek, Alek M
Spring 2013

R1A/11

Reading and Composition:
Eros in Shakespeare

TTh 5-6:30

In this course we will read some of Shakespeare’s works and look at the aesthetics of Eros. We will read Shakespeare with an eye toward how Eros is represented: as a figure (the god of love), as “love” in the most spiritual sense...(read more)

Castillo, Carmen
Spring 2013

R1B/1

Reading and Composition:
What Is Enlightenment?

MWF 9-10

What constitutes cultural progress? How do we value the potential of a life and a mind? This course will explore some of the complicated legacies of the European Enlightenment. To begin, we will survey ways in which the Enlightenment remains both ...(read more)

Mangin, Sarah
Spring 2013

R1B/2

Reading and Composition:
The Poetry of the Past

MWF 9-10

The objects of study in this course are ancient, medieval, and early modern poems that not only describe past events, but in doing so also formulate specific and often surprising conceptions of the past through the manipulation of poetic form.&nbs...(read more)

Garcia, Marcos Albert
Spring 2013

R1B/3

Reading and Composition:
Representative Men

MWF 10-11

This class, which takes its title from a series of lectures by Ralph Waldo Emerson, will examine one of the most basic questions of literature—about whom should we write?—and consider the ways in which this seemingly simple question is...(read more)

Dumont, Alex
Spring 2013

R1B/4

Reading and Composition:
“It’s the End of the World as We Know It (And I feel fine)”

MWF 11-12

“But the age of chivalry is gone—That of sophisters, oeconomists, and calculators has succeeded; and the glory of Europe is extinguished for ever,” laments the political thinker Edmund Burke upon seeing Marie-Antoinette’s h...(read more)

Lee, Sookyoung (Soo)
Spring 2013

R1B/5

Reading and Composition:
Indecision

MWF 11-12

This course will ask its students to take up a strangely double task: to practice how to craft an argument—how to take a position in writing—while spending time reflecting on what it means to be, and to remain, undecided.  

...(read more)

Ty, Michelle
Spring 2013

R1B/6

Reading and Composition:
Early American Literature - Pessimism and Unease

MWF 12-1

This course will concentrate on American works written in the decades following the outbreak of the Revolutionary War.  We will be focusing on the work of authors who express unease, pessimism and even anger about the newly created United Sta...(read more)

Junkerman, Nicholas
Spring 2013

R1B/7

Reading and Composition:
The English of France

MWF 12-1

To say that the English have a complicated relationship to their French neighbors is probably a bit of an understatement.  There has historically been a great deal of political cooperation between these two nations, but there has been a great...(read more)

Perry, R. D.
Spring 2013

R1B/8

Reading and Composition:
Ethnicizing America

MWF 12-1

Why are we a “nation of immigrants”? What does it mean to possess “the audacity of hope”? How are we “post-race” but not post-ethnicity? This course examines the mythos of America through (mostly) contemporary l...(read more)

Xiang, Sunny
Spring 2013

R1B/10

Reading and Composition:
This is Not Real.

MWF 2-3

This is a course about a strange, perhaps essentially aesthetic form of experience. From daydreamers and romantics to addicts and the insane, these works confront us with figures whose experiences put in question any...(read more)
Creasy, CFS
Spring 2013

R1B/11

Reading and Composition:
The Sonic Artifact

MWF 2-3

“How canst thou hear / Who knowest not the language of the dead?” This is the question Earth has for Prometheus in Percy Bysshe Shelley’s Prometheus Unbound. Prometheus, inhabitant of the mortal world and not yet dead, s...(read more)

Le, Serena
Spring 2013

R1B/12

Reading and Composition:
Asian American Speculative Realism

MWF 2-3

Asian American literature hasn’t always gotten along with realism. As a literature read through the lens of ethnicity, it is saddled with the responsibility of realistically portraying ethnicity. Is Asian American realism therefore ultimatel...(read more)

Fan, Christopher Tzechung
Spring 2013

R1B/13

Reading and Composition:
Difficult Literature

MWF 3-4

“Poets in our civilization, as it exists at present, must be difficult.” Or so thought T.S. Eliot in 1921. Whether poets must be difficult is an open question, but the fact is that a lot of what we call literature is ...(read more)

Taylor, Bradford Alden
Spring 2013

R1B/14

Reading and Composition:
Revelation and Revision

MW 4-5:30

“… now with the scales dropped from his eyes…”

-       Herman Melville, “Benito Cereno”

As an R&C course, this R1B co...(read more)

O'Connor, Megan
Spring 2013

R1B/15

Reading and Composition:
Revolution and Counter-Revolution in the Long 20th Century

TTh 8-9:30

Hannah Arendt once claimed that the modern concept of revolution involves a sometimes mistaken sense of history beginning anew. For Arendt, this notion of a new day, of  “an entirely new story, a story never known or told before” ...(read more)

Richards, Jill
Spring 2013

R1B/16

Reading and Composition:
“So this is Dyoublong?”: Reading Modern Ireland

TTh 9:30-11

James Joyce claimed in a 1907 lecture that “No one who has any self-respect stays in Ireland, but flees afar as though from a country that has undergone the visitation of an angered Jove.” Literary critic Declan Kiberd writes that the ...(read more)

Tazudeen, Rasheed
Spring 2013

R1B/17

Reading and Composition:
Creation and Creativity

TTh 11-12:30

“It is only good for God to create without toil; that which man can create without toil is worthless.” – John Ruskin

Creativity was not always a concept applied to the human potential to conceive of something original, to ...(read more)

Saltzman, Benjamin A.
Spring 2013

R1B/18

Reading and Composition:
The Parallel Discourses of Sex and Race: The Problems of Othering Sexuality

TTh 12:30-2

James Baldwin once said, “The sexual question and the racial question have always been entwined, you know.  If Americans can mature on the level of racism, then they have to mature on the level of sexuality.” This course will be i...(read more)

Seeger, Andrea Yolande
Spring 2013

R1B/19

Reading and Composition:
U.S. Latina/o Literature and Culture

TTh 2-3:30

This course will move toward a collaborative writing practice through in-class presentations designed to create a shared responsibility for understanding the reading, peer-editing, and group office hours. We will also learn the various stages of t...(read more)

Maese-Cohen, Marcelle
Spring 2013

R1B/20

Reading and Composition:
A Poetic Education in the American Grain

TTh 3:30-5

Why is there education, there is education because the two tables which are folding are not tied together with a ribbon, string is used and string being used there is a necessity for another one and another one not bein...(read more)

Miller, Christopher Patrick
Spring 2013

R1B/21

Reading and Composition:
Bad Writing

TTh 5-6:30

This course asks students to become better writers by thinking – and writing – about why we call certain kinds of writing “bad” and other kinds “good.” Specifically, we’ll ask what writers, critics, and, y...(read more)

Mansouri, Leila
Spring 2013

R1B/22

Reading and Composition:
Thinking Through Poetry

TTh 5-6:30

"Poets are the unacknowledged legislators of the world."
"Poetry makes nothing happen."

Behind Percy Bysshe Shelley's exalted claim for poetry's shaping influence on the outside world and W.H. Auden's s...(read more)

Lee, Richard Z
Summer 2013

N173/1

The Language and Literature of Films:
The Hollywood Western

M 2-5 & W 2-4

Regular attendance is required. Two seven-page essays and a final quiz. Viewing notes taken during films viewed on Mondays will be handed in on Wednesdays. The class will be a mix of lecture and discussion.

This course will be taught in...(read more)

Breitwieser, Mitchell
Summer 2013

N180A/1

Autobiography

MTuTh 10-12

In 1909 William Dean Howells called autobiography, “the most democratic province in the republic of letters.” Acknowledging autobiography as a “characteristically American mode of st...(read more)

Wong, Hertha D. Sweet
Summer 2013

N180H/1

The Short Story

MW 10-12

A broad survey of the short story, this course will cover texts from several regions and historical periods.  We will examine the origin of the short story and some of its common features as well as the unique impressions culturally and histo...(read more)

Gordon, Zachary
Fall 2012

R1A/1

Reading & Composition:
Snobbery

MWF 9-10

We know a snob when we see one, though snobbery itself is curiously hard to define. Is it a process of making aesthetic distinctions or social ones? Or both? How do the choices we make every day – reading the right books, riding the right bik...(read more)

Ling, Jessica
Fall 2012

R1A/2

Reading & Composition:
Love Songs

MWF 10-11

This course takes as its object of study works of art that concern themselves with the nature of  “love.”  Arguably the most popular and ubiquitous of aesthetic productions, what we will broadly be calling Love Songs are now ...(read more)

Perry, R. D.
Fall 2012

R1A/3

Reading & Composition:
The Miniature

MWF 10-11

First and foremost, this course will be about writing.  A propos of the seminar’s theme, we will work on and revise mostly small pieces, while reading and thinking about miniatures of a...(read more)

Ty, Michelle
Fall 2012

R1A/4

Reading & Composition:
Music and Modernism

MWF 11-12

“Poets who will not study music are defective.” So wrote Ezra Pound in 1917, as World War I raged in Europe and literary modernism gained momentum both alongside, and in response. Pound may have been among the bluntest of his contempor...(read more)

Le, Serena
Fall 2012

R1A/5

Reading & Composition:
What Have I Done ?

MWF 12-1

This course will examine the problematic interactions between experience, action, and knowledge. Focusing primarily on the second half of the 19th and the first half of the 20th century, we will read mostly narrative l...(read more)

Creasy, CFS
Fall 2012

R1A/6

Reading & Composition:
(Re)presenting the Past

MWF 12-1

This course will ask a variety of questions about the interaction of the past and the present in literature, beginning with one that may (at first) seem simple:  What exactly do we mean by “the past”?  This question, as we wi...(read more)

Dumont, Alex
Fall 2012

R1A/7

Reading & Composition:
Imagining America, Imagining a New World

MWF 1-2

What do we imagine when we imagine America? Is America a place? A set of ideals? Both? For the writers we’ll look at, America was a “new world” – one that represented not only a new and uncharted space on the map but a spac...(read more)

Mansouri, Leila
Fall 2012

R1A/8

Reading & Composition:
Perception and Revolution

MWF 2-3

"But these enchantments were a little disenchanted as his eye fell on the corroded main-chains."                                         ...(read more)

O'Connor, Megan
Fall 2012

R1A/9

Reading & Composition:
Eros and Its Discontents

MWF 2-3

This class will have two aims: to develop transferrable writing skills so that students will be well equipped to approach the variety of essay forms they will encounter throughout their college careers, an...(read more)

Lee, Richard Z
Fall 2012

R1A/10

Reading & Composition:
Things Are Not Okay

MWF 3-4

 

This course will concentrate on American works written in the decades following the outbreak of the Revolutionary War.  We will be focusing on the work of authors who express unease, pessimism and even anger about the newly crea...(read more)

Junkerman, Nicholas
Fall 2012

R1A/11

Reading & Composition:
Inhumanity

MWF 1-2

“Nature is acquainted with no forms and no concepts, and likewise with no species, but only with an X that remains inaccessible and undefinable for us”

—Friedrich Nietzsche

Nineteenth- and ...(read more)

Tazudeen, Rasheed
Fall 2012

R1A/12

Reading & Composition:
Everywhere is Nowhere: Urbanism and Place in Literature and Art

TTh 8-9:30

How do you describe the feel of a city?  What gives a place character?  What enables someone know where they are?  What do we do when we are lost?   
 
This course will pursue fundamental ...(read more)
Miller, Christopher Patrick
Fall 2012

R1A/13

Reading & Composition:
Nostalgia, Homesickness and Exile

MW 4-5:30

“History is a nightmare from which I am trying to awake,” declares Stephen Dedalus in A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, wishing to unburden himself from the baggages of the past that placed him where he is.

Yet m...(read more)

Lee, Sookyoung (Soo)
Fall 2012

R1A/14

Reading & Composition:
The Essay: Evidence and Idea

MW 10:30-12

Our work in this class will focus on the essay.  Not the five-paragraph one.  Not the one that begins with a simple assertion and moves forward, sometimes ploddingly, point by point.  The essays we will write in this class ...(read more)

Speirs, Kenneth
Fall 2012

R1A/15

Reading & Composition:
Tanto melior: The Rhetoric of Superiority

TTh 12:30-2

“Tanto melior: ne ego quidem intellexi!” [So much better: even I couldn’t understand it!]

So goes the famous compliment than an ancient orator once gave to his student. In response to this example of rhetorical pr...(read more)

Saltzman, Benjamin A.
Fall 2012

R1A/16

Reading & Composition:
Unreliable Narrators

TTh 2-3:30

What happens when the teller of a story misleads us? What qualities make for a palatable narrator that we as readers are willing to follow to the end of the book? In this course, we will read select twentieth-century novels that prompt us to exami...(read more)

Xiang, Sunny
Fall 2012

R1A/17

Reading & Composition:
History and Form

TTh 3:30-5

The goal of this course is to explore the conventions, contexts, and uses of writing about the past.  We will investigate historical "writing" in a variety of media (oral recitation, chronicles, poetry, plays, novels, film, etc.) an...(read more)

Garcia, Marcos Albert
Fall 2012

R1A/18

Reading & Composition:
Taste Matters

TTh 3:30-5

What do we mean when we say that someone has “good taste” or a “cultured palate”? What makes a joke “tasteless” or a film “disgusting”? The concept of taste plays a role in our daily activities (&ldq...(read more)

Taylor, Bradford Alden
Fall 2012

R1A/19

Reading & Composition:
What is Enlightenment?

TTh 5-6:30

What constitutes cultural progress? How do we value the potential of a life and a mind? This course will explore some of the complicated legacies of the European Enlightenment. To begin, we will survey ways in which the Enlightenment remains both ...(read more)

Mangin, Sarah
Fall 2012

R1A/20

Reading & Composition:
When Reading Goes Wrong

TTh 5-6:30

Every day, we’re called upon to make hundreds of interpretive judgments based on things we read, see, or hear.  But what happens when we misjudge one of these texts, or when we’re unable to judge it at all?  In addition to be...(read more)

Bauer, Mark
Fall 2012

R1A/21

Reading & Composition:
Educating the Creature

MWF 12-1

"Well, sir, after all, I cannot help feeling very unco...(read more)

Naturale, Lauren
Fall 2012

R1B/1

Reading & Composition:
Ideas of the University

MWF 9-10

This seems like a good a time to try to figure out, maybe even articulate, what we are all doing here. We will read and write around the themes of education, work and leisure, trying to come to some understanding of what they mean and how they fun...(read more)

Larner-Lewis, Jonathan
Fall 2012

R1B/2

Reading & Composition:
On the Road

MWF 11-12

The six decades between Frederick Jackson Turner’s 1893 declaration of the end of the American Frontier and John F. Kennedy’s commitment to a “Ne...(read more)

Yoon, Irene
Fall 2012

R1B/3

Reading & Composition:
Quarrels with Ourselves

MWF 1-2

“Out of our quarrels with others we make rhetoric. Out of our quarrels with ourselves we make poetry.” – W.B. Yeats

In this college writing course, we will study works of literature that record an author’s quarrels w...(read more)

Emerson, Maude
Fall 2012

R1B/4

Reading & Composition:
The Cold War and American Art

MWF 3-4

National security, the nuclear family, racial tensions, and rampant consumerism mark the early years of the Cold War in the United States.  In this course, we will examine the cultural influence of the Cold War context on American literature,...(read more)

Rahimtoola, Samia Shabnam
Fall 2012

R1B/5

Reading & Composition:
Adventures of the Unheroic: A Hero’s Journey in Fourteenth-Century Poetry

MWF 3-4

Narrow escapes, displays of prowess, and confrontations that end in triumph tend to typify the heroic in popular culture, whether in action films or graphic novels.  Although some contributions to these genres may at times complicate this por...(read more)

Crosson, Chad Gregory
Fall 2012

R1B/6

Reading & Composition:
"The Play's the Thing": Literature as Make-Believe

TTh 8-9:30

Course Description: Make-believe has an astonishing ability to register itself as fantasy, diversion, duplicity, therapy, etc. This course will introduce students to methods of close reading, argumentati...(read more)

Xin, Wendy Veronica
Fall 2012

R1B/7

Reading & Composition:
Revolution and Counter-Revolution in the Long 20th Century

TTh 8-9:30

In "Modernity and Revolution," Perry Anderson begins with a periodizing claim, arguing that “the haze of social revolu...(read more)

Richards, Jill
Fall 2012

R1B/8

Reading & Composition:
Fictions of the Human

TTh 11-12:30

What constitutes our humanness? Are thinking and language-use uniquely human capacities or can intelligence be attributed to animals and machines? Is it possible to conceive of a timeless definition of the human being, or is human identity periodi...(read more)

Gaydos, Rebecca
Fall 2012

R1B/9

Reading & Composition:
Yes: Fragmentary Literature

TTh 3:30-5

The work of the critic is often thought of as constructing a “yes” out of a “no”: of making meaning out of textual problems.  In order to better align the critic with the writer, this class will work with 20th(read more)

Acu, Adrian Mark
Fall 2012

R1B/10

Reading & Composition:
Writing and Controversy

TTh 3:30-5

How do we approach writing that seeks to alienate us?  How can we understand books whose characters refuse to understand each other?  How should we react when confronted with art so offensive that understanding seems unethical? 

...(read more)
Rodal, Jocelyn
Fall 2012

R1B/11

Reading & Composition:
Belief

TTh 5-6:30

(read more)

Kolb, Margaret
Fall 2012

R1B/12

Reading & Composition:
Labyrinths of Language

TTh 5-6:30

Words, when they are well-behaved, are supposed to do our bidding. We trust them to contain our thoughts and mediate our relationships with each another without asserting their own agency or being. But Western literature is full of stories in whic...(read more)

Moore, Stephanie Anne
Fall 2012

R1B/13

Reading & Composition:
Hip-hop and American Culture

TTh 3:30-5

In a typical college class on hip-hop, you might expect to investigate the history and sociology of this complex cultural movement, beginning in the South Bronx with DJ Kool Herc and the transformation of household appliance into musical instrumen...(read more)

Lee, Seulghee
Spring 2012

R1A/1

Reading & Composition:
American Song

MWF 9-10

Course Description:  This course revolves around the popular American Song form from the mid-19th century to the present.  We will approach the American song not just as a historical artifact aided by inventions in technology (sheet musi...(read more)

Sullivan, Khalil
Spring 2012

R1A/2

Reading & Composition:
Apocalypse / Now

MWF 10-11

The stolen title of this course perfectly captures the two topics this class will explore. The first is "nowness," or what it is to live in our time; the second is the notion of apocalypse—perhaps better understood as the unmaking ...(read more)

Cullen, Ben
Spring 2012

R1A/3

Reading & Composition:
Ideas of the University: School, Work, and the World

MWF 11-12

This seems like a good a time to figure out, and maybe even start to articulate, what we are all doing here. We will read and write around the concepts of education, work and leisure, trying to come to some understanding of how they function and i...(read more)

Larner-Lewis, Jonathan
Spring 2012

R1A/4

Reading & Composition:
Autobiography

MWF 12-1

“I have become a question to myself”

                               &nbsp...(read more)

Ketz, Charity Corine
Spring 2012

R1A/5

Reading & Composition:
Refusal and Resistance in Tragedy

MWF 1-2

Tragedy, roughly speaking, is a form of dramatic art that asks whether human suffering can be made to signify. In this class, we will trace a figure who recurs throughout the corpus of tragic plays written in Europe from antiquity to the present: ...(read more)

Moore, Stephanie Anne
Spring 2012

R1A/6

Reading & Composition:
The Social Practice of Love

MWF 3-4

De La Rochefoucauld famously wrote that “plenty of people would never fall in love if they had not heard other people talk about it.” Where do we find this “talk about love” that has such suggestive power?  This course...(read more)

Weiner, Joshua J
Spring 2012

R1A/7

Reading & Composition:
Communication of Poetic Effects in Shakespeare

TTh 5-6:30

We use language to express our thoughts and to be understood: to communicate.  In communication we rely on the shared knowledge and the shared assumptions of our audience in order to ensure as effective communication as possible.  In poe...(read more)

Castillo, Carmen
Spring 2012

R1A/8

Reading & Composition:
Ghosts of the Past

TTh 8-9:30

This course will focus on the presence of the past in various literary genres and texts. We will examine how the past is embodied through flashback, memory, and recurrence, and explore the formal means by which the past structures or intrudes upon...(read more)

Knox, Marisa Palacios
Spring 2012

R1A/9

Reading & Composition:
Writing About Literarary Experience

TTh 9:30-11

In this course we will read and write about markedly different kinds of literature—one novel, one play, a good deal of verse, some short stories, some contemporary song lyrics—with the aim of coming to some conclusions about what makes...(read more)

