Class Archive

Semester
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

Please note: the more classes you ask for, the slower the page will load.

Semester Course #
Instructor
Course Area
Spring 2020

24/1

Freshman Seminar:
Emily Dickinson

W 4-5

We will be reading and discussing extraordinary poems by Emily Dickinson.

This 1-unit course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.

...(read more)
Wagner, Bryan
Fall 2019

24/1

Freshman Seminar:
Walt Whitman

Tues. 2-3

We will read and discuss extraordinary poems by Walt Whitman.

This 1-unit course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.

...(read more)
Wagner, Bryan
Fall 2019

24/2

Freshman Seminar:
Here Here in Tommy Orange's There There

Tues. 12:30-1:30

Tommy Orange's story cycle, There There, depicts the lives of contemporary indigenous people in Oakland, California. Shaped by a transgenerational trauma, Orange's characters nonetheless survive. Countering romantic stereotype...(read more)

Wong, Hertha D. Sweet
Spring 2019

24/1

Freshman Seminar:
Emily Dickinson

M 1-2

We will read and discuss extraordinary poems by Emily Dickinson.

This 1-unit course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.

...(read more)
Wagner, Bryan
Fall 2018

24/1

Freshman Seminar:
Emily Dickinson

Tues. 3:30-4:30

We will read and discuss extraordinary poems by Emily Dickinson.

This 1-unit course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.

...(read more)
Wagner, Bryan
Fall 2018

24/3

Freshman Seminar:
The Films of Alfred Hitchcock

W 2-3

We will watch and discuss films that span the length of Alfred Hitchcock's cinematic career, with a special focus on "Vertigo," "Rear Window," "Psycho" and other masterpieces from the decades after World War Two. I...(read more)

Goble, Mark
Fall 2018

24/4

Freshman Seminar:
Graphic Journalism: Reading Joe Sacco’s Palestine

Note new time: Tues. 2-4 on the following dates: August 28, September, 4, 11, 18, 25, October 9, 16

“The landmark work of comics journalism,” Joe Sacco’s Palestine is “a political and aesthetic work of extraordinary originality.”  In this seminar, we will devote ourselves to a close reading of Pales...(read more)

Wong, Hertha D. Sweet
Fall 2018

24/5

Freshman Seminar:
The Handmaid's Tale on Stage, Page, and Screen

Tuesdays 1:30-3:30 (Aug. 28 to Oct. 9 only)

In concert with the selection of Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale for the campus's 2018 On the Same Page program, this seminar will offer a closer look at this award-winning 1985 novel and the ...(read more)

Snyder, Katherine
Fall 2017

24/1

Freshman Seminar:
Reading Walt Whitman’s Leaves of Grass

M 12-2, 8/28 to 10/16 only

Walt Whitman self published the first edition of Leaves of Grass, a collection of poems, in 1855.  For the rest of his life, he reworked, revised, and added to this collection. He produced at least six distinguishable editions. We wil...(read more)

Wong, Hertha D. Sweet
Fall 2017

24/2

Freshman Seminar:
Shakespeare's Sonnets

W 12-1

Shakespeare's sonnets were first published in 1609, rather late in his career, with a second, curiously distorted edition in 1640. Although little is known about how they were first received by the reading public, the sonnets still cause p...(read more)

Nelson, Alan H.
Fall 2017

24/3

Freshman Seminar:
African American Poetry

Tues. 4-5

We will read, discuss, and write about poems by African American authors including Phillis Wheatley, Frances Harper, Paul Laurence Dunbar, Claude McKay, Countee Cullen, Langston Hughes, Gwendolyn Brooks, Amiri Baraka, Audre Lorde, Na...(read more)

Wagner, Bryan
Spring 2017

24/2

Freshman Seminar:
The Arts and Literature at Berkeley and Beyond

W 4-5

In this seminar we will read the work of Berkeley poets; study the paintings, sculpture, and video installations in our own Berkeley Art Museum; attend musical and theatrical performances at Zellerbach Hall; see and discuss films at the Pacific Fi...(read more)

Padilla, Genaro M.
Spring 2017

24/3

Freshman Seminar:
Reading Walden Carefully

Tues. 5-6

As close and careful a reading of Thoreau's dense and enigmatic work as we can manage in the time that we have. Regular attendance and participation and five pages of writing will be required.

