Class Archive

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Semester Course #
Instructor
Course Area
Fall 2019

122/1

The Victorian Period

TTh 9:30-11

The Victorian period (1837 - 1901) is a notoriously arbitrary periodic designation, tied to the reign of one particular woman, Victoria Alexandrina Hanover, otherwise known as Queen Victoria I. The period is not self-evidently defined by any generi...(read more)

Lavery, Grace
Fall 2019

166/7

Special Topics:
Charles Dickens

TTh 2-3:30

Close readings of several of Charles Dickens's major works.

Grading will be based on two eight-page essays, on-time completion of all assigned reading, and attendance and participation in discussion.

Please purchase the indi...(read more)

Breitwieser, Mitchell
Fall 2019

190/6

Research Seminar:
Literature on Trial: Romanticism, Law, Justice

TTh 11-12:30

This course will introduce students to “law and literature” studies, focusing on the way literature imagines the relation between law and justice.  We’ll concentrate on literature of the ...(read more)

Langan, Celeste
Spring 2019

45B/1

Literature in English: Late-17th Through Mid-19th Centuries

Lectures MW 11-12 in 3 LeConte + one hour of discussion section per week in various locations (sec. 101: F 9-10; sec. 102: F 9-10; sec. 103: F 11-12; sec. 104: F 11-12; sec. 105: Thurs. 9-10; sec. 106: Thurs. 10-11)

Readings in English, Scottish, Irish and North American prose fiction, autobiography, and poetry from 1688 through 1848: a century and a half that sees the formation of a new, multinational British state with the political incorporation of Scotland...(read more)

Duncan, Ian
Spring 2019

121/1

The Romantic Period:
Romantic Voices

MWF 2-3

Romanticism has long been identified with democratic revolutions of the late 18th century, and the social demand that every citizen have a “voice” in the constitution of community and law.  In this survey of li...(read more)

Langan, Celeste
Spring 2019

165/9

Special Topics:
The 1890s

Thurs. 5-8

What difference does a date make? What is it about the numerical end of a century that encourages feelings of apocalypse, degeneration, or renewal? This course will consider texts written in and around the 1890s, a decade characterized by its inten...(read more)

Puckett, Kent
Spring 2019

166/1

Special Topics:
Gothic

MWF 2-3

In the eighteenth century, Gothic was a historical category (the “Dark” or “Middle” Ages, between the fall of Rome and the Renaissance) and then an ethnic one (the Germanic peoples who overthrew classical civilization). It&r...(read more)

Duncan, Ian
Spring 2019

166/6

Special Topics:
Realism, Then and Now

MW 5-6:30

This course explores the relationship between life and literature, with a focus on the following types of questions: How have novelists and poets—as well as filmmakers, television producers, and Instagram aficionados—attempted to repres...(read more)

Cordes Selbin, Jesse
Spring 2019

190/7

Research Seminar

 This section of English 190 was canceled on November 2.

...(read more)
Stancek, Claire Marie
Summer 2019

152/1

Women Writers:
Jane Austen

MTuTh 4-6

In this course we will read—closely and deeply—a handful of novels by Jane Austen, considering them in terms of their historical context, their stylistic sophistication and innovation, and their enduring popular appeal. Accord...(read more)

Creasy, CFS
Fall 2018

121/1

The Romantic Period

TTh 12:30-2

Romanticism was once defined as a turn toward “nature” in response to the industrialization marking Britain’s transition to modern capitalism in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries.  Rather than simply resurrec...(read more)

Francois, Anne-Lise
Fall 2018

122/1

Victorian Period

Lectures MW 12-1 + one hour of discussion section per week (sec. 101: F 12-1; sec. 102: F 2-3)

The Victorian period witnessed dramatic and probably permanent changes to the literary culture of Britain, including: the morphing of scattered memoirs into formal autobiographies; the rise of the realist novel as the indispensable genre of bourgeo...(read more)

Lavery, Grace
Fall 2018

165/1

Special Topics:
Oscar Wilde and the Nineteenth Century

MW 3-4:30

Oscar Wilde's jokes, and his pathos, can seem out of place in Victorian literature: they leap off the dusty page and into a present moment where their author seems to fit more happily. Without wishing to consign him back to that potentially hos...(read more)

