Class Archive

Semester
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

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Semester Course #
Instructor
Course Area
Spring 2020

125E/1

The Contemporary Novel

"Check back later for more information!"

No instructor assigned yet.
Fall 2019

20/1

Modern British and American Literature:
The Handmaid's Tale in Adaptation

TTh 12:30-2

With the advent of the Trump presidency (2016-present), Margaret Atwood’s dystopian, feminist masterpiece, The Handmaid’s Tale, has gained new relevance. And with the popular and critical success of its Hulu TV series adaptatio...(read more)

Snyder, Katherine
Fall 2019

122/1

The Victorian Period

TTh 9:30-11

The Victorian period (1837 - 1901) is a notoriously arbitrary periodic designation, tied to the reign of one particular woman, Victoria Alexandrina Hanover, otherwise known as Queen Victoria I. The period is not self-evidently defined by any generi...(read more)

Lavery, Grace
Fall 2019

125D/1

The 20th-Century Novel

MWF 11-12

This course is a survey of the 20th-century novel. The novel is the quintessential form of expression of modernity and modern subjectivity. In this survey of key works of the century, we will explore the novel form as it is framed by these three th...(read more)

Jones, Donna V.
Fall 2019

137B/1

Chicana/o Literature and Culture Since 1910:
Chicanx Novels

TTh 11-12:30

This course will focus on the study of Chicanx novels. The themes and formal features in these novels have been influenced to a large degree by a broad range of social experiences: living in the borderlands of culture, language, and nationality; gr...(read more)

Gonzalez, Marcial
Fall 2019

166/4

Special Topics:
Literatures of the Asian Diaspora in America

TTh 9:30-11

This aim of this survey is two-fold: First, to interrogate the concept of nationhood and, particularly, what it means to be American.  Focusing on writings by and about peoples of Asian descent across the twentieth century and into the twenty-...(read more)

Lee, Steven S.
Fall 2019

166/5

Special Topics:
Seeing Is Believing: Early Realist Painting and Writing

TTh 9:30-11

Seventeenth-century Dutch painting, with its mirror-like copies of everyday objects, and early English prose fiction, with its claims to represent true stories, invited viewers and readers to believe that their representations credibly copied the r...(read more)

Sorensen, Janet
Fall 2019

166/7

Special Topics:
Charles Dickens

TTh 2-3:30

Close readings of several of Charles Dickens's major works.

...(read more)
Breitwieser, Mitchell
Fall 2019

166/11

Special Topics:
The Works of Vladimir Nabokov

TTh 11-12:30

We will study the work of Nabokov as a novelist on two continents over a period of nearly sixty years. The course will be structured (more or less) chronologically and divided between novels translated from Russian and written in English. After beg...(read more)

Naiman, Eric
Fall 2019

175/1

Literature and Disability

TTh 3:30-5

This course will allow students to explore theories and representations of disability.  We’ll wonder whether it’s possible to develop an inclusive, common “theory” adequate to vario...(read more)

Langan, Celeste
Fall 2019

190/4

Research Seminar:
Cli Fi (Climate Change Fiction)

TTh 9:30-11

How do we imagine the unimaginable? When it comes to global climate change, we have for the most part avoided imagining it altogether. But contemporary fiction writers are increasingly turning their gaze, and ours, toward the impact and meanings of...(read more)

Snyder, Katherine
Fall 2019

190/5

Research Seminar:
The Urban Postcolonial

TTh 11-12:30

An intensive research seminar exploring the relationship between urban landscapes and postcolonial literary cultures. Readings in theories of postcoloniality and diaspora as well as studies in city planning and architecture will accompany...(read more)

Ellis, Nadia
Fall 2019

190/6

Research Seminar:
Literature on Trial: Romanticism, Law, Justice

TTh 11-12:30

This course will introduce students to “law and literature” studies, focusing on the way literature imagines the relation between law and justice.  We’ll concentrate on literature of the ...(read more)

Langan, Celeste
Fall 2019

190/10

Research Seminar:
Inventing Nature and Constructing Race

TTh 3:30-5

Scholars have recently argued that race and nature were "invented" around the turn of the nineteenth century. We'll begin by unpacking their counterintuitive arguments: what does it mean to argue that fundamental conceptual categories...(read more)

McWilliams, Ryan
Spring 2019

20/1

Modern British and American Literature:
Post-Apocalypse Now

MW 1:30-3

Apocalyptic stories have been told for centuries, even millenia. But novels, movies, and other forms of media that imagine the end of the world—and what comes after that—seem to have inundated us (floods!) in recent times....(read more)

Snyder, Katherine
Spring 2019

80K/1

Children's Literature

TTh 9:30-11

This course has two principal aims: (1) to provide an overview of the history of children's literature in English; (2) to introduce students to the major generic, political, aesthetic, and philosophical questions such literature has posed. Amon...(read more)

Creasy, CFS
Spring 2019

121/1

The Romantic Period:
Romantic Voices

MWF 2-3

Romanticism has long been identified with democratic revolutions of the late 18th century, and the social demand that every citizen have a “voice” in the constitution of community and law.  In this survey of li...(read more)

Langan, Celeste
Spring 2019

125C/1

The European Novel:
Lost Illusions

Thurs. 2-5

In his 1917 essay, “Science as a Vocation,” the sociologist Max Weber writes, “The fate of our times is characterized by rationalization and intellectualization and, above all, by the ‘disenchantment of the world.’ Pre...(read more)

Puckett, Kent
Spring 2019

C136/2

Topics in American Studies:
Noir: Films, Fiction, Criticism

TTh 3:30-5

A city no worse than others, a city rich and vigorous and full of pride, a city lost and beaten and full of emptiness. It all depends on where you sit and what your own private score is. I didn't have one. I didn't care.&rdq...(read more)

Moran, Kathleen and Greil Marcus
Spring 2019

166/1

Special Topics:
Gothic

MWF 2-3

In the eighteenth century, Gothic was a historical category (the “Dark” or “Middle” Ages, between the fall of Rome and the Renaissance) and then an ethnic one (the Germanic peoples who overthrew classical civilization). It&r...(read more)

Duncan, Ian
Spring 2019

166/5

Special Topics:
Asian American Literature - World, Nation, Locality

MWF 1-2

This class provides a foundation for reading Asian American literature at three levels of scale: world, nation, and locality. At the world scale, we will discuss the political origins of the phrase “Asian American” in the late 1960...(read more)

Leong, Andrew Way
Spring 2019

166/6

Special Topics:
Realism, Then and Now

MW 5-6:30

This course explores the relationship between life and literature, with a focus on the following types of questions: How have novelists and poets—as well as filmmakers, television producers, and Instagram aficionados—attempted to repres...(read more)

Cordes Selbin, Jesse
Spring 2019

180N/1

The Novel

This course has been canceled (Jan. 7, 2019).

...(read more)
No instructor assigned yet.
Spring 2019

180Z/1

Science Fiction

MWF 12-1

This course will examine in depth the history of speculative fiction and its engagement with the thematics and topoi of the new life sciences—representation of cloning, ecological dystopias, hybrid life-forms, genetic engineering dystopias. W...(read more)

Jones, Donna V.
Spring 2019

190/1

Research Seminar:
Flann O'Brien and Irish Literature

MW 10:30-12

In this seminar, we will explore the comic, satirical, and genre-crossing writings of Flann O’Brien/Myles na gCopaleen/Brian O’Nolan. We will examine him as an heir to modernist innovation, starting with his novels and moving on to his ...(read more)

Flynn, Catherine
Spring 2019

190/2

Research Seminar:
Transsexual Literatures and Cultures

MW 12-1:30

Trans people are not a novelty. A desire to change sex, or else the fact of an individual whose sex has changed, is depicted in some of the most canonical texts of the literary canon: from the Metaphorphoses of Ovid, through the cross-identificatio...(read more)

Lavery, Grace
Spring 2019

190/11

Research Seminar:
Willa Cather

TTh 3:30-5

Two essays (seven pages and thirteen pages) will be required, along with regular attendance and participation in discussion.