Jordan, Joseph P
Jordan, Joe
Spring 2012

R1A/10

Reading & Composition:
Totality Chic

MWF 10-11

Where did the sandwich you ate for lunch come from? Where were the lettuce and tomatoes farmed? Who harvested them? Where did they come from, and why? What river or reservoir contributed the water? How about the electricity used -- how wa...(read more)

Fan, Christopher Tzechung
Spring 2012

R1A/11

Reading & Composition:
American Exposures

TTh 12:30-2

Dear reader, this is a course that thinks about Facebook while it is pretending to contemplate American literary history. Perhaps you can identify. This course worries that maintaining a fascinating individual identity comes with far too much bagg...(read more)

Clinton, Daniel Patrick
Spring 2012

R1A/13

Reading & Composition:
19th- and 20th-Century Experiment/alisms

TTh 3:30-5

What does it mean to undertake an experiment? Why might one wish to describe a work of art as “experimental”?  Is there any value in a failed experiment?  Beginning with these questions, this course will explore the hope, eup...(read more)

Rahimtoola, Samia Shabnam
Spring 2012

R1B/1

Reading & Composition:
21st-Century Native American Fiction

MWF 9-10

This course will examine a variety of texts written by or about Native Americans in the first decade of the 21st century. Course requirements will include two preliminary essays (3-5 pp), and a final research component (10-15 pp). At th...(read more)

Gillis, Brian
Spring 2012

R1B/2

Reading & Composition:
U.S. Autobiography as Ethnography

MWF 9-10

How should we read the “I” under the burden of representation?  What is the relationship between singular life and group consciousness?  How does the act of self-documentation produce a social record?  In this course, we...(read more)

Rana, Swati
Spring 2012

R1B/3

Reading & Composition:
No Man's Land--Dividing Lines in the Great War

MWF 10-11

This is the second class in the Reading and Composition series and, as a result, it will focus on the writing process, critical reading, and research, all of which culminate in a research paper due at the end of the sem...(read more)

Jeziorek, Alek M
Spring 2012

R1B/6

Reading & Composition:
Victorian Research

MWF 11-12

This course will be about research in two senses: first, we will learn how to perform research on a number of Victorian texts; second, we will discuss the way research itself is represented in these texts. In other words, we’ll be researchin...(read more)

Terlaak Poot, Luke
Spring 2012

R1B/7

Reading & Composition:
Speaking the Unspeakable, Voicing the Unspoken

MWF 12-1

This course, while seeking to build on the basic writing tenants introduced in R1A by essaying longer expository and argumentative pieces with an emphasis on learning and utilizing research skills, will focus on exploring the unspeakable and unspo...(read more)

Seeger, Andrea Yolande
Spring 2012

R1B/8

Reading & Composition:
Beyond Islands

MWF 12-1

The meaning behind this class’s title is twofold. While it will use islands—which frequently inhabit a strange, fantastical space—as a guiding theme for its selection of texts and readings, this class encourages thinking beyond t...(read more)

Shelley, Jonathan
Spring 2012

R1B/9

Reading & Composition:
The Gothic: Revivals and Survivals

MWF 1-2

The word “Gothic” still evokes stock images of darkness, decay, and danger, from the mouldering Castle Dracula to the inky bayous of True Blood. The source of these images is ultimately the Gothic novel trad...(read more)

Cannon, Benjamin Zenas
Spring 2012

R1B/10

Reading & Composition:
Strange Cases

MWF 1-2

Per the title of Robert Louis Stevenson’s 1886 novella, this course will explore a number of “strange cases”—serpent seductresses, mesmerized corpses, duplicitous doppelgangers, spectral monkeys (and other inexplicable appa...(read more)

Mershon, Ella
Spring 2012

R1B/11

Reading & Composition:
Recent Memoirs on Loss

MWF 2-3

In her review of Joyce Carol Oates’ A Widow’s Story (2011), Janet Maslin describes the memoir as a contribution to the growing “loss-of-spouse-market.” Indeed, from Calvin Trillin’s About Alice (2006...(read more)

Fritz, Tracy
Spring 2012

R1B/12

Reading & Composition:
Late Victorians

MWF 2-3

"I don't believe there is much of a future to speak of. We're in a bit of a decadent spiral, aren't we? Sinking fast. Big brother all the way, baby. Which is why we prefer impressions to ideas. Situatio...(read more)

Naturale, Lauren
Spring 2012

R1B/14

Reading & Composition:
Country and City

MWF 3-4

The opposition between city life and country life goes back at least as far as ancient Rome, but today it takes on a new significance as urbanites are asked to respond to a problem that is often felt more sharply in rural areas, whether it’s...(read more)

Bauer, Mark
Spring 2012

R1B/15

Reading & Composition:
Storytelling

MWF 11-12

This course will develop your writing and research skills through careful study of works that, to varying degrees, concern the art of storytelling. We will closely read several authors ranging from Herodotus to Italo Calvino, all the while posing ...(read more)

Gordon, Zachary
Spring 2012

R1B/16

Reading & Composition:
Victorian Crime

TTh 8-9:30

We like to describe the Victorians the way we think about our great-great aunts—well-meaning and sweet, but also uptight, prudish, and stodgy.  But just because polite Victorian society didn’t talk about sex, drugs, and c...(read more)

Baldwin, Ruth
Spring 2012

R1B/17

Reading & Composition:
Alternate Narratives

TTh 8-9:30

The texts we will read this semester have generally been read as stories of self-discovery. Through class discussion and close reading analysis, we will uncover the hidden themes and formal structures which complicate how we understand these stori...(read more)

Menilla, David D.
Spring 2012

R1B/18

Reading & Composition:
Modern African American Poetry, 1940-1960

TTh 9:30-11

In this course, we will...(read more)

Gardezi, Nilofar
Spring 2012

R1B/19

Reading & Composition:
Postcolonial China

MWF 9-10

Postcolonialism, as a discourse that analyzes and critiques the legacy of colonialism, has largely been developed to describe the experiences of former Western colonies in the Caribbean, India, and Africa.  This course examines the value and ...(read more)

Lee, Amy
Spring 2012

R1B/20

Reading & Composition:
Reading California

TTh 11-12:30

This course will examine literature produced in and about California.  After grounding our inquiries with Indigenous stories and questions of performance, we will then explore the convergences of narrative, geography, identity, and economics ...(read more)

Hausman, Blake M.
Hausman, Blake
Spring 2012

R1B/22

Reading & Composition:
Shakespearean Tragedy

TTh 12:30-2

This course is primarily a writing course, and our focus will be on writing. That said, since we need a subject to write about, I've chosen to focus on Shakespeare's great tragedies—namely, Hamlet, Macbeth, Othello and K...(read more)

Jordan, Joseph P
Jordan, Joe
Spring 2012

R1B/23

Reading & Composition:
Laughter and Literature

TTh 2-3:30

In this course we will be taking laughter seriously. “No animal laughs, except man,” Aristotle declares. We will study the different theories that attempt to explain why we laugh. I must warn you, student, that it is not the purpose of...(read more)

Huerta, Javier
Spring 2012

R1B/24

Reading & Composition:
Reading California

TTh 2-3:30

This course will examine literature produced in and about California.  After grounding our inquiries with Indigeno...(read more)

Hausman, Blake M.
Hausman, Blake
Spring 2012

R1B/25

Reading & Composition:
Paranoia

TTh 3:30-5

We all recognize its symptoms: feelings of persecution, irrational thinking, fear that others are plotting against you. We see its plots in popular culture -- dystopian fiction, political thrillers, and suspense films all move the story along with...(read more)

Ahmed, Adam
Spring 2012

R1B/26

Reading & Composition:
Shakespearean Tragedy

TTh 3:30-5

This course is primarily a writing course, and our focus will be on writing. That said, since we need a subject to write about, I've chosen to focus on Shakespeare's great tragedies—namely, Hamlet, Macbeth, Othello and K...(read more)

Jordan, Joseph P
Jordan, Joe
Spring 2012

R1B/27

Reading & Composition:
'They did not wear such hats'; or, Puritans in the New World

TTh 5-6:30

Taking as its focus that group of men and women who came to New England between 1620 and 1640, this course will hone your literary capacities, particularly your expository, argumentative, and research skills. There could be no better subject for s...(read more)

Trocchio, Rachel
Spring 2012

R1B/28

Reading & Composition:
Reading California

TTh 5-6:30

This course will examine literature produced in and about California.  After grounding our inquiries with Indigeno...(read more)

Hausman, Blake M.
Hausman, Blake
Spring 2012

R1B/29

Reading & Composition:
The Essay--Evidence and Idea

MW 9-10:30

This course is designed to prepare you for more rigorous thinking, more elegant writing and more complex academic work.  Our work will focus on the essay.  Not the five-paragraph one.  Not the one that begins with a si...(read more)

Speirs, Kenneth
Speirs, Kenneth
Spring 2012

R1B/30

Reading & Composition:
The Essay--Evidence and Idea

MW 12-1:30

This course is designed to prepare you for more rigorous thinking, more elegant writing, and more complex academic work.  Our work will focus on the essay.  Not the five-paragraph one.  Not the one that begins with a simple...(read more)

Speirs, Kenneth
Speirs, Kenneth
Summer 2012

N1A/1

Reading & Composition:
Unreliable Narrators

MW 10-12

What happens when the teller of a story misleads us? What qualities make for a palatable narrator who we as readers are willing to follow to the end of the book? In this course, we will examine through select twentieth-century novels the condition...(read more)

Xiang, Sunny
Summer 2012

N1A/2

Reading & Composition:
Racial Metaphors of Global Capitalism

MW 2-4

From myths of the Yellow Peril to contemporary discourses on the model minority, representations of Asian American subjects have long been intertwined with metaphors of economic exchange and capitalist excess.  More than simply agents of capi...(read more)

Lee, Amy
Summer 2012

N1A/3

Reading & Composition:
Destroying Modernity--Ruin and Apocalypse, 1750-2012

MW 6-8

"i know this wont happen...bt i cant wait fr something like this to happen...it sure is thrilling and i'm bored of life!!"                   (Comment  on youtube string for 2012(read more)

Cannon, Benjamin Zenas
Summer 2012

N1B/1

Reading & Composition:
Techno-Orientalism

TTh 10-12

Course Objectives
This course will focus on developing students’ practical fluency with exposition and argumentation, with an emphasis...(read more)

Fan, Christopher Tzechung
Summer 2012

N1B/2

Reading & Composition:
Fictions of the Human

TTh 12-2

What constitutes our humanness? Are thinking and language-use uniquely human capacities or can intelligence be attributed to animals and machines? Is it possible to conceive of a timeless definition of the human being, or is human identity periodi...(read more)

Gaydos, Rebecca
Summer 2012

N1B/3

Reading & Composition:
Victorian Sensation

TTh 4-6

The literary genre of the Victorian sensation novel of the 1860s-1870s was defined less by its form and content than by the response it was supposed to engender in its readers. This course aims to explore the significance of physical and ...(read more)

Knox, Marisa Palacios
Summer 2012

N1B/4

Reading & Composition:
Crossing the Color Line

TTh 6-8

Color, for anyone who uses it, or is used by it, is a most complex, calculated and dangerous phenomenon.

–  James Baldwin

(read more)

Martinez, Rosa Angelica
Fall 2011

R1A/1

Reading and Composition:
Writing about Literary Experience

MWF 9-10

In this course we will read and write about markedly different kinds of literature—one novel, a good deal of verse, some short stories, maybe one play—with the aim of coming to some conclusions about what makes great literature great a...(read more)

Jordan, Joseph P
Jordan, Joe
Fall 2011

R1A/2

Reading and Composition:
Utopian Fiction

MWF 10-11

Imagine that you could create the ideal society. What would it look like? What conditions would be necessary for its survival and success? In this class, we’ll be reading several texts that take on this mental exercise. Starting with Plato&r...(read more)

Obi, Trudy
Obi, Gertrude
Fall 2011

R1A/3

Reading and Composition:
Speaking the Unspeakable

MWF 10-11

This course, while seeking to elucidate and define the basic structural aims of academic writing (thesis construction, processes of analysis and argumentation, use of evidence and writing mechanics), will focus on exploring the unspeakable and uns...(read more)

Seeger, Andrea Yolande
Seeger, Andrea
Fall 2011

R1A/4

Reading and Composition:
Writing about Literary Experience

MWF 11-12

In this course we will read and write about markedly different kinds of literature—one novel, a good deal of verse, some short stories, maybe one play—with the aim of coming to some conclusions about what makes great literature great a...(read more)

Jordan, Joseph P
Jordan, Joe
Fall 2011

R1A/5

Reading and Composition:
Kitsch and "Bad Taste" in 20th Century America

MWF 12-1

Is there such a thing as a universal standard of good taste? When we judge a work of art, can our judgment hold true for everyone? Or does our cultural and social context determine our taste in art? In this class we will consider how what counts a...(read more)

Gaydos, Rebecca
Gaydos, Rebecca
Fall 2011

R1A/6

Reading and Composition:
California Stories

MWF 12-1

This course will examine literature produced in and about California.  After grounding our inquiries with Indigenous origin stories, we will then explore the convergences of narrative, geography, identity, and economics as portrayed by severa...(read more)

Hausman, Blake M.
Hausman, Blake
Fall 2011

R1A/7

Reading and Composition:
The Others: Literary Ghost Stories from Shakespeare to Stephen King

MWF 1-2

Why are we fascinated by ghosts?  From ancient myths and folktales through modern horror the questions are the same as the ones which open Hamlet, “Who’s there,” and, more to the point, how come?  This course will inves...(read more)

Munson, Rebecca
Munson, Rebecca
Fall 2011

R1A/8

Reading and Composition:
City and Country

MWF 2-3

The opposition between city life and country life goes back at least as far as ancient Rome, but today it takes on a new significance as urbanites are asked to respond to a problem that is often felt more sharply in rural areas – global clim...(read more)

Bauer, Mark
Bauer, Mark
Fall 2011

R1A/9

Reading and Composition:
California Stories

MWF 2-3

This course will examine literature produced in and about California.  After grounding our inquiries with Indigenous origin stories, we will then explore the convergences of narrative, geography, identity, and economics as portrayed by severa...(read more)

Hausman, Blake M.
Hausman, Blake
Fall 2011

R1A/10

Reading and Composition:
Artificial Paradises

MWF 3-4

In his famous song, “Heroin,” Lou Reed declared “I don't know just where I'm going,/But I'm gonna try for the kingdom, if I can.” That was 1967. But even before the release of The Velvet Underground and Nico...(read more)

Ahmed, Adam
Ahmed, Adam
Fall 2011

R1A/11

Reading and Composition:
The Essay Form

MWF 3-4


Whether it be because we have to write so many of them in our scholastic endeavors or because we undervalue what’s right before our eyes, the essay is a woefully under-appreciated and understudied form. My goal in this course is to exp...(read more)

Cullen, Ben
Cullen, Ben
Fall 2011

R1A/12

Reading and Composition:
Frauds on the Fairies: Metafiction and the Pretty Monster

MW 4-5:30

"I want you for my museum of woman monsters," Madame Schreck tells Fevvers, the winged heroine of Angela Carter's Nights at the Circus. "Take your time about making up your mind." This class considers the woman mon...(read more)

Naturale, Lauren
Naturale, Lauren
Fall 2011

R1A/13

Reading and Composition:
Misery (Loves Comedy)!

TTh 8-9:30

The spectrum of miserable emotions (from misery as such to melancholy or depression) tends to produce totalizing views of the world with startling intensity. While we are miserable, we believe we see the world for “what it truly is:” a...(read more)

Jeziorek, Alek M
Jeziorek, Alexander
Fall 2011

R1A/14

Reading and Composition:
Storytelling

TTh 8-9:30

…the art of storytelling is coming to an end.  Less and less frequently do we encounter people with the ability to tell a tale properly.  More and more often there is embarrassment all around when the wish to hear a story...(read more)
Baldwin, Ruth
Baldwin, Ruth
Fall 2011

R1A/15

Reading and Composition:
Shifting Modernisms

TTh 9:30-11

We will consider how literary modernism grapples with shifts in American modernity in the early twentieth century.  Our focus will be on writers for whom migration, dislocation, and place are central formal and thematic concerns.  Many o...(read more)

Rana, Swati
Rana, Swati
Fall 2011

R1A/16

Reading and Composition:
Strange Cases

TTh 11-12:30

Per the title of Robert Louis Stevenson’s 1886 novella, this course will explore a number of “strange cases”—serpent seductresses, mesmerized corpses, duplicitous doppelgangers, spectral monkeys (and other inexplicable appa...(read more)

Mershon, Ella
Mershon, Ella
Fall 2011

R1A/17

Reading and Composition:
Heroes

TTh 12:30-2

This course will follow the figure of the hero as it evolves from Classical literature to comic books. As we work our way through a cast of epic, tragic, anti-, and middle-class heroes, we will look at the way both the function of the hero and the...(read more)

Terlaak Poot, Luke
Terlaak-Poot, Luke
Fall 2011

R1A/18

Reading and Composition:
Outer Space

TTh 2-3:30

In Milton’s Paradise Lost, the angel Raphael tells Adam, the first Man, not to think about the cosmos—“Whether the Sun predominant in Heav’n / Rise on the Earth, or Earth rise on the Sun, / […] / Solicit not...(read more)

Shelley, Jonathan
Shelley, Jonathan
Fall 2011

R1A/19

Reading and Composition:
On the Road from the Closed to the New Frontier

TTh 3:30-5

The six decades between Frederick Jackson Turner’s 1893 declaration of the end of the American Frontier and John F. Kennedy’s inaugural commitment to a “New Frontier” of outer space mark a unique period of American mobility...(read more)

Yoon, Irene
Yoon, Irene
Fall 2011

R1A/20

Reading and Composition:
Writing and Controversy

TTh 5-6:30

How do we approach writing that seeks to alienate us?  How can we understand books whose characters refuse to understand each other?  How should we react when confronted with art so offensive that sympathy seems unethical?  
(read more)

Rodal, Jocelyn
Rodal, Joceyln
Fall 2011

R1A/21

Reading and Composition:
Modern African American Poetry, 1940-1960

MWF 2-3

In this course, we will examine the “lost years” of the 1940s-1960s in African American literature and culture by critically reading and writing about the poetry and history of this period. Traditional surveys of 20th-century African A...(read more)

Gardezi, Nilofar
Gardezi, Nilofar
Fall 2011

R1A/22

Reading and Composition

MWF 1-2

T. B. A.

...(read more)
Bady, Aaron J.
Bady, Aaron
Fall 2011

R1A/23

Reading and Composition:
Laughter and Literature

T. B. A.

In this course we will be taking laughter seriously. “No animal laughs, except man,” Aristotle declares. We will study the different theories that attempt to explain why we laugh. I must warn you, student, that it is not the purpose of...(read more)

Huerta, Javier
Huerta, Javier
Fall 2011

R1A/24

Reading and Composition

TTh 9:30-11

T. B. A.

...(read more)
Speirs, Kenneth
Speirs, Kenneth
Fall 2011

R1B/1

Reading and Composition:
China in the Western Imagination

MWF 9-10

In recent years, “the rise of China” has been a popular topic of discussion and debate amongst academics, politicians, and journalists.  Yet, in framing China’s presence on the world stage in this way also implies the eventu...(read more)

Lee, Amy
Lee, Amy
Fall 2011

R1B/2

Reading and Composition:
Nineteenth-Century American Consolation Novels

MWF 11-12

In this class, we will study the nineteenth-century American consolation novel. Reading consolation novels in conjunction with essays in literary criticism and cultural history, we will ask the following question: How did these texts both reflect ...(read more)

Fritz, Tracy
Auclair Fritz, Tracy
Fall 2011

R1B/3

Reading and Composition:
City Spaces

MWF 1-2

In this course, we will explore the representation of urban space in novels, poems, and nonfictional texts. The class examines the literary and historical depiction of actual cities such as Manchester, London, Chicago, and New York, and how the ex...(read more)

Knox, Marisa Palacios
Knox, Marisa
Fall 2011

R1B/4

Reading and Composition:
The Enlightenment

MW 4-5:30

“Saper aude! ‘Have courage to use your own reason!’ –
that is the motto of the enlightenment” – Immanuel Kant

The Enlightenment was a period of revolutionary changes in science, li...(read more)

Thomas-Bignami, Ian M.
Thomas-Bignami, Ian
Fall 2011

R1B/5

Reading and Composition:
"They did not wear such hats"; or, Puritans in the New World

TTh 9:30-11

Taking as its historical subject that group of men and women who came to New England in the 1620s and 30s, this course will hone your literary capacities, particularly, your expository, argumentative, and research skills (including drafting and re...(read more)

Trocchio, Rachel
Trocchio, Rachel
Fall 2011

R1B/6

Reading and Composition:
The American Song

TTh 11-12:30

This course revolves around the popular American Song form from mid-19th century to present.  We will approach the American song not just as a historical artifact aided by inventions in technology (sheet music, phonograph, radio, television, ...(read more)

Sullivan, Khalil
Sullivan, Khalil
Fall 2011

R1B/7

Reading and Composition:
Victoriana!