Lavery, Grace
Fall 2018

190/4

Research Seminar:
William Blake

TTh 9:30-11

In this seminar, we will read our way slowly into William Blake's forbidding and exciting “fourfold” poetic environments: graphic works of “Illuminated Printing” in which a city like London, or “Golgonooza,” ...(read more)

Goldstein, Amanda Jo
Fall 2018

250/4

Research Seminar:
Evolution and Literary Form, 1800-1900

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

Reading the newly published On the Origin of Species together in November 1859, George Eliot and George Henry Lewes hailed Charles Darwin’s book as confirmation of the “Development Hypothesis,” founded a hundred years ear...(read more)

Duncan, Ian
Spring 2018

125B/1

The English Novel (Dickens through Conrad)

TTh 3:30-5

In this class we'll read novels by Charles Dickens, Charlotte Brontë, George Eliot, W.M. Thackeray, and others. We'll think about these novels in two related ways. First, what was it about the novel—as opposed, for instance, to t...(read more)

Puckett, Kent
Spring 2018

138/1

Studies in World Literature in English:
Orphans, Feral Children, Runaways—Strange Childhood in World Literature

TTh 2-3:30

From Harry Potter to Oliver Twist, the figure of the orphan is a much beloved literary trope. Why do children have to be denuded of family ties in order to set off on self-making adventures? What in the traditional family form hinders our developme...(read more)

Saha, Poulomi
Spring 2018

166/2

Special Topics:
Romantic Science

Note new time: TTh 2-3:30

Today we use the word “experimental” to designate both the most respected scientific method and the most outlandish works of art. This course on Romantic era literature and science explores a key phase of the hidden interrelation (and r...(read more)

Goldstein, Amanda Jo
Spring 2018

177/1

Literature and Philosophy:
Surveillance, Paranoia, and State Power

TTh 9:30-11

This course examines the long, intimate relationship between technologies of surveillance and the making of British and American empires. While digital technology and state surveillance has been significant in the post-9/11 world, identifying, moni...(read more)

Saha, Poulomi
Spring 2018

190/1

Research Seminar:
Trials of Literature: Romanticism, Justice, and the Law

MW 9:30-11

This seminar will focus on the way literature imagines the relation between law and justice, concentrating on literature of the Romantic period. We’ll consider writers’ interest in persons (from beggars and trespassers to gods and sover...(read more)

Langan, Celeste
Spring 2018

203/1

Graduate Readings:
Radical Enlightenment?

Note new time: TTh 9:30-11

Channeling the voice of his own Enlightened despot, Kant’s famous answer to the question “What is Enlightenment?” included the chilling injunction to “argue as much as you want and about whatever you want, ...(read more)

Goldstein, Amanda Jo
Spring 2018

250/4

Research Seminar:
The Rhetoric of Technique

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

“Sex is boring,” Foucault declared in an interview published posthumously in 1986, before expressing his interest in those “intentional and voluntary actions by which men […] make their life an oeuvre that car...(read more)

Lavery, Grace
Fall 2017

122/1

The Victorian Period

MW 2-3 + discussion sections F 2-3

The Victorian period witnessed dramatic and probably permanent changes to the literary culture of Britain, including: the morphing of scattered memoirs into formal autobiographies; the rise of the realist novel as the indispensable genre of bourgeo...(read more)

Lavery, Grace
Fall 2017

180L/1

Lyric Verse

TTh 5-6:30 PM

This course will examine the historical trajectory of a very fuzzy category, “lyric,” from its identified origins and early practice in English (anonymous medieval lyrics) to its 20th- and 21st- cent...(read more)

O'Brien, Geoffrey G.
Fall 2017

190/2

Research Seminar:
The Historical Novel

MW 2-3:30

“It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the ...(read more)

Puckett, Kent
Fall 2017

190/3

Research Seminar:
Another Day in Purgatory: Irish Literature and the Afterlife

MW 3:30-5

Life is full of death; the steps of the living cannot press the earth without disturbing the ashes of the dead—we walk upon our ancestors—the globe itself is one vast churchyard.
(read more)

Creasy, CFS
Fall 2017

190/8

Research Seminar:
George Eliot and the Realist Novel

TTh 11-12:30

Note the changes in the topic, book list, and course description for this section of English 190 as of early June, 2017.