This 1-unit course may not be counted as on...(read more)

Breitwieser, Mitchell
Spring 2017

24/4

Freshman Seminar:
Post-Apocalypse Now

Wed. 3-4

Apocalyptic and post-apocalyptic stories—are these really two different things?—have been told for centuries. But novels and movies that imagine the end of the world (and what comes after that) seem to have inundated us recently. In thi...(read more)

Snyder, Katherine
Fall 2016

24/1

Freshman Seminar:
Reading Walden Carefully

W 4-5

As close and careful a reading of Thoreau's dense and enigmatic work as we can manage in the time that we have. Regular attendance and participation and five pages of writing will be required.

This 1-unit course may not be counted as on...(read more)

Breitwieser, Mitchell
Fall 2016

24/2

Freshman Seminar

This section of English 24 has been canceled; it will be offered in Spring '17 instead.

...(read more)
Hutson, Richard
Fall 2016

24/3

Freshman Seminar:
Graphic Journalism: Reading Joe Sacco's Palestine

Note new time: Tues. 9-11 (for seven weeks only)

"The landmark work of comics journalism," Joe Sacco's Palestine is "a political and aesthetic work of extraordinary originality." In this seminar, we will devote ourselves to a close reading of Palestine, ...(read more)

Wong, Hertha D. Sweet
Spring 2016

24/1

Freshman Seminar:
Masterpieces of World Cinema: Federico Fellini's La dolce vita

M 2-3

Though over 55 years old, La dolce vita (“The Sweet Life,”1960) is still trending, with its famous images circulating in visual media more widely than ever.  This continued ebullience is probably owing to two things.&nbsp...(read more)

Miller, D.A.
Fall 2015

24/1

Freshman Seminar:
Shakespeare's Sonnets

M 12-1

Shakespeare's sonnets were first published in 1609. Although little is known about how they were first received by the reading public, they have caused puzzlement and delight since their second edition, published in 1640. Over the course of th...(read more)

Nelson, Alan H.
Spring 2015

24/1

Freshman Seminar:
The Arts In and Around Berkeley

W 11-1 (January 21 to March 4 only)

In this seminar (that will meet the first seven Wednesdays of the semester from 11:00 to 1:00) we will explore the diverse practices of art in and around Berkeley. We will visit local galleries and artists’ studios as well as arts programs a...(read more)

Wong, Hertha D. Sweet
Spring 2015

24/2

Freshman Seminar:
Reading Madame Bovary

Tues. 4-5

Gustave Flaubert’s Madame Bovary is widely regarded as one of the world’s classic novels, but that acclaim does not get at what’s uniquely weird about it.  Read the novel fast and you’ll find a compelling stor...(read more)

Miller, D.A.
Spring 2015

24/3

Freshman Seminar:
The Arts and Culture at Berkeley and Beyond

W 4-5

In this seminar we will read the work of Berkeley poets; study the paintings, sculpture, and video installations in our own Berkeley Art Museum; attend musical and theatrical performances at Zellerbach Hall; see and discuss films at the Pacific Fi...(read more)

Padilla, Genaro M.
Spring 2015

24/4

Freshman Seminar:
California Detectives in Fiction and Film

W 10-11

For a variety of reasons, both San Francisco and Los Angeles have been great places for the work of crime and detection. Certain theorists of detective fiction have noted that such works of art are especially committed to the invocation and experi...(read more)

Hutson, Richard
Spring 2015

24/5

Freshman Seminar:
Campus Onomastics

F 2-3

"Onomastics," from the Greek onoma, 'name,'  is a minor branch of linguistics that studies proper names. In this course we will study the names of the buildings, spaces, institutions, scholarship funds and...(read more)

Hanson, Kristin
Fall 2014

24/1

Freshman Seminar:
Reading Art Spiegelman's MAUS

Tues. 2-4 (Sept. 2-Oct. 14 only)