TTh 12:30-2

We tend to think of the Victorians as repressed conservatives, but in fact the 19th century was a time of rapid and far-reaching change in nearly every aspect of life. In this course we will explore Victorian literature in its cultural context, pa...(read more)

Cannon, Benjamin Zenas
Cannon, Ben
Fall 2011

R1B/8

Reading and Composition:
Performing Revenge

TTh 2-3:30

Murder, mutilation, madness, imprisonment, adultery, cannibalism, torture and rape: this gruesome list forms not only revengers’ prime motives, but also the tools of their vengeance.  Is this only fitting or a perverse paradox?  Wh...(read more)

Bahr, Stephanie M
Bahr, Stephanie
Fall 2011

R1B/9

Reading and Composition:
Writing from Life

TTh 3:30-5

This course seeks to approach, in a loosely historical fashion, some of the problems associated with the literary recording of lives. During the first segment of the class, we will develop a broad perspective on the emergence of autobiography as a...(read more)

Weiner, Joshua J
Weiner, Joshua
Fall 2011

R1B/10

Reading and Composition:
Shakespeare's Poetics and Aesthetic of Love

TTh 5-6:30

In a culture steeped in the humoral paradigm in which psychological and physiological well-being depended on managing and tempering the passions, there was growing concern over dangerous stimuli that might perturb the passions and generate mental ...(read more)

Castillo, Carmen
Castillo, Carmen
Fall 2011

R1B/11

Reading and Composition:
Literary Case Studies: Fiction, Ethics, and Policy

MWF 1-2

Business, law, and policy schools frequently teach ethics (and other topics) through a genre of writing known as the “case study” – detailed, well-researched, factual accounts of a relevant real-world situation.  While the m...(read more)

Williams, Karen
Williams, Karen
Fall 2011

R1B/12

Reading and Composition

MWF 12-1

The texts we will read this semester have generally been read as stories of self-discovery. Through class discussion and close reading analysis, we will uncover the hidden thematic and formal narratives which complicate how we understand this stor...(read more)

Menilla, David D.
Menilla, David
Spring 2011

R1A/1

Reading and Composition:
(Re)Telling Arthur: The Historical Evolution and Cultural Manifestations of the Arthurian Legends

MWF 10-12

From medieval manuscripts to twentieth-century film, Arthurian legends underwent various mutations as they passed to new generations and cultures.  The content of this course will consider these mutations, beginning with a look at some of the...(read more)

Crosson, Chad Gregory
Crosson, Chad
Spring 2011

R1A/2

Reading and Composition:
First Persons

MWF 1-2

The linguist Emile Benveniste writes that “I”—that is, the person referred to by the first-person singular pronoun—“can only be identified by the instance of discourse that contains it and by that alone.” In thi...(read more)

Benson, Alex
Benson, Alex
Spring 2011

R1A/3

Reading and Composition:
Performing Revenge

MWF 3-4

Murder, mutilation, madness, imprisonment, adultery, cannibalism, torture, and rape: this gruesome list forms not only revengers’ prime motives, but also the tools of their vengeance.  Is this only fitting or a perverse paradox?  W...(read more)

Bahr, Stephanie M
Bahr, Stephanie
Spring 2011

R1A/4

Reading and Composition:
Chicano/Chicana Art, Literature, and Feminisms

MW 4-5:30

This course is designed as a writing workshop. Through peer editing and multiple drafts of papers, we will begin with a focus on the syntax and grammar of the sentence, the basic unit for all prose writing. We will then study the introduction, the...(read more)

Maese-Cohen, Marcelle
Maese-Cohen, Marcelle
Spring 2011

R1A/5

Reading and Composition:
Reading Readers

TTh 8-9:30

What happens when we read a book? What do we think happens when we read a book, and why? Readers, writers, critics, philosophers, and even scientists have been pondering these questions for centuries. This class will explore the experienc...(read more)

Huang, Lynn
Huang, Lynn
Spring 2011

R1A/6

Reading and Composition:
A History of Monsters

TTh 9:30-11

This course will study the evolving definition of monstrosity from the Renaissance to the 19th century. We will carefully analyze versions of the monstrous body proposed in literary, medical, and philosophical texts across a broad historical range...(read more)

Lee, James J
Lee, James
Spring 2011

R1A/7

Reading and Composition:
Reading for Happiness

TTh 2-3:30

This class will explore various understandings of happiness, in both literature and philosophy.  We will examine strategies for and impediments to the attainment of happiness, as they manifest themselves in modernist novels, short stories, an...(read more)

Lempert, Manya
Lempert, Manya
Spring 2011

R1A/8

Reading and Composition:
Documents and the Literature of the Undocumented

TTh 5-6:30

We will engage our critical reading and writing skills on the topical question of undocumented immigration by analyzing works written by authors that have lived the undocumented experience. We will also turn our critical attention to articles from...(read more)

Huerta, Javier
Huerta, Javier
Spring 2011

R1A/9

Reading and Composition:
Nineteenth-Century American Consolation Novels

TTh 5-6:30

In this class, we will study the nineteenth-century American consolation novel.  Reading consolation novels in conjunction with essays in literary criticism and cultural history, we will ask the following question:  How did these texts b...(read more)

Auclair Fritz, Tracy
Spring 2011

R1B/1

Reading and Composition:
Multiethnic Literature and the American City

MWF 9-10

This course will explore multiethnic writing about the American city from the turn of the century to the present day.  We will examine the ways in which literary and cultural representations constitute and negotiate race, class, and sexual bo...(read more)

Lee, Amy
Lee, Amy
Spring 2011

R1B/2

Reading and Composition:
Keeping it Real?: Racial & Queer Passing in American Literature

MWF 10-11

“I had a literature rather than a personality, a set of fictions about myself.”
                              &nbs...(read more)

Martinez, Rosa Angelica
Martinez, Rosa
Spring 2011

R1B/3

Reading and Composition:
The Family in Early Modern England

MWF 11-12

"The mischievous consequences of vice and folly, of irregular desires and predominant passions, are best discovered by those relations which are levelled with the general surface of life, which tell not how any man became great, but how he wa...(read more)

Mead, Christopher
Mead, Christopher
Spring 2011

R1B/4

Reading and Composition

This section has been canceled.

...(read more)
No instructor assigned yet.
Spring 2011

R1B/5

Reading and Composition:
Voice and Narration in Asian American Fiction

MWF 12-1

What happens when a character must serve as a viable representative for a particular social group and as a palatable protagonist that we as readers are willing follow to the end of the book?  What determines our faith in the proficiency of ch...(read more)

Xiang, Sunny
Xiang, Sunny
Spring 2011

R1B/6

Reading and Composition:
The Literary Animal

MWF 12-1

In this course, we will explore the various roles of animals in works of literature and film from the premodern fable to contemporary cinematic and televisual representations of animals.  Among other things, we will be investigating the idea ...(read more)

Tazudeen, Rasheed
Tazudeen, Rasheed
Spring 2011

R1B/7

Reading and Composition:
American Art in the 1950s

MWF 1-2

In many ways, the American 1950s were a period of conservatism and conformity, shaped by postwar prosperity and Cold War politics. Artistically, the fifties are something of an interlude, falling after the height of modernism but before the creati...(read more)

Emerson, Maude
Emerson, Maude
Spring 2011

R1B/8

Reading and Composition:
The Literature of Paranoia

MWF 2-3

In the process of developing methods for critical writing and research, this course will plunge students into the inner workings of a bizarre conspiracy that shapes the lives of millions: modern culture. This description is half a joke, but only h...(read more)

Clinton, Daniel Patrick
Clinton, Daniel
Spring 2011

R1B/9

Reading and Composition:
Words Without Borders

MWF 2-3

In this course, we will read and discover new short fiction from around the world. While we will begin with a 2010 anthology of just-published short stories, the bulk of the syllabus will be put together by students, who will scour the library, th...(read more)

Bady, Aaron J.
Bady, Aaron
Spring 2011

R1B/10

Reading and Composition:
The Power of I: Literary Constructions of the Self

MWF 3-4

What are the different ways that we come to understand first person narration?  How are different selves created and chosen through texts and textual choices?  How do issues of memory and claims to authenticity affect the way that we rea...(read more)

Bednarska, Dominica
Spring 2011

R1B/11

Reading and Composition:
Utopian Fiction

MW 4-5:30

Imagine that you could create the ideal society. What would it look like? What conditions would be necessary for its survival and success? In this class, we’ll be reading several texts that take on this mental exercise. Starting with Plato&r...(read more)

Obi, Trudy
Obi, Gertrude
Spring 2011

R1B/12

Reading and Composition:
Service

TTh 8-9:30

Service is a strange kind of labor, a labor that Adam Smith calls “unproductive labor” because it does not produce a product—it has no effect, adds no value, except by “add[ing] to the value of nothing.” What, then, i...(read more)

Chow, Juliana H.
Chow, Juliana
Spring 2011

R1B/13

Reading and Composition:
Abject America

TTh 9:30-11

In this course we will be exploring the converse of the American dream of “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.” In texts spanning from the antebellum period to the 1990s, we’ll read stories of death, captivity, and the p...(read more)

Goodwin, Peter
Goodwin, Peter
Spring 2011

R1B/14

Reading and Composition:
Under Fire: Issues in Autobiography

TTh 11-12:30

What does it mean in the midst of life to write one’s life—or one’s experiences? What is gained by drawing into view the/a consciousness that senses, judges, and responds? If autobiography is more than one fiction (an “I&rd...(read more)

Ketz, Charity Corine
Ketz, Charity
Spring 2011

R1B/15

Reading and Composition:
Abject America

TTh 12:30 - 2

In this course we will be exploring the converse of the American dream of “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.” In texts spanning from the antebellum period to the 1990s, we’ll read stories of death, captivity, and the p...(read more)

Goodwin, Peter
Goodwin, Peter
Spring 2011

R1B/16

Reading and Composition:
The Monster in the Mirror

TTh 2-3:30

A woman in the shape of a monster
a monster in the shape of a woman
the skies are full of them

        ~Adrienne Rich

A monster can be defined as a creature who is not human and...(read more)

Lankin, Andrea A
Lankin, Andrea
Spring 2011

R1B/17

Reading and Composition:
Apocalyptic and Dystopian Fiction

TTh 3:30-5

War, environmental disaster, moral decadence, governmental corruption—we’ve learned to live with it.  But a rich history of dystopian and apocalyptic literature helps awaken us to the horrors of these regrettably familiar aspects ...(read more)

Goodwin, Peter
Goodwin, Peter
Spring 2011

R1B/18

Reading and Composition:
Free Speech and You

TuTh 5-6:30

This is the United States, and you hear people across the political spectrum talking about free speech.  You read something offensive or you hear something stupid, and perhaps you resent the fact that you had to be exposed to these words.&nbs...(read more)

Hausman, Blake M.
Hausman, Blake
Spring 2011

R1B/19

Reading and Composition:
Memoirs of Twentieth Century Black Social Movements

TTh 5-6:30

The twentieth century saw social upheaval by and political progress for black America.  Following abolition and the failure of Reconstruction, African Americans have advocated collectively against racial violence, segregation, suppression of ...(read more)

Lee, Seulghee
Lee, Seulghee
Spring 2011

R1B/20

Reading and Composition:
Literary Frauds

MWF 3-4

Western literary history, especially since the eighteenth century, is full of impostors and forgeries. Since Chatterton purported to “discover” a fifteenth-century poet and his contemporary MacPherson faked an ancient Celtic epic, ther...(read more)

Naumovska, Slavica
Naumovska, Slavica
Spring 2011

R1B/21

Reading and Composition:
Beyond Reason: Characters as Omniscient Narrators

MWF 12-1

If time as we know it does not exist; if the past, present, and the future are but social conventions we use to organize our experiences, what happens to the notions of history and self when those boundaries are blurred or done away with? This cla...(read more)

Menilla, David D.
Menilla, David
Spring 2011

R1B/22

Reading and Composition:
Other Minds

TTh 5-6:30

It’s often been suggested that fiction is defined by the access it grants us to other minds.  While historians speculate about what their subjects must have thought, novelists can provide their readers direct access to the inner working...(read more)

Gordon, Zachary
Gordon, Zach
Spring 2011

R1B/23

Reading and Composition:
Try, Try Again, Little Song: Exploring Form and Formlessness through Essays and the Sonnet

TTh 2-2:30

In this introduction to researched critical writing, we’ll focus our attention on two of literature’s most canonical and contestable forms: the essay and the sonnet.  In the first half of the course, we’ll explore the possib...(read more)

Osborne, Gillian K.
Osborne, Gillian
Spring 2011

R50/1

Freshman and Sophomore Studies:
The "Odd Woman"

TTh 9:30-11

"So many odd women--no making a pair with them."

This course will examine the figure of the "odd woman" in a variety of texts. The term "odd women" arose in the nineteenth century to describe women who could no...(read more)

Knox, Marisa Palacios
Knox, Marisa
Spring 2011

R50/2

Freshman and Sophomore Studies:
Reading and Eating

TTh 12:30-2

What does it mean to "digest" something, and what does reading have to do with eating? From Adam and Eve eating the apple to communicants eating the body and blood of Christ, eating in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England was fraug...(read more)

Loofbourow, Lili
Loofbourow, Liliana
Summer 2011

N1A/1

Reading and Composition:
Writing About Poems

MW 10-12P

In this course we will hone our reading and writing skills by focusing on a special challenge: the reading, discussion, and written analysis of lyric poetry. We will work towards a historical sense of how expectations about lyric poems have evolved fr...(read more) Bigley, Michael Erik
Bigley, Michael
Summer 2011

N1A/2

Reading and Composition:
Victoriana!

MW 2-4P

We tend to think of the Victorians as repressed conservatives, but in fact the 19th century was a time of rapid and far-reaching change in nearly every aspect of life. In this course we will explore Victorian literature in its cultural context, ...(read more)

Cannon, Benjamin Zenas
Cannon, Ben
Summer 2011

N1A/3

Reading and Composition:
Detective Fiction

MW 6-8P

“The detective is the one who looks, who listens, who moves through this morass of objects and events in search of the thought, the idea that will pull all of these things together and make sense of them. In effect, the writer and the detecti...(read more) Mershon, Ella
Mershon, Ella
Summer 2011

N1B/1

Reading and Composition:
The American Song

TuTh 10-12P

This course revolves around the popular American Song form from mid-19th century to present.  We will approach the American song not just as a historical artifact aided by inventions in technology (sheet music, phonograph, radio, television, film...(read more) Sullivan, Khalil
Sullivan, Khalil
Summer 2011

N1B/2

Reading and Composition:
Our America

TuTh 12-2P

When José Martí referred to “Nuestra América” in his famous 1891 essay of that title, he did not have the United States in mind.  This revolutionary writer, theorist, and fighter sought to imagine an independent L...(read more) Rana, Swati
Rana, Swati
Summer 2011

N1B/3

Reading and Composition:
Eating the Word: Reading and Digestion

TuTh 4-6P

What does it mean to “digest” something, and what does reading have to do with eating? From Adam and Eve eating the apple to communicants eating the body and blood of Christ, eating in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England was fraught...(read more) Loofbourow, Lili
Loofbourow, Liliana
Summer 2011

N1B/4

Reading and Composition:
The Black Arts Movement

TuTh 6-8P

Sometimes called the cultural wing of Black Power, the Black Arts Movement of the 1960s and 1970s attempted to articulate an independent and often separatist “black aesthetic.”  Yet the writings of this period refuse neat characteriza...(read more) Lee, Seulghee
Lee, Seulghee
Fall 2010

R1A/1

Autobiography

MWF 9 - 10

James Frey’s memoir A Million Little Pieces, which chronicled the author’s horrific past, created a sensation among readers for its gripping treatment of addiction. But the book caused a far greater sensation when The Smoking Gun,...(read more) Beck, Rachel
Beck, Rachel
Fall 2010

R1A/2

Memoirs of Twentieth Century Black Social Movements

MWF 10-11

The twentieth century saw social upheaval by and political progress for black America.  Following abolition and the failure of Reconstruction, African Americans have advocated collectively against racial violence, segregation, suppression of free...(read more) Lee, Seulghee
Lee, Seulghee
Fall 2010

R1A/3

Keeping it Real?: Racial & Queer Passing in American Literature

MWF 11-12

“I had a literature rather than a personality, a set of fictions about myself.”
      -  Kafka Was the Rage by Anatole Broyard

This course intends to explore the “art” o...(read more)

Martínez, Rosa
Fall 2010

R1A/4

The Enlightenment

MWF 12-1

Saper aude! ‘Have courage to use your own reason!’ –
that is the motto of the enlightenment” – Immanuel Kant

The Enlightenment was a period of revolutionary changes in science, literatur...(read more)

Thomas-Bignami, Ian M.
Thomas-Bignami, Ian
Fall 2010

R1A/5

Memory and Memorials

MWF 1-2

This course will explore questions of memory and mourning through a series of fictional texts that stage social strategies for confronting (or avoiding) loss while also acting as memorials in their own right. These texts describe the way that experien...(read more) Clinton, Daniel Patrick
Clinton, Daniel
Fall 2010

R1A/6

Putting It Together

MWF 2-3

In this course we will be reading texts composed of multiple narratives told by a variety of speakers and writers. We will examine the various rhetorical strategies employed by these narratives in and of themselves and in relation to the whole. Questi...(read more) Knox, Marisa Palacios
Knox, Marisa
Fall 2010

R1A/7

Memory and Memorials

MWF 3-4

This course will explore questions of memory and mourning through a series of fictional texts that stage social strategies for confronting (or avoiding) loss while also acting as memorials in their own right. These texts describe the way that experien...(read more) Patnaik, Sangina
Clinton, Daniel Patrick
Patnaik, Sangina
Fall 2010

R1A/8

19th Century American Literature and the Aesthetic Turn to Natural History

MW 4-5:30

Lectures, essays, and stories.  Paintings, panoramas, and daguerreotypes.  Cabinets, dioramas, and museums.  Beginning in the 1880s, natural history exhibits became incredibly popular along with many other already existing or emerging &...(read more) Chow, Juliana H.
Chow, Juliana
Fall 2010

R1A/9

Information, Crisis, Catastrophe

TTh 8-9:30

This course will explore representations of crisis, calamity, and general mayhem. We will think about how a crisis can both push at the limits of possible representation and create is own spectacular form of reality. Moving from natural disaster to Ho...(read more) Richards, Jill
Richards, Jill
Fall 2010

R1A/10

Alcatraz

TTH 9:30-11:00

Alcatraz Island occupies an unusual space in American literature and popular culture. Over its long history, the island has served as the location of a lighthouse, a federal penitentiary, a military prison, a naval fortification, a tourist site, a ...(read more)

Gillis, Brian
Gillis, Brian
Fall 2010

R1A/11

Fiction and Foreign Policy

TTh 11-12:30

This course suggests that works of fiction (and, increasingly, the film adaptations which bring them to a larger audience) can shape foreign policy, both at home and abroad.  We’ll look at works spanning multiple genres (the memoir, the nov...(read more) Williams, Karen
Williams, Karen
Fall 2010

R1A/12

Martyrdom, Sacrifice, and Literature

TTh 12:30-2

Between 1535 and 1681, at least six hundred people were executed in England for their religious beliefs.  These sacrificial killings provided form and justification for many other real and imagined deaths, most of which were motivated by non-reli...(read more) Mead, Christopher
Mead, Christopher
Fall 2010

R1A/13

U.S. Third World Feminisms, the Chicana/o Novel and Literary (re)Form

TTh 2-3:30

For Sylvia Wynter, the modern novel form, and its appropriation of the “spatio-temporal-world” of modernity, has its textual roots in the “mutation” of “the figuration of Self and World” produced by the ‘disco...(read more) Maese-Cohen, Marcelle
Maese-Cohen, Marcelle
Fall 2010

R1A/14

American Art in the 1950s

TTh 3:30 - 5

In many ways, the American 1950s were a period of conservatism and conformity, shaped by postwar prosperity and Cold War politics. Artistically, the fifties are something of an interlude, falling after the height of modernism but before the creative e...(read more) Emerson, Maude
Emerson, Maude
Fall 2010