Beginning at the age of 37, publishing under a male pen name,George Eliot reinvented the novel as we know it...(read more)

Kolb, Margaret
Fall 2017

190/11

Research Seminar:
Nonsense

TTh 3:30-5

This course will explore nonsense as a literary genre, connecting its distinctive linguistic form to the ideas it takes up.   In nonsense, conventional meanings of linguistic forms are prevented from arising, but the forms themselves are ...(read more)

Hanson, Kristin
Fall 2017

250/1

Research Seminar:
Victorian Cultural Studies

W 9-12

This course will follow the long history of the culture concept in Britain.  We will begin by working through Raymond Williams’ account in Culture & Society in order to see how several senses of the word “culture&rdquo...(read more)

Puckett, Kent
Spring 2017

180L/1

Lyric Verse

TTh 2-3:30

This course will examine the historical trajectory of a very fuzzy category, “lyric,” from its identified origins and early practice in antiquity (Sappho, Catullus, et al.) to its 20th and 21st century rejections ...(read more)

O'Brien, Geoffrey G.
Spring 2017

190/4

Research Seminar:
Jane Austen and the Theory of the Novel

MW 12:30-2

While there is hardly a dearth of criticism on Jane Austen, it is rare to find her used, as Balzac, Flaubert, Dostoevsky, or Proust is used, as the basis for theorizing the Novel as a form.  The gender bias of classic continental novel theory...(read more)

Miller, D.A.
Fall 2016

121/1

The Romantic Period

TTh 11-12:30

This course will look with wild surmise at the event of Romanticism.  What happened to literature between 1789 and 1830?  Is it true, as some critics have claimed, that Romantic-era writers revolutio...(read more)

Langan, Celeste
Fall 2016

190/9

Research Seminar:
On Style

TTh 2-3:30

NOTE: The topic, course description, book list, and instructor for this section of English 190 changed on May 2.

Good style is easy to spot but tough to imitate, and "style," good or bad, is itself difficult to define: does style ...(read more)

Xin, Wendy Veronica
Spring 2016

122/1

The Victorian Period

MWF 12-1

The Victorian period witnessed dramatic and probably permanent changes to the literary culture of Britain, including: the morphing of scattered memoirs into formal autobiographies; the rise of the realist novel as the indispensable genre of bourge...(read more)

Lavery, Grace
Spring 2016

165/3

Special Topics:
Oscar Wilde and the Nineteenth Century

MW 4-5:30

Oscar Wilde's jokes, and his pathos, can seem out of place in Victorian literature: they leap off the dusty page and into a present moment where their author seems to fit more happily. Without wishing to consign him back to that potentially ho...(read more)

Lavery, Grace
Spring 2016

190/13

Research Seminar:
Keats and Literary Tradition

TTh 5-6:30 P.M.

This research seminar focuses on the poems and letters of John Keats. We will read his work in relation to some of his predecessors (Shakespeare, Milton) and near contemporaries (Wordsworth, Hazlitt) while addressing questions of the burdens of cu...(read more)

Francois, Anne-Lise
Spring 2016

203/1

Graduate Readings:
George Eliot and Victorian Science

MW1:30-3

A study of the Victorian novel in relation to nineteenth-century theories of natural and aesthetic form, focused on major writings by George Eliot and Charles Darwin. We will read two novels -- Middlemarch and Daniel Deronda &nda...(read more)

Duncan, Ian
Fall 2015

45B/1

Literature in English: Late-17th Through Mid-19th Centuries

MW 12-1; discussion sections F 12-1

This course has two fundamental purposes. The first is to provide a broad working overview of the development of literature in English, from the end of the 17th century, in the wake of civil war, revolution, and restoration in England, to the mid-...(read more)

Blanton, C. D.
Fall 2015

125B/1

The English Novel:
Dickens through Conrad

MW 4-5:30

In this class we'll read novels by Charles Dickens, Charlotte Bronte, George Eliot, Lewis Carroll and others. We'll think about these novels in two related ways. First, what was it about the novel—as opposed, for instance, to the poe...(read more)

