Class Archive

Semester
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

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Semester Course #
Instructor
Course Area
Spring 2020

160/1

Methods and Materials of Literary Criticism

Thurs. 2-5

In this course, we will look at some major moments in and read some major works of literary criticism written in English.  Beginning with Sir Philip Sidney’s “The Defence of Poesy” and moving through writing by William Wordsw...(read more)

Puckett, Kent
Spring 2020

172/1

Literature and Psychology:
Literature and Therapy

Lectures MW 1-2 in 2060 Valley LSB + one hour of discussion section per week in different locations (sec. 101: F 1-2; sec. 102: F 2-3; sec. 103: W 3-4; sec. 104: W 4-5; sec. 105: F 9-10; sec. 106: F 10-11)

The originator of the “talking cure,” Sigmund Freud, placed a great deal of faith in the capacities of literature: both to depict and figure psychic problematics for a reader, and to transform an author’s own neurotic condition in...(read more)

Lavery, Grace
Spring 2020

190/1

Research Seminar:
Ecopoetry and Ecopoetics

MW 10:30-12

Ecopoetry – nature poetry that is environmental and environmentalist – is an international twenty-first century movement.  But in the nature poetry and poetics of the United States it has deep and wide-spread roots.  This semi...(read more)

Shoptaw, John
Spring 2020

190/6

Research Seminar:
Hollywood in the Thirties

TTh 12:30-2

Our subject will be Hollywood cinema from the birth of talking pictures to the start of World War II.  We'll sample the extraordinary range of films that Golden-Age Hollywood offered its consumers: from gangster pictures and screwball come...(read more)

Knapp, Jeffrey
Fall 2019

130D/1

American Literature: 1900-1945:
Class, Race, Critique, Rewound

MW 5-6:30

This course is a retrospective or "rewound" survey of American literature and criticism from 1945 to 1900. We'll begin in the 1940s, working our way back in time, not only through key works in prose and poetry, but also through c...(read more)

Leong, Andrew Way
Fall 2019

161/1

Introduction to Literary Theory

TTh 12:30-2

In this course we will study how literary theory developed as a field in the twentieth century, even as it regularly drew its principles, methods, and inspiration from other academic disciplines and social discourses.  Our focus will be on the...(read more)

Hale, Dorothy J.
Fall 2019

190/6

Research Seminar:
Literature on Trial: Romanticism, Law, Justice

TTh 11-12:30

This course will introduce students to “law and literature” studies, focusing on the way literature imagines the relation between law and justice.  We’ll concentrate on literature of the ...(read more)

Langan, Celeste
Fall 2019

190/8

Research Seminar:
Ideology

TTh 2-3:30

This research seminar will focus on how the concept of ideology historically has been employed by literary and cultural critics. During the first half of the semester, the reading material will include major theoretical statements on the meaning an...(read more)

Gonzalez, Marcial
Fall 2019

H195A/1

Honors Course

MW 3:30-5

(read more)

Goble, Mark
Fall 2019

H195A/2

Honors Course

TTh 11-12:30

H195A/B is a two-semester seminar that lays the groundwork for and guides you through the completion a 40-60 page Honors thesis on a subject of your choice. The first semester offers an inquiry into critical approaches, research methods, and theore...(read more)

Abel, Elizabeth
Spring 2019

166/2

Special Topics:
Marxism and Literature

MWF 2-3

In the early 1990s, the Marxist literary theorist Fredric Jameson responded to critics who were at once proclaiming the emergence of a capitalist “new world order” and asserting the death of Marxism.  Jameson wrote: “It does ...(read more)

Gonzalez, Marcial
Spring 2019

166/6

Special Topics:
Realism, Then and Now

MW 5-6:30

This course explores the relationship between life and literature, with a focus on the following types of questions: How have novelists and poets—as well as filmmakers, television producers, and Instagram aficionados—attempted to repres...(read more)

Cordes Selbin, Jesse
Spring 2019

176/1

Literature and Popular Culture:
The Sitcom

Lectures MW 3-4 + one hour of discussion section per week in various locations (sec. 101: F 2-3; section 102: F 3-4; sec. 103: Thurs. 10-11; sec. 104: Thurs. 11-12; sec. 105: Thurs. 12-1; sec. 106: Thurs. 12-1; sec. 107: F 11-12; sec. 108: F 10-11)

The television situation comedy has been one of the most durable, wide-ranging, and successful genres of  popular  culture  of  all  time.  Its  narrative  forms  (such  as  the  &ldq...(read more)

Lavery, Grace
Spring 2019

180N/1

The Novel

This course has been canceled (Jan. 7, 2019).