R1A/15

Englishness at Home and Abroad in the 20th century

TTh 5-6:30 PM

At the start of the 20th century, England was the world’s dominant colonial power, with an empire spanning from the Indian subcontinent to west, east, and sub-Saharan Africa to the Caribbean and South America.  By the end of the 20th centur...(read more) Tazudeen, Rasheed
Tazudeen, Rasheed
Fall 2010

R1A/16

Early American Literature of Crime and Punishment

MWF 12-1

In this course we will examine the role of crime, moral transgression, exposure, and punishment in the creation of U.S. American identity. If in public rituals of accusation, trial, confession, and punishment, the state simultaneously affirms and over...(read more) Goodwin, Peter
Goodwin, Peter
Fall 2010

R1A/17

Early American Literature of Crime and Punishment

MWF 2-3

In this course we will examine the role of crime, moral transgression, exposure, and punishment in the creation of U.S. American identity. If in public rituals of accusation, trial, confession, and punishment, the state simultaneously affirms and over...(read more) Goodwin, Peter
Goodwin, Peter
Fall 2010

R1A/18

Comparative Diasporas

MWF 9-10

This course will trace the concept of “diaspora” as it has developed within a post-war, postcolonial, and post-Cold War world order. Taking Paul Gilroy’s idea of the “Black Atlantic” as a point of departure, we will look ...(read more) Lee, Amy
Lee, Amy
Fall 2010

R1A/19

The Rhetoric of Rants

MWF 1-2

The art of arguing while furious is actually a very difficult rhetorical task.  This class will read the works of master debaters from medieval Europe to twenty-first century America.  Using their work as primary sources and as inspirations,...(read more) Lankin, Andrea A
Lankin, Andrea
Fall 2010

R1A/20

The Power of I: Literary Constructions of the Self

MW 4-5:30

What are the different ways that we come to understand first person narration?  How are different selves created and chosen through texts and textual choices?  How do issues of memory and claims to authenticity affect the way that we rea...(read more)

Bednarska, Dominika
Bednarska, Dominika
Fall 2010

R1B/1

Voice and Narration in Asian American Fiction

MWF 9-10

What happens when a character must serve as a viable representative for a particular social group and as a palatable protagonist that we as readers are willing to follow to the end of the book?  What determines our faith in the proficiency of cha...(read more) Xiang, Sunny
Xiang, Sunny
Fall 2010

R1B/2

Fictional Minds

MWF 11-12

Depictions of consciousness are central to twentieth century (modernist) fiction.  This course will investigate literary styles of the period, which turn the life of the mind into words on the page.  A selection of narrative points of view (...(read more) Lempert, Manya
Lempert, Manya
Fall 2010

R1B/3

Free Speech and You

MWF 1-2

This is the United States, and you hear people across the political spectrum talking about free speech.  You read something offensive or you hear something stupid, and perhaps you resent the fact that you had to be exposed to these words.  Y...(read more) Hausman, Blake M.
Hausman, Blake
Fall 2010

R1B/5

The Changing Soul

MWF 3-4

In this course, we will work through several influential definitions of the soul, from Aristotle to Milton. As we shall see, the soul took on different meanings depending on the intellectual context in which it was established. First, we will compare ...(read more) Lee, James J
Lee, James
Fall 2010

R1B/6

Politics and Poetics of Refusal

MW 4 - 5:30

This course will explore the politics and poetics of refusal. In civil disobedience, refusal becomes a central tactic for protesting injustice. Think of Rosa Parks refusing to give up her seat and of the bus boycott that followed. Think of the East L....(read more) Huerta, Javier
Huerta, Javier
Fall 2010

R1B/7

(Re)Telling Arthur: The Historical Evolution and Cultural Manifestations of the Arthurian Legends

TTh 8-9:30

From medieval manuscripts to twentieth-century film, Arthurian legends underwent various mutations as they passed to new generations and cultures.  This course will consider these mutations, beginning with a look at some of the earliest English p...(read more) Crosson, Chad Gregory
Crosson, Chad
Fall 2010

R1B/8

Literature and Experiment

TTh 9:30-11:00

What does it mean to call a novel (or a painting or film) “experimental”? What is the relationship between literary experiment and the kinds of experiment that occur in the natural and social sciences? In attempting to answer these questio...(read more) Clinton, Daniel Patrick
Patnaik, Sangina
Bernes, Jasper
Bernes, Jasper
Fall 2010

R1B/9

Reading and Composition:
Raised By Wolves

TTh 11-12:30

In this course we’ll track the strange careers of feral children, foundlings, escaped slaves, vagabonds, and the occasional talking animal—quite different figures whose stories, nonetheless, have a similar way of troubling the distinctions...(read more) Benson, Alex
Benson, Alex
Fall 2010

R1B/10

note new course: Love and Poetic Aesthetics in the Renaissance

TTh 12:30-2

In this course you will learn what’s so great about great poetry.  The way we will go about this is to first learn to pay attention to our moment-to-moment experience of reading poetry in order to slow us down enough to notice what poems do...(read more) Castillo, Carmen
Castillo, Carmen
Fall 2010

R1B/11

Reading Beyond the Text

TTh 2-3:30

The old adage insists, “Don’t judge a book by its cover”—and yet we find ourselves doing just that, and not without reason. A book’s cover, along with its size, length, illustrations, and all manner of paratextual materia...(read more) Huang, Lynn
Huang, Lynn
Fall 2010

R1B/12

The Queer Harlem Renaissance

TTh 3:30-5

This course will primarily center on the conversation between two controversial texts--Thurman's Infants of the Spring and Van Vechten's Nigger Heaven--in an effort to tease out the platform and discourse around queer, inter-...(read more) Sullivan, Khalil
Sullivan, Khalil
Fall 2010

R1B/13

What are facts doing in fiction?

TTh 5-6:30

Most bookstores and libraries categorize certain of their materials into fiction and non-fiction with little trouble. Non-fiction seems defined by its claim to telling the truth about the actual/historical world, while fiction seems not to make this c...(read more) Coldren, Robert Spencer
Coldren, Robert Spencer
Spring 2010

R1A/1

American Short Works

MWF 9-10

This course will examine a variety of short American works of art.  We’ll start with major short stories from the 19th and 20th centuries and expand outward from there to look at other short forms, includi...(read more) Junkerman, Nicholas
Junkerman, Nicholas
Spring 2010

R1A/2

Social Ladders, Pyramids, and Circles

MWF 12-1

In this class, we will look at the ways societies organize themselves and, in turn, the way literature reflects, reinforces, or criticizes those organizational schemes. How do classes, castes, or cliques form, and what purpose do they serve? Who becom...(read more) Miller, Monica
Miller, Monica
Spring 2010

R1A/3

The Power of I: Literary Constructions of the Self

MWF 2-3

What are the different ways that we come to understand first person narration?  How are different selves created and chosen through texts and textual choices?  How do issues of memory and claims to authenticity affe...(read more) Bednarska, D.
Spring 2010

R1A/4

On the Anecdote

MW 4-5:30

This course will examine the trajectory of the short story and its relationship to technology. We'll start off looking at the development of the genre from myth, tale, parable, joke, etc. to the “canonical” literary form as it emerged ...(read more) Loofbourow, Lili
Loofbourow, Liliana
Spring 2010

R1A/5

Method to Madness/Madness to Method

TTh 8-9:30

The surrealist literary experimentation (exquisite corpse, automatic writing, etc) arises out of dissatisfaction with what the conscious and "rational" mind fails to express. Instead, Surrealists claim that an unconscious production will pe...(read more) Lee, Sookyoung (Soo)
Lee, Sookyoung
Spring 2010

R1A/6

Asian American Literature after Cultural Nationalism

TTh 12:30-2

Broadly, this course will acquaint you with the close readings of texts and the tools for writing expository essays. In this course, we will read Asian American texts written from the 1990s to 2008, nearly three decades after cultural national Asian A...(read more) Clark, Audrey S.
Wu Clark, Audrey
Spring 2010

R1A/7

First Contact

MWF 1-2

In The Gods Must Be Crazy, an airline pilot drops a coke bottle into an isolated !Kung community in the Kalahari desert, their first experience of the outside world. As the hapless Xi attempts to get rid of the offending object, we are meant to laugh ...(read more) Bady, Aaron J.
Bady, Aaron
Spring 2010

R1A/8

Decolonial Epistemologies or Self-Reflexive Composition

TTh 5-6:30pm

This course is designed as a writing workshop. Through peer editing and multiple drafts of papers, we will begin with a focus on the syntax and grammar of the sentence, the basic unit for all prose writing. We will then study the paragraph, the transi...(read more) Maese-Cohen, Marcelle
Maese-Cohen, Marcelle
Spring 2010

R1A/9

American Elegy

MWF 3-4

In this class, we will study the American elegy, following its development from the 17th-century to the present.  Reading poems in conjunction with essays in literary criticism and cultural history, we will ask the followi...(read more) Auclair, Tracy
Spring 2010

R1B/1

Textual Histories

MWF 9-10

What is it that we are reading when we read a text? Long-standing internet repositories like Project Gutenberg and the recent lurch toward e-books in the publishing industry suggest that texts are fungible data-sets whose digital transfer from compute...(read more) Cecire, Natalia
Cecire, Natalia
Spring 2010

R1B/2

Native American Autobiography and Life Writing

MWF 10-11

Long before European contact Native people in North America were telling, performing, and preserving their personal narratives through pictographs, oral stories, and performances.  This course will sample some of the diverse array of...(read more) Gillis, Brian
Gillis, Brian
Spring 2010

R1B/3

Martyrdom and Literature

MWF 10-11

Between 1535 and 1681, at least six hundred people were executed in England for their religious beliefs. Many others were imprisoned and tortured. As we will see, however, one person's martyr is another person's traitor, and the primary medium...(read more) Mead, Christopher
Mead, Christopher
Spring 2010

R1B/4

Green Reading

MWF 11-12

In this class, you will become ecologically literate, and learn to write clear argumentative prose. You will learn to identify birds and trees, and keep a journal to practice writing about the environment. As exemplars, we will look at how other write...(read more) Legere, Charles
Legere, Charles
Spring 2010

R1B/5

Eat Read Write: Food as Socially Symbolic Act

MWF 11-12

This course is primarily concerned with developing and refining your writing, reading, and thinking skills. We will tackle these goals through works that engage food in broad terms. For a good number of us, but by no means all of us, food has gone fro...(read more) Arreglo, Carlo
Arreglo, Carlo
Spring 2010

R1B/6

Holiday Literature

MWF 12-1

Holidays find much common ground with literature.  In their ways, both exist outside of time and place by means of their inherent, if relative, universality.  Thanksgiving is not celebrated around the globe, just as...(read more) Drosdick, Alan
Spring 2010

R1B/7

Short Stories in Literature

MWF 1-2

The course will focus on close reading short stories for details that students will learn to use to make larger arguments about issues such as race, gender, class, history, narrative, and creativity. So come opinionated. There will be three papers (2,...(read more) Ungar-Sargon, Batya
Ungar-Sargon, Batya
Spring 2010

R1B/8

T.B.A.

T.B.A.

Instructor, time, and location to be announced.

No one will be able to enroll in this section until it has been finalized, which might not be until November or so.

...(read more)
T.B.A.
Spring 2010

R1B/9

Autobiography

MWF 2-3

James Frey’s memoir A Million Little Pieces created a sensation with its gripping treatment of addiction. But the book caused a far greater sensation in January 2006 when the website The Smoking Gun, examining police records, determined...(read more) Beck, Rachel
Beck, Rachel
Spring 2010

R1B/10

Learning and Constraint

MWF 3-4

This class will try to stimulate reflection on what learning is, and what its relation is to different kinds of constraint. The pressure of this question (learning) and this theme (constraint) will be everywhere brought to bear on the task of this cou...(read more) Weiner, Joshua J
Weiner, Joshua
Spring 2010

R1B/11

Travel Writing

MW 4-5:30

“There is no frigate like a book, to take us lands away.” -- Emily Dickinson

Exotic lands, unfamiliar customs, and bizarre creatures challenge the ability of travelers, writers, and readers to make se...(read more)

Thomas-Bignami, Ian M.
Thomas-Bignami, Ian
Spring 2010

R1B/12

The Victorian Detective

TTh 8-9:30

In addition to giving us some of the greatest novels ever written, the Victorian period (roughly 1832-1900) also gave us the detective. This does not mean that people didn’t use their brains to solve crimes before 1832, far from it; it is, howev...(read more) Covalciuc, Esquire, Alexander M.
Covalciuc, Alexander
Spring 2010

R1B/13

The Elements of Surprise

TTH 9.30-11

Literature demands much of its readers—our time, our sympathy, our willing disbelief—and so it is probably inevitable that we readers will come to demand things in return.  Surely, one of the central pleasures of reading ...(read more) Martin, Theodore
Martin, Theodore
Spring 2010

R1B/14

Framing the Modern Death and Paralysis

TTh 9:30 - 11

In Radiohead's 2006 song "Videotape" (inspired by Koreeda's After life), Thom Yorke dourly laments the inevitable fact:  one day we shall all encounter death.  Yet, how will w...(read more) Sullivan, Khalil
Sullivan, Khalil
Spring 2010

R1B/15

The Fall of Woman

TTh 11-12:30

This class will focus on the role and treatment of women in the story of the Fall of Man. We begin with two texts that have shaped the way the Fall is viewed in the Western imagination: the creation story in the book of Genesis and Milton’s ...(read more) Obi, Trudy
Obi, Gertrude
Spring 2010

R1B/16

Conspiracy Fiction

MWF 12-1

In his essay “The Paranoid Style in American Politics,” Richard Hofstadter identifies the distinguishing feature of a conspiracy theory not in “the absence of verifiable facts,” but rather in the “curious leap in imaginat...(read more) Seidel, Matthew
Spring 2010

R1B/17

Skeletons in the Closet

TTh 2-3:30

The plot of many works of fiction is often that of a secret being gradually revealed to the reader. This course will examine texts in which characters conceal things from each other, from the most mundane motives to the darkest Gothic sins of the past...(read more) Knox, Marisa Palacios
Knox, Marisa
Spring 2010

R1B/18

America in the Thirties

TTh 3:30-5:00

                               &n...(read more)

Pugh, Megan
Pugh, Megan
Spring 2010

R1B/19

Reading the Past, Writing the Future: Literary Communication Across Ages

TTh 5-6:30 pm

The developers of Nevada's Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository have a problem: how do they effectively tell humans not to open the site for the 10,000 years needed for the radioactive waste to decay--despite the fact that languages and technol...(read more) Williams, Karen
Williams, Karen
Spring 2010

R50/1

Freshman and Sophomore Studies:
Literary Frauds

TTh 11-12:30

Western literary history, especially since the eighteenth century, is full of impostors and forgeries. Since Chatterton purported to “discover” a fifteenth-century poet and his contemporary Macpherson faked an ancient Celtic epic, there ha...(read more) Naumovska, Slavica
Naumovska, Slavica
Spring 2010

R50/2

Freshman and Sophomore Studies:
Forms of Minority Writing

TTh 2-3:30

This course will explore the formal interests and strategies of minority authors. “Minority” here is taken not in the U.S. ethnic sense of the word but broadly, and the authors we will examine represent diverse arenas of world literature....(read more) Townsend, Sarah
Townsend, Sarah
Summer 2010

N1A/1

Literary Fright

MW 10-12

This class will be a ramble through frightening genres, moving across the ghost story, detective novel, degenerative fantasy, and apocalyptic poem. Filled with mysterious strangers and sudden death, these texts will also afford a way to think about ho...(read more) Richards, Jill
Richards, Jill
Summer 2010

N1A/2

Narrative Obsessions

MW 12-2

The aim of any text is to make a claim on a reader’s time, to arouse in him or her an obsession with its narrative world. One way a text can accomplish this is to depict an obsession of its own: unhealthy, often all-consuming, and always fasc...(read more)

Seidel, Matthew
Summer 2010

N1A/3

Fact and Fantasy

MW 6-8

This course satisfies the first half of the R&C requirement and focuses on the craft of writing expository and argumentative essays. You will be required to produce 32 pages of writing, consisting of several short assignments, online discussion po...(read more) Naumovska, Slavica
Naumovska, Slavica
Summer 2010

N1B/1

Hearing Voices

TTh 10-12

Literature functions as a sort of ghostly presence in our lives, speaking to worlds outside our experience of everyday reality.  At its most basic level, this is a course filled with ghost stories. We will encounter characters that are haunted by...(read more) Patnaik, Sangina
Patnaik, Sangina
Summer 2010

N1B/2

Delirious Professions and Odd Declarations

TTh 12-2

This course will explore a series of texts in which the principle characters are engaged in the “delirious professions,” a phrase coined by Paul Valery to denote “all those occupations in which the principal instrument is one’s...(read more) Clinton, Daniel Patrick
Clinton, Dan
Summer 2010

N1B/3

Poetics of Refusal

TTh 4-6

This course will explore the politics and aesthetics of refusal. In civil disobedience, refusal becomes a central tactic for protesting injustice. Think of Rosa Parks refusing to give up her seat and of the bus boycott that followed. Think of the East...(read more) Huerta, Javier
Huerta, Javier
Summer 2010

N1B/4

The Survival of Magic in American Literature

TTh 6-8 pm

Magic is a persistent and troubling force in American literature, a source of wonder, terror, and fascination.  In this course we’ll be looking at the idea of magic in a variety of American literary contexts.  Our primary focus will...(read more)

Junkerman, Nicholas
Junkerman, Nicholas
Fall 2009

R1A/1

Insular Fictions

MWF 9-10

This course examines the figure of the island in English and Irish literature. Through a series of readings we will explore the perceived possibilities and limitations of insularity. We will use literary models of geographical and psychological insu...(read more) Townsend, Sarah
Townsend, Sarah
Fall 2009

R1A/2

Horror Before Horror

MWF 9-10

Haunted houses, rape, murder, violence, ghosts, deals with the devil: these are just some of the most common features of 20th-century horror fiction. While we tend to associate these characteristics with writers like Stephen King and movies like T...(read more) Covalciuc, Esquire, Alexander M.
Covalciuc, Alexander
Fall 2009

R1A/3

Things

MWF 10-11

This is a class about things. We will consider literary depictions of things, possessions, objects, or whaddyacallems — as the semester progresses, these vague terms will become less and less interchangeable. What, we will ask, is an object? Wha...(read more) Miller, Monica
Miller, Monica
Fall 2009

R1A/4

The Elements of Surprise

MWF 11-12

Literature demands much of its readers—our time, our sympathy, our willing disbelief—and so it is probably inevitable that we readers will come to demand things in return. Surely, one of the central pleasures of reading is having these de...(read more) Martin, Theodore
Martin, Theodore
Fall 2009

R1A/5

Early Modern Bogeymen

MWF 12-1

Renaissance drama is rife with what can be called blocking figures—the doddering father who refuses to let his daughter marry her true love, the pesky servant who keeps an overly protective eye on our young hero. These characters are not quite ...(read more) Drosdick, Alan
Fall 2009

R1A/6

Veils: Race and Nineteenth-Century American Gothic Literature

MWF 12-1

Broadly, this course will acquaint you with the close readings of texts, research, and the tools for writing expository and research-based essays. Taking as a point of departure Toni Morrison’s assertion that thematic shadows and blackness in go...(read more) Clark, Audrey S.
Wu Clark, Audrey
Fall 2009

R1A/7

The Modest Witness

MWF 1-2

The science historians Steven Shapin and Simon Shaffer coined the term “modest witness” to describe a kind of scientific observer, one who can attest to reality without bias by eliminating any trace of personality. In the late nineteenth a...(read more) Cecire, Natalia
Cecire, Natalia
Fall 2009

R1A/8

The Power of I: Literary Constructions of the Self

MWF 2-3

What are the different ways that we come to understand first person narration? How are different selves created and chosen through texts and textual choices? How do issues of memory and claims to authenticity affect the way that we read different ki...(read more) Bednarska, Dominika
Bednarska, Dominika
Fall 2009

R1A/10

American Elegy

MW 4-5:30

In this class, we will study the American elegy, following its development from the 17th century to the present. Reading poems in conjunction with essays in literary criticism and cultural history, we will ask the following question: How did elegiac...(read more) Auclair, Tracy
Fall 2009

R1A/11

Green Reading

TTh 8-9:30

The aims of this course are ecological literacy and clear argumentative prose. On a field trip to the UC Botanical Garden, and as homework, you will begin by observing and naming birds, trees, and flowers. You will keep an environmental journal to pra...(read more) Legere, Charles
Legere, Charles
Fall 2009