Puckett, Kent
Fall 2015

203/3

Graduate Readings:
Victorian Literature from Hegel to Freud

TTh 2-3:30

This course embarks from the premise that “Victorian” names neither a period of time (1837 – 1901) nor the body of a British sovereign (Alexandrina Victoria Hanover) but a spatially and temporally mobile set of stylistic practice...(read more)

Lavery, Grace
Spring 2015

27/1

Introduction to the Study of Fiction

MWF 2-3

A 2013 study at the New School for Social Research corroborates the truism that reading literary fiction enhances our ability to understand the emotional states of other people. Even without the blessing of the sciences, it is undeniable that fict...(read more)

Knox, Marisa Palacios
Spring 2015

121/1

The Romantic Period

TTh 11-12:30

This course will look with wild surmise at the event of Romanticism.  What happened to literature between 1789 and 1830?  Is it true, as some critics have claimed, that Romantic w...(read more)

Langan, Celeste
Spring 2015

122/1

The Victorian Period

TTh 3:30-5

The Victorian period witnessed dramatic and probably permanent changes to the literary culture of Britain, including: the morphing of scattered memoirs into formal autobiographies; the rise of the realist novel as the indispensable genre of bourge...(read more)

Lavery, Grace
Spring 2015

125B/1

The English Novel (Dickens through Conrad)

This course has been canceled.

...(read more)
Christ, Carol T.
Christ, Carol
Spring 2015

166/1

Special Topics:
Scotland and Romanticism

MWF 11-12

Between 1760 and 1830 Scotland was one of the centers of the European-North Atlantic “Republic of Letters.” Here were invented the signature forms and discourses of the “Enlightenment” and “Romanticism” (terms f...(read more)

Duncan, Ian
Fall 2014

45B/1

Literature in English: Late-17th Through Mid-19th Centuries

MW 1-2 + discussion sections F 1-2

As we read works produced in a period of often tumultuous change, we shall consider those works as zones of contact, reflecting and sometimes negotiating conflict. In a world of expanding global commerce (imports like tea suddenly becoming commonp...(read more)

Sorensen, Janet
Fall 2014

45B/2

Literature in English: Late-17th Through Mid-19th Centuries

MW 3-4 + discussion secctions F 3-4

On the face of it, English 45B seems like a “neither/nor” course; neither a course in the great English "originals" (Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, Milton) nor a course in “modern(ist)” literature. It represents n...(read more)

Langan, Celeste
Fall 2014

45C/1

Literature in English: Mid-19th Through the 20th Century

MW 11-12 + discussion sections F 11-12

This course provides an overview of the many literary innovations now grouped under the term “modernism,” as well as their relations to the historical and social disruptions associated with the term “modernity.”  After...(read more)

Lee, Steven S.
Fall 2014

45C/2

Literature in English: Mid-19th Through the 20th Century

MW 3-4 + discussion sections F 3-4

This course examines a range of British and American texts from the period with an emphasis on literary history and its social and political contexts. We will focus on the emergence, development, and legacy of modernism as a set of formal innovati...(read more)

Goble, Mark
Fall 2014

174/1

Literature and History:
The French Revolution

MWF 12-1

“The French Revolution did not take place.”

“The French Revolution is not yet over.”

These two sentences might seem not only counterfactual, but also contr...(read more)

Langan, Celeste
Fall 2014

180N/1

The Novel

This course has been canceled.

...(read more)
No instructor assigned yet.
Fall 2014

190/4

Research Seminar:
Victorian Masculinities

TTh 9:30-11

The Queen for whom the Victorian era was named defines the period’s cultural reputation in more ways than one; the stereotypes of Victorianism—moral constraint, prudery, repression—are almost always associated with women. This co...(read more)

Knox, Marisa Palacios
Fall 2014

190/10

Research Seminar:
The Romantic Novel

TTh 2-3:30

Readings in the “novelistic revolution” (Franco Moretti’s phrase) of European Romanticism. With our main focus on the establishment of  “the classical form of the historical novel” in Scott’s Waverley(read more)

Duncan, Ian
Fall 2014

250/2

Research Seminars:
Victorian Prose Style

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

In this course, we’ll look at the idea of prose style in a few different ways.  First, we’ll read some key texts on the theory of st...(read more)