...(read more)
No instructor assigned yet.
Spring 2019

190/7

Research Seminar

 This section of English 190 was canceled on November 2.

...(read more)
Stancek, Claire Marie
Fall 2018

161/1

Introduction to Literary Theory:
Free Speech, in Theory

TTh 2-3:30

This course will interrogate the way in which “free” speech informs and complicates our understanding of literature and the literary.  We will trace the conceptual intersection of freedom and speech both historically and across sev...(read more)

Langan, Celeste
Fall 2018

165/3

Special Topics:
Literature and Media Theory

TTh 9:30-11

This course will consider literature in relation to media theory.  Is literature made obsolete by new media?  What happens when we consider print literature in re...(read more)

Langan, Celeste
Fall 2018

173/1

The Language and Literature of Films:
The Film Essay: James Baldwin, Roland Barthes, Susan Sontag

Lectures TTh 3:30-5 + film screenings Thurs. 5-8

This course offers an in-depth study of three of the most influential public intellectuals of the twentieth century: James Baldwin, Roland Barthes, and Susan Sontag. Working in the postwar period between France and the United States, and grappling ...(read more)

Best, Stephen M.
Young, Damon
Fall 2018

202/1

History of Literary Criticism

W 2-5

An introduction to Western literary theory from antiquity to the present, focusing on the historical shift from the disciplines of poetics and rhetoric to that of aesthetics, with special attention to the concept of aesthetics and the discourse of ...(read more)

Kahn, Victoria
Fall 2018

203/1

Graduate Readings:
Allegorical Moments: Public, Private, and the Writing of Everyday Life

MW 10:30-12

This seminar will undertake a critical reading of, and participation in, some possibilities (or impossibilities) of contemporary realisms and realities, public and private. It will query, from an array of perspectives, problems of process, represen...(read more)

Hejinian, Lyn
Spring 2018

160/1

Special Topics:
Methods and Materials of Literary Criticism

TTh 12:30-2

In this course, we will look at some major moments in and read some major works of literary criticism written in English.  Beginning with Sir Philip Sidney’s “The Defence of Poesy” and moving through writing by William Wordsw...(read more)

Puckett, Kent
Spring 2018

166/4

Special Topics:
Marxism & Literature

TTh 3:30-5

For the past thirty years, it’s become a cliché that it’s easier to imagine the end of the world than the end of capitalism. Yet, ever since the 2008 financial crash, there’s been rising popular consciousness of capitalism&...(read more)

Lye, Colleen
Spring 2018

174/2

Literature and History:
History as Literature

TTh 3:30-5

Are the events of the world and human lives meaningful? And if they are, how do we discern the meaning?

History, as a form of narrative literature, seeks to answer these questions. In this class we will read a range of historical texts, w...(read more)

Thornbury, Emily V.
Spring 2018

190/8

Research Seminar:
Literary Theory and Its Objects

TTh 12:30-2

This course explores some ...(read more)

Creasy, CFS
Spring 2018

190/10

Research Seminar:
Pagan Fictions in Christian Literature

TTh 5-6:30

Although late antique and medieval Christian authors routinely decried the falsehood of pagan literature, they could hardly get enough of it. Pagan mythology became not only a major inspiration of medieval poetry and philosophy but even a part of e...(read more)

Hobson, Jacob
Spring 2018

203/1

Graduate Readings:
Radical Enlightenment?

Note new time: TTh 9:30-11

Channeling the voice of his own Enlightened despot, Kant’s famous answer to the question “What is Enlightenment?” included the chilling injunction to “argue as much as you want and about whatever you want, ...(read more)

Goldstein, Amanda Jo
Spring 2018

203/2

Graduate Readings:
The Novel in Theory

TTh 11-12:30

This course traces the development of novel theory in the twentieth century.  Designed as an introduction to major arguments that are still influential in literary studies generally, the course asks why so many different theoretical schools ha...(read more)

Hale, Dorothy J.
Spring 2018

250/4

Research Seminar:
The Rhetoric of Technique

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

“Sex is boring,” Foucault declared in an interview published posthumously in 1986, before expressing his interest in those “intentional and voluntary actions by which men […] make their life an oeuvre that car...(read more)