Please read the paragraph about English 190 on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes fo...(read more)

Breitwieser, Mitchell
Summer 2019

152/1

Women Writers:
Jane Austen

MTuTh 4-6

In this course we will read—closely and deeply—a handful of novels by Jane Austen, considering them in terms of their historical context, their stylistic sophistication and innovation, and their enduring popular appeal. Accord...(read more)

Creasy, CFS
Summer 2019

176/1

Literature and Popular Culture:
O, the horror! Horror Films and Horror Fiction

TuWTh 12:30-3

This course will examine the historical development of the horror genre in both film and literature. Horror is a notoriously comprehensive genre, borrowing from  numerous story-telling and literary traditions. In this class we will address the...(read more)

Jones, Donna V.
Fall 2018

20/1

Modern British and American Literature:
Reliving the Past: Art and the Historical Imagination

TTh 9:30-11

In 1951, William Faulkner wrote: "The past is never dead. It's not even past." In 2008, Barack Obama invoked Faulkner to discuss the racial inequalities that continue to fracture the American nation, suggesting that we can only allevi...(read more)

Cordes Selbin, Jesse
Fall 2018

122/1

Victorian Period

Lectures MW 12-1 + one hour of discussion section per week (sec. 101: F 12-1; sec. 102: F 2-3)

The Victorian period witnessed dramatic and probably permanent changes to the literary culture of Britain, including: the morphing of scattered memoirs into formal autobiographies; the rise of the realist novel as the indispensable genre of bourgeo...(read more)

Lavery, Grace
Fall 2018

125C/1

The European Novel:
Society and Desire

TTh 2-3:30

This course will examine diverse instances of the European novel from the sixteenth to the twentieth century and consider how appetites of various kinds feature as organizing forces. How do hunger, lust, material greed, and the desire for order, be...(read more)

Flynn, Catherine
Fall 2018

125C/2

The European Novel:
The Many Faces of the 19th-Century European Novel

TTh 5-6:30

The novel emerged as the principal literary genre in 19th-century Europe and has continued to dominate the literary market in Europe and North America ever since. What were the constitutive formal elements as well as social and psychological c...(read more)

Golburt, Luba
Fall 2018

125D/1

The 20th-Century Novel

TTh 11-12:30

This course is a survey of the 20th-century novel. The novel is the quintessential form of expression of modernity and modern subjectivity. In this survey of key works of the century, we will explore the novel form as it is framed by these three th...(read more)

Jones, Donna V.
Fall 2018

125E/1

The Contemporary Novel:
The Latest Pulitzer Prize-Winning Novels

Lectures MW 11-12 + one hour of discussion section per week (sec. 101: F 11-12; sec. 102: F 2-3; sec. 103: Thurs. 9-10; sec. 104: Thurs. 10-11)

The Pulitzer Prize in Fiction is awarded for “distinguished fiction by an American author, preferably dealing with American life.” In this course, we will read the four most recent (2015-2018) Pulitzer-Prize winning novels and two novel...(read more)

Wong, Hertha D. Sweet
Fall 2018

126/1

British Literature, 1900-1945

MWF 2-3

How did British and Irish literature change over the first half of the twentieth-century? Was “modernism” a historical moment, an aesthetic movement, or a critical attitude—or some combination of the three? How did write...(read more)

Gang, Joshua
Fall 2018

165/3

Special Topics:
Literature and Media Theory

TTh 9:30-11

This course will consider literature in relation to media theory.  Is literature made obsolete by new media?  What happens when we consider print literature in re...(read more)

Langan, Celeste
Fall 2018

175/1

Literature and Disability

TTh 3:30-5

We will examine the ways disability is represented in a variety of works of fiction and drama.  Sometimes disability is used as a metaphor or symbol of something else.  In other cases, texts explore disability as a lived experience. ...(read more)

Kleege, Georgina
Fall 2018

190/1

Research Seminar:
Melville in the 50s

MW 9-10:30

In this seminar we will read as much of Herman Melville’s fiction from the 1850s as we can, delving patiently into Moby-Dick (1851) early in the semester and then tracking the experiments in prose that eventually led Melville to the ...(read more)

Goldsmith, Steven
Fall 2018

190/2

Research Seminar:
Laughter and Vision: Explorations in the Novel of Ideas

Note new time: Tuesdays 2-5

In this seminar we will trod fiction's "path not taken"—the tradition of the novel of ideas that, with the triumph of Realism in the nineteenth century of Dickens and Balzac, became mainstream fiction's dark shadow. Our expl...(read more)

Danner, Mark
Fall 2018

190/8

Research Seminar:
Repression and Resistance

TTh 2-3:30

In this course, we’ll analyze representations of repression and resistance in a collection of contemporary American novels. We’ll examine various forms of repression—physical, social, political, and psychological—represented...(read more)

Gonzalez, Marcial
Fall 2018

250/4

Research Seminar:
Evolution and Literary Form, 1800-1900

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

Reading the newly published On the Origin of Species together in November 1859, George Eliot and George Henry Lewes hailed Charles Darwin’s book as confirmation of the “Development Hypothesis,” founded a hundred years ear...(read more)

Duncan, Ian
Spring 2018

125A/1

The English Novel (Defoe through Scott)

TTh 12:30-2

The period from which our reading draws has been credited with the “rise of the novel”—the emergence of the then new genre, the “novel,” so familiar to us today. While critics have qualified and revised that claim, the...(read more)

Sorensen, Janet
Spring 2018

125B/1

The English Novel (Dickens through Conrad)

TTh 3:30-5

In this class we'll read novels by Charles Dickens, Charlotte Brontë, George Eliot, W.M. Thackeray, and others. We'll think about these novels in two related ways. First, what was it about the novel—as opposed, for instance, to t...(read more)

Puckett, Kent
Spring 2018

125E/1

The Contemporary Novel:
The Latest Pulitzer Prize-Winning Novels

Lectures MW 9-10 + one hour of discussion section per week (sec. 101: F 9-10; sec. 102: F 11-12; sec. 103: Thurs. 9-10; sec. 104: Thurs. 11-12)

The Pulitzer Prize in Fiction is awarded for “distinguished fiction by an American author, preferably dealing with American life.” In this course, we will read the five most recent (2013-2017) Pulitzer-Prize winning novels and two novel...(read more)

Wong, Hertha D. Sweet
Spring 2018

134/1

Contemporary Literature

Lectures MW 11-12 + one hour of discussion section per week (sec. 101: F 9-10; sec. 102: F 11-12; sec. 103: Thurs. 9-10; sec. 104: Thurs. 1-2)

This course will survey Irish and British writing since World War II.  As we dig into the formal and generic workings of a range of texts, we will also think through the political and cultural contexts from which they emerge.  Along ...(read more)

Falci, Eric
Spring 2018

137B/1

Chicana/o Literature and Culture Since 1910:
Chicanx Novels

TTh 11-12:30

This course will focus exclusively on the study of Chicanx novels. As we shall see, the formal features and thematic representations of these novels have been influenced to a large degree by a broad range of social experiences: living in the border...(read more)

Gonzalez, Marcial
Spring 2018

166/1

Special Topics:
Comedy & Violence

MWF 2-3

What relation does comedy have to violence? Can humor be a gauge of political freedom? How does it resist violence or ally itself with it? In this class, we will consider various styles of humor—wit, buffoonery, satire, parody, nonsense, absu...(read more)

Flynn, Catherine
Spring 2018

166/4

Special Topics:
Marxism & Literature

TTh 3:30-5

For the past thirty years, it’s become a cliché that it’s easier to imagine the end of the world than the end of capitalism. Yet, ever since the 2008 financial crash, there’s been rising popular consciousness of capitalism&...(read more)

Lye, Colleen
Spring 2018

166/6

Special Topics:
Speculative Fiction

Lectures MW 1-2 + one hour of discussion section per week (sec. 101: F 10-11; sec. 102: F 1-2)

This course will examine in depth the history of speculative fiction and its engagement with the thematics and topoi of the new life sciences—representation of cloning, ecological dystopias, hybrid life-forms, genetic engineering dystopias. W...(read more)

Jones, Donna V.
Spring 2018

190/1

Research Seminar:
Trials of Literature: Romanticism, Justice, and the Law

MW 9:30-11

This seminar will focus on the way literature imagines the relation between law and justice, concentrating on literature of the Romantic period. We’ll consider writers’ interest in persons (from beggars and trespassers to gods and sover...(read more)

Langan, Celeste
Spring 2018

190/2

Research Seminar:
James Joyce

MW 10:30-12

Our course traces the evolution of Joyce’s writing, from his angry essays at the turn of the twentieth century to his all-compassing comedy, Finnegans Wake, published just before the outbreak of World War II. We will consider the tra...(read more)

Flynn, Catherine
Spring 2018

190/3

Research Seminar:
Hawthorne & Melville

MW 2-3:30

This course takes a close and critical look at the literary careers of Nathaniel Hawthorne and Herman Melville.  We will read their works in relation to each other and within their historical and intellectual contexts, with special attention t...(read more)

Tamarkin, Elisa
Spring 2018

190/6

Research Seminar:
Sixty Years Since: The Historical Novel

TTh 9:30-11

“Sixty Years Since” takes up Waverley’s audacious claim that sixty years is the ideal distance for fictional representations of history. Grounded in theories of the novel in relation to history, we’ll ask how (and ...(read more)

Kolb, Margaret
Spring 2018

190/8

Research Seminar:
Literary Theory and Its Objects

TTh 12:30-2

This course explores some ...(read more)