R1A/13

Modern Selves and Others

TTh 11-12:30

Many storytellers have suggested that “our stories tell us who we are.” How, then, do our stories tell us who we are not? How do we create define, and identify ourselves and others? During the twentieth century in particular, creative w...(read more) Hausman, Blake M.
Hausman, Blake
Fall 2009

R1A/14

America in the 1930s

TTh 11-12:30

By the relief office I seen my people;
As they stood there hungry, I stood there asking
Is this land made for you and me?
—Woody Guthrie

In the 1930s, as economic crisis brought new attention to the struggles of w...(read more)
Pugh, Megan
Pugh, Megan
Fall 2009

R1A/15

Decolonial Epistemologies or Self-Reflexive Composition

TTh 5-6:30pm

This course is designed as a writing workshop. Through peer editing and multiple drafts of papers, we will begin with a focus on the syntax and grammar of the sentence, the basic unit for all prose writing. We will then study the paragraph, the tran...(read more) Maese-Cohen, Marcelle
Maese-Cohen, Marcelle
Fall 2009

R1B/1

Work in Progress

MWF 9-10

Although our ultimate goal as writers is to finish our work, we can learn a great deal from the process of working through an idea. As Haruki Murakami suggests about his running, sometimes the process of a work is even more meaningful than the end pro...(read more) Oyama, Misa
Oyama, Misa
Fall 2009

R1B/2

Conspiracy Fiction

MWF 9-10

In his essay “The Paranoid Style in American Politics,” Richard Hofstadter identifies the distinguishing feature of a conspiracy theory not in “the absence of verifiable facts,” but rather in the “curious leap in imaginat...(read more) Seidel, Matthew
Fall 2009

R1B/3

Short Stories in Literature

MWF 10-11

The course will focus on close reading short stories for details that students will learn to use to make larger arguments about issues such as race, gender, class, history, narrative, and creativity, so come opinionated. There will be three papers (2,...(read more) Ungar-Sargon, Batya
Ungar-Sargon, Batya
Fall 2009

R1B/4

Collaborative Production

MWF 11-12

If you think of a team of researchers, its members are probably in lab coats: Marie and Pierre Curie, Watson and Crick, the Manhattan project. But there are sociable aspects of scholarly and creative work outside the hard sciences, too. In this R1B, w...(read more) Beck, Rachel
Beck, Rachel
Fall 2009

R1B/5

Apocalyptic and Dystopian Literature

MWF 12-1

War, environmental disaster, moral decadence, pervasive governmental intrusion into private life—we’ve learned to live with it. But a rich history of dystopian and apocalyptic literature continues to play a crucial role in awakening us to...(read more) Goodwin, Peter
Goodwin, Peter
Fall 2009

R1B/6

Seeing Double

MWF 12-1

Although cases of mistaken identity often result in comedy, the figure of the “double” or “doppelgänger” tends to have more sinister associations. As a literary motif, the double can be an omen of doom, a deliberate exerci...(read more) Knox, Marisa Palacios
Knox, Marisa
Fall 2009

R1B/7

Portrait of an Artist as an Old Man

MWF 1-2

Longevity offers a curious dilemma for an artist: how are literary and historic movements articulated to him/her over time, and how does s/he in turn shape them? This is not only a question of tradition and the act of historical sense-making, but also...(read more) Lee, Sookyoung (Soo)
Lee, Sookyoung
Fall 2009

R1B/8

Travel Writing

MWF 1-2

“There is no frigate like a book, to take us lands away.” -- Emily Dickinson

Exotic lands, unfamiliar customs, and bizarre creatures challenge the ability of travelers, writers, and readers to make sense of what they experie...(read more)
Thomas-Bignami, Ian M.
Thomas-Bignami, Ian
Fall 2009

R1B/9

On the Anecdote

MWF 2-3

This course will examine the trajectory of the short story and its relationship to technology. We'll start off looking at the development of the genre from myth, tale, parable, joke, etc. to the “canonical” literary form as it emerged ...(read more) Loofbourow, Lili
Loofbourow, Liliana
Fall 2009

R1B/10

First Contact

MWF 3-4

In The Gods Must Be Crazy, an airline pilot drops a coke bottle into an isolated !Kung community in the Kalahari desert, their first experience of the outside world. As the hapless Xi attempts to get rid of the offending object, we are meant ...(read more) Bady, Aaron J.
Bady, Aaron
Fall 2009

R1B/11

American Short Works

MW 4-5:30

This course will examine a variety of short American works of art. We’ll start with major short stories from the 19th and 20th centuries and expand outward from there to look at other short forms, including film and theater. Along the way, we&...(read more) Junkerman, Nicholas
Junkerman, Nicholas
Fall 2009

R1B/12

Information, Crisis, Catastrophe

TTh 8-9:30

This course will explore representations of crisis, calamity, and general mayhem, moving from natural disaster to Hollywood stampede, from Mallarmé’s Crise de Vers to the Cold War to our current financial meltdown. We will think ...(read more) Richards, Jill
Richards, Jill
Fall 2009

R1B/13

Words for Nature: Representing Environments in American Literature

TTh 11-12:30

This course is primarily concerned with developing and refining your writing, reading, and thinking skills. We will tackle these goals through the broad topic of American literature as it relates to the evolution of environmental thought. What makes a...(read more) Arreglo, Carlo
Arreglo, Carlo
Fall 2009

R1B/14

Contemporary American Narrative

TTh 12:30-2

This course will focus on strengthening your critical reading and writing skills through the study of contemporary American narrative. While the overarching thematic concerns of the course will be our texts’ self-conscious engagements with histo...(read more) Gordon, Zachary
Gordon, Zachary
Fall 2009

180R/1

The Romance

TTh 9:30-11

For more information on this course, please see professor Miller during her office hours on Fridays from 2-4.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major. ...(read more)
Miller, Jennifer
Miller, Jennifer
Spring 2009

R1A/1

Reading and Composition:
Beyond Good and Evil

MWF 9-10

This course takes its title from Friedrich Nietzsche’s book on the "philosophy of the future," in which he argues that traditional moral categories no longer apply to the modern world. In this course we will test that claim. After a br...(read more) Kerschen, Paul
Spring 2009

R1A/2

Reading and Composition:
Storytelling

MWF 12-1

“…the art of storytelling is coming to an end.  Less and less frequently do we encounter people with the ability to tell a tale properly.  More and more often there is embarrassment all around when the wish to hear a story is...(read more)

Baldwin, Ruth
Baldwin, Ruth
Spring 2009

R1A/3

Reading and Composition:
Talking Normal

MWF 3-4

This course explores the ways in which speech disorders and disability have been interrelated in twentieth-century literary and visual culture.  Students will engage with a range of genres including novels, autobiographies, critical essays, films...(read more) Eagle, Christopher
Eagle, Chris
Spring 2009

R1A/4

Reading and Composition:
The African Writer

MW 4-5:30

The literatures produced on the continent of Africa are old, rich, and vast, from epic poems and religious verse to extensive dramatic and storytelling folk cultures. This class, however, will focus on modern African writers, men and women who have wr...(read more) Bady, Aaron J.
Bady, Aron
Spring 2009

R1A/5

Reading and Composition:
The Southernization of America

TTh 8-9:30

In 1927, the Mississippi River flooded some 27,000 square miles of American heartland, displacing hundreds of thousands of Southerners. Two years later, the stock market bottomed out and triggered the Great Depression. These national catastrophes prov...(read more) Pugh, Megan
Pugh, Megan
Spring 2009

R1A/7

Reading and Composition:
Authenticity, Fraud, and Representation

TTh 11-12:30

This course will consider the relationship between concepts of fraud and authenticity in literary and artistic representation, using this basic opposition to explore questions about originality, mimesis, and identity. Can something fake be real if it ...(read more) Cannon, Benjamin Zenas
Cannon, Ben
Spring 2009

R1A/8

Reading and Composition:
Poetry and Science

TTh 12:30-2

In college lore, the stereotypical easy science class is “Physics for Poets,” a class supposedly evacuated of all the specifics that make physics what it is. The premise of a title like “Physics for Poets” is that the poet is t...(read more) Cecire, Natalia
Cecire, Natalia
Spring 2009

R1B/1

Reading and Composition:
Secrecy and Detection (note new title)

MWF 9-10

The critical reader may easily fall into the habit of regarding even the most innocent tale as a case awaiting solution, such that every bright country cottage or society salon becomes a crime scene to be scrutinized by the inch. Leaving aside the que...(read more) Clinton, Daniel Patrick
Clinton, Dan (note new instructor)
Spring 2009

R1B/2

Reading and Composition:
Science! Fiction!

MWF 10-11

This course will explore both traditional and non-traditional examples of science fiction with a special emphasis on book-to-film adaptations. Some of our organizing questions will be: If science has on one hand become notorious for taking the life ou...(read more) Fan, Christopher Tzechung
Fan, Chris
Spring 2009

R1B/4

Reading and Composition:
The Confessing Animal

MWF 11-12

Written and oral confessions are a mainstay of western culture, with manifestations as different as Augustine's fourth-century spiritual autobiography and Rousseau's shocking eighteenth-century tell-all memoir. Confession in a variety of fo...(read more)

Browning, Catherine Cronquist
Browning, Catherine
Spring 2009

R1B/5

Reading and Composition:
Reading the Past, Writing the Future: Literary Communication Across Ages

MWF 11-12

The developers of Nevada's Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository have a problem: how do they effectively tell humans not to open the site for the 10,000 years needed for the radioactive waste to decay--despite the fact that languages and technol...(read more) Williams, Karen
Williams, Karen
Spring 2009

R1B/6

Reading and Composition:
Plotting Suspicion

MWF 12-1

This course will inspect a lineup of “unusual suspects” plucked from what might be called a literature of suspicion. Although a motley generic arrangement encompassing revenge tragedy, psychoanalytic theory, detective fiction, and postmode...(read more) Ring, Joseph
Ring, Joseph
Spring 2009

R1B/7

Reading and Composition:
The Capitalist

MWF 1-2

This course will explore the figure of the capitalist in literature and film. We will question to what extent he and she is a useful model for describing the modern ideal self in all its excesses, its brutalities, and its pleasures. While most of our ...(read more) Costantino, Jesse
Constantino, Jesse
Spring 2009

R1B/8

Reading and Composition:
A People’s History of the English Language

MWF 1-2

The R1 series is built to hone your critical thinking, and to train you in the basic reading and composition techniques necessary to organize, sharpen, and communicate that thinking.  When you master the rules of the language in which you write o...(read more) Sergi, Matthew
Sergi, Matthew
Spring 2009

R1B/9

Reading and Composition:
Stylin’

MWF 2-3

In this class we will consider style as a literary and a cultural problematic.  We will endeavor to find precise ways of talking about the distinctive style of a text, and we will think about style in a broader sense, as a currency that promises ...(read more) Katz, Stephen A
Katz, Stephen
Spring 2009

R1B/10

Reading and Composition:
How Form Plots the Historical

MWF 2-3

The texts we will read in this course will compel us to think about how characters and stories develop in time.  How does the concept of History change when time moves non-linearly instead of linearly? What happens to a character's experience...(read more) Menilla, David D.
Menilla, David
Spring 2009

R1B/11

Reading and Composition:
“Native American Literature”

MWF 3-4

As studies in “American literature” or “Literature in English” grow increasingly diverse and inclusive, several important questions arise in relation to “Native American literature.”  What is Native American li...(read more) Hausman, Blake M.
Hausman, Blake
Spring 2009

R1B/12

Reading and Composition:
Literature of the Undocumented

MW 4-5:30

The texts we will read this semester ask us to engage our critical reading and writing skills on the topical question of undocumented immigration. We will turn our critical attention to articles from both sides of current debates on immigration in ord...(read more) Huerta, Javier
Huerta, Javier
Spring 2009

R1B/13

Reading and Composition:
The Long and Short of It

Th 8-9:30

You can’t judge a book by its cover, but can you judge it by its length?  Why is it that some of us love burying our noses in a large book, while others of us feel drowsy at the very sight of anything over 200 pages long?  Why don&rsqu...(read more) Tsao, Tiffany
Spring 2009

R1B/14

Reading and Composition:
Googleable: Language, Politics and Mass Media

TTh 9:30-11

George Orwell's 1984 envisions a world where language, thought, and information are controlled by the ruling Party. Reading 1984 as a primer of media and information control, we will examine the challenges that mass media and the...(read more) Ecke, Jeremy S
Ecke, Jeremy
Spring 2009

R1B/15

Reading and Composition:
On and Off the Map

TTh 11-12:30

This course examines the topic of map-making in contemporary American and world literature and film.  We will begin with Brian Friel’s 1980 play Translations, which takes up a literal mapping project, the British Odnance Survey tha...(read more) Townsend, Sarah
Townsend, Sarah
Spring 2009

R1B/16

Reading and Composition:
Speaking to Power in Early Modern England

TTh 11-12:30

How do writers influence and persuade?  Can an artist change the course of history?   Are there rhetorical techniques which can touch and sway an audience?  This course examines a variety of texts from early modern Europe which att...(read more) Smythe, Fiona
Smythe, Fiona
Spring 2009

R1B/17

Reading and Composition:
Think Like the Pacific: American Literature and Alternate Environmentalisms

TTh 2-3:30

This course is primarily concerned with developing and refining your writing, reading, and thinking skills. We will, however, tackle these goals through the broad topic of American literature as it relates to the evolution of environmental thought and...(read more) Arreglo, Carlo
Arreglo, Carlo
Spring 2009

R1B/18

Reading and Composition:
Dystopian Fiction and the Fate of the Body

TTh 3:30-5

This course will examine the body as a site through which dystopian fiction enacts many of its central conflicts.  We will discuss ways in which dystopian fiction both speculates about the future of the body and registers anxiety about the loss o...(read more) Edwards, Erin E
Edwards, Erin
Spring 2009

R1B/19

Reading and Composition:
The Garden and Revolution—English ‘Eco’ Poetry, 1603-67

TTh 5-6:30

Earth felt the wound, and nature from her seat
Sighing gave signs of woe, that all was lost.
— John Milton, Paradise Lost (1667)

We will read and write about environmentally engaged poetry of seventeenth-century England ...(read more)
Prawdzik, Brendan
Prawdzik, Brendan
Spring 2009

R50/1

Freshman and Sophomore Studies:
Social Reform in Literature

TTh 2-3:30

What is social reform? What are the thought processes involved in defining a social problem?  And how does this definition affect the manner and methods used to solve it?  This course seeks to better understand the impulse to want to solve a...(read more) Black, Kelvin C.
Black, Kelvin
Spring 2009

R50/2

Freshman and Sophomore Studies:
Slavery in British and American Literature

TTh 5-6:30

The representation of slavery in Anglo-American literature between the seventeenth and nineteenth centuries raises a number of interesting questions.  Is it possible to represent the trauma of slavery in the form of literature? What literary and ...(read more) Infante-Abbatantuono, Jhoanna
Infante, Jhoanna
Fall 2008

R1A/1

Reading & Composition:
Poetry and the Varieties of English

MWF 9-10

"Students are often enjoined to read �the great authors� in order to absorb �good English.� But English has so many variations across time and space that it�s hard to imagine what that could possibly mean. In this course, we�ll read a lot of poetry in...(read more) Natalia Cecire
Fall 2008

R1A/2

Reading & Composition:
Fictional Educations

MWF 10-11

"Everyone experiences childhood, but representing that experience from the perspective of adulthood is often an act as much of imagination as of memory. This course will engage with texts that undertake that imaginative act. We will discuss how these ...(read more) Arcadia Falcone
Fall 2008

R1A/3

Reading & Composition:
Contemporary African American and Asian American Experimental Poetry

MWF 11-12

"Within the traditions of contemporary African American and Asian American poetry, a category of self-identified ?experimental? writing has emerged recently. What is minority ?experimental? poetry? One of the primary aims of this course is to familiar...(read more) Chris Chen
Fall 2008

R1A/6

Reading & Composition:
Victorian Industry

MWF 2-3

"The problem of labor preoccupied writers of prose, fiction, and poetry during the reign of Queen Victorian, a period of industrial and urban expansion in England. The discourse around labor overlapped with aesthetic discourse, as both addressed the a...(read more) Jhoanna Infante
Fall 2008

R1A/8

Reading & Composition:
Noir Fiction and Film

MW 4-5:30

"This course focuses on the period of American fiction and cinema often referred to as �Noir,� a cycle of crime and detective stories dating roughly from 1939 to 1958. We will begin the semester by trying to get at what exactly makes noir fiction and ...(read more) Chris Eagle
Fall 2008

R1A/9

Reading & Composition:
Playing with Literature

TTh 8-9:30

"For this course, we will look at a handful of texts that equate �reading� and �writing� with �playing.� In these texts, stories become games, books become toys, and passive reading becomes active participation. We will consider a handful of theoretic...(read more) Jesse Costantino
Fall 2008

R1A/10

Reading & Composition:
The African Writer

TTh 9:30-11

"Africa's literatures are old, rich, and vast, from epic poems and religious verse to an extensive dramatic and storytelling folk culture that can be found in almost every corner of the continent. This class, however, will focus on *modern * African w...(read more) Aaron Bady
Fall 2008

R1A/13

Reading & Composition:
T.B.A.

2-3:30

No additional information about this class is available at this time. ...(read more) Carlo Arreglo
Fall 2008

R1A/14

Reading & Composition:
The Garden and the Century of Revolution: English Poetry, 1600-67

TTh 3:30-5

"Earth felt the wound, and nature from her seat Sighing gave signs of woe, that all was lost. -- John Milton, Paradise Lost (1667)



We will read and write about environmentally engaged poetry of seventeenth-century England as we develop ...(read more)
Brendan M. Prawdzik
Fall 2008

R1A/15

Reading & Composition:
T.B.A.

TTh 5-6:30

No additional information about this class is available at this time....(read more) Karen Leibowitz
Fall 2008

R1B/1

Reading & Composition:
Authenticity, Fraud, and Representation

MWF 9-10

"Visual art may include: Rubens, Goya, Corot, Warhol, Koons. This course will consider the relationship between concepts of fraud and authenticity in literature, using this basic opposition to explore questions about originality, representation, and i...(read more) Ben Cannon
Fall 2008

R1B/3

Reading & Composition:
The Southernization of America : The 1930s to the 1950s

MWF 11-12

"In 1927, the Mississippi River flooded some 27,000 square miles of American heartland, displacing hundreds of thousands of Southerners. Two years later, the stock market bottomed out and triggered the Great Depression. These national catastrophes pro...(read more) No instructor assigned yet.
Fall 2008

R1B/6

Reading & Composition:
Stylin�

MWF 2-3

"In this class we will consider style as a literary and a cultural problematic. We will endeavor to find precise ways of talking about the distinctive style of a text, and we will think about style in a broader sense, as a currency that promises creat...(read more) Stephen Katz
Fall 2008

R1B/7

Reading & Composition:
"The Ghostly Time of the �Present� has no Boundaries

Instructor: David Menilla"

MWF 3-4

"The texts we will read in this course will challenge us to think about how a story is constructed. Our imagination and critical thinking skills will be stretched to their limits by novels which disrupt assumptions we may have about how a story develo...(read more) David Menilla
Fall 2008

R1B/9

Reading & Composition:
Vagrancy

TTh 8-9:30

"When did it become potentially criminal to be poor? Why is vagrancy a source of such contention and anxiety for so many? What are some of the popular myths and fantasies about vagrancy and homelessness, and where did they come from? What are the stor...(read more) Ruth Baldwin
Fall 2008

R1B/10

Reading & Composition:
Literature and the City

TTh 9:30-11

"This course will consider the ways in which literature has responded to the city and its accompanying modes of life: alienating, unhealthful and frightening; thrilling, liberatory and glamorous; the site of torments and marvels; of endless workdays a...(read more) Jasper Bernes
Fall 2008

R1B/11

Reading & Composition:
Illogical Fictions

TTh 11-12:30

"As you will learn in this course, the key to good writing is impeccable logic, but as you will also learn, good writing is often terribly illogical. Although that statement may make little sense, it should give you a good idea of the kinds of logic y...(read more) Monica Miller
Fall 2008

R1B/12

Reading & Composition:
Imagining Elizabeth

TTh 12:30-2

"This course will examine the many ways in which the figure of Queen Elizabeth I fired the imagination of her contemporaries and of recent writers and directors. We will use Elizabeth as a touchstone; a central topic around which we will build skills ...(read more) Fiona Smythe
Fall 2008

R1B/13

Reading & Composition:
In the Wake of War

TTh 2-3:30

Wars punctuate and define our history. Governments declare armistices, but do we ever really move past the moment of battle? In the wake of death, what new forms of living emerge? In this course, we?ll focus on texts which play out the days, months an...(read more) Gina Patnaik
Fall 2008

R1B/14

Reading & Composition:
Secrecy and Detection

TTh 3:30-5

"The critical reader may easily fall into the habit of regarding even the most innocent tale as a case awaiting solution, such that every bright country cottage or society salon becomes a crime scene to be scrutinized by the inch. Leaving aside the qu...(read more) Dan Clinton
Fall 2008

R1B/15

Reading & Composition:
Documents

TTh 5-6:30

"The document is a fragment that takes on a life of its own. An idea, a perception, an image gets uprooted and reframed, sculpted or distorted, and formed into something new. The result has an aura of 'the real'. Think of documents like your passport,...(read more) Josh Weiner
Spring 2008

R1B/1

Reading & Composition:
Bay Area Social Movements and Literatures

MWF 9-10

"Alfred Arteaga, Imamu Amiri Baraka, Elaine Brown, Angela Davis, Allen Ginsberg, Thom Gunn, Robert Hass, Lyn Hejinian, Janice Gould, June Jordan, Cherr�e Moraga, Maxine Hong Kingston, Huey P. Newton, Ishmael Reed, Sonia Sanchez, Amy Tan.