Lavery, Grace
Fall 2017

161/1

Introduction to Literary Theory

MWF 2-3

This course will offer an introduction to literary theory with a focus on twentieth- and twenty-first-century political approaches to the study of literature, including theories of Marxism, feminism, sexuality, race, post-colonialism, and ecocritic...(read more)

Gonzalez, Marcial
Fall 2017

165/1

Special Topics:
Genres of Free Speech

MW 5-6:30

We endure a difficult relation to free speech. Most arguments on the topic, whether for or against, focus on the capacity of language to harm others, directly or indirectly, and therefore concern the scope and nature of necessary prohibitions of sp...(read more)

Lavery, Grace
Fall 2017

165/2

Special Topics:
Art of Writing

TTh 2-3:30

This seminar/workshop, co-taught by Lyn Hejinian and Daniel Benjamin, will be devoted to collaboratively composed writing in a range of genres, including poetry, short fiction, performance, and critical essays. Multiple examples of collaborations w...(read more)

Hejinian, Lyn
Benjamin, Daniel
Fall 2017

175/1

Literature and Disability

TTh 3:30-5

This course will have several components. An introductory section will provide students with a grounding in disability theory; we’ll wonder whether it’s possible to develop a common “theory” adequate to various disability ca...(read more)

Langan, Celeste
Fall 2017

179/1

Literature and Linguistics

TTh 11-12:30

The medium of literature is language.  This course aims to deepen understanding of what this means through consideration of how certain literary forms can be defined as grammatical forms.  These literary forms include meter; rhyme and all...(read more)

Hanson, Kristin
Fall 2017

180L/1

Lyric Verse

TTh 5-6:30 PM

This course will examine the historical trajectory of a very fuzzy category, “lyric,” from its identified origins and early practice in English (anonymous medieval lyrics) to its 20th- and 21st- cent...(read more)

O'Brien, Geoffrey G.
Fall 2017

180N/1

The Novel:
"The Novel as the Book of Other People"

MW 5-6:30

In 2007, Zadie Smith edited an anthology of short fiction entitled The Book of Other People.  In her preface to this volume, Smith describes her desire to give contemporary writers the opportunity to try on “different skins,&rdq...(read more)

Hale, Dorothy J.
Fall 2017

190/2

Research Seminar:
The Historical Novel

MW 2-3:30

“It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the ...(read more)

Puckett, Kent
Fall 2017

190/6

Research Seminar:
Literature and Revolution

MW 5-6:30

This seminar will piece together a cross-regional, cross-linguistic genre that we will loosely call “the literature of revolution”—texts that try to capture (and, at times, direct) great historical and political upheaval.  Ou...(read more)

Lee, Steven S.
Fall 2017

190/10

Research Seminar:
Suspicious Mind

TTh 12:30-2

Literary critics have made suspicion an essential aspect of what it means to read.  When we set out to do a “suspicious reading” of a text we assume a few things about it: that its true meaning consists in what it cannot say, know,...(read more)

Best, Stephen M.
Fall 2017

H195A/2

Honors Course

TTh 12:30-2

This two-semester course is designed as an accompaniment to the writing of your Honors Thesis. The fall semester prepares you to write this long essay (40-60 pages) on a topic and texts of your choosing. It will behoove you to decide on t...(read more)

Serpell, C. Namwali
Fall 2017

250/1

Research Seminar:
Victorian Cultural Studies

W 9-12

This course will follow the long history of the culture concept in Britain.  We will begin by working through Raymond Williams’ account in Culture & Society in order to see how several senses of the word “culture&rdquo...(read more)

Puckett, Kent
Spring 2017

166/1

Special Topics:
Marxism and Literature

MWF 1-2

For the past thirty years, it’s become a cliché that it’s easier to imagine the end of the world than the end of capitalism. Yet, ever since the 2008 financial crash, there’s been rising popular consciousness of capitalism...(read more)

Lye, Colleen
Spring 2017

166/3

Special Topics:
Slavery and Conspiracy

MWF 3-4

This is a multidisciplinary seminar on the law and literature of slave conspiracy. We will be reading novels and stories by authors such as Martin Delany and Herman Melville alongside contemporary newspapers, confessions, warrants, witness deposit...(read more)

Wagner, Bryan
Spring 2017

180L/1

Lyric Verse

TTh 2-3:30

This course will examine the historical trajectory of a very fuzzy category, “lyric,” from its identified origins and early practice in antiquity (Sappho, Catullus, et al.) to its 20th and 21st century rejections ...(read more)

O'Brien, Geoffrey G.
Spring 2017

190/4

Research Seminar:
Jane Austen and the Theory of the Novel

MW 12:30-2

While there is hardly a dearth of criticism on Jane Austen, it is rare to find her used, as Balzac, Flaubert, Dostoevsky, or Proust is used, as the basis for theorizing the Novel as a form.  The gender bias of classic continental novel theory...(read more)

Miller, D.A.
Spring 2017

190/5

Research Seminar:
Writing a World in Crisis: Medieval and Modern

MWF 1-2

Please note the changes in the topic, book list, and courses description of this class (as of November 22).