Creasy, CFS
Spring 2018

203/5

Graduate Readings:
Contemporary Chicanx/Latinx Novels

TTh 2-3:30

In this course, we’ll examine narrative form in several Chicanx/Latinx novels, focusing on the role of problematic narrators. We’ll explore the specific ways that these novels tend to reify the social world through the eyes and voice of...(read more)

Gonzalez, Marcial
Spring 2018

250/4

Research Seminar:
The Rhetoric of Technique

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

“Sex is boring,” Foucault declared in an interview published posthumously in 1986, before expressing his interest in those “intentional and voluntary actions by which men […] make their life an oeuvre that car...(read more)

Lavery, Grace
Summer 2018

125D/1

The 20th-Century Novel

MTuTh 9:30-12

This course is a survey of the 20th-century novel. The novel is the quintessential form of expression of modernity and modern subjectivity. In this survey of key works of the century, we will explore the novel ...(read more)

Jones, Donna V.
Summer 2018

166/1

Special Topics:
Speculative Fictions, Possible Futures

TuWTh 4-6:30

This course will present the genre of speculative fiction and its historical commitment to imagining plausible and implausible alternatives to the present. We will begin by looking at the Golden Age of the science fiction short story, the 1950s and...(read more)

O'Brien, Geoffrey G.
Fall 2017

122/1

The Victorian Period

MW 2-3 + discussion sections F 2-3

The Victorian period witnessed dramatic and probably permanent changes to the literary culture of Britain, including: the morphing of scattered memoirs into formal autobiographies; the rise of the realist novel as the indispensable genre of bourgeo...(read more)

Lavery, Grace
Fall 2017

125D/1

The 20th-Century Novel

TTh 9:30-11

This course is a general survey of the 20th-century novel. The novel is the quintessential form of experession of modernity and modern subjectivity. In this survey of key works of the century, we will explore the novel form as it is framed by these...(read more)

Jones, Donna V.
Fall 2017

175/1

Literature and Disability

TTh 3:30-5

This course will have several components. An introductory section will provide students with a grounding in disability theory; we’ll wonder whether it’s possible to develop a common “theory” adequate to various disability ca...(read more)

Langan, Celeste
Fall 2017

180N/1

The Novel:
"The Novel as the Book of Other People"

MW 5-6:30

In 2007, Zadie Smith edited an anthology of short fiction entitled The Book of Other People.  In her preface to this volume, Smith describes her desire to give contemporary writers the opportunity to try on “different skins,&rdq...(read more)

Hale, Dorothy J.
Fall 2017

190/2

Research Seminar:
The Historical Novel

MW 2-3:30

“It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the ...(read more)

Puckett, Kent
Fall 2017

190/3

Research Seminar:
Another Day in Purgatory: Irish Literature and the Afterlife

MW 3:30-5

Life is full of death; the steps of the living cannot press the earth without disturbing the ashes of the dead—we walk upon our ancestors—the globe itself is one vast churchyard.
(read more)

Creasy, CFS
Fall 2017

190/8

Research Seminar:
George Eliot and the Realist Novel

TTh 11-12:30

Note the changes in the topic, book list, and course description for this section of English 190 as of early June, 2017.

Beginning at the age of 37, publishing under a male pen name,George Eliot reinvented the novel as we know it...(read more)

Kolb, Margaret
Fall 2017

190/12

Research Seminar:
Making Memories

TTh 5-6:30

This seminar examines a literary turn toward narratives of counterfeit confessional memory. It asks what is at stake in narratiing and even confessing a past that didn't happen—and what that even means in the context of a fictional text. ...(read more)

Yoon, Irene
Spring 2017

119/1

Literature of the Restoration and the Early 18th Century

TTh 12:30-2

In an age of commercial print expansion, men and women writers negotiated the possibilities, limits, and perceived dangers of publishing. In this class, we will explore the forms and strategies writers deployed in those negotiati...(read more)

Sorensen, Janet
Spring 2017

125C/1

The European Novel:
The Many Faces of the 19th-Century European Novel

MWF 3-4

The novel emerged as the principal literary genre in 19th-century Europe and has continued to dominate the literary market in Europe and North America ever since.  What were the constitutive formal elements as well as social and ps...(read more)

Golburt, Luba
Spring 2017

125E/1

The Contemporary Novel

MW 1-2 + discussion sections F 1-2

In this class, we will read a selection of 21st-century novels written in English, as well as some book reviews, interviews, and critical essays. We will consider the formal and thematic elements of these contempora...(read more)
Snyder, Katherine
Spring 2017

132/1

The American Novel

MW 2-3 + discussion sections F 2-3

This course is a survey of major American novels from the late-nineteenth century to the present, with a focus on realism, naturalism, and modernism. Rather than trace a single history of the novel in this period, we will explore a range of genres...(read more)

Goble, Mark
Spring 2017

137B/1

Chicana/o Literature and Culture Since 1910:
Chicanx/Latinx Novels

TTh 11-12:30

In this course, we’ll read a cluster of post-1970 Chicanx/Latinx novels.  We’ll explore a variety of issues and experiences—race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, political activism, revolution, philosophy, art, storytelling, a...(read more)

Gonzalez, Marcial
Spring 2017

166/1

Special Topics:
Marxism and Literature

MWF 1-2

For the past thirty years, it’s become a cliché that it’s easier to imagine the end of the world than the end of capitalism. Yet, ever since the 2008 financial crash, there’s been rising popular consciousness of capitalism...(read more)

Lye, Colleen
Spring 2017

166/5

Special Topics:
Modern Irish Literature

TTh 11-12:30

In this course we will focus on one of the major canons in modern literature, one that includes, some would argue, the most significant English-language poet, the most important novelist, and the most remarkable playwright of the 20th century. &...(read more)
Falci, Eric
Spring 2017

180Z/1

Science Fiction

TTh 9:30-11

This course will examine in depth the history of speculative fiction and its engagement with the thematics and topoi of the new life sciences—representation of cloning, ecological dystopias, hybrid life-forms, genetic engineering dystopias. ...(read more)

Jones, Donna V.
Spring 2017

190/4

Research Seminar:
Jane Austen and the Theory of the Novel

MW 12:30-2

While there is hardly a dearth of criticism on Jane Austen, it is rare to find her used, as Balzac, Flaubert, Dostoevsky, or Proust is used, as the basis for theorizing the Novel as a form.  The gender bias of classic continental novel theory...(read more)

Miller, D.A.
Spring 2017

190/8

Research Seminar:
Literatures of the Ocean

TTh 9:30-11

In this seminar we’ll explore literary (and some non-literary) representations of life at sea and of sailors, both offshore and on, primarily but not exclusively during the expansion of Britain’s first empire during the eighteenth cent...(read more)

Sorensen, Janet
Summer 2017

N125D/1

The 20th-Century Novel

MTTh 2-4

This course is a general survey of the 20th-century novel. The novel is the quintessential form of expression of modernity and modern subjectivity. In this survey of key works of the century, we will explore the novel form as it is framed by these ...(read more)

Jones, Donna V.
Summer 2017

N180Z/1

Science Fiction

MTTh 10-12

This course will examine in depth the history of speculative fiction and its engagement with the thematics and topoi of the new life sciences--representation of cloning, ecological dystopias, hybrid life-forms, genetic engineering dystopia...(read more)

Jones, Donna V.
Fall 2016

27/1

Introduction to the Study of Fiction

This class has been canceled.

...(read more)
No instructor assigned yet.
Fall 2016

125D/1

The 20th-Century Novel

MWF 1-2

(read more)

Jones, Donna V.
Fall 2016

166/2

Special Topics:
Vladimir Nabokov

MWF 10-11

We will study the work of Nabokov as a novelist on two continents over a period of nearly sixty years. The course will be structured (more or less) chronologically and divided between novels translated from Russian and written in English. After be...(read more)

Naiman, Eric
Fall 2016

171/2

Literature and Sexual Identity:
Gender, Sexuality, and Modernism

TTh 2-3:30

“Is queer modernism simply another name for modernism?” The question Heather Love poses in her special issue of PMLA will also guide this seminar on the crossovers between formal and sexual “deviance” in modernist ...(read more)

Abel, Elizabeth
Fall 2016

175/1

Literature and Disability

TTh 9:30-11

We will examine the ways disability is represented in a variety of works of fiction and drama.  Assignments will include two short (5-8 page) critical essays, a group performance project and a take-home final examination.  (This is a cor...(read more)

Kleege, Georgina
Fall 2016

190/3

Research Seminar:
Moby-Dick, and More

MW 3:30-5

We will read Moby-Dick scrupulously, and we also will consider historical and literary contexts, Melville’s range of sources, 19th-century responses, 20th- and 21st-century literary criticism, and the pres...(read more)

Otter, Samuel
Fall 2016

190/4

Research Seminar:
U.S. Modernism

MW 5-6:30 PM

We will survey major American writers from the first half of the twentieth century, with a special focus on texts that challenged both the formal and social conventions of literature in the period. We will examine a ran...(read more)

Goble, Mark
Fall 2016

190/9

Research Seminar:
On Style

TTh 2-3:30

NOTE: The topic, course description, book list, and instructor for this section of English 190 changed on May 2.