(read more)
Marcelle Maese-Cohen
Spring 2008

R1B/2

Reading & Composition:
Egypt in the Cultural Memory of the West

MWF 10-11

Various myths and constructions of Egypt have been centrally important to the cultural development of the Western tradition from antiquity to the present. Egypt has often been viewed in a highly conflicted manner as both a land of idolatry and magic a...(read more) Marques Redd
Spring 2008

R1B/3

Reading & Composition:
What�s So New About New Media?

MWF 10-11

"This course will continue to develop and polish the critical thinking and writing skills introduced in English 1A. Through the primary works of the class, we will refine close reading, analysis, argumentation and organization. In addition, we will en...(read more) Franklin Melendez
Spring 2008

R1B/4

Reading & Composition:
Reading Closely and Writing

MWF 11-12

In this course we will read closely and write about markedly different kinds of literature � a novel, verse, a couple short stories, a play � with the aim of coming to some conclusions about what makes great literature great. The reading list is thus ...(read more) Joseph Jordan
Spring 2008

R1B/5

Reading & Composition:
T.B.A.

MWF 11-12

"The reader of science fiction often finds him or herself venturing into a world where the rules of the reader�s reality simply don�t apply: lands inhabited by alien species and races, existing in prehistoric or futuristic eras; societies governed by ...(read more) Tiffany Tsao
Spring 2008

R1B/6

Reading & Composition:
Victorian Mysteries

MWF 12-1

"In this class, we will read mystery stories written during the Victorian era, and we will approach Victorian culture as a mystery to be explored through students� own research into the laws and culture of this period (1837-1901). We will develop a se...(read more) Karen Leibowitz
Spring 2008

R1B/7

Reading & Composition:
War and Literary Form

MWF 1-2

"This course will explore the connections between war and literary form, with a general focus on 20 th century literature written in English. We will consider how writers represent war in explicit and implicit ways, how various literary genres set up ...(read more) Marguerite Nguyen
Spring 2008

R1B/8

Reading & Composition:
Truth and Fiction

MWF 1-2

"This course will examine the relationship between truth and fiction in literature and film. Some of these works dramatize real events; others show the impact that stories have on their readers and authors. What do we seek from fictional works�how do ...(read more) Misa Oyama
Spring 2008

R1B/9

Reading & Composition:
Literature and the History of the Senses

MWF 2-3

"Scholars used to assume that the number, function, and ranking of the senses were determined entirely by biology and, therefore, were among the only constants of human experience across different cultures and throughout the centuries. However, in the...(read more) Tracy Auclair
Spring 2008

R1B/10

Reading & Composition:
Travels with America

MWF 2-3

"Is globalism really a new thing for America? The colonization and settlement of the Americas was the first time that people from four continents were all part of the same ""global"" economic system, a system defined by immigration and put into place ...(read more) Aaron Bady
Spring 2008

R1B/11

Reading & Composition:
�Horseman, Pass By�: Crossing Over in the Southwest

MWF 3-4

"What is it about the American Southwest � a region famed for sweeping vistas, a vibrant syncretic culture, and prickly traditions of independence � that perennially fascinates people of all ages and backgrounds? This course will attempt a literary an...(read more) Bradford Boyd
Spring 2008

R1B/12

Reading & Composition:
Mobility, Identity, and the Law

MW 4-5:30

"From affirmative action to enemy combatants, �identity� and legally-supported identifications maintain important yet often-challenged positions within our society. In this course we will utilize readings, class discussions, group work, and essays to ...(read more) Aurelio Perez
Spring 2008

R1B/13

Reading & Composition:
The Art of Stasis

TTh 8-9:30

"This class will focus on literary texts which use various representational strategies to depict scenes of personal and social stasis. With each text, we will return to a central question: How does this author represent stasis? We will also often ask ...(read more) Sumner, Charles
Spring 2008

R1B/14

Reading & Composition:
Talking Normal: Speech Disorders and Disability in the 20 th Century

TTh 9:30-11

"This course explores the numerous conflicted and contradictory ways in which speech disorders have been represented in twentieth century literature. We will engage with texts from a range of genres including novels, plays, nonfiction memoirs, essays ...(read more) Chris Eagle
Spring 2008

R1B/15

Reading & Composition:
Boredom

TuTh 11-12:30

"�Boredom,� E.M. Cioran writes, �is the echo in us of time tearing itself apart�the revelation of the void, the drying up of that delirium which sustains�or invents�life.� Cioran is just one of many writers convinced that the seemingly unremarkable ph...(read more) Ayon Roy
Spring 2008

R1B/16

Reading & Composition:
Worlds Apart in Shakespeare

TTh 12:30-2

"Shakespeare�s plays often project stereoptic visions of worlds set apart from the geographical center of the dramatic action. These removed places, like Arden forest in As You Like It, the realm of fairies in A Midsummer Night�s Dream, or romantic Be...(read more) Joseph Ring
Spring 2008

R1B/17

Reading & Composition:
The Russian Short Story

TTh 3:30-5

"This is a writing course whose main objective is to turn you into competent writers of academic prose. However, since we need a subject to write about, I decided on one I am interested in and which, I hope, will be of interest to you: short stories b...(read more) Vitaliy Eyber
Spring 2008

R1B/18

Reading & Composition:
Consciousness and Feeling in Narrative

TTh, 3:30-5

"This course takes on a basic assumption about the experience of reading literature: namely, that we not only feel and experience emotions when we read, but also that the narratives we encounter in literature seem to house feelings and forms of consci...(read more) Ryan P. McDermott
Spring 2008

R1B/19

Reading & Composition:
Literature in a Time of War

MWF 9-10

"In your writing for this course, you will try to come up with an answer to one question: what does literature say or tell us about war? Some poets glorify or rationalize war, while others protest. For still others, a work of literature does not say a...(read more) Charles Legere
Spring 2008

R50/1

Freshman and Sophomore Studies:
Visions and Revisions

TTh 2-3:30

"This course begins with the premise that literary texts make their meanings in dialogue with one another and in engagement with their social and cultural contexts. We will be reading three nineteenth-century works alongside late-twentieth-century ada...(read more) Goodwin, Peter
Goodwin, Peter
Spring 2008

R50/2

Freshman and Sophomore Studies:
Short & Sweet

TTh 5-6:30

"This course continues your R1A training in the systematic practice of reading and writing, with the aim of developing your fluency through longer expository papers and the incorporation of research into argumentation. You will be responsible for writ...(read more) Bartlett, Jami L
Bartlett, Jami
Fall 2007

R1A/1

Reading and Composition:
Grappling with the Postmodern

MWF 9-10

"This course is designed develop and polish college-level writing. By engaging the primary works of the class, we will focus on critical thinking skills, close reading/ analysis, argumentation and organization. We will pursue these objectives through ...(read more) Franklin Melendez
Fall 2007

R1A/2

Reading and Composition:
Staging Citizenship in English Renaissance Drama

MWF 11-12

"Course Description: This course will focus on representations of citizenship in early modern drama. We will begin with several Elizabethan plays whose central characters are racially or religiously marked as �other,� and hence excluded from citizensh...(read more) Joseph Ring
Fall 2007

R1A/3

Reading and Composition:
Dystopian and Post-Apocalyptic Literature

MWF 12-1

"War, environmental disaster, moral decadence, pervasive governmental intrusion into private life�we�ve learned to live with all of it; but a rich history of dystopian and apocalyptic literature continues to play a crucial role in awakening us to the ...(read more) Peter Goodwin
Fall 2007

R1A/4

Reading and Composition:
Shakespeare and Chekov

MWF 1-2

" This is a writing course whose main objective is to turn you into competent writers of academic prose. However, since we need a subject to write about, I have chosen two plays by Shakespeare and two by Chekhov. I think I can teach you more about the...(read more) Vitaliy Eyber
Fall 2007

R1A/5

Reading and Composition:
War and Literary Form

MWF 3-4

"This course will explore the connections between war and literary form, with a general focus on 20 th century texts written in English. We will consider how writers represent war in explicit and implicit ways, how various literary genres set up diffe...(read more) Marguerite Nguyen
Fall 2007

R1A/6

Reading and Composition:
Literature and the History of the Senses

TTh 8-9:30

" Scholars used to assume that the number, function, and ranking of the senses were determined entirely by biology and, therefore, were among the only constants of human experience across different cultures and throughout the centuries. However, in th...(read more) Tracy Auclair
Fall 2007

R1A/7

Reading and Composition:
Irish Literature

TTh 9:30-11

" Have you ever noticed that some of the most interesting �British� writers of the last two centuries are actually Irish or, at least, have a significant connection to Ireland? What is it about this place that gives these authors the itch to write abo...(read more) Kea Anderson
Fall 2007

R1A/8

Reading and Composition:
Bad Managements

TTh 11-12:30

" This course begins your training in the systematic practice of reading and writing, with the aim of developing your critical attention and argumentation skills through short expository papers, in-class essays, and informal close readings. You will b...(read more) Jami Bartlett
Fall 2007

R1A/9

Reading and Composition:
Beautiful Objections

TTh 11-12:30

"There are some gems of cultural critque in the English language. We will consider just a few and see what we can find out about how they accomplish both beauty and critique. We'll read Jamaica Kincaid's smoldering A Small Place for a look at colonial...(read more) Katharine Wright
Fall 2007

R1A/10

Reading and Composition:
Perspectivisms

TTh 12:30-2

" This course approaches literary works from a philosophical standpoint, taking up certain longstanding philosophical debates about the nature of Truth and Reality, and applying those debates to works of literature and to films. We will spend the firs...(read more) Chris Eagle
Fall 2007

R1A/11

Reading and Composition:
The Once and Future King

TTh 12:30-2

" Certain narratives, endlessly told and retold, altered and reshaped, have kept audiences fascinated for a very long time. The story of the sixth-century British warrior-king Arthur is one of these. This class will begin with two of the most influent...(read more) Andrea Lankin
Fall 2007

R1A/12

Reading and Composition:
Marrying the Master

TTh 2-3:30

Marriage has historically been seen as women�s primary source of socioeconomic mobility; whereas male ascendancy is narrated explicitly in terms of material wealth and status, the woman�s acquisition of socioeconomic status is narrated in affective te...(read more) Natalia Cecire
Fall 2007

R1A/13

Reading and Composition:
Writing about Reading and Reading about Writing

TTh 3:30-5:00

"In this course, students will not only practice reading and writing but also reflect on the meaning of reading and writing in autobiography, fiction, and poetry. We�ll discuss how societies have restricted reading and writing, what �good� reading and...(read more) Karen Leibowitz
Fall 2007

R1A/14

Reading and Composition:
Grimmer Than Grimm

TTh 3:30-5

"Let's take an adult look at six classic folktales (and their variations) often relegated to the children's room. What are they really about? Why is their cultural influence so persistent? Folklorists, psychoanalysts, feminists, poets-- all have somet...(read more) Katharine Wright
Fall 2007

R1B/1

Reading and Composition:
Immigrant Form

MWF 10-11

Immigrant form will serve as our forum for developing research and investigative skills. We will read a set of texts by and about immigrants in the United States in the context of post-1965 immigration, ultimately focusing on immigrant form in the pos...(read more) Swati Rana
Fall 2007

R1B/2

Reading and Composition:
Writing From Memory

MWF 11-12

"At the beginning of Trout Fishing in America, Richard Brautigan frets over accurately remembering and recording his own memories, saying, �I�d like to get it right.� What does this mean? �Getting it right� may not always mean reporting it the way it ...(read more) Marisa Libbon
Fall 2007

R1B/3

Reading and Composition:
Postcolonial Gothic

MWF 12-1

"In recent years, literary scholars have taken an interest in the sub-genre �Postcolonial Gothic,� examining how and why colonial and postcolonial writers employ elements of the Gothic genre in their portrayals of racial difference and of power. This ...(read more) Sarah Townsend
Fall 2007

R1B/4

Reading and Composition:
Literature and the Environment

MWF 1-2

"Industrialization transformed the landscape of nineteenth century Britain. Poets and novelists of this period often expressed, to use Thomas Hardy�s words, the �ache of modernism�: they longed for a simpler time in which human beings lived according ...(read more) Jhoanna Infante
Fall 2007

R1B/6

Reading and Composition:
TBA

MWF 3-4

No course description is available at this time. ...(read more) Melissa Fabros
Fall 2007

R1B/7

Reading and Composition:
In and Out of Realism

TTh 8:00-9:30

"How is literature to represent human experience? A prevalent strategy in English literature since the eighteenth century has been that of the realist novel, which presents a rich and detailed account of ordinary life�or some near approximation. But a...(read more) Paul Kerschen
Fall 2007

R1B/8

Reading and Composition:
Mariners, Renegades and Castaways

TTh 9:30-11:00

"This course, designed to train you in the practice of critical reading and writing, will focus on literature about sailors and slaves in the era of Atlantic revolution. We will examine sea-chronicles, novels, ballads, and slave-narratives in order to...(read more) Cody Marrs
Fall 2007

R1B/9

Reading and Composition:
Highway 61

TTh 11-12.30

" In his song �Highway 61� Bob Dylan suggests we can solve all of our problems by taking to the road. The song also expresses the American love affair with mobility. Through twentieth-century American novels, we will examine the circumstances that giv...(read more) Alia Yap Pan
Fall 2007

R1B/10

Reading and Composition:
The Power of Theater: Tracking the Social Role of Dramatic Texts

TTh 12:30-2

"How powerful is theater�and in what way is it powerful? Does it have a point, a purpose? Should it? What role does it play in the culture that produces it? What role does it play in the culture that it produces? And how has this role changed over tim...(read more) Matthew Sergi
Fall 2007

R1B/11

Reading and Composition:
Getting Real: Exploring Passing and Authenticity

TTh 2-3:30

"This course will examine imperatives and anxieties about authenticity in relation to race, ethnicity, gender and disability. Concern about who is and is not a part of these social categories is not simply a contemporary phenomenon, but also a major t...(read more) D. Bednarska
Fall 2007

R1B/12

Reading and Composition:
Hybrid Writing

TTh 3:30-5

"An ex-slave, a super-villain, a monster, an android, and a Jewish mouse are among the starring figures in the books we�ll be reading. Their experiences are vastly different, but what they share is a particular response to their exclusion from the maj...(read more) Talissa Ford
Fall 2007

R1B/13

Reading and Composition:
The Historical Novel

MWF 9-10

"This class is intended to develop critical reading and writing skills through the study of the historical novel. Over the course of the semester we will examine this genre (which, very generally, is defined by the centrality of historical events for ...(read more) Gordon, Zachary
Zach Gordon
Fall 2007

R1B/14

Reading and Composition:
Eating Meat

TTh 12:30-2

A course on the literature of carnivory. In this class, we�ll look at essays, novels, and poems about culture and diet. We�ll explore concepts like taste, hunger, food chains, trophic levels, nutrition, predation, and domestication. You�ll write a clo...(read more) Charles Legere
Spring 2007

R1A/1

Reading and Composition:
Improper Love in the Renaissance

MWF 10-11

"A story of forbidden love can compel a reader through both sympathy and repulsion. We hope the frustrated lovers can somehow overcome the unjust exigencies preventing their happy union. We fear they will not demonstrate self-control if consummating t...(read more) Alan Drosdick
Spring 2007

R1A/2

Reading and Composition:
Facing West from California?s Shores?

MWF 1-2

In this course we will explore the poetic representations of California?s wilderness. From the photography of A.P. Hill and Ansel Adams, to the letters, reports, and journal entries of Clarence King and John Muir, we will examine how an environmental ...(read more) Jeremy S. Ecke
Spring 2007

R1A/3

Reading and Composition:
The Contemporary Nomad

MWF 3-4

"A nomad is typically understood as a wanderer, rootless and given to vagrancy. However, as suburbanization and over-inflated housing markets continue to override interests in creating and maintaining public spaces, it might be more fitting to conside...(read more) Becky Hsu
Spring 2007

R1A/4

Reading and Composition:
Hamlet, Lear, Macbeth - Writing about Shakespearean Tragedy

T-Th 8-9:30

"This is a writing course whose main objective is to turn you into competent writers of academic prose. However, since we need a subject to write about, I decided on one I am interested in and which, I hope, will be of interest to you: Shakespeare. I ...(read more) Vitaliy Eyber
Spring 2007

R1A/5

Reading and Composition:
Monstrosities

Tuesday and Thursday, 8:00-9:30 a.m.

"Who are our monsters, and why? This course will examine the idea of the monstrous in literature and culture, from the Romantic era to the present day. Through a variety of texts and other media, we will explore a wide range of issues: how the monstro...(read more) Arcadia Falcone
Spring 2007

R1A/6

Reading and Composition:
Secrets and Sexuality in the Modern Novel

TTh 9:30-11:00 a.m.

"Throughout this course, we will consider a broad range of aesthetic responses to the problem of representing sexuality in literature, with a particular focus on the role that secrets play in literary constructions of non-normative sexual desire. Begi...(read more) Ryan P. McDermott
Spring 2007

R1A/7

Reading and Composition:
Culture and Politics of Food and Eating

TTh 11:00 ? 12:30

"What we eat and how we eat it says a lot about our culture?our history, our politics, our religious beliefs, and our ways of relating to each other. Why are some foods distasteful, or even taboo? How can choosing what to have for lunch be a political...(read more) Peter Goodwin
Spring 2007

R1A/8

Reading and Composition:
Time Bandits

TTh 12:30-2

"The blurb on the back of Robert Coover?s 1977 novel The Public Burning claims that the novel was the ?first major work of contemporary fiction ever to use living historical figures as characters.? But Coover?s novel certainly doesn?t read like histor...(read more) Ted Martin
Spring 2007

R1A/9

Reading and Composition:
Metamorphosis and Literature

TTh 3:30-5

"This course examines why metamorphosis has been such an enduring motif in literature and how its meanings change over time. Starting with classical myths and working through more modern fairy tales, poems, novels, and psychological case studies, we w...(read more) Erin E. Edwards
Spring 2007

R1A/10

Reading and Composition:
Fact and Fantasy

TTH 3:30 ? 5:00

"In this course, you will focus on the craft of writing college essays?a vast process that includes everything from refining grammar and style to developing theses, engaging critical thinking, and structuring your arguments in logical and dynamic ways...(read more) Slavica Naumovska
Spring 2007

R1B/1

Reading and Composition:
Literary Utopias: Nonsense and Sensibility

MWF 9-10

"The point of this class is to help you become better writers and critical thinkers, and we?ll approach that goal by discussing and writing about an enduring literary topic -- utopia. In its strictest sense ?utopia? doesn?t mean ?good place,? but simp...(read more) Blaine Greteman
Spring 2007

R1B/2

Reading and Composition:
Trade-offs and Sacrifices

MWF 10-11

"This course continues your R1A training in the systematic practice of reading and writing, with the aim of developing your fluency through longer expository papers, and the incorporation of research into argumentation. You will be responsible for wri...(read more) Jami Bartlett
Spring 2007

R1B/3

Reading and Composition:
The Asian Hordes - Modernities and Postmodernities

MWF 11-12

"This class will examine how the figure of the Asian horde functions in cultural texts about modernity and postmodernity. What historical contexts have given rise to particular ways of representing Asians as hordes? How have cultural exchanges across ...(read more) Marguerite Nguyen
Spring 2007

R1B/4

Reading and Composition:
What is Realism?