This course looks at two distinct moments in which individual authors attempted to create encyclopedic visions in an attemp...(read more)

Perry, R. D.
Fall 2016

161/1

Introduction to Literary Theory

MWF 11-12

This course offers an introduction to literary theory with a focus on 20th- and 21st-century social and political approaches, including Marxism, feminism, race and ethnicity, post-colonialism, and ecocriticism. The course wil...(read more)

Gonzalez, Marcial
Fall 2016

190/2

Research Seminar:
Slow Seeing / Slow Reading

MWF 11-12

This is a seminar in the poetics of reading poems and seeing paintings. Over the course of the semester, students will undertake prolonged, exploratory, multi-contextual readings of a selection of recent and contemporary “difficult” po...(read more)

Hejinian, Lyn
Fall 2016

190/10

Research Seminar:
Do I Dare? Indecision and Modernist Literature

TTh 3:30-5

From Prufrock's peach to Frost's two roads, modernism gave us many famous moments of indecision. We will follow along with texts depicting speakers and characters as they hesitate, delay, cavil, evade, hedge, sidestep, prevaricate, tergive...(read more)

Blevins, Jeffrey
Fall 2016

H195A/1

Honors Course

TTh 11-12:30

The Honors Thesis is a long research essay. Length, however, is not the only way it differs from every essay you have ever written in the English Department. In most literature classes, the function of essay assignments is to he...(read more)

Marno, David
Fall 2016

H195A/2

Honors Course

TTh 2-3:30

(read more)

Langan, Celeste
Fall 2016

250/2

Research Seminar:
Ethnic Modernisms

Tues. 3:30-6:30

This seminar will explore the convergence of modernist and ethnic cultures in twentieth-century America and Europe, placing race and ethnicity in dialogue with the modernist compulsion to "make it new" and the avant-gardist compulsion to...(read more)

Lee, Steven S.
Spring 2016

138/1

Studies in World Literature in English:
Postcolonial Sex

TTh 9:30-11

This course will explore the intersection of theories of gender and sexuality and the postcolonial world. We will consider how gender and nation are shaped and represented in literature and film. Why are nations routinely imagined as women, and im...(read more)

Saha, Poulomi
Spring 2016

161/1

Introduction to Literary Theory:
Free Speech, In Theory

TTh 11-12:30

This course will interrogate the way in which “free” speech, as moral value or political right, informs and complicates our understanding of literature and the literary.  W...(read more)

Langan, Celeste
Spring 2016

165/5

Special Topics:
Is It Useless to Revolt?: Literature of Revolt

TTh 2-3:30

“Is it useless to revolt?”  Our course borrows its title from an essay by Foucault on the Iranian Revolution of 1979.  Foucault urges us to suspe...(read more)

Goldsmith, Steven
Spring 2016

165/6

Special Topics:
Queer Lifestyles in Literature and Theory

TTh 3:30-5

Before the twentieth century, "queer" usually just meant strange or peculiar; it suggested an unusual way of living or being. The word gradually became a slur to describe someone sexually different, and we have now rehab...(read more)

Weiner, Joshua J
Spring 2016

172/1

Literature and Psychology:
Literature and the Brain

TTh 3:30-5

What can the scientific study of mind tell us about literature? And what can literature tell us about the ways our minds and brains do—and do not—work? Looking at literature, philosophy, and the sciences of mind from the past three hun...(read more)

Gang, Joshua
Spring 2016

190/8

Research Seminar:
Vital Texts: Literature and the Discourse of Life

TTh 11-12:30

If the romantic trope of “organic form” naturalizes literature by likening literary texts to living organisms, it equally suggests that man-made forms can be "alive." In this course, our task will be to trace the trope of &qu...(read more)