Good style is easy to spot but tough to imitate, and "style," good or bad, is itself difficult to define: does style ...(read more)

Xin, Wendy Veronica
Fall 2016

190/10

Research Seminar:
Do I Dare? Indecision and Modernist Literature

TTh 3:30-5

From Prufrock's peach to Frost's two roads, modernism gave us many famous moments of indecision. We will follow along with texts depicting speakers and characters as they hesitate, delay, cavil, evade, hedge, sidestep, prevaricate, tergive...(read more)

Blevins, Jeffrey
Fall 2016

190/11

Research Seminar:
Modern California Literature and Film

Tues. 5-8 PM

Besides reading and discussing some fiction and poetry with Western settings, and essays that attempt to identify or explain distinctive regional characteristics, this course will consider various movies shaped by and shaping conceptions of Califo...(read more)

Starr, George A.
Fall 2016

190/12

Research Seminar:
Modern Utopian and Dystopian Literature and Film

Thurs. 5-8 PM

Most utopian and dystopian authors are more concerned with persuading readers of the merits of their ideas than with the "merely" literary qualities of their writing. Although utopian writing has sometimes made converts, inspiring reader...(read more)

Starr, George A.
Spring 2016

122/1

The Victorian Period

MWF 12-1

The Victorian period witnessed dramatic and probably permanent changes to the literary culture of Britain, including: the morphing of scattered memoirs into formal autobiographies; the rise of the realist novel as the indispensable genre of bourge...(read more)

Lavery, Grace
Spring 2016

125E/1

The Contemporary Novel:
The Latest Pulitzer Prize-Winning Novels

MW 10-11; discussion sections F 10-11

The Pulitzer Prize in Fiction is awarded for “distinguished fiction by an American author, preferably dealing with American life.”  In this cou...(read more)

Wong, Hertha D. Sweet
Spring 2016

126/1

British Literature: 1900-1945:
The Modernist Novel

TTh 2-3:30

The British novel in the first half of the twentieth century was a site of massive formal experimentation. Time, space, narrators, characters, and language were dismantled and reconfigured in startling new ways. In this survey, we will look at nov...(read more)

Flynn, Catherine
Spring 2016

132/1

The American Novel

MW 3-4; discussion sections F 3-4

A survey of major American novels from the late-nineteenth century to the present, with a focus on realism, naturalism, and modernism. Rather than trace a single history of the novel in this period, we will explore a range of genres—includin...(read more)

Goble, Mark
Spring 2016

137T/1

Topics in Chicana/o Literature and Culture:
The Chicana/o Novel

MWF 12-1

This course on Chicana/o and Latina/o novels complements a Chicana/o literature course I taught in the fall entitled “Migrant Narratives.”  But whereas the fall course included works that represented various literary genres (the n...(read more)

Gonzalez, Marcial
Spring 2016

180N/1

The Novel:
The Novel as "The Book of Other People"

TTh 12:30-2

In 2007, Zadie Smith edited an anthology of short fiction entitled The Book of Other People.  In her preface to this volume, Smith describes her desire to give contemporary writers the opportunity to try on “different skins,&rd...(read more)

Hale, Dorothy J.
Spring 2016

180Z/1

Science Fiction

This course has been canceled.

...(read more)
Jones, Donna V.
Spring 2016

190/2

Research Seminar:
Through a Future Darkly: Global Crisis and the Triumph of Dystopia

M 3-6

At what past moment did the future grow so dark? Formal liteary dystopia has been with us prominently since at least 1726, with the arrival of Swift's Gulliver. But the tendency to critique the present by imagining a darkly extrapolated future...(read more)

Danner, Mark
Spring 2016

190/4

Research Seminar:
The Urban Postcolonial

MW 4-5:30

In this seminar we will explore recent issues in postcolonial studies by focusing on cities. Moving through a diverse set of texts and very different cities—London and Lagos, Kingston and Mumbai, New York and Johannesburg, New Orl...(read more)

Ellis, Nadia
Spring 2016

190/12

Research Seminar:
Daniel Defoe and the Rise of the 18th-Century Novel

TTh 3:30-5

Reading, discussing, and writing mainly about the fictional works of Daniel Defoe, and (depending on student interests) about contemporary writing on some of Defoe’s subjects, such as overseas commerce, colonies, and piracy; the predicaments...(read more)

Starr, George A.
Spring 2016

203/1

Graduate Readings:
George Eliot and Victorian Science

MW1:30-3

A study of the Victorian novel in relation to nineteenth-century theories of natural and aesthetic form, focused on major writings by George Eliot and Charles Darwin. We will read two novels -- Middlemarch and Daniel Deronda &nda...(read more)

Duncan, Ian
Spring 2016

250/3

Research Seminar:
How It Strikes a Contemporary: Reading the Novel in the 21st Century

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

As a generic term, the “novel” has always been entangled with the new, the up-to-the-moment, the contemporary. If the weft of the genre of the novel is fiction, then its warp is modernity. So what might distinguish our own conte...(read more)

Snyder, Katherine
Snyder, Katie
Summer 2016

N125D/1

The 20th-Century Novel

MTTh 2-4

This course is a general survey of the 20th-century novel. The novel is the quintessential form of expression of modernity and modern subjectivity. In this survey of key works of the century, we will explore the novel form as it is framed by these...(read more)

Jones, Donna V.
Summer 2016

N166/1

Special Topics:
Moby-Dick and the Theory of the Novel

MTTh 4-6

In this summer session, we'll read one and only one novel: Herman Melville's Moby-Dick (1851). We'll read the book carefully and closely, working particularly to understand Melville's idiosyncratic use of particuar aesthet...(read more)

Puckett, Kent
Summer 2016

N166/2

Special Topics:
The U.S. Novel Since 1945: Authors and Workers

TTh 10-12

This course will examine the development of the U.S. novel in light of the profound reorganization of working life since 1945, a process that has involved a m...(read more)

Bernes, Jasper
Summer 2016

N180Z/1

Science Fiction

MTTh 10-12

This course will examine in depth the history of speculative fiction and its engagement with the thematics and topoi of the new life sciences--representation of cloning, ecological dystopias, hybrid life-forms, genetic engineering dystopi...(read more)

Jones, Donna V.
Fall 2015

27/1

Introduction to the Study of Fiction

MWF 1-2

This section of English 27 has been canceled.

...(read more)
T. B. A.
Fall 2015

27/3

Introduction to the Study of Fiction

TTh 3:30-5

The title of the course is “Introduction to the Study of Fiction,” but more specifically the course will be an introduction to analytic critical writing about fiction. We will work on close reading, on learning how to read with a mind ...(read more)

Breitwieser, Mitchell
Fall 2015

125B/1

The English Novel:
Dickens through Conrad

MW 4-5:30

In this class we'll read novels by Charles Dickens, Charlotte Bronte, George Eliot, Lewis Carroll and others. We'll think about these novels in two related ways. First, what was it about the novel—as opposed, for instance, to the poe...(read more)

Puckett, Kent
Fall 2015

125C/1

The European Novel:
Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, and the English Novel

TTh 3:30-5

A close reading of selected works of Dostoevsky and Tolstoy in conjunction with English novels. We will focus on how the Russian and English novels resemble one another, differ from one another, and respond to one another, especially in their trea...(read more)

Paperno, Irina
Fall 2015

125D/1

The 20th-Century Novel

MWF 9-10

This course is a general survey of the 20th-century novel. The novel is the quintessential form of expression of modernity and modern subjectivity. In this survey of key works of the century, we will explore the novel form as it is framed by these...(read more)

Jones, Donna V.
Fall 2015

126/1

British Literature: 1900-1945

MWF 1-2

How did the form, content, circulation, and ambitions of British literature change over the first half of the twentieth century? How did writers contend with historical upheavals such as World War I, suffrage, and the wane of empire? With the adve...(read more)

Gang, Joshua
Fall 2015

139/1

The Cultures of English:
Literature of The Great War

MWF 11-12

In the years following World War One, European intellectuals debated the implications of the new balance of power and the terms of the peace among the combatant nations, but they were haunted by the prospect of the decline of the West itself. A fo...(read more)

Jones, Donna V.
Fall 2015

141/1

Modes of Writing (Exposition, Fiction, Verse, etc.)