Art Spiegelman has been called “one of our era’s foremost comics artists” and “perhaps the single most important comic creator working within the field.” In this seminar we will devote ourselves to a close reading of ...(read more)

Wong, Hertha D. Sweet
Fall 2014

24/2

Freshman Seminar:
Crime and Punishment

Mon. 3-5 (Sept. 8-Oct. 27 only)

In Crime and Punishment (1866), the main characters are two intelligent young men (temporarily college drop-outs because they cannot afford the tuition) and two remarkable young women, in St. Petersburg, Russia, about the time of the Amer...(read more)

Tracy, Robert
Tracy, Robert
Fall 2014

24/3

Freshman Seminar:
FSM

Fridays 10-12 (Sept. 19 to Nov. 7 only; no meeting Oct. 24)

Every fall semester, The College of Letters and Scie...(read more)

Paley, Morton D.
Spring 2014

24/2

Freshman Seminar:
Seeking Justice: The Art of Argument

W 2-4 (1/29-3/12 only)

This course, like its title, has both a subject and an object. Its subject is argument; its object is to study how arguments are constructed, what the rhetoric of persuasion consists of, what constitutes evidence, how to identify good logic and we...(read more)

Friedman, Donald M.
Spring 2014

24/3

Freshman Seminar:
Mark Twain's Boys

W 12-1

Mark Twain became immensely popular with his stories about boys like Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn, as well as his prince and pauper.  In the post-Civil War era, 1865-1910, writers like Horatio Alger, Louisa May Alcott, Mark Twain, and others (eve...(read more)

Hutson, Richard
Spring 2014

24/4

Freshman Seminar:
Alfred Hitchcock

W 2-3

For more information on this course, please contact Professor Goble at mgoble@berkeley.edu.

This 1-unit course may not be counted as one of the twelve courses required to complete the English major.

...(read more)
Goble, Mark
Fall 2013

24/1

Freshman Seminar:
Shakespeare's Twelfth Night

W 12-1

This seminar will investigate the nature of Shakespearean comedy in Twelfth Night, which involves disguise, cross-dressing, gender-bending, mistaken identities, and misdirected affections. The seminar will read the entire play thorough in...(read more)

Nelson, Alan H.
Fall 2013

24/2

Freshman Seminar:
Shakespeare's Hamlet

Tues. 3-5 (Sept. 3 to Oct. 15 only)

Hamlet is perhaps the greatest, the most challenging, and at times the most frustrating play in the English language. In this course we will concentrate intensively on the text (which will be the only assigned reading). We’ll consid...(read more)

Paley, Morton D.
Fall 2013

24/3

Freshman Seminar:
Reading Art Spiegelman's Maus I & II

Tues. 11-1 (Sept. 3 to Oct. 15 only)

Art Speigelman has been called "one of our era's foremost comics artists" and "perhaps the single most important comic creator working within the field." In this seminar we will devote ourselves to a close reading of his Pu...(read more)

Wong, Hertha D. Sweet
Fall 2012

24/1

Freshman Seminar:
Reading Art Spiegelman's Maus I & II

W 3-5 (8/29-10/10 only)

This seminar will meet for seven weeks on the following dates: August 29, September 5, September 12, September 19, September 26, October 3, and October 10.

Art Spiegelman has been called "one of our era's foremost comics artists&qu...(read more)

Wong, Hertha D. Sweet
Fall 2012

24/2

Freshman Seminar:
Margaret Atwood’s Dystopian Fictions

Tues. 10-11

<!--{cke_protected}{C}%3C!%2D%2D%0A%20%2F*%20Font%20Definitions%20*%2F%0A%40font-face%0A%09%7Bfont-family%3ACambria%3B%0A%09panose-1%3A2%204%205%203%205%204%206%203%202%204%3B%0A%09mso-font-ch...<a href="/courses/3631" target="_blank">(read more)</a>

Snyder, Katherine
Fall 2012

24/3

Freshman Seminar:
The Arts at Berkeley and Beyond

W 2-3

In this seminar we will attend literary, art, and musical performances in and around Berkeley to introduce first-year students to the astonishing range of cultural production on the campus and in the Bay Area. We will visit the Berkeley Art Museum...(read more)