Gaydos, Rebecca
Spring 2016

202/1

History of Literary Criticism

note new time: F 2-5

An introduction to Western literary theory from antiquity to the present, focusing on the historical shift from the disciplines of poetics and rhetoric to that of aesthetics, with special attention to the discourse of the sublime. Readings in Plat...(read more)

Kahn, Victoria
Spring 2016

203/2

Graduate Readings:
Aesthetics and Politics: Kant and Beyond

TTh 9:30-11

This introduction to aesthetics will navigate between the following quotations: 1) “If man is ever to solve that problem of politics in practice he will have to approach it through the problem of the aesthetic, because it is only through Bea...(read more)

Goldsmith, Steven
Spring 2016

203/4

Graduate Readings:
What Does Critical Theory Have to Do with the Postcolonial?

TTh 12:30-2

This course considers the relationship between the development of critical theory and the colonized and postcolonial worlds. It will ask how and where histories, cultures, and philosophies of the global south appear and intersect with continental ...(read more)

Saha, Poulomi
Spring 2016

250/1

Research Seminar:
Capitalist Crisis and Literature

M 3-6

Since the global financial crisis of 2007-08 and the onset of the “Great Recession,” a small but growing number of literary scholars have strived to theorize the relation between capitalist crisis and literary studies. Two short articl...(read more)

Gonzalez, Marcial
Spring 2016

250/2

Research Seminar:
The Limits of Historicism

Tues. 3:30-6:30

Fredric Jameson famously enjoined critics to “Always historicize!,” and while many responded by committing to ideology critique and the project of demystification, of late a number have sought to satisfy the imperative by “practi...(read more)

Best, Stephen M.
Spring 2016

250/4

Research Seminar:
Modernism's Metaphysics

F 9-12

Over recent decades, we have become accustomed to speaking of the ‘cultural logic’ of modernism, using a periodizing term to delineate a larger complex of historical effects, while also insinuating its availability to the integrated de...(read more)

Blanton, C. D.
Summer 2016

N166/1

Special Topics:
Moby-Dick and the Theory of the Novel

MTTh 4-6

In this summer session, we'll read one and only one novel: Herman Melville's Moby-Dick (1851). We'll read the book carefully and closely, working particularly to understand Melville's idiosyncratic use of particuar aesthet...(read more)

Puckett, Kent
Fall 2015

166/1

Special Topics:
Epistles: The Letter in Life and Literature

MWF 12-1

In this course, we will explore one of the most intimate, versatile, and surprising of literary forms: (read more)

Thornbury, Emily V.
Fall 2015

175/1

Literature and Disability

MWF 12-1

In this course we will think about the concept of literature via the category of disability. We are told that "poems make nothing happen" (Auden); for speech-act theory, fictional utterance is a peculiarly "parasitic" form of s...(read more)

Langan, Celeste
Fall 2015

190/1

Research Seminar:
Aesthetics and Enlightenment

MW 9:30-11

The enlightenment was the first great century of modern aesthetics, giving us a critical vocabulary to think about how, as Foucault put it, we construct ourselves as works of art. This course will give the student a taste of some of the foundation...(read more)

Weiner, Joshua J
T. B. A.
Fall 2015

190/9

Research Seminar:
Ideology

TTh 2-3:30

This research seminar will focus on the concept of ideology. We will examine the manner in which ideology has been employed as a category for social analysis, but we will gear our attention especially toward the ways ideology has been useful for l...(read more)

Gonzalez, Marcial
Fall 2015

203/1

Graduate Readings:
Poetic Meter

W 2-5

This course will provide a basic introduction to the major meters of the modern English poetic tradition from the perspective of a theory of poetic meter rooted in generative linguistics.  Taking the "strict" iambic pentameter of Sh...(read more)

Hanson, Kristin
Fall 2015

203/3

Graduate Readings:
Victorian Literature from Hegel to Freud

TTh 2-3:30

This course embarks from the premise that “Victorian” names neither a period of time (1837 – 1901) nor the body of a British sovereign (Alexandrina Victoria Hanover) but a spatially and temporally mobile set of stylistic practice...(read more)

Lavery, Grace
Spring 2015

27/1

Introduction to the Study of Fiction

MWF 2-3

A 2013 study at the New School for Social Research corroborates the truism that reading literary fiction enhances our ability to understand the emotional states of other people. Even without the blessing of the sciences, it is undeniable that fict...(read more)