TTh 9:30-11

This course will introduce students to the study of creative writing--fiction, poetry, and drama.  Students will learn to talk critically about these forms and begin to feel comfortable and confident writing within these genres.  Student...(read more)

Chandra, Melanie Abrams
Fall 2015

141/2

Modes of Writing (Exposition, Fiction, Verse, etc.)

TTh 9:30-11

This course will introduce students to the study of creative writing--fiction, poetry, and drama.  Students will learn to talk critically about these forms and begin to feel comfortable and confident writing within these genres.  Student...(read more)

Hass, Robert L.
Fall 2015

143C/1

Long Narrative:
The Novel

TTh 2-3:30

The purpose of this course is to begin writing a novel. None of us will finish writing a novel in the three months we spend together. Novels take time, notwithstanding NaNoWriMo. There are some reported exceptions to this—Jack Kerouac wrote ...(read more)

Serpell, C. Namwali
Fall 2015

165/4

Special Topics:
Longing and Belonging in Contemporary Writing

MW 3-4:30

This course will interrogate the possible relationships between desire and social position or identity (what I conceive myself to have and to lack) by reading contemporary literature in which (read more)

Langan, Celeste
Fall 2015

165/7

Special Topics:
Modern California Books and Movies

Tuesdays 6-9 P.M.

Besides discussing fiction and poetry with Western settings, and essays that attempt to identify or explain distinctive regional characteristics, this course will include consideration of various movies shaped by and shaping conceptions of Califor...(read more)

Starr, George A.
Fall 2015

171/1

Literature and Sexual Identity:
Gender, Sexuality, and Modernism

TTh 12:30-2

“Is queer modernism simply another name for modernism?” The question Heather Love poses in her special issue of PMLA will also guide this seminar on the crossovers between formal and sexual “deviance” in modernist ...(read more)

Abel, Elizabeth
Fall 2015

175/1

Literature and Disability

MWF 12-1

In this course we will think about the concept of literature via the category of disability. We are told that "poems make nothing happen" (Auden); for speech-act theory, fictional utterance is a peculiarly "parasitic" form of s...(read more)

Langan, Celeste
Fall 2015

190/7

Research Seminar:
Ethics and U.S. Fiction

TTh 11-12:30

Is reading good for us? Or bad for us? How does literature work as, or against, moral philosophy? What responsibilities do the author and the reader hold with regard to texts? What is the relationship between ethics, aesthetics, and affect? How do...(read more)

Serpell, C. Namwali
Fall 2015

190/14

Research Seminar:
Modern Utopian and Dystopian Books and Movies

Thursdays 6-9 PM

Most utopian and dystopian authors are more concerned with persuading readers of the merits of their ideas than with the "merely" literary qualities of their writing. Although utopian writing has sometimes made converts, inspiring reader...(read more)

Starr, George A.
Spring 2015

27/1

Introduction to the Study of Fiction

MWF 2-3

A 2013 study at the New School for Social Research corroborates the truism that reading literary fiction enhances our ability to understand the emotional states of other people. Even without the blessing of the sciences, it is undeniable that fict...(read more)

Knox, Marisa Palacios
Spring 2015

27/2

Introduction to the Study of Fiction

TTh 3:30-5

The title of the course is “Introduction to the Study of Fiction,” but, more specifically, the course will be an introduction to analytic critical writing about fiction. We will work on close reading, on learning how to read with a min...(read more)

Breitwieser, Mitchell
Spring 2015

121/1

The Romantic Period

TTh 11-12:30

This course will look with wild surmise at the event of Romanticism.  What happened to literature between 1789 and 1830?  Is it true, as some critics have claimed, that Romantic w...(read more)

Langan, Celeste
Spring 2015

122/1

The Victorian Period

TTh 3:30-5

The Victorian period witnessed dramatic and probably permanent changes to the literary culture of Britain, including: the morphing of scattered memoirs into formal autobiographies; the rise of the realist novel as the indispensable genre of bourge...(read more)

Lavery, Grace
Spring 2015

125A/1

The English Novel (Defoe through Scott)

TTh 9:30-11

This class explores eighteenth-century British innovations in narrative prose writings that we have come to call novels. A scientific revolution, broadened financial speculation, expanding empire, changing notions of gender, and new philosophies o...(read more)

Sorensen, Janet
Spring 2015

125A/2

The English Novel (Defoe through Scott)

TTh 3:30-5

A survey of early fiction, much of which pretended to be anything but. Most was published anonymously and purported to be a true "History," "Expedition," or the like, about "Things as They Are." We will consider at th...(read more)

Starr, George A.
Spring 2015

125E/1

The Contemporary Novel:
The Latest Pulitzer Prize-Winning Fiction

MW 9-10 + discussion sections F 9-10

The Pulitzer Prize in Fiction is awarded for “distinguished fiction by an American author, preferably dealing with American life.” In this course, we will read the seven most recent (2007-2014) Pulitzer Prize-winning novels (actually, ...(read more)

Wong, Hertha D. Sweet
Spring 2015

166/1

Special Topics:
Scotland and Romanticism

MWF 11-12

Between 1760 and 1830 Scotland was one of the centers of the European-North Atlantic “Republic of Letters.” Here were invented the signature forms and discourses of the “Enlightenment” and “Romanticism” (terms f...(read more)

Duncan, Ian
Spring 2015

166/3

Special Topics:
The Works of Vladimir Nabokov

TTh 9:30-11

We will study the work of Nabokov as a novelist on two continents over a period of nearly sixty years. The course will be structured (more or less) chronologically and divided between novels translated from Russian and written in English. Aft...(read more)

Naiman, Eric
Spring 2015

174/1

Literature and History:
The Seventies

TTh 12:30-2

As one historian has quipped, it was the worst of times, it was the worst of times. "The '70s" routinely come in for mockery: even at the time, it was known as the decade when "it seemed like nothing happened."

Yet w...(read more)

Saul, Scott
Spring 2015

180N/1

The Novel:
The Novel as a Literary Genre

Note new time: MW 2:30-4

Henry James, writing in 1888, describes his cultural moment as a time of remarkable transformation in the production and reception of the English language novel.  At the beginning of the century, James observes, “there was a comfortable...(read more)

Hale, Dorothy J.
Spring 2015

180Z/1

Science Fiction

TTh 12:30-2

This course will examine in depth the history of speculative fiction and its engagement with the thematics and topoi of the new life sciences--representation of cloning, ecological dystopias, hybrid life-forms, genetic engineering dystopias. While...(read more)

Jones, Donna V.
Spring 2015

190/7

Research Seminar:
Toni Morrison

TTh 12:30-2

We will read as many of Toni Morrison’s novels as we can in the time we have. Most class meetings will be organized around discussion of the assigned daily reading, though I will intrude with brief lectures when I feel that doing so will hel...(read more)

Breitwieser, Mitchell
Spring 2015

190/10

Research Seminar:
Utopian and Dystopian Literature and Film

Tues. 7-10 P.M.

Most utopian and dystopian authors are more concerned with persuading readers of the merits of their ideas than with the "merely" literary qualities of their writing. Although utopian writing has sometimes made converts, inspiring reader...(read more)

Starr, George A.
Summer 2015

N125D/1

The 20th-Century Novel

MTTh 2-4

This course is a general survey of the 20th-century novel. The novel is the quintessential form of expression of modernity and modern subjectivity. In this survey of key works of the century, we will explore the novel form as it is framed by these...(read more)

Jones, Donna V.
Summer 2015

N125E/1

The Contemporary Novel:
Selected Pulitzer Prize-Winning Novels, 2007-2014

MTTh 12-2

The Pulitzer Prize in Fiction is awarded for “distinguished fiction by an American author, preferably dealing with American life.”  In this course, we will read a selection of the most recent (2007-2014) Pulitzer Priz...(read more)

Wong, Hertha D. Sweet
Summer 2015

N180Z/1

Science Fiction

MTTh 10-12

(read more)

Jones, Donna V.
Fall 2014

119/1

Literature of the Restoration & the Early 18th Century

TTh 3:30-5

The period from the "Restoration" of Charles II (1660) to the death of Alexander Pope (1744) produced the last poems of Milton, the first English pornography and feminist polemic, the most devastating satires ever written, some of the mo...(read more)

Turner, James Grantham
Fall 2014

125D/1

The 20th -Century Novel

TTh 9:30-11

This course is a general survey of the 20th-century novel. The novel is the quintessential form of expression of modernity and modern subjectivity. In this survey of key works of the century, we will explore the novel form as it is framed by these...(read more)

Jones, Donna V.
Fall 2014

126/1

British Literature: 1900-1945

MW 3-4 + discussion sections F 3-4

(read more)
Blanton, C. D.
Fall 2014

C136/1

Topics in American Studies:
Boys and Girls in the Era of Mark Twain and Henry James

MWF 12-1

Historians often define the era after the Civil War and especially from 1880 to ca. 1915 as the “era of the child.”  Children became the heroes of popular  culture as well as major subjects for painters and intellectuals and ...(read more)

Hutson, Richard
Fall 2014

141/1

Modes of Writing:
Writing Fiction, Poetry, and Plays

TTh 9:30-11

This course will introduce students to the study of creative writing--fiction, poetry, and drama.  Students will learn to talk critically about these forms and begin to feel comfortable and confident writing within these genres.  Student...(read more)

Chandra, Melanie Abrams
Fall 2014

141/2

Modes of Writing:
Writing Fiction, Poetry, and Plays

TTh 9:30-11

This course will introduce students to the study of creative writing--fiction, poetry, and drama.  Students will learn to talk critically about these forms and begin to feel comfortable and confident writing within these genres.  Student...(read more)

Hass, Robert L.
Fall 2014

171/1

Literature and Sexual Identity:
Gender, Sexuality, and Modernism

TTh 3:30-5

Gender norms and literary forms both exploded at the turn of the twentieth century. These paired crises in social and literary narratives were perceived on the one hand as the stuttering end of western culture's story, the drying up of libidin...(read more)

Abel, Elizabeth
Fall 2014

174/1

Literature and History:
The French Revolution

MWF 12-1

“The French Revolution did not take place.”