Padilla, Genaro M.
Spring 2012

24/1

Freshman Seminar:
Bullets Across the Bay--Detective Narratives Set in San Francisco

W 9-10

Why are detective novels set in a place?  San Francisco has provided a favorite setting for the detective story since the work of Dashiell Hammett, especially with the publication of The Maltese Falcon (1930).  Of course, San Fr...(read more)

Hutson, Richard
Spring 2012

24/2

Freshman Seminar:
Reading Walden Carefully

M 2-3

As close and careful a reading of Thoreau's dense and enigmatic work as we can manage in the time that we have. Regular attendance and participation and five pages of writing will be required.

This 1-unit course may not be counted a...(read more)

Breitwieser, Mitchell
Fall 2011

24/1

Freshman Seminar:
Reading Walden Carefully

Tues. 2-3

We will read Thoreau's Walden in small chunks, probably about thirty pages per week. This will allow us time to dwell upon the complexities of a book that is much more mysterious than those who have read the book casually, or those wh...(read more)

Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell
Fall 2011

24/2

Freshman Seminar:
Procrastination: Theory and Practice

Tues. 10-11

Why do we procrastinate? What can we do to stop it? This course explores procrastination both as a practical problem and as a springboard for theoretical inquiry into questions of choice, will, agency, rationality and morality. We'll read (slo...(read more)

Schweik, Susan
Schweik, Susan
Fall 2011

24/3

Freshman Seminar:
Two Novels by Jane Austen: Sense and Sensibility and Emma

Tues. 2-4 (9/6 - 10/25 only)

This seminar is meant to be an interesting and pleasant introduction to the study of a great novelist: Jane Austen. We'll read and discuss two novels: Sense and Sensibility and Emma. We'll approach the novels from a numbe...(read more)

Paley, Morton D.
Paley, Morton
Fall 2011

24/4

Freshman Seminar:
David Copperfield

M 3-5 (9/12 - 10/31 only)

In David Copperfield (1849-50), Charles Dickens writes a novel about a novelist named David Copperfield who writes a novel about Charles Dickens--for many of David's adventures and ordeals mirror Dickens's own experiences that pre...(read more)

Tracy, Robert
Tracy, Robert
Fall 2011

24/5

Freshman Seminar

W 3-4

T. B. A.

...(read more)
Padilla, Genaro M.
Padilla, Genaro
Spring 2011

24/1

Freshman Seminar:
The Arts at Berkeley

W 11-12

The goal of the course is to help students to feel confident in talking about the arts and to take pleasure in that confidence, as well as to feel at home in the various venues that exhibit art and performance at Berkeley. We will discuss how best...(read more)

Altieri, Charles F.
Altieri, Charles
Spring 2011

24/2

Freshman Seminar:
Reading Walden Carefully

M 2-3

We will read Thoreau's Walden in small chunks, probably about thirty pages per week. This will allow us time to dwell upon the complexities of a book that is much more mysterious than those who have read the book casually, or those wh...(read more)

Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell
Fall 2010

24/1

Freshman Seminar:
Shakespeare's Hamlet

W 2-4 (9/1-10/20 only)

Hamlet is perhaps the greatest, the most challenging, and at times the most frustrating play in the English language. In this course we will concentrate intensively on the text (which will be the only assigned reading). We’ll consid...(read more)

Paley, Morton D.
Paley, Morton
Fall 2010

24/2

Freshman Seminar:
Reading Walden Carefully

Thurs. 4-5

We will read Thoreau's Walden in small chunks, probably about thirty pages per week. This will allow us time to dwell upon the complexities of a book that is much more mysterious than those who have read the book casually, or those wh...(read more)

Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell
Fall 2010

24/3

Freshman Seminar:
This section has been cancelled

This section has been canceled. 
...(read more)
Tracy, Robert
Tracy, Robert
Spring 2010