MWF 12-1

"In this class, we will be interested in the question ?what is realism?? and, specifically, in figuring out what makes a novel or a short story a ?realist text,? as opposed to something else (like a fable, romance, myth, or tale). We will focus our in...(read more) D. Rae Greiner
Spring 2007

R1B/5

Reading and Composition:
Contemporary African American and Asian American Experimental Poetry

MWF 1-2

"Within the traditions of contemporary African American and Asian American poetry, a category of self-identified ?experimental? writing has emerged recently. What is minority ?experimental? poetry? One of the primary aims of this course is to familiar...(read more) Chris Chen
Spring 2007

R1B/6

Reading and Composition:
The History of Trauma; The Trauma of History

MWF 2-3

Trauma, in its essence, is paradoxical. On the one hand, it yearns to be inscribed, even broadcast; on the other, it often stubbornly refuses inscription. This course will examine how literature has grappled with this paradox of trauma. Why do trauma ...(read more) Popkin, Suzanne
Spring 2007

R1B/7

Reading and Composition:
Literature and the Environment

MWF 3-4

"For many generations of authors, writing about the Earth and our human impact upon it has been an intriguing artistic challenge. In this course, we will explore the challenges of representing our natural environment and its human stewardship by consi...(read more) Nicole Asaro
Spring 2007

R1B/8

Reading and Composition:
Writerly Texts

MWF 3-4

"The texts we will read in this course will challenge us to think about how a story is constructed. We will enter the mind of a child who believes his dead mother is a fish, and a mentally unstable woman who sees another woman hiding in a wallpaper. W...(read more) David Menilla
Spring 2007

R1B/9

Reading and Composition:
Ghostly Women

TuTh 8:00-9:30

"In ?The Philosophy of Composition,? Edgar Allan Poe writes, ?the death . . . of a beautiful woman is, unquestionably, the most poetical topic in the world.? A recurring focus of interest in Anglophone literature is the dead woman?literally dead, imag...(read more) Natalia Cecire
Spring 2007

R1B/10

Reading and Composition:
If it had been a movie, I wouldn't have believed it: Representation Of and After 9/11

TTh 8-9:30 am

"Responses to the events of September 11th, 2001 made surprisingly frequent reference to narrative: unable to describe the attacks any other way, we either noted their similarity to film or TV, or we described our shock by saying, as the title of this...(read more) Annie McClanahan
Spring 2007

R1B/11

Reading and Composition:
Global Modernisms

TTh 9:30-11:00

"Literary movements described as ?modernist? are typically associated with the social phenomena of ?modernity?: urbanization, industrialization, and secularization, to name a few. But these social developments occurred at very different times, and in ...(read more) Joel Nickels
Spring 2007

R1B/12

Reading and Composition:
Elegiac Modes - Authenticity and Mourning in Lyric, Monument, and Popular Culture

TTh 9.30-11.00am

"What do we expect from a work of art that takes death as its subject? How do we expect it to make us feel? Do we read it differently than, say, a love poem, or a comedy ? and what happens when love, comedy, and death intermix? What can the disappoint...(read more) Penelope Anderson
Spring 2007

R1B/13

Reading and Composition:
Proof

TTh 11-12:30

"What constitutes evidence? Epistemology is the study of the origin, nature, and methods of human knowledge, and in this course we will address in our reading, writing, and discussion such questions as: When should one trust one?s intuition? When and ...(read more) Fiona Murphy
Spring 2007

R1B/14

Reading and Composition:
Reading Closely and Writing

TTh 11-12:30

"In this course we will read closely and write about markedly different kinds of literature ? a novel, verse, a couple short stories, and one play in two different translations ? with the aim of coming to some conclusions about what makes great litera...(read more) Joseph Patrick Jordan
Spring 2007

R1B/15

Reading and Composition:
TBA

TTh 12:30-2:00

No course description is available at this time...(read more) Melissa Fabros
Spring 2007

R1B/16

Reading and Composition:
Cognitive Poetics

TTh 12:30-2:00

"In this class, we will learn about a new and exciting approach to the study of literature called cognitive poetics. Cognitive poetics is not a homogeneous school of criticism, but a constellation of diverse assumptions about and practical techniques ...(read more) Tracy Auclair
Spring 2007

R1B/17

Reading and Composition:
Social Reform in Literature

TTh 2-3:30 PM

"What is social reform? What are the thought processes involved in defining a social problem? And how does this definition affect the manner and methods used to solve it? This course seeks to better understand the impulse to want to solve a problem pe...(read more) Kelvin C. Black
Spring 2007

R1B/18

Reading and Composition:
Globalization

TTh 3:30-5:00

Often mentioned but rarely explained, the term ?globalization? provides one way of thinking about the economic, social, and cultural processes of recent years. For some, globalization promises a world at our fingertips, an exciting world free of bound...(read more) Ben Graves
Spring 2007

R1B/19

Reading and Composition:
Race, Violence, and Paranoia

TTh 3:30-5:00 pm

"As the title suggests, this course will consider the relationship between race, violence, and paranoia. Often when narratives (whether novels or films) explore racial difference, depictions of violence are not far removed. The texts I?ve assembled fo...(read more) Jesse Costantino
Spring 2007

R1B/20

Reading and Composition:
Approaches to 21st Century Poetry

TTh 3:30-5

"There are several varieties of contemporary poetry: Lyric, L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E, Post-Lang, ?mainstream?, slam, and flarf poets, as well as others who can?t or won?t be categorized. Major publishers, university presses, and dozens of small presses publish...(read more) Charles Legere
Spring 2007

R50/1

Freshman and Sophomore Studies:
Writing America

MWF 11-12

"The American historian Frederick Jackson Turner argued in 1893 that the United States was essentially born on the frontier, that it had forged its unique national, legislative, social, and intellectual identity upon the ?hither edge of free land.? To...(read more) Fujie, Kristin
Spring 2007

R50/2

Freshman and Sophomore Studies:
Love and Money

TTh 2-3:30

"This course topic is meant to refigure, in more pedestrian terms, the intersection of sexual desire and socioeconomic status in the literary domain. In familiarizing those academic terms, we will chart the difference, if any, between ?love? and ?sexu...(read more) Hurh, Paul
Fall 2006

R1A/1

Reading and Composition:
Image and Text: Visual Readings

MWF 10-11

"This course will introduce students to the process and practice of critical reading and writing, through examining a selection of twentieth century literary texts, examples of visual art, and works that combine elements of both textual and visual art...(read more) Sophia Wang
Fall 2006

R1A/2

Reading and Composition:
Fact and Fantasy

MWF 12-1

"In this course, you will focus on the craft of writing college essays�a vast process that includes everything from refining grammar and style to developing theses, engaging critical thinking, and structuring your arguments in logical and dynamic ways...(read more) Slavica Naumovska
Fall 2006

R1A/3

Reading and Composition:
Imagining History

MWF 1-2

"What is history? What effect does it have on our projects in the present? And on our future projects? This course is interested in exploring what role the way in which we imagine past events has in shaping our understanding of what�s possible and imp...(read more) Kelvin Black
Fall 2006

R1A/4

Reading and Composition:
Acts of Interpretation

MWF 3-4

"This course is an introduction to the mechanics and pleasures of critical reading and writing. If you�re not sure how critical reading and writing differ from other kinds of reading and writing, don�t despair! That�s precisely what we�re here to figu...(read more) Kristin Fujie
Fall 2006

R1A/5

Reading and Composition:
No course description is available at this time.

"Check back later for more information!"

No instructor assigned yet.
Fall 2006

R1A/6

Reading and Composition:
Novel Experiences: The Social Imaginary of Private Reading

TTh 8-9:30

"In 1913, the social philosopher George Mead declared, �It is fair to say that the modern western world has lately done much of its thinking in the form of the novel.� For Mead, it seems, novels had not only begun to test and represent developments in...(read more) Ryan P. McDermott
Fall 2006

R1A/7

Reading and Composition:
Metamorphosis and Literature

TTh 9:30-11

"This course examines why human metamorphosis has been such an enduring motif in literature and how the meanings of literary metamorphoses have themselves changed over time. Starting with classical myth and working through more modern fairy tales, poe...(read more) Erin E. Edwards
Fall 2006

R1A/8

Reading and Composition:
�Self as Art, Self as History: The Western Tradition of Autobiography�

TTh 9:30-11

"In the fifth century, Augustine of Hippo wrote his Confessions, arguably the most significant and foundational autobiography in the Western tradition. In this work, he represents the act of making an autobiography as a quest for self and a quest for ...(read more) Eleanor Johnson
Fall 2006

R1A/8

Reading and Composition:
�Self as Art, Self as History: The Western Tradition of Autobiography�

TTh 9:30-11

"In the fifth century, Augustine of Hippo wrote his Confessions, arguably the most significant and foundational autobiography in the Western tradition. In this work, he represents the act of making an autobiography as a quest for self and a quest for ...(read more) Eleanor Johnson
Fall 2006

R1A/9

Reading and Composition:
Character and Psychopathology

TTh 11-12:30

"For this course, we will consider the relationship between modern understandings of character (in film and literature) and the development of psychopathology in the 19 th and 20 th centuries. While we will borrow some terms and ideas from psychoanaly...(read more) Jesse Costantino
Fall 2006

R1A/10

Reading and Composition:
Asian Hordes

TTh 12:30-2

"This class will examine representations of the Asian masses in selected works of literature and film. What historical contexts have given rise to particular ways of representing Asians as masses or hordes? How can we think about the Asian masses as b...(read more) Marguerite Nguyen
Fall 2006

R1A/11

Reading and Composition:
�Reason is but choosing�: Ethical Dilemmas and Literary Form

TTh 2-3.30

"John Milton, arguing against the governmental oversight of book printing in Areopagitica, tells us that �reason is but choosing.� He also tells us, famously, of another choice: that �from out the rind of one apple tasted, . . . the knowledge of good ...(read more) Penelope Anderson
Fall 2006

R1A/12

Reading and Composition:
Reading Closely and Writing

( -) 2-3:30

"In this course we will read closely and write about markedly different kinds of literature � a novel, verse, a couple short stories, and one play in two different translations � with the aim of coming to some conclusions about what makes great litera...(read more) Joseph Jordan
Fall 2006

R1A/13

Reading and Composition:
Bad Managements

TTh 3:30-5

"""I enjoy seeing the lengths to which bad managements go to preserve what they call their independence�which really just means their jobs."" Donald Trump, The Art of the Deal (1987)



""To cast in my lot with Jekyll was to die to those a...(read more)
Jami Bartlett
Fall 2006

R1B/1

Reading and Composition:
Madwomen in the Attic: Literature and Female Insanity

MWF 10-11

"How have mad women been represented in literature? This course will explore a variety of overlapping approaches (including Gothic, medical, psychoanalytic, and autobiographical) appearing in literary representations of female insanity. Through severa...(read more) Arcadia Falcone
Fall 2006

R1B/2

Reading and Composition:
Rhetoric, Repetition and Rhyme

MWF 11-12

"Roman Jakobson argues that babies first begin to make meaning when they begin to repeat phonemes: ba-ba, da-da, etc. Like Chomsky�s notion of Universal Grammar, repetition is embedded in the structure of language and has aesthetic, rhetorical, perfor...(read more) Tanya Brolaski
Fall 2006

R1B/3

Reading and Composition:
�Crises of Faith�

MWF 1-2

"The topic of this course examines literary portrayals of faith and doubt. By looking at texts which explore both the human need for belief without proof and the tendency of reason toward skepticism, we will chart a literary history of personal religi...(read more) Paul Hurh
Fall 2006

R1B/4

Reading and Composition:
Cold War Literature and Culture

MWF 3-4

"This course looks at what was happening in culture at large from the mid- twentieth century until the end of the Cold War. We will immerse ourselves in the popular and political culture of the time�literature, poetry, film, television, advertising, a...(read more) Melissa Fabros
Fall 2006

R1B/5

Reading and Composition:
�If it had been a movie, I wouldn�t have believed it�: Culture, Politics & Narrative After 9/11

TTh 8-9:30

"Individual responses to the events of September 11th, 2001 made surprisingly frequent reference to film and narrative: unable to describe the attacks any other way, we either noted their similarity to particular films, or we described our shock by sa...(read more) Annie McClanahan
Fall 2006

R1B/6

Reading and Composition:
Magic Realism and National Allegory

TTh 9:30-11

"The term �magic realism� can be used to describe any work of fiction that combines fantastic or otherworldly forms of narrative with those that belong to more traditional realist methods. But the aesthetic and social significance of magic realist dev...(read more) Joel Nickels
Fall 2006

R1B/7

Reading and Composition:
Googleable

TTh 11-12:30

"George Orwell�s 1984 envisions a world where language, thought, and information are controlled by the ruling Party. Reading 1984 as a primer of media and information control, this class will examine the new challenges that mass media and the internet...(read more) Jeremy S. Ecke
Fall 2006

R1B/8

Reading and Composition:
English Renaissance Drama (1588-1640): Text and Performance

TTh 12:30-2

We will hone the skills of composition, argumentation, and research as we journey through the glory days of the early English stage. The �stage� here not only refers to the plays that we have come to accept as masterpieces of the English literary cann...(read more) Brendan Prawdzik
Fall 2006

R1B/9

Reading and Composition:
L.A. Fictions

TTh 2-3:30

"The inspiration for this course came first from the sprawling geography of Los Angeles and the popularly accepted notion that L.A. has no center. Often viewed as a contemporary wasteland, the idea that L.A. has no center has also led people to consid...(read more) Becky Hsu
Fall 2006

R1B/10

Reading and Composition:
The Once and Future King

TTh 3:30-5

"Certain narratives, endlessly told and retold, altered and reshaped, have kept audiences fascinated for a very long time. The story of the sixth-century British warrior-king Arthur has been enormously popular for at least eight hundred years, if not ...(read more) Andrea Lankin
Fall 2006

R1B/11

Reading and Composition:
Abject America

TTh 3:30-5

"In this course we will be exploring the converse of the American dream of �life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.� In texts spanning from the antebellum period to the 1980s, we�ll follow stories of death, captivity, and pursuit by misery. Julia...(read more) Peter Goodwin
Spring 2006

R50/1

Freshman and Sophomore Studies:
Stylin

MWF 11-12

"Humbert Humbert, the narrator of Lolita, speaks of the ?refuge of art? ? a notion that the sheer beauty of his text renders it permanent, impervious to the incursions of time or the judgments of his readers. But if transcendent immortality is the pre...(read more) Katz, Stephen A
Katz, Stephen
Spring 2006

R50/2

Freshman and Sophomore Studies:
Textual Embodiment?What is a text? What is a body?

TTh 2-3:30

"in order to see what a photograph is of, we must first repress the knowledge of what the photograph is?? George Batchen



This quote about the transparency of the photograph as object in relation to its photographic content is also a goo...(read more)
Edwards, Rebekah
Fall 2005

R1A/1

Reading and Composition:
Metaphysical Literature

MWF 10-11

"Many works in literature have been said to have a ?metaphysical? quality; in this class we will examine some of those works, paying special attention to the claims of imaginative literature upon philosophy. During the course of the semester, our read...(read more) Paul Hurh
Fall 2005

R1A/2

Reading and Composition:
TBA

MWF 12-1

TBA...(read more) Len von Morze
Fall 2005

R1A/3

Reading and Composition:
Comparing Asian American and African American Literature

MWF 1-2

"This course will examine Asian American and African American literature and ask what might be gained in a comparative approach to ethnic literature. While texts produced by a specific ethnic group are usually read apart from both the dominant white E...(read more) Janice Tanemura
Fall 2005

R1A/4

Reading and Composition:
TBA

MWF 3-4

TBA...(read more) Katie Simon
Fall 2005

R1A/5

Reading and Composition:
TBA

TTh 8-9:30

TBA...(read more) Avilah Getzler
Fall 2005

R1A/6

Reading and Composition:
Ralph Ellison and Double-Consciousness

TTh 8-9:30

"In this class we will read Ralph Ellison?s two novels, Invisible Man and the recently compiled reader?s edition of his magisterial forty-year work-in-progress, Juneteenth. We will also read sizable excerpts from his collection of essays, Shadow and A...(read more) Joel Nickels
Fall 2005

R1A/7

Reading and Composition:
Improper Love in the Renaissance

TTh 9:30-11

"A story of forbidden love can compel a reader through both sympathy and repulsion. We hope the frustrated lovers can somehow overcome the unjust exigencies preventing their happy union. We fear they will not demonstrate self-control if consummating t...(read more) Alan Drosdick
Fall 2005

R1A/8

Reading and Composition:
Modern Theater of Attractions

TTh 9:30-11

Theater historians of Shakespeare?s London often observe the intense demand for innovation and novelty a diverse but sophisticated playgoing public exerted on rival theater companies vying for its interest. Confined to the frontier zone of the suburbs...(read more) Joseph Ring
Fall 2005

R1A/9

Reading and Composition:
The Novel and Revolution

TTh 11-12:30

"In this course we will consider the relationship between two phenomena closely associated with modernity: the novel and political revolution. How do novels represent?or fail to represent?the revolutionary event? In what ways do they seek to promulgat...(read more) Mark Allison
Fall 2005

R1A/10

Reading and Composition:
Adapting the Nineteenth Century

TTh 12:30-2

This course seeks to refine composition skills (thesis building, argumentation, processes of analysis, use of evidence, and mechanics) while also introducing students to the discipline of literary study. Students will be responsible for 32 pages of wr...(read more) Leslie Walton
Fall 2005

R1A/12

Reading and Composition:
TBA

TTh 2-3:30

TBA...(read more) Ben Graves
Fall 2005

R1A/13

Reading and Composition:
Mocked with Art

TTh 2:00-3:30

"In Shakespeare's The Winter's Tale, Leontes, astonished by the seemingly lifelike rendering of his wife, exclaims, ?The fixure of her eye has motion in 't, / As we are mocked with art? (V.iii.67). Leontes's words provide the thematic prompt for our c...(read more) Dori Takata
Fall 2005

R1A/14

Reading and Composition:
TBA

TTh 3:30-5

TBA...(read more) Rae Greiner
Fall 2005

R1B/1

Reading and Composition:
Poetic Richness

MWF 11-12

"Literature as art and, more specifically, poetry and poetic drama as art will be our main concern in this class. We will be reading some of the most famous plays and poems in the language and talking about the ways they give their readers the experie...(read more) Vitaliy Eyber
Fall 2005

R1B/2

Reading and Composition:
V-Chips and Codpieces: Intersexions of Early Modern and Modern Texts

MWF 1-2

"What relationships can we discover between the Elizabethan sonnet sequence and the contemporary hip-hop record? How have debates about marriage and the domestic scene been transformed and re-shaped into debates about homosexuality and the ?sanctity? ...(read more) Brendan Prawdzik
Fall 2005

R1B/3

Reading and Composition:
TBA

MWF 3-4

TBA...(read more) Arthur Bahr
Fall 2005

R1B/4

Reading and Composition:
Myth, Fable, and History

TTh 8-9:30

"In this course, we will examine the works of a handful of authors and filmmakers who utilize myth in the 20th century. ?Myth? is difficult to define convincingly, but the assumption for this course will be that myths tell us how to think about oursel...(read more) Jesse Constantino
Fall 2005

R1B/5

Reading and Composition:
Translators, Interpreters, and Go-Betweens

TTh 8-9:30

"This course brings together a series of literary texts which focus around acts of translation or interpretation in some fashion. We will begin the course thinking about linguistic translation and will use that as a foundation for discussion of other ...(read more) Sarah Townsend
Fall 2005

R1B/6

Reading and Composition:
Shipwreck'd: How to Survive (with a little help)

TTh 9:30-11:00

"Two of the most famous survival stories are Shakespeare?s The Tempest and Daniel Defoe?s Robinson Crusoe. However, these are not just simply grand adventure stories. These narratives, which celebrate the self-made (English) man, demonstrate that his ...(read more) Kimberly Tsau
Fall 2005

R1B/7

Reading and Composition:
The Making of Evil

TTh 11-12:30

"Evil is a shifting, nebulous notion. The conception of it has differed between time periods, cultures and nationalities. And, of course, its conception can differ between contemporaneous social and political groups ? that the phrase ?Axis of Evil? ca...(read more) Simon Huynh
Fall 2005

R1B/8

Reading and Composition:
Female Fantasy and the Gothic

TuTh 12:30-2

"This class is designed to help you develop your essay writing skills as we read and view our way through some classics of the Female Gothic genre. The most famous canonical text in this genre is Charlotte Bront?s Jane Eyre, while non-canonical exampl...(read more) Monica Soare
Fall 2005

R1B/9

Reading and Composition:
Mobile Americans: Travel, Literature, Belonging

TTh 2-3:30

"Ralph Waldo Emerson described traveling as ?a fool?s paradise.? In this course, we will work on refining critical reading and writing skills by examining and discussing the role of travel in literature, particularly in what Gertrude Stein called ?the...(read more) Carlo Arreglo
Fall 2005

R1B/10

Reading and Composition:
Asian American Literature and the Rhetorics of Nation and Transnation

TTh 3:30-5:00

"In recent years, Asian American studies has been influenced by postcolonial critiques of nationalism and the New American Studies? focus on American imperialism. This course is, in part, a comparative study of the framings of nation and transnation i...(read more) Audrey Wu Clark
Fall 2005

R1B/11

Reading and Composition:
Thematics and Forms of Obsession in Literature

TTh 3:30-5

"This course will focus on literature and the craft of critical writing through an exploration of obsession as a principle of narration. We will begin in the late Middle Ages with selections from Chaucer and will finish off over 600 years later with N...(read more) Eleanor Johnson
Spring 2005

R1A/1

Reading and Composition:
Noise

MWF 9-10

"This course is about reading and writing through noise. I have chosen texts that teach us how to listen, that are deliberately indulgent, layered, provocative, and intense. Because the opposite of noise isn't silence but signal, no matter where you w...(read more) Jami Bartlett
Spring 2005

R1A/2

Reading and Composition:
The Language of Authorship

MWF 11:00-12:00

"This course will focus on the language and craft of writing through our examination of the themes of authorship and narration in experimental, twentieth century literature. We will read, discuss and write about literature and critical essays that cha...(read more) Sophia Wang
Spring 2005

R1A/3

Reading and Composition:
Austenmania!