“The French Revolution is not yet over.”

These two sentences might seem not only counterfactual, but also contr...(read more)

Langan, Celeste
Fall 2014

175/1

Literature and Disability

MW 4-5:30

We will examine the ways disability is represented in a variety of works of fiction and drama.  Assignments will include two short (5-8 page) critical essays, a group presentation project, and a take-home final examination.  (This is a c...(read more)

Kleege, Georgina
Fall 2014

180N/1

The Novel

This course has been canceled.

...(read more)
No instructor assigned yet.
Fall 2014

190/3

Research Seminar:
James Joyce

MW 4-5:30

Our course traces the evolution of Joyce’s writing, from his angry essays at the turn of the twentieth century to his all-compassing comedy, Finnegans Wake, published just before the outbreak of World War II. We will consider the tr...(read more)

Flynn, Catherine
Fall 2014

190/7

Research Seminar:
Virginia Woolf

TTh 12:30-2

This course will examine the evolution of Woolf’s career across the nearly three decades that define the arc of British modernism. This co-incidence will allow us to theorize the shape of a career and of a literary movement, and to re-read t...(read more)

Abel, Elizabeth
Fall 2014

190/10

Research Seminar:
The Romantic Novel

TTh 2-3:30

Readings in the “novelistic revolution” (Franco Moretti’s phrase) of European Romanticism. With our main focus on the establishment of  “the classical form of the historical novel” in Scott’s Waverley(read more)

Duncan, Ian
Fall 2014

246K/1

Literature in English 1900-1945:
The Modernist Novel

MW 12-1:30

In this seminar, we will read ten modernist novels. We will consider the strangeness of their modes of narrative and characterization as they respond to challenges such as the destabilizing of traditional social hierarchies and gender roles, the...(read more)
Flynn, Catherine
Spring 2014

130D/1

American Literature: 1900-1945

TTh 11-12:30

 A survey of American texts tracing the literary response to the emerging shape of modern life in the first decades of the twentieth century. We will read across a range of genres and styles to assess the influence of modernism and other expe...(read more)

Goble, Mark
Spring 2014

161/1

Introduction to Literary Theory:
Free Speech, in Theory

TTh 2-3:30

This course will interrogate the way in which “free” speech, as moral value or political right, informs and complicates our understanding of literature and the literary.  We...(read more)

Langan, Celeste
Spring 2014

171/1

Literature and Sexual Identity:
Gender, Sexuality, and Modernism

MW 4-5:30

Gender norms and literary forms both exploded at the turn of the twentieth century. These paired crises in social and literary narratives were perceived on the one hand as the stuttering end of western culture's story, the drying up of libidin...(read more)

Abel, Elizabeth
Spring 2014

174/1

Literature and History:
Writing the British Nation

TTh 12:30-2

This course will offer an introduction to critical methods focused on practices of historical interpretation. While we will read widely in critical and theoretical writing, our case studies will focus on key texts in the history of nationhood and ...(read more)

Savarese, John L.
Spring 2014

180N/1

The Novel

MWF 12-1

A survey of the novel, this course will cover eight examples of the genre from the beginning of the 19th century to the end of the 20th, with a focus on the representation of subjectivity and history....(read more)

Gordon, Zachary
Spring 2014

190/2

Research Seminar:
Charles Darwin and George Eliot

MW 4-5:30

George Eliot was the Victorian novelist most attuned to contemporary developments in the natural and human sciences. We will read three of her major novels -- The Mill on ...(read more)

Duncan, Ian
Spring 2014

190/4

Research Seminar:
Samuel Beckett

TTh 11-12:30

An intensive reading of the works of Samuel Beckett.

Please read the paragraph on page 2 of the instructions area of this Announcement of Classes for more details about enrolling in or wait-listing for this course.

...(read more)
Blanton, C. D.
Spring 2014

190/5

Research Seminar:
Reading Like a Victorian

TTh 11-12:30

This course will recreate the reading experiences of the nineteenth-century public, examining publishing trends and literary forms in Victorian Britain. We'll explore the rise of mass literacy, the growth of the periodical press, the serializa...(read more)

Browning, Catherine Cronquist
Spring 2014

190/7

Research Seminar:
Cybernetics; or Control and Communication in the Postwar Novel

TTh 12:30-2

The title of this course plays on Norbert Wiener’s highly influential 1948 book, Cybernetics; or Control and Communication in the Animal and the Machine. Though hardly remembered today, the field that it inaugurated, cybernetics, en...(read more)

Bernes, Jasper
Spring 2014

190/8

Research Seminar:
Moby Dick

TTh 12:30-2

We will read Moby-Dick very closely, twice. Regular attendance and participation will be required, along with two ten-page essays. Students should purchase the Penguin Classics edition, not the Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition.

...(read more)

Breitwieser, Mitchell
Spring 2014

190/9

Research Seminar:
Literature of the Ocean

TTh 12:30-2

Provisional Book List:  William Wycherley, The Plain-Dealer; Ned Ward, The Wooden World Dissected; Daniel Defoe, Captain Singleton; Olaudah Equiano, Interesting Narrative; Tobias Smollett, Roderick Rand...(read more)

Sorensen, Janet
Spring 2014

190/12

Research Seminar:
Henry James

TTh 3:30-5

Henry James asked a lot of his readers, especially in these fictions written late in his career, but they’re extremely rewarding, and worth the labor they require, rewarding because of the labor they require. Students enrolling in the class ...(read more)

Breitwieser, Mitchell
Spring 2014

190/13

Research Seminar:
Realism and Naturalism

TTh 3:30-5

Our readings will focus on major American writers of the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth century whose works helped to define the literary modes of realism and naturalism. We will be asking questions about how literature responds to new ways o...(read more)

Goble, Mark
Spring 2014

203/2

Graduate Readings:
Campus/Novel/Theory

Tues. 3:30-6:30

This course considers the relationship between the campus, the novel, and literary theory in the West. Accordingly, we will discuss theories of the novel, read some post-war British and American “campus novels,” consider the campu...(read more)

Serpell, C. Namwali
Summer 2014

N20/1

Modern British and American Literature

MTuTh 10-12

Virginia Woolf famously wrote that “on or about December 1910, human character changed.” In her view, the exciting and experimental works of modernism—written by authors like T.S. Eliot, James Joyce, and Woolf herself—came ...(read more)

Creasy, CFS
Summer 2014

N125B/1

The English Novel: Dickens through Conrad

TTh 12-2

In this class we'll read novels by Charles Dickens, Emily Brontë, George Eliot, Lewis Carroll and others. We'll think about these novels...(read more)

Puckett, Kent
Summer 2014

N180Z/1

Science Fiction:
Speculative Fiction and Dystopias

MTuTh 10-12

This cou...(read more)

Jones, Donna V.
Fall 2013

125D/1

The 20th-Century Novel

TTh 9:30-11

In this course we will analyze nine 20th-century American novels, taking note of how their formal organization participates in their thematic concerns.  We'll spend the first few class meetings reviewing the history of the novel as a form...(read more)

Loewinsohn, Ron
Fall 2013

125E/1

The Contemporary Novel

TTh 8-9:30

A survey of major novels, including nonfiction novels, published in the last fifty years.  There will be two papers, a midterm, and a final exam.

Note:  The instructor (and book list and course description) of this course changed ...(read more)

Gordon, Zachary
Fall 2013

132/1

American Novel

TTh 12:30-2

This course will explore eight major American novels.  There will be two papers, a midterm, and a final exam.