24/1

Freshman Seminar: Reading Walden Carefully

Thurs. 2-3

We will read Thoreau's Walden in small chunks, probably about thirty pages per week.  This will allow us time to dwell upon the complexities of a book that is much more mysterious than those who have read the bo...(read more)

Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell
Fall 2009

24/1

Freshman Seminar: Shakespeare's Sonnets

M 12-1

Shakespeare's sonnets were first published in 1609. Although little is known about how they were first received by the reading public, they are known to have caused delight and puzzlement since their second edition in 1640. Over the course of the ...(read more) Nelson, Alan H.
Nelson, Alan
Fall 2009

24/2

Freshman Seminar: Hamlet

W 2-4 (Aug 26 to Oct. 14 only)

Hamlet is perhaps the greatest, the most challenging, and at times the most frustrating play in the English language. In this course we will concentrate intensively on the text (which will be the only assigned reading). We’ll consider...(read more) Paley, Morton D.
Paley, Morton D.
Fall 2009

24/3

Freshman Seminar: Animal Rights and Disability Studies

M 5-6

This seminar will examine the intersections between two concepts and two movements: animal rights and disability rights. Exploring work done in gender and women's studies, critical race studies, disability studies, and thinking on animal rights...(read more) Schweik, Susan
Schweik, Susan and Taylor, Sunaura
Fall 2009

24/4

Freshman Seminar: The Mystery of Edwin Drood

M 3-5 (Sept 14 to Nov. 2 only)

Dickens's last novel, The Mystery of Edwin Drood, is the most successful mystery story ever written. Dickens died before finishing it or solving the mystery. Unlike other mystery stories, it fails to reassure us that justice is done, and ...(read more) Tracy, Robert
Tracy, Robert
Fall 2009

24/5

Freshman Seminar: California and Ethnicity -- Fiction and Film

Wed. 4-6 (Aug. 26 to Oct. 14 only)

We will read and view a group of narratives (in fiction and film) that delineates the California experience across ethnicity, race, gender, and class. This seminar is part of the Food for Thought Seminar Series.

This course may not ...(read more)
Padilla, Genaro M.
Padilla, Genaro
Spring 2009

24/2

Freshman Seminar:
Ang Lee Films and James Schamus' screenplays

M 12-1

For this seminar, we will look at four of Ang Lee’s films and at two of the novels that are the sources of two of the films. Two of the screenplays were written by Lee’s producer and friend, James Schamus: The Wedding Banquet ...(read more)

Hutson, Richard
Hutson, Richard
Fall 2008

24/1

Freshman Seminar:
Shakespearean Comedy: Twelfth Night

M 12-1

"This seminar will investigate the nature of Shakespearean comedy in Twelfth Night, which involves disguise, cross-dressing, gender-bending, mistaken identities, and misdirected affections. The seminar will read the entire play through in the first we...(read more) A. Nelson
Fall 2008

24/2

Freshman Seminar:
POSTPONED TILL SPRING 2009

"Check back later for more information!"

No instructor assigned yet.
Fall 2008

24/3

Freshman Seminar:
Rethinking Hemingway

W 2-3

The past two decades have seen a dramatic reassessment of Ernest Hemingway. Departing from earlier critical traditions that first celebrated him as a macho sportsman, then vilified him as a misogynist, a homophobe, and a racist, the current critical r...(read more) Snyder, Katie
Fall 2008

24/4

Freshman Seminar:
The Mystery of Edwin Drood

M 3-5 (September 15 through November 3 only)

"Dickens's last novel, The Mystery of Edwin Drood, is the most successful mystery story ever written. Dickens died before finishing it, or solving the mystery. Unlike other mystery stories, it fails to reassure us that justice is done, and forces us t...(read more) Tracy, Robert
Tracy, Robert
Fall 2008

24/5

Freshman Seminar:
The Monster in the Mirror: Frankenstein and Dracula

W 4-5

We will read Bram Stoker's Dracula and Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, together with some film versions of these two archetypal horror tales, appreciating them as mirror opposites of each other, and investigating what they have to tell us about human age...(read more) Loewinsohn, Ron
Loewinsohn, Ron
Fall 2008

24/6

Freshman Seminar:
Reading Walden Carefully

W 2-3

"We will read Thoreau's Walden in small chunks, probably about thirty pages per week. This will allow us time to dwell upon the complexities of a book that is much more mysterious than those who have read the book casually, or those who have only hear...(read more) Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell
Spring 2008

24/1

Freshman Seminar:
Visual Culture and Autobiography

W 5-8 P.M.