MWF 12-1

"This course seeks to refine composition skills (thesis building, argumentation, processes of analysis, use of evidence, and mechanics) while also introducing students to the discipline of literary study. Students will be responsible for 32 pages of w...(read more) Leslie Walton
Spring 2005

R1A/4

Reading and Composition:
Literary Sleuths

MWF 3 - 4 pm

"From Sherlock Holmes to Columbo, fictional detectives have captured the popular imagination in books, movies, and television. These figures are often set apart from the crowd by their extraordinary skills in perception, analysis, and deduction as wel...(read more) Kristine Ha
Spring 2005

R1A/5

Reading and Composition:
Bringing the Dead Paper to Life

T/TH 8-9:30

"This course is an introduction to the mechanics and pleasures of critical reading and writing. We will explore what your professors mean when they ask you to read texts 'critically,' and what they want when they ask you to write a 'critical' essay. I...(read more) Kristin Fujie
Spring 2005

R1A/6

Reading and Composition:
Literary and Cinematic Cities

TTh 9:30-11

"In one of the conversations that compose Invisible Cities, Marco Polo tells Kublai Khan:



With cities it is as with dreams; everything imaginable can be dreamed, but even the most unexpected dream is a rebus that conceals a desire or it...(read more)
Erin E. Edwards
Spring 2005

R1A/7

Reading and Composition:
High Modernism and its Others

Tuesday and Thursday 12:30-2:00

"In this class we will spend time acquainting ourselves with some of the literary works known as 'high modernist' and the orthodox critical views of what it means to be high modern. Once we have a good idea of what this term means, we will try to deve...(read more) Charles Sumner
Spring 2005

R1A/8

Reading and Composition:
Science and Literature

TTh 2-3:30

"Several of last year's Hollywood movies-I, Robot, Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow, and Van Helsing-seem to register a continuing anxiety that scientists lack a moral sense and cannot control their invented technologies. Neither this anxiety tha...(read more) Jhoanna Infante
Spring 2005

R1A/9

Reading and Composition:
Making and Unmaking the Self-Made (Wo)Man

T Th 3:30-5

In this course we will work to hone your analytical reading, writing, and thinking skills by examining stories -- including your own -- of self-made men (and women), as well as alternatives to, and critiques of, this archetypal American story. To what...(read more) Liza Kramer
Spring 2005

R1A/10

Reading and Composition:
Language, Writing and the Self

TuTh 3:30-5:00

"The purpose of the course is to teach you what it means to ""think critically"" about sophisticated texts and how to express the results of this critical thinking in well-conceived, thesis-driven essays as well as orally. In working towards our goals...(read more) Richards, Diane
Spring 2005

R1B/1

Reading and Composition:
The Prose Poem: The Past, Present and Future of a Form

MWF 9-10

"In this course we will be reading and responding to nineteenth and twentieth, and twenty-first century texts which fall into the amorphous category of the prose-poem. With an eye toward sharpening our sensitivity to form and our appreciation for expe...(read more) Julie Carr
Spring 2005

R1B/2

Reading and Composition:
"You See a Dead Pig That Has Been Lying There a Long Time': Dirt, Darwin,

Dickens, Dogma "

MWF 10:00-11:00

"In this class, we will examine a wide variety of texts leading up to the 'Darwinian Revolution,' and will read from several of his core texts, as well as letters and entries from his travel logs and autobiography. We will then move from Darwin's core...(read more) D. Rae Greiner
Spring 2005

R1B/3

Reading and Composition:
The Faust Tradition

MWF 11-12

This course will focus on the Faust story, the legend of the magician (or scholar) who sells his soul to the Devil for love (or knowledge, or money). The Faust character has had a long life in legend and folklore, from early Christian times to the pre...(read more) Adrienne Williams Boyarin
Spring 2005

R1B/4

Reading and Composition:
The Politics of Romance and Miscegenation

Monday, Wednesday, Friday 12-1

"The purpose of this course is to trace the history of 'romance' beginning with its early use by American authors to introduce a humane foundation for American democracy. We will follow how the idea of romance as a literary form that emerges alongside...(read more) Janice Tanemura
Spring 2005

R1B/5

Reading and Composition:
Relationships

MWF 1-2 p.m.

"The thing these books and films have in common is the problematic nature of the main character's relationship to other people, usually one particular person. The relationships range from the disturbing and exploitative to the comical and unconvention...(read more) Misa Oyama
Spring 2005

R1B/6

Reading and Composition:
Subjects of Mobility: Wanderers, Outcasts, Detectives, and Expatriates

MWF (2-3 p.m.)

"This class will examine the individual character in literature as a subject of mobility, autonomy, and alienation, while exploring his or her relationship to larger social networks and systems of belief. The characters in the works that we will read ...(read more) Monika Gehlawat
Spring 2005

R1B/7

Reading and Composition:
Holiday Literature

MWF 3-4

"Holidays find much common ground with literature. In their ways, both exist outside of time and place by means of their inherent, if relative, universality. Thanksgiving is not celebrated around the globe, just as Donne is not read the world over, bu...(read more) Alan Drosdick
Spring 2005

R1B/8

Reading and Composition:
The Mind's Island

MWF 3-4

This course takes as its organizing topic early modern and modern literary islands. As we hop from island to island, starting with Thomas More's Utopia (at once overdetermined as literally 'nowhere,' as a mirrored double of England, and as the New Wor...(read more) Joseph Ring
Spring 2005

R1B/9

Reading and Composition:
City Images

TTh 8:00-9:30

A number of prominent 19th and 20th century writers and artists felt drawn to represent urban experience in their imaginative works, as well as to analyze critically the place of cities in their lives and those of their contemporaries. What is so comp...(read more) Katherine Anderson
Spring 2005

R1B/10

Reading and Composition:
Fessing Up

TTH 8-9:30

"The most casual glance at 'bad' television or print media is enough to confirm Michel Foucault's claim that 'Western man has become a confessing animal.' From Jerry Springer and Pete Rose to that inimitable Hilton heiress herself, public and truthful...(read more) Stephen Katz
Spring 2005

R1B/11

Reading and Composition:
Literature and World War I

T Th 9:30-11

World War I, or the Great War, has inspired a tremendous amount of great poetry and fiction. Writers immediately turned the experience of war into the subject of verse and novelists continue to use it as a subject more than eighty years after the war ...(read more) James Murphy
Spring 2005

R1B/12

Reading and Composition:
Cities and their Representations

TTH 9:30-11:00

"Rousseau described cities as 'the abyss of the human species,' and this conviction lives on in modern consciousness. But cities--both then and now--also represent the promise of diverse global community, innovation, and the ideals of human civilizati...(read more) Slavica Naumovska
Spring 2005

R1B/13

Reading and Composition:
Female subjects: an exploration of harm

TTh 11-12:30

"This course will take a brief look at what it is to be a woman in American culture. We will pair readings in psychoanalysis and philosophy with the texts listed below to flesh out the questions they raise about our society: Why are these girls' comin...(read more) Erin Khue Ninh
Spring 2005

R1B/14

Reading and Composition:
Gods and Monsters

TTh 12:30-2

"Using texts that explore the exercise of unusual power by unusual characters, this course examines the entangled interfaces linking human and almost-human, individual and community, and identity and responsibility. Who determines what is ""human"" or...(read more) Sharon Goetz
Spring 2005

R1B/15

Reading and Composition:
Literature of the Suburbs

TTh 12:30-2:00

White picket fences, well-groomed lawns, 2.5 well-groomed kids, a station wagon in the font, an elm tree in the back: Middle America is a seemingly benign place, but it is also where extremes collide. It's not quite rural, and it's not completely urba...(read more) Nicholas Nace
Spring 2005

R1B/16

Reading and Composition:
Tales of Two Places

TTh 2:00-3:30

"Over the last few decades many scholars have written extensively on the nature of Otherness and on various ways in which portrayal and creation of one's ethnic, racial, or gender 'opposite' reflect concerns and dilemmas of one's own subjectivity or s...(read more) Vlasta Vranjeŝ
Spring 2005

R1B/17

Reading and Composition:
(Ab)Normal Bodies

T TH 3:30-5

"The novels and short stories we will read for this class revolve around characters who are perceived by their community as being physically 'abnormal.' We will read these texts in conversation with a series of essays on the history and/or social cons...(read more) Rebekah Edwards
Spring 2005

R1B/18

Reading and Composition:
Realism and Contemporary Fiction

T Th 3:30-5:00

"Realism names a complicated array of literary conventions and procedures, but it is also a familiar term in everyday usage. One film or TV show may be 'realistic' while another is not, but in either case we tend to judge the success of the work in te...(read more) Ben Graves
Spring 2005

R1B/19

Reading and Composition:
Advocacy and Abilidad: Filipino American Literature

TTh 3:30-5,

"This course examines selected texts in Filipino American literature, with emphasis on elements of advocacy and abilidad (the latter is a Filipino term for creating with found and scavenged resources) as expressed through media (newspapers, magazines,...(read more) Jean Vengua Gier
Spring 2005

R1B/20

Reading and Composition:
Psychological Approaches to Contemporary Asian-American Literature and Film

MWF 9-10

"While psychological discourse often claims universality, literary discourse by and large celebrates particularity, which leads us to ask: what do these two discourses have to say to each other? Dividing our reading roughly equally between literature ...(read more) Carlos Reyes
Spring 2005

R1B/21

Reading and Composition:
Ethics, Morality, Law and Literature

MWF 10-11

"This course focuses on issues of ethics, morality, and law as a way to both analyze arguments and to apply critical thinking and reading to one's own writing. The readings include essays on current events such as first amendment rights, affirmative a...(read more) No instructor assigned yet.
Spring 2005

R1B/22

Reading and Composition:
British Literature and Culture, 1840s - 1914

TTh 8- 9:30

"This course will introduce students to a wide range of fiction and non-fiction prose written during the Victorian and Edwardian eras. Selected works of literary criticism and theory will deepen our understanding of the social and historical climate a...(read more) Antoinette Chevalier
Spring 2005

R1B/23

Reading and Composition:
Storytelling and the Problem of History

T Th 9:30-11

"This course is designed to prepare you to compose college level essays that are superior in form and content. Our focus will be on acquiring strategies that enable you to develop your intuitions about what you read into viable, complex theses. We wil...(read more) Joy Viveros
Spring 2005

R1B/24

Reading and Composition:
Storytelling and the Problem of History

T Th 12:30-2

"This course is designed to prepare you to compose college level essays that are superior in form and content. Our focus will be on acquiring strategies that enable you to develop your intuitions about what you read into viable, complex theses. We wil...(read more) Joy Viveros
Spring 2005

R50/1

Freshman and Sophomore Studies:
Tradition and Dislocation

MWF 11-12

"The child,' William Wordsworth famously wrote, 'is father to the man,' a line that argues for the determinant power of an individual's past on his/her future. The modern world, however, has lost faith in this concept, leading to our so-called 'postmo...(read more) Stasi, Paul
Spring 2005

R50/2

Freshman and Sophomore Studies:
Grim Things That Must Be Told' -- The Graphic Novel in an Era of Human Rights

TTh 2-3:30

"It performs the essential magic trick of all good narrative art: the characters come to living, breathing life. The drawing's greatest virtue is its straightforward, blunt sincerity. Its conviction and honesty allow you to believe in the unbelievable...(read more) Hong, Christine
Fall 2004

R1A/1

Reading and Composition:
An Exploration of Harm

MWF 9-10

"This course will take a brief look at what it is to be a woman in American culture. We will pair readings in psychoanalysis and philosophy with the texts listed above to flesh out the questions they raise about our society: Why are these girls' comin...(read more) Erin Khue Ninh
Fall 2004

R1A/2

Reading and Composition:
Exile and Literature

MWF 11-12

In this course, we will examine the theme of exile in 20th century literature in English. Exile has become a subject of much interest, even considered by some critics to be the norm of contemporary existence. Yet its definitions vary widely, and one o...(read more) Marguerite Nguyen
Fall 2004

R1A/3

Reading and Composition:
Criminality and the Criminal Mind

MWF 12-1

"Once I falsely hoped to meet with beings who?would love me for the excellent qualities I was capable of unfolding. I was nourished with high thoughts of honor and devotion. But now crime has degraded me beneath the meanest animal?was there no injusti...(read more) Padma Rangarajan
Fall 2004

R1A/4

Reading and Composition:
Shakespeare's Problem Plays and Romances

MWF 1-2

In this course, we will read seven of Shakespeare's later plays, three of them often called the problem plays and four usually lumped together as the romances.Together, these constitute some of Shakespeare's most difficult, painful, and uncategorizabl...(read more) drienne Williams Boyarin
Fall 2004

R1A/6

Reading and Composition:
Gods and Monsters

MWF 3-4

"Using texts that explore the exercise of unusual power by unusual characters, this course examines the entangled interfaces linking human and almost-human, individual and community, and identity and responsibility. Who determines what is ""human"" or...(read more) Sharon Goetz
Fall 2004

R1A/7

Reading and Composition:
"""On the Road"""

TTh 8-9:30

"In this course we will study what it means to be ""on the road"" in classic American literature (and one European novella.) We will read about the roadtrips of impulsive boys, American expatriates in Europe, European emigres in America, and Beat Gene...(read more) Els Andersen
Fall 2004

R1A/8

Reading and Composition:
The Seducer's Plots

TTh 8-9:30

"While it's unlikely that anyone has ever emerged from reading a particularly absorbing poem to find his or her shirt unbuttoned, we still find it helpful to use the metaphor of seduction to talk about a certain power that literature can have over us....(read more) Nicholas Nace
Fall 2004

R1A/9

Reading and Composition:
Gossip

T/Th 9:30 a.m.-11 a.m.

This course will train you to write grammatical, concise, stylistically sophisticated, and convincing expository and analytic prose. We will develop your ability to close-read a text, develop a thesis, and marshal and analyze evidence in logically coh...(read more) Travis Williams
Fall 2004

R1A/10

Reading and Composition:
Romantic Comedy: Misrecognition

TTh 11-12:30

"This course will investigate a certain strain of romantic comedy predicated on the hero?s (or heroine?s) inability to recognize his (or her) ideal partner. In addition to considering the history of romantic comedy more broadly, we?ll study how these ...(read more) Leslie Walton
Fall 2004

R1A/11

Reading and Composition:
Sympathy and The Social Contract

Tuesday/Thursday 12:30-2:00

In this course, we will be using a wide variety of pre-Romantic, Romantic, Victorian and contemporary texts in order to examine the changing function of rhetorical strategies across disciplines and across centuries. In particular, we will be asking qu...(read more) D. Rae Greiner
Fall 2004

R1A/12

Reading and Composition:
TBA

Tu/Th 2-3:30

No course description is available at this time. ...(read more) Snehal Shingavi
Fall 2004

R1A/13

Reading and Composition:
Love Stories

TTh 3:30-5

"This course fulfills the first portion of the undergraduate reading and composition requirement, and as such, it aims to strengthen students� basic writing skills and teach them how to write increasingly complex expository and argumentative essays. T...(read more) Vlasta Vranje
Fall 2004

R1A/14

Reading and Composition:
Modernism and the Harlem Renaissance

T Th 3:30 - 5:00

"In this course we will think about the relationship between the ""aesthetic"" and the ""political"" by reading works from two literary formations of the 1920s and 30s that are often taken to embody the two sides of this divide -- modernism, read most...(read more) Paul Stasi
Fall 2004

R1B/1

Reading and Composition:
Melodrama and Morality

MWF 10-11

"Melodrama is often seen as an old-fashioned or simplistic genre, because it appeals to emotions rather than reason and dramatizes the battle between good and evil. But these characteristics also make melodrama a popular way of dealing with complex pr...(read more) Misa Oyama
Fall 2004

R1B/2

Reading and Composition:
Realisms and Aesthetic Experience

MWF 1-2

"In this course we will experiment with reading against traditional notions of ?realism? in order both to grasp the central concerns of realist literature composed over the turn of the 20th century and to broaden our analytical horizons. This will mea...(read more) Jennifer Scappettone
Fall 2004

R1B/3

Reading and Composition:
TBA

MWF 3-4

No course description is available at this time. ...(read more) Katie Simon
Fall 2004

R1B/4

Reading and Composition:
Evolution & Fiction: Generic, Social and Personal Adaptation

MWF 3-4

"In this course, we will engage with the concept of ""adaptation"" as it relates to literary genre, social change, Darwin's theory of evolution, and your own approach to writing. You will learn how to be an observant reader, as well as how to be an ""...(read more) Jhoanna Infante
Fall 2004

R1B/5

Reading and Composition:
Wisdom Literature

TTh 8-9:30

"In this course we will read a variety of works that have been?or might be?construed as offering ?wisdom? to their readers. We will examine sacred texts from several religious traditions, classical forms of wisdom writing (fables, aphorisms, dialogues...(read more) Mark Allison
Fall 2004

R1B/6

Reading and Composition:
Writing Communities and Reading Constituencies: Filipino American Literature

TTH 8-9:30

"This course examines selected texts in Filipino literature in English, with emphasis on how writing communities and reading constituencies are developed through media (newspapers, magazines, film) for a minority literature. We focus on how Filipinos ...(read more) Jean Gier
Fall 2004

R1B/7

Reading and Composition:
Detective Fiction

T/Th, 9:30-11:00 a.m.

"Whodunnit? Who cares? This course about detective fiction will pose more complex questions: What is the relationship between the detected and detective? Between detection and desire? Between criminal and police? What constitutes moral culpability? Ho...(read more) Peter Goodwin
Fall 2004

R1B/8

Reading and Composition:
Out of the One, Many: Ethnicity in American Literature Before Ethnic Literature

TuTh 11-12:30

"1953 marked the first appearance of the word ?ethnicity?; three years later, the U.S. officially abandoned e pluribus unum as its national motto. These minor events were mirrored by a larger scholarly recognition that the history of American society ...(read more) L. von Morze
Fall 2004

R1B/9

Reading and Composition:
Truth, Lie, and Narration in the Novel and Film

T/Th, 12:30 ? 2:00

"This course approaches literary works from a philosophical standpoint, taking up certain longstanding philosophical debates about the nature of Truth, and applying those debates to works of literature. We will spend the first few weeks familiarizing ...(read more) Chris Eagle
Fall 2004

R1B/10

Reading and Composition:
Canonical and African-American Modernism

TTH 3:30-5

In this class we will explore some of the unique challenges posed by modernist literature. Then we will explore the relationship between canonical modernism and African-American literature of the first half of the twentieth century. Further, we will t...(read more) Charles Sumner
Fall 2004

R1B/11

Reading and Composition:
The Postmodern and Beyond

TT 3:30-5

"This course is designed to introduce the complex problem of the postmodern. Despite the frequent deployment of this term, its definition remains vague, ranging from the fuzzy to the completely opaque. The central questions driving the course will rev...(read more) Franklin Melendez