Note:  The instructor (and book list and course description) of this course changed in June.  There has been no cha...(read more)

Gordon, Zachary
Fall 2013

180N/1

The Novel:
The American Novel Since 1900

MW 3-4 + discussion sections F 3-4

A survey of the American novel: its forms, patterns, techniques, ideas, cultural context, and interaction with other media. Special attention will be paid to questions of aesthetics, epistemology, and ethics—w...(read more)

Serpell, C. Namwali
Fall 2013

190/1

Research Seminar:
Victorian Sensations

MW 4-5:30

The literary genre of the Victorian sensation novel of the 1860s-1870s was defined less by its form and content than by the response it was supposed to engender in its readers. This course will explore the significance of physical and psy...(read more)

Knox, Marisa Palacios
Fall 2013

203/1

Graduate Readings:
Post-9/11 Fiction

M 1-4

Note: Those interested in taking the course, please email me (ksnyder@berkeley.edu) the first week of classes for the reading assignment required for our first seminar meeting on September 9.

For mo...(read more)

Snyder, Katherine
Fall 2013

250/3

Research Seminar:
The Romantic Novel and the History of Man

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

In his introduction to Tom Jones (1749) Henry Fielding formally announced the “rise of the novel” by grounding the new genre on “human nature,” which David Hume had recently proclaimed the foundation of all the sci...(read more)

Duncan, Ian
Spring 2013

119/1

Literature of the Restoration and the Early 18th Century

TTh 12:30-2

We will explore the relationship between literature and everyday life in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. Areas of emphasis include popular periodical literature (England's first advice column, the first "women's m...(read more)

Picciotto, Joanna M
Spring 2013

125B/1

The English Novel (Dickens through Conrad)

TTh 11-12:30

What do novels do? How do they 'think'? How do they change the ways in which we perceive fictional and real worlds? Why does the novel come to dominate the literary scene so thoroughly in the Victorian period and into the twentieth century...(read more)

Eichenlaub, Justin
Eichenlaub, Justin
Spring 2013

125D/1

The 20th-Century Novel

TTh 9:30-11

This course is a genera...(read more)

Jones, Donna V.
Fall 2012

125E/1

The Contemporary Novel:
The Novel Since 2000

TTh 12:30-2

We who study literature are perhaps always belated. This course aims to redefine at least one literary period: the “contemporary” novel, scholarship about which sometimes stretches as far back as novels written in the 1950s! I protest....(read more)

Serpell, C. Namwali
Fall 2012

132/1

The American Novel

MWF 1-2

This course traces the formal and thematic development of the American novel, focusing on innovations in the novel’s form as it engages with history, identity, race, class and gender.  A principle goal of this course is to increase your...(read more)

Speirs, Kenneth
Fall 2012

135AC/1

Literature of American Cultures:
Repression and Resistance

TTh 12:30-2

In this course we will analyze representations of repression and resistance in nine novels, three each from the following three cultural groups: Chicanos/Chicanas, African Americans, and Euro-Americans.  We will examine various forms of repre...(read more)

Gonzalez, Marcial
Fall 2012

H195A/2

Honors Course

TTh 3:30-5

English H195A is the first part of a two-semester sequence for those English majors writing honors theses. It is designed to give students the critical tools and practical skills to write a strong essay, in the spring semester, that will have a gr...(read more)

Saul, Scott
Spring 2012

119/1

Augustan Age: Literature of the Restoration and the Early 18th Century

TTh 3:30-5

We will explore the relationship between literature and everyday life in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. Areas of emphasis include popu...(read more)

Picciotto, Joanna M
Picciotto, Joanna
Spring 2012

125A/1

The English Novel (Defoe through Scott)

TTh 12:30-2

This class explores eighteenth-century British innovations in narrative prose writings that we have come to call novels. A scientific revolution, broadened financial speculation, expanding empire, changing notions of gender, and new philosophies o...(read more)

Sorensen, Janet
Sorensen, Janet
Spring 2012

125C/1

The European Novel:
Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, and the English Novel

TTh 3:30-5

A close reading of works by Dostoevsky and Tolstoy in conjunction with two English novels. We will focus on how the Russian and English novels respond to one another, resemble one another, and differ from one another, especially in their treatment...(read more)

Paperno, Irina
Paperno, Irina
Spring 2012

133T/1

Topics in African American Literature and Culture:
Slavery--Theory and Literature

TTh 11-12:30

This course will explore the differences and similarities between the “theory” of slavery and the “experience” of slavery.  Theoretical explorations of slavery will be chosen from the writings of Aristotle, John Locke,...(read more)

JanMohamed, Abdul R.
JanMohamed, Abdul
Spring 2012

134/1

Contemporary Literature

MWF 11-12

This course will survey British and Irish writing since World War II.  We will dig deeply into the texts' formal and generic workings, and think through the cultural and social contexts from which they emerge. Along the way, we'l...(read more)

Falci, Eric
Falci, Eric
Spring 2012

143C/1

Long Narrative:
The Short Novel

W 3-6

In this class, we’ll be reading and discussing various novels under 150 pages from a diverse group of authors. The point is to take a close look at a text of manageable size, paying attention to its structure – how the author manages t...(read more)

Alarcon, Daniel
Alarcon, Daniel
Spring 2012

166/2

Special Topics:
Narrating the Nation

TTh 12:30-2

This course will focus on each novelist’s invention of, or critique of, national identity myths in a time of national crisis. Students will explore the intimate connection between choice of narrative strategy and construction of meaning.

...(read more)
Mukherjee, Bharati
Mukherjee, Bharati
Spring 2012

180Z/1

Science Fiction:
Speculative Fiction and Dystopias

MWF 12-1

This course will examine in depth the history of speculative fiction and its engagement with the thematics and topoi of the new life sciences—representation of cloning, ecological dystopias, hybrid life-forms, genetic engineering dy...(read more)

Jones, Donna V.
Spring 2012

190/2

Research Seminar:
Yeats, Joyce, & Beckett

MW 4-5:30

This course will focus on the major writings by this trio of Irish modernists.  We will think about the ways in which these writers fit into and challenge international canons of modernist literature, about the Irish attachments and condition...(read more)

Falci, Eric
Falci, Eric
Spring 2012

190/5

Research Seminar:
The Historical Novel

TTh 9:30-11

A survey of the historical novel.  This course covers a selection of major examples of the genre, focusing on its development in the nineteenth century in Great Britain, France, and Russia, and concluding with a contemporary Amer...(read more)

Gordon, Zachary
Gordon, Zach
Spring 2012

190/7

Research Seminar:
Literature of Racial Passing

TTh 11-12:30

A passing narrative is an account—fiction or nonfiction—of a person (or group) claiming a racial or ethnic identity that she does not (or they do not) “possess.”  Such narratives speak—directly, indirectly, and v...(read more)

Giscombe, Cecil S.
Giscombe, Cecil
Spring 2012

190/12

Research Seminar:
Henry James

TTh 3:30-5

We will read novels, shorter fiction, and essays written by Henry James across his career and also analyses of James’s work, and we will consider how James has become a central figure for rethinking literary criticism, especially for those i...(read more)

Otter, Samuel
Otter, Samuel
Spring 2012

190/14

Research Seminar:
Cultures of Realism in Postwar Britain

Tues. 3:30-6:30

This course traces transformations in British literary culture in the two decades following the Second World War.  Toward that end we'll read a diverse set of writings, emphasizing prose narrative in genres including documentary, social c...(read more)

Premnath, Gautam
Premnath, Gautam
Spring 2012

203/4

Graduate Readings:
British Novel--1800-1900

W 3-6

Reading and discussion of a selection of major nineteenth-century British novels.  We will bring large questions to bear on one another, concerning: the worlds and communities the novel aims to represent and to address (region or province; na...(read more)

Duncan, Ian
Spring 2012

250/3

Research Seminar:
Everyday Postcoloniality

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

One of the defining preoccupations of literary realism is the precise, penetrating depiction of everyday life. This course will consider how this ambition is pursued in the context of postcolonial writing. Our primary reading will be a series of f...(read more)

Premnath, Gautam
Premnath, Gautam
Summer 2012

N132/1

American Novel

TTh 2-4

We will concentrate on the central issues deeded to the American novel by democratic ideology -- refusal and autonomy, loyalty, guilt, and atonement, futurity and the burden of the past -- and try to figure out how the formal innovations in the Am...(read more)

Breitwieser, Mitchell
Summer 2012

N180Z/1

Science Fiction:
New Currents in Science Fiction

MTuTh 10-12

This course will examin...(read more)

Jones, Donna V.
Fall 2011

125D/1

The 20th-Century Novel

TTh 3:30-5

This course is a general survey of the 20th-century novel. The novel is the quintessential form of expression of modernity and modern subjectivity. In this survey of key works of the century, we will explore the novel form as it is framed by these...(read more)