Visual culture is not just about pictures, but the (post) �modern tendency to picture or visualize experience��what W.J.T. Mitchell calls �the pictorial turn.� Not surprisingly, as contemporary writers and artists struggle to find forms that convey po...(read more) Wong, Hertha D. Sweet
Wong, Hertha
Fall 2007

24/1

Freshman Seminar:
Visual Culture and Autobiography

Tues. 5-8

Visual culture is not just about pictures, but the (post)?modern tendency to picture or visualize experience??what W.J.T. Mitchell calls ?the pictorial turn.? Not surprisingly, as contemporary writers and artists struggle to find forms that convey pos...(read more) Wong, Hertha D. Sweet
Wong, Hertha
Fall 2007

24/2

Freshman Seminar:
Reading Walden Carefully

M 4-5

"We will read Thoreau's Walden in small chunks, probably about thirty pages per week. This will allow us time to dwell upon the complexities of a book that is much more mysterious than those who have read the book casually, or those who have only hear...(read more) Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell
Fall 2007

24/3

Freshman Seminar:
Shakespeare's Sonnets

W 12-1

Shakespeare's sonnets were first published in 1609. Although little is known about how they were first received by the reading public, they are known to have caused delight and puzzlement since their second edition in 1640. Over the course of the seme...(read more) Nelson, Alan H.
Nelson, Alan
Fall 2007

24/4

Freshman Seminar:
Gary Wills' Lincoln at Gettysburg : The U.S. and the Civil War Era

F 12-1

I would like to read Wills' book slowly and carefully with students. I plan to offer some other materials about the culture of the mid-19th-century U.S. , perhaps some of the Ken Burns documentary on the Civil War, letters and other speeches by Lincol...(read more) Hutson, Richard
Hutson, Richard
Fall 2007

24/5

Freshman Seminar:
Contemporary Irish Theater: The Plays of Brian Friel

M 3-5

Brian Friel (b. 1928) is the most prominent playwright of the contemporary Irish theater, best known for Translations and Dancing at Lughnasa. In a series of innovative plays, he has examined some of the stories the Irish tell themselves about their p...(read more) Tracy, Robert
Tracy, Robert
Fall 2007

24/6

Freshman Seminar:
Three Novels by Jane Austen

Thurs. 1-2

We will read three of Jane Austen's novels very slowly to learn why they are among the world's most enduringly popular and the most technically innovative. The novels are Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice, and Emma. For additional insights, w...(read more) Gallagher, Catherine
Gallagher, Catherine
Spring 2007

24/1

Freshman Seminar:
The Arts at Berkeley

W 11-12

The goal of this course is to help students to feel confident in talking about the arts and to take pleasure in that confidence, as well as to feel at home in the various venues that exhibit art and performance at Berkeley. We will discuss how best to...(read more) Altieri, Charles F.
Altieri, Charles
Spring 2007

24/3

Freshman Seminar:
Reading Walden Carefully

M 4-5

"Course Description: We will read Thoreau's Walden in small chunks, probably about thirty pages per week. This will allow us time to dwell upon the complexities of a book that is much more mysterious than those who have read the book casually, or thos...(read more) Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell
Fall 2006

24/1

Freshman Seminar:
Growing Up Chicano/a with Gary Soto and Sandra Cisneros

W 4-5

We will read a small group of narratives about growing up Chicano/Latino. I believe that this is a particularly difficult time for all children as they face sexual pressure, violence, discouraging schools. By focusing on Chicano youth we will glimpse ...(read more) Padilla, Genaro M.
Padilla, Genaro
Fall 2006