Puckett, Kent
Spring 2014

121/1

Romantic Period

MWF 2-3

Romanticism was once defined as a turn toward “nature” in response to the industrialization marking Britain’s transition to modern capitalism in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Rather than simply resurrecting ...(read more)

Francois, Anne-Lise
Spring 2014

165/2

Special Topics:
Oscar Wilde and the Nineteenth Century

TTh 11-12:30

Oscar Wilde’s jokes, and his pathos, can seem out of place in Victorian literature: they leap off the dusty page and into a present moment where their author seems to fit more happily. Without wishing to consign him back to that potentially ...(read more)

Lavery, Grace
Spring 2014

174/1

Literature and History:
Writing the British Nation

TTh 12:30-2

This course will offer an introduction to critical methods focused on practices of historical interpretation. While we will read widely in critical and theoretical writing, our case studies will focus on key texts in the history of nationhood and ...(read more)

Savarese, John L.
Spring 2014

190/2

Research Seminar:
Charles Darwin and George Eliot

MW 4-5:30

George Eliot was the Victorian novelist most attuned to contemporary developments in the natural and human sciences. We will read three of her major novels -- The Mill on ...(read more)

Duncan, Ian
Spring 2014

190/3

Research Seminar:
Reflections of the French Revolution

TTh 9:30-11

“In France it was what people did that was wild and elemental; in England it was what people wrote…Verbally considered, Carlyle’s French Revolution was more revolutionary than the real French Revolution” –G....(read more)

Knox, Marisa Palacios
Spring 2014

190/5

Research Seminar:
Reading Like a Victorian

TTh 11-12:30

This course will recreate the reading experiences of the nineteenth-century public, examining publishing trends and literary forms in Victorian Britain. We'll explore the rise of mass literacy, the growth of the periodical press, the serializa...(read more)

Browning, Catherine Cronquist
Spring 2014

250/2

Research Seminars:
Aesthetics and the Orient

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

The kinds of writing called “aesthetics” and “Orientalism” are usually studied in relative isolation from each other, but they share certain features. Both pull readers outside their comfort zones, towards an unfamiliar pla...(read more)

Lavery, Grace
Summer 2014

N20/1

Modern British and American Literature

MTuTh 10-12

Virginia Woolf famously wrote that “on or about December 1910, human character changed.” In her view, the exciting and experimental works of modernism—written by authors like T.S. Eliot, James Joyce, and Woolf herself—came ...(read more)

Creasy, CFS
Summer 2014

N125B/1

The English Novel: Dickens through Conrad

TTh 12-2

In this class we'll read novels by Charles Dickens, Emily Brontë, George Eliot, Lewis Carroll and others. We'll think about these novels...(read more)

Puckett, Kent
Fall 2013

121/1

The Romantic Period

MWF 10-11

This course will examine the Romantic movement in Britain, a movement often described as an outgrowth of the “Age of Revolution.” From the hopes for the French Republic to the “revolution in poetic language” attempted in (read more)

Savarese, John L.
Savarese, John
Fall 2013

122/1

The Victorian Period

MWF 2-3

The Victorian period witnessed dramatic and probably permanent changes to literature in Britain, including: the morphing of scattered memoirs into formal autobiographies; the rise of the realist novel as the indispensable genre for describing the ...(read more)

Lavery, Grace
Lavery, Joseph
Fall 2013

190/1

Research Seminar:
Victorian Sensations

MW 4-5:30

The literary genre of the Victorian sensation novel of the 1860s-1870s was defined less by its form and content than by the response it was supposed to engender in its readers. This course will explore the significance of physical and psy...(read more)

Knox, Marisa Palacios
Fall 2013

250/3

Research Seminar:
The Romantic Novel and the History of Man

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

In his introduction to Tom Jones (1749) Henry Fielding formally announced the “rise of the novel” by grounding the new genre on “human nature,” which David Hume had recently proclaimed the foundation of all the sci...(read more)

Duncan, Ian
Spring 2013

122/1

The Victorian Period

TTh 2-3:30

This course is designed to be a wide-ranging survey of some of the best imaginative writing in English from the so-called “Victorian” period (roughly, 1837-1901), as well as an introduction, though only incidentally, to the historical ...(read more)