Jones, Donna V.
Jones, Donna
Fall 2010

125D/1

The 20th-Century Novel

MWF 12-1

This course is a general survey of the 20th century novel. The novel is the quintessential form of expression of modernity and modern subjectivity. In this survey of key works of the century, we will explore the novel form as it is framed by these ...(read more)

Jones, Donna V.
Jones, Donna
Fall 2010

180N/1

The Novel

MWF 1-2 (note new time)

A survey of the American novel since 1900: its forms, patterns, techniques, ideas, cultural context, and intertextuality. Special attention will be paid to questions of aesthetics, epistemology, and ethics—what is beautiful? how do we know? w...(read more)

Serpell, C. Namwali
Serpell, Namwali
Spring 2010

125A/1

The English Novel (Defoe through Austen)

MWF 2-3

A survey of early fiction, much of which pretended to be anything but. Most of it, published anonymously, purported to be a true "History," "Expedition," or the like, about "Things as They Are." We will consider at the outset why these works so strenu...(read more) Starr, George A.
Starr, George
Spring 2010

125D/1

The 20th -Century Novel

TTh 12:30-2

By reading one of the most significant 20th century novels in detail, the course will attempt to answer questions about the thematic concerns and formal techniques of modernism. The relationships between changing conceptions of language and desire, of...(read more) Bernstein, Michael A.
Bernstein, Michael
Spring 2010

125E/1

The (Really) Contemporary Novel

MW 3-4 + Discussion F 3-4

We who study literature are perhaps inexorably belated. But this course aims to redefine at least one temporally muddled literary term: the “contemporary,” a period that sometimes stretches as far back as 1950 in academic parlance. I prote...(read more) Serpell, C. Namwali
Serpell, Namwali
Summer 2010

N125E/1

The Contemporary Novel

MWF 12-2

In this course, we will read seven contemporary novels published from 1939 to 1997.  The common thread in these novels is that they all focus on the internal turmoil of characters involved in social conflicts: war, racism, sexism, sexual abuse...(read more)

Marcial Gonzalez
Fall 2009

125A/1

The English Novel (Defoe through Scott)

MW 3-4 + Discussion F 3-4

As we read a variety of novels from the period credited with the “rise of the novel,” we shall consider what it was that might have been new about this form of writing. We shall be especially interested in tracking what it was that some fo...(read more) Sorensen, Janet
Sorensen, Janet
Fall 2009

125C/1

The European Novel

TTh 2-3:30

Focusing on key texts from English, French, and Russian, literatures, this course traces the development of the modern novel in Europe, from the early 19th- to the early 20th century. The texts are chosen to allow us to follow a specific thread: the n...(read more) Paperno, Irina
Paperno, Irina
Fall 2009

125D/1

The 20th Century Novel

TTh 2-3:30

This course is a general survey of the 20th century novel. The novel is the quintessential form of expression of modernity and modern subjectivity. In this survey of key works of the century, we will explore the novel form as it is framed by these thr...(read more) Jones, Donna V.
Jones, Donna
Spring 2009

125C/1

The European Novel

MWF 1-2

This course is cross-listed with Slavic 133, The Russian Novel and the West.

Focusing on key texts from English, Russian, and French literatures, this course traces the development of the modern novel in Europe, from the early 19th to the early 20t...(read more)

Paperno, Irina
Paperno, Irina
Spring 2009

125D/1

The 20th-Century Novel

TTh 11-12:30

By reading one of the most significant 20th-century novels in detail, the course will attempt to answer questions about the thematic concerns and formal techniques of modernism.  The relationships between changing conceptions of language and desi...(read more) Bernstein, Michael A.
Bernstein, Michael
Fall 2008

180N/1

Literature:
The Novel: The American Novel Since 1900

MWF 1-2

A survey of the American novel, its forms, patterns, techniques, ideas, cultural context, and intertextua- lity. Special attention will be paid to questions of aesthetics, epistemology, and ethics�what is beautiful? how do we know? what ought we do?�i...(read more) Serpell, C. Namwali
Serpell, Namwali
Spring 2008

125C/1

:
The European Novel: History and the Novel

TTh 9:30-11

Focusing on key texts from English, French, and Russian traditions, this course examines how the genre of the novel approaches and appropriates historical material as well as reflects its own particular historical contexts. We will consider 5 European...(read more) Golburt, Luba
Spring 2008

125D/1

:
The Twentieth -Century Novel

TTh 12:30-2

By reading one of the most significant 20 th-century novels in detail, the course will attempt to answer questions about the thematic concerns and formal techniques of modernism. The relationships between changing conceptions of language and desire, o...(read more) Bernstein, Michael A.
Bernstein, Michael
Fall 2007

125D/1

:
The 20th-Century Novel

MWF 1-2

This course is a general survey of the 20th-century novel. The novel is the quintessential form of expression of modernity and modern subjectivity. In this survey of key works of the century, we will explore the novel form as it is framed by these thr...(read more) Jones, Donna V.
Jones, Donna
Fall 2007

125E/1

:
The Contemporary Novel

TTh 2-3:30

An exploration of the novels listed above, all of them published since 1960. The course will move through these texts inductively, without any particular preconceptions or thematic axes to grind, in an effort both to understand these writers on their ...(read more) Bishop, John
Bishop, John
Spring 2007

125C/1

Junior Coursework:
European Novel: History and the Novel

TTh 9:30-11

Focusing on key texts from English, French, and Russian traditions, this course examines how the genre of the novel approaches and appropriates historical material as well as reflects its own particular historical contexts. We will consider four major...(read more) Golburt, Lyubov
Spring 2007

125D/1

Junior Coursework:
The 20th-Century Novel

TTh 12:30-2

"By reading one of the most significant 20th-century novels in detail, the course will attempt to answer questions about the thematic concerns and formal techniques of modernism. The relationships between changing conceptions of language and desire, o...(read more) Bernstein, Michael A.
Bernstein, Michael
Fall 2006

125E/1

Upper Division Coursework:
The Contemporary Novel

TTh 3:30-5

An exploration of the novels listed above, all of them written in the second half of the twentieth century. The course will move through these texts inductively, without any particular preconceptions or thematic axes to grind, in an effort both to und...(read more) Bishop, John
Bishop, John
Spring 2006

125C/1

Upper Division Coursework:
The European Novel

TTh 3:30-5

This course focuses on the European novel of education or formation (Bildungsroman), the novel whose protagonist is a student. We will be interested, among other things, in the meeting between the student and history, usually in the form of a revoluti...(read more) Banfield, Ann
Banfield, Ann
Spring 2006

125D/1

Upper Division Coursework:
The 20th-Century Novel

TTh 12:30-2

"By reading one of the most significant 20th-century novels in detail, the course will attempt to answer questions about the thematic concerns and formal techniques of modernism. The relationships between changing conceptions of language and desire, o...(read more) Bernstein, Michael A.
Bernstein, Michael
Fall 2005

125C/1

Upper Division Coursework:
The European Novel

TTh 11-12:30

Focusing on key texts from English, French, and Russian literatures, this course traces the development of the novel as a genre in 19th-century Europe. Our discussions will emphasize strategies of close reading and literary analysis and elements of th...(read more) Paperno, Irene
Fall 2005

125D/1

Upper Division Coursework:
The 20th-Century Novel

MWF 12-1

"Novels take a really long time to read, and they are filled with lies, or, more politely, fictions. Why write novels? Why read them? If you can ask these questions, and at the same time and without hesitation look forward to reading novels, then this...(read more) Rubenstein, Michae
Fall 2005

125E/1

Upper Division Coursework:
The Contemporary Novel

TTh 12:30-2

An exploration of the novels listed above, all of them written in the second half of the twentieth century. The course will move through these texts inductively, without any particular preconceptions or thematic axes to grind, in an effort both to und...(read more) Bishop, John
Bishop, John
Fall 2005

180N/1

Upper Division Coursework:
The Novel

MWF 11-12

"This course will consider the history and theory of the novel form, reading both novels and essays on the novel. (Theorists or critics of the novel may include Erich Auerbach, Mikhail Bakhtin, Roland Barthes, Walter Benjamin, Dorrit Cohn, Margaret Do...(read more) Banfield, Ann
Banfield, Ann
Spring 2005

125D/1

Upper Division Coursework:
The 20th-Century Novel

TTh 12:30-2

"By reading one of the most significant 20th-century novels in detail, the course will attempt to answer questions about the thematic concerns and formal techniques of modernism. The relationships between changing conceptions of language and desire, o...(read more) Bernstein, Michael A.
Bernstein, Michael
Fall 2004

125C/1

Upper Division Coursework:
The European Novel

TTh 9:30-11

Focusing on key texts from English, French, and Russian literatures, this course traces the development of the novel as a genre in 19th-century Europe. Our discussions will emphasize strategies of close reading and literary analysis and elements of th...(read more) Paperno, Irene