24/2

Freshman Seminar:
The Essays of Virginia Woolf

W 2-3

In addition to the novels for which she is most famous, Virginia Woolf produced a voluminous body of short prose, with more than 500 essays and reviews on a dazzling array of topics, including, but far from limited to, peace and war, consciousness and...(read more) Snyder, Katherine
Snyder, Katherine
Fall 2006

24/3

Freshman Seminar:
Joyce�s Dubliners in Joyce�s Dubliners

M 3:30-5:30

James Joyce�s Dubliners (1914) is a collection of short stories about the inhabitants of his native city. Joyce helps invent the modern short story as he tries to evoke the mood or atmosphere of Dublin as it manifests itself in the behavior of Dublin ...(read more) Tracy, Robert
Tracy, Robert
Fall 2006

24/5

Freshman Seminar:
Two Novels by Jane Austen

Tues. 3:30-5:30

"This seminar is meant to be an interesting and pleasant introduction to the study of a great novelist: Jane Austen. We�ll read and discuss two novels: Pride and Prejudice and Northanger Abbey. We�ll approach the novels from a number of different pers...(read more) Paley, Morton D.
Paley, Morton
Fall 2006

24/6

Freshman Seminar:
Shakespearean Comedy: Twelfth Night

Tues. 9:00-11:00

Our seminar will concentrate on one of Shakespeare's best and most beloved comedies, Twelfth Night. We will read every word of the play as a group, and do trial readings and enactments of various scenes. Members of the seminar will give at least two o...(read more) Nelson, Alan H.
Nelson, Alan
Spring 2006

24/1

Freshman Seminar:
Shakespeare?s Sonnets

M 12-1

Shakespeare's sonnets were published in 1609. Although little is known about how they were first received by the reading public, they are known to have caused delight and puzzlement since their second edition in 1640. Over the course of the semester, ...(read more) Nelson, Alan H.
Nelson, Alan
Spring 2006

24/2

Freshman Seminar:
Pop Song Poetics

Tues. 2-3

All the core elements of versification found the world over?meter, rhyme, alliteration and syntactic parallelism?are normally taught with reference to high art forms of poetry. But these same basic elements are also found in some form in the lyrics of...(read more) Hanson, Kristin
Hanson, Kristin
Spring 2006

24/3

Freshman Seminar:
Boys and Girls in Mark Twain and Henry James

W 3-4

Historians often define the era from 1880 to ca. 1915 as the ?era of the child.? Some historians also include the problem of American adolescence in this period. Just as there developed an issue of defining masculinity and femininity, authors of the p...(read more) Hutson, Richard
Hutson, Richard
Spring 2006

24/4

Freshman Seminar:
Through Hell?Reading Dante?s Inferno

W 2-3

"""Divine Power, Supreme Wisdom and Primal Love made me,"" declares the scandalous inscription on the gate of Dante's Hell, the ""city of suffering,"" a place that resembles the totalitarian prison-states of our own political nightmares. Dante's journ...(read more) Duncan, Ian
Duncan, Ian
Fall 2005

24/1

Freshman Seminar:
Children, Families and Disability

Tues. 10-11

This course will explore how disability, gender and race intersect in the lives of people with disabilities across the early lifespan (from birth to age 18), primarily in the United States. The questions we'll address are fundamental disability issues...(read more) Schweik, Susan
Schweik, Susan and O'Toole, Corbett Joan
Fall 2005

24/2

Freshman Seminar:
Visual Culture and Autobiography

W 10-11

"Visual culture is not just about pictures, but the (post)""modern tendency to picture or visualize experience""--what W.J.T. Mitchell calls ""the pictorial turn."" Not surprisingly, as contemporary writers and artists struggle to find forms that conv...(read more) Wong, Hertha D. Sweet
Wong, Hertha Sweet
Fall 2005

24/3

Freshman Seminar:
Growing Up Chicano/Latino

W 4:30-5:30

We will read a small group of narratives about growing up Chicano/Latino. I believe that this is a particularly difficult time for all children as they face sexual pressure, violence, discouraging schools. By focusing on Chicano youth we will glimpse ...(read more) Padilla, Genaro M.
Padilla, Genaro
Fall 2005