Jordan, Joseph P
Spring 2013

125B/1

The English Novel (Dickens through Conrad)

TTh 11-12:30

What do novels do? How do they 'think'? How do they change the ways in which we perceive fictional and real worlds? Why does the novel come to dominate the literary scene so thoroughly in the Victorian period and into the twentieth century...(read more)

Eichenlaub, Justin
Eichenlaub, Justin
Fall 2012

45B/1

Literature in English: Late 17th- Through Mid-19th Centuries

MW 10-11 + discussion sections F 10-11

Our course begins at sea, with the “violent storm” and shipwreck of Gulliver’s Travels, and ends at sea in (read more)

Goldsmith, Steven
Fall 2012

45B/2

Literature in English: Late 17th- Through Mid-19th Centuries

MW 12-1 + discussion sections F 12-1

This course is an introduction to British and American literature from the eighteenth through the mid-nineteenth century. We'll read works from that period (by Swift, Pope, Sterne, Franklin, Equiano, Wordsworth, Austen, Melville, Dickinson, Wh...(read more)

Puckett, Kent
Fall 2012

45C/2

Literature in English: Mid-19th Through the 20th Century

MW 1-2 + discussion sections F 1-2

This survey course of literature in English from the mid-nineteenth century to the present will consider a variety of literary forms and movements in their historical and cultural contexts. We'll examine the literature of colonization and impe...(read more)

Wong, Hertha D. Sweet
Fall 2012

122/1

The Victorian Period

MWF 2-3

In the years 1837 to 1901 British literary culture responded to and helped to shape a range of world-historic events, trends, and revolutions. During these years Darwin published his theory of natural selection and evolution, the industrial city w...(read more)

Eichenlaub, Justin
Eichenlaub, Justin
Fall 2012

166/2

Special Topics:
Specters of the Atlantic

TTh 12:30-2

The large scale transportation of Africans to the Americas is a signal fact of modernity in the West. The trouble is that we both do and do not know this. One of the most salient, confounding aspects of life in the Caribbean and the United States,...(read more)

Ellis, Nadia
Fall 2012

190/10

Research Seminar:
John Clare: A Peasant Naturalist Among the Romantic Poets

TTh 9:30-11

John Clare was an uneducated farm laborer, a contemporary of Keats, who became very briefly a very famous poet in the 1820's in the wake of the great years of Burns, Byron, Wordsworth, Coleridge, and Shelley.  He published three books, co...(read more)

Hass, Robert L.
Fall 2012

203/2

Graduate Readings:
Discursive Identities in British Romanticism

TTh 2-3:30

The Romantic Age is arguably the first age in which we see systematic attempts at deriving the self from itself, at constructing an identity through the discourse that is produced by a subject, which, however, is itself seen as the product of that...(read more)

Bode, Christoph
Bode, Christoph
Fall 2012

250/1

Research Seminars:
Victorian Cultural Studies

M 3-6

This course will follow the long history of the culture concept in Britain.&n...(read more)

Puckett, Kent
Spring 2012

45B/1

Literature in English: Late 17th- Through Mid-19th Centuries

MW 10-11, + discussion sections F 10-11

This course is an introduction to British and American literature from the eighteenth through the mid-nineteenth century. We'll read works from that period (by Pope, Sterne, Franklin, Equiano, Wordsworth, Austen, Shelley, Melville, Dickinson, ...(read more)

Puckett, Kent
Spring 2012

45B/2

Literature in English: Late 17th- Through Mid-19th Centuries

MW 12-1, + discussion sections F 12-1

Readings in English, Scottish, Irish and North American prose narrative and poetry from 1688 through 1848: a century and a half that sees the formation of a new...(read more)

Duncan, Ian
Spring 2012

45C/2

Literature in English: Mid-19th Through the 20th Century

MW 3-4, + discussion sections F 3-4

A broad survey of the period that witnessed the arrival of English as a fully global literary language, with Anglophone empires (both political and cultural) centered on both sides of the Atlantic and spread around the world.  (read more)