24/4

Freshman Seminar:
Two Novels by Jane Austen

Fri. 10-12

"This seminar is meant to be an interesting and pleasant introduction to the study of a great novelist: Jane Austen. We'll read and discuss two novels: : Sense and Sensibility and Emma a. We'll approach the novels from a number of different perspectiv...(read more) Paley, Morton D.
Paley, Morton
Fall 2005

24/5

Freshman Seminar:
Reading Robert Frost

Mon. 4-5

"In a letter to a publisher friend, Robert Frost offered the following engaging definition of poetry: �A poem starts with a lump in the throat, a homesickness or a lovesickness. It is a reaching out toward expression, an effort to find fulfillment. A ...(read more) McQuade, Donald
McQuade, Don
Fall 2005

24/6

Freshman Seminar:
Contemporary Irish Theater-The Plays of Brian Friel

Mon. 3:30-5:30

Brian Friel (b. 1928) is the most prominent playwright of the contemporary Irish theater, best known for Translations and Dancing at Lughnasa. In a series of innovative plays, he has examined some of the stories the Irish tell themselves about their p...(read more) Tracy, Robert
Tracy, Robert
Fall 2005

24/7

Freshman Seminar:
Reading Walden Carefully

222 Wheeler

"We will read Thoreau's Walden in small chunks, probably about thirty pages per week. This will allow us time to dwell upon the complexities of a book that is much more mysterious than those who have read the book casually, or those who have only hear...(read more) Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell
Spring 2005

24/1

Freshman Seminar:
Representing Psychiatric Disability

M 12-1

In this seminar we will view films and read works of fiction that deal with various issues related to psychiatric disability (including questions of the social construction of mental illness, diagnosis, treatment, accommodation, ADA court cases, and t...(read more) Susan Schweik and Aaron Cohen
Spring 2005

24/2

Freshman Seminar:
Pleasure, Politics, and Public Fantasy in Bollywood Cinema

M 4-5

"Every day, over twelve million people go to the movies in India. Seated on planks of wood and on the floor, in air-conditioned movie palaces and open maidans, the world's most avid cinema-goer watches the hundreds of films that roll out of the world'...(read more) Joshi, Priya
Spring 2005

24/3

Freshman Seminar:
Shakespeare's Sonnets

W 12-1

Shakespeare's sonnets were published in 1609. Although little is known about how they were first received by the reading public, they are known to have caused delight and puzzlement since their second edition in 1640. Over the course of the semester, ...(read more) Nelson, Alan H.
Nelson, Alan
Spring 2005

24/4

Freshman Seminar:
Reading Walden Carefully

Tues. 2-3

"We will read Thoreau's Walden in small chunks, probably about thirty pages per week. This will allow us time to dwell upon the complexities of a book that is much more mysterious than those who have read the book casually, or those who have only hear...(read more) Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell
Fall 2004

24/1

Freshman Seminar:
(topic unknown)

Tues. 3:30-5:30

List and Course Description: For more information on this course, please email the professor at gpadilla@berkeley.edu...(read more) Padilla, Genaro M.
Padilla, Genaro
Fall 2004

24/2

Freshman Seminar:
William Blake's Songs of Innocence and of Experience

W 2-4

"In recent years the study of William Blake has come to concentrate more and more upon what has been called his composite art--the union of text and image that characterized Blake's work in illuminated printing. In this seminar we'll study the interac...(read more) Paley, Morton D.
Paley, Morton
Fall 2004

24/3

Freshman Seminar:
British and American Poetry of the 19th Century

W 4-5

In this seminar, we will consider what nineteenth-century British and American poets have to say (issues of self, desire, pleasure, memory, freedom, faith, beauty, nature, and nation, among others) and how they say these things (features of line, synt...(read more) Otter, Sam
Fall 2004

24/4

Freshman Seminar:
Joyce's Dubliners in Joyce's Dubliners

Mon. 3-5

James Joyce?s Dubliners (1914) is a collection of short stories about his native city. Joyce helps invent the modern short story as he tries to evoke the mood or spirit of Dublin as it manifests itself in the behavior of the Dublin men and women. When...(read more) Tracy, Robert
Tracy, Robert