Blanton, C. D.
Blanton, Dan
Spring 2012

190/3

Research Seminar:
Nonsense

MW 4-5:30

This course will explore the relationship between two characteristics of these classic works of nonsense literature for children. One is their foregrounding of linguistic form, shared with language games and of obvious special interest to children...(read more)

Hanson, Kristin
Hanson, Kristin
Spring 2012

203/1

Graduate Readings:
Literature & the Science of the Feelings, 1740-1819

M 3-6

William Wordsworth’s 1800 declaration that poetry “is the history or science of feelings” cuts many ways, as such genitive constructions often do.  His phrase alludes both to the contemporary human and life sciences that mad...(read more)

Goodman, Kevis
Goodman, Kevis
Spring 2012

203/4

Graduate Readings:
British Novel--1800-1900

W 3-6

Reading and discussion of a selection of major nineteenth-century British novels.  We will bring large questions to bear on one another, concerning: the worlds and communities the novel aims to represent and to address (region or province; na...(read more)

Duncan, Ian
Summer 2012

N121/1

The Romantic Period

MTuTh 12-2

We'll spend six weeks reading the poetry and prose of the Romantic Period.  Although we'll read a number of different figures, we will focus on the careers of William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge.  

This cour...(read more)

Puckett, Kent
Spring 2011

125B/1

The English Novel: Dickens through Conrad

MW 3-4 + discussion sections F 3-4

In this class we'll read novels by Charles Dickens, Charlotte Bronte, George Eliot, Lewis Carroll and others. We'll think about these novels in two related ways. First, what was it about the novel--as opposed, for instance, to the poem or ...(read more)

Puckett, Kent
Puckett, Kent
Spring 2010

121/1

Romantic Period

TTh 9:30-11

Romanticism is a term as difficult to define as it is persistent. We will read British Romanticism as a set of diverse, sometimes contradictory responses to an overarching question: what is the role of literature in a rapidly modernizing world? Britis...(read more) Goldsmith, Steven
Goldsmith, Steven
Fall 2009

122/1

The Victorian Period

TTh 12:30-2

A survey of and introduction to the writing produced in the years between 1837 and 1901, when Victoria presided over the apparent apogee of British cultural power and (formally at least) over a very large portion of the planet. We will explore this lo...(read more) Blanton, C. D.
Blanton, C.D.
Spring 2009

121/1

The Romantic Period

MWF 11-12

The word ‘romantic’ has come to mean so many things that, by itself, it has ceased to perform the function of a verbal sign.”  --Arthur O. Lovejoy

This course will look with wild surmise at the phenomenon of Rom...(read more)
Langan, Celeste
Langan, Celeste
Spring 2008

121/1

:
The Romantic Period

MWF 11-12

"In 1796, Samuel Taylor Coleridge published a poem in the Monthly Magazine with an odd subtitle: ""A Poem which affects not to be Poetry."" Why write a poem that doesn�t want to seem like a poem? Literature since that time has been in conversation wit...(read more) Langan, Celeste
Langan, Celeste
Spring 2008

122/1

:
The Victorian Period

MWF 12-1

This course is an introduction to the literature and culture of the Victorian period. Victorian poets, novelists, and critics responded to rapid industrial growth, colonial expansion, and profound developments in science, technology, and social life w...(read more) Puckett, Kent
Puckett , Kent
Fall 2005

122/1

Upper Division Coursework:
The Victorian Period

TTh 9:30-11

This course is an introduction to the literature and culture of the Victorian period. Victorian poets, novelists, and critics responded to rapid industrial growth, colonial expansion, and profound developments in science, technology, and social life w...(read more) Puckett, Kent
Puckett, Kent
Spring 2005

121/1

Upper Division Coursework:
The Romantic Period

MWF 1-2

"In 1796, Samuel Taylor Coleridge published a poem in the Monthly Magazine with an odd subtitle: ""A Poem which affects not to be Poetry."" Literature since that time has been in conversation with the experimental poetry of Coleridge and of the Romant...(read more) Langan, Celeste
Langan, Celeste
Fall 2004

125B/1

Upper Division Coursework:
The English Novel: Dickens through Conrad

TTh 11-12:30

This course will consider the British novel between Late Victorianism and Modernism. The reading list will include some of the above. ...(read more) Banfield, Ann
Banfield, Ann