Knox, Marisa Palacios
Spring 2015

179/1

Literature and Linguistics

TTh 11-12:30

<!--{cke_protected}{C}%3C!%2D%2D%0A%20%2F*%20Font%20Definitions%20*%2F%0A%40font-face%0A%09%7Bfont-family%3A%22Cambria%20Math%22%3B%0A%09panose-1%3A2%204%205%203%205%204%206%203%...<a href="/courses/4519" target="_blank">(read more)</a>

Hanson, Kristin
Fall 2014

161/1

Introduction to Literary Theory

TTh 11-12:30

In this course we will study how literary theory developed as a field in the twentieth century, even as it regularly drew its principles, methods, and inspiration from other academic disciplines and social discourses.  Our focus will be on th...(read more)

Hale, Dorothy J.
Fall 2014

165/1

Special Topics:
Critical Influences in Contemporary Culture

TTh 9:30-11

The lectures, class discussions, readings, and writing assignments of this course are intended to develop students’ ability to analyze, understand, and evaluate a number of difficult and important texts concerning the concepts of free...(read more)

Campion, John
Fall 2014

171/1

Literature and Sexual Identity:
Gender, Sexuality, and Modernism

TTh 3:30-5

Gender norms and literary forms both exploded at the turn of the twentieth century. These paired crises in social and literary narratives were perceived on the one hand as the stuttering end of western culture's story, the drying up of libidin...(read more)

Abel, Elizabeth
Fall 2014

174/1

Literature and History:
The French Revolution

MWF 12-1

“The French Revolution did not take place.”

“The French Revolution is not yet over.”

These two sentences might seem not only counterfactual, but also contr...(read more)

Langan, Celeste
Fall 2014

190/13

Research Seminar

 

...(read more)
Lye, Colleen
Fall 2014

250/1

Research Seminars:
Comintern Modernisms

W 3-6

It has long been common practice to see Western metropolises like Paris and New York as competing centers of global modernism, as capitals of a "world republic of letters."  The aim of this seminar is to posit an alternate mapping o...(read more)

Lee, Steven S.
Spring 2014

161/1

Introduction to Literary Theory:
Free Speech, in Theory

TTh 2-3:30

This course will interrogate the way in which “free” speech, as moral value or political right, informs and complicates our understanding of literature and the literary.  We...(read more)

Langan, Celeste
Spring 2014

166/1

Special Topics:
Theory of the Poet

MWF 11-12

The figure of The Poet occupies a significant place in cultural imagination, even when The Poet is thought to occupy a marginal position or engage in useless activity. Bard, rebel, cultural diplomat, priest, historian, recluse—who or what is...(read more)

Thornbury, Emily V.
Spring 2014

174/1

Literature and History:
Writing the British Nation

TTh 12:30-2

This course will offer an introduction to critical methods focused on practices of historical interpretation. While we will read widely in critical and theoretical writing, our case studies will focus on key texts in the history of nationhood and ...(read more)

Savarese, John L.
Spring 2014

202/1

History of Literary Criticism

W 2-5

An introduction to Western literary theory from antiquity to the present, focusing on the historical shift from the disciplines of poetics and rhetoric to that of aesthetics, with special attention to the concept of mimesis and the discourse of th...(read more)

Kahn, Victoria
Spring 2014

203/2

Graduate Readings:
Campus/Novel/Theory

Tues. 3:30-6:30

This course considers the relationship between the campus, the novel, and literary theory in the West. Accordingly, we will discuss theories of the novel, read some post-war British and American “campus novels,” consider the campu...(read more)

Serpell, C. Namwali
Spring 2014

250/2

Research Seminars:
Aesthetics and the Orient

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

The kinds of writing called “aesthetics” and “Orientalism” are usually studied in relative isolation from each other, but they share certain features. Both pull readers outside their comfort zones, towards an unfamiliar pla...(read more)

Lavery, Grace
Fall 2013

180A/1

Autobiography:
American Autobiography: Race, Gender, Culture

TTh 11-12:30

We will take a group of texts--conventional memoir, poetry, painting, photography, and I-focused new media--to explore what American auto/bio/graphy really means.  We will start in the 18th century with Benjamin Franklin and close with a...(read more)

Padilla, Genaro M.
Fall 2013

190/8

Research Seminar:
Suspicious Mind

TTh 12:30-2

Suspicious reading, which is sometimes called “symptomatic reading,” starts from the assumption that a text’s true meaning lies in what it does not say, know, or cannot understand.  For symptomatic readers, influenced by the...(read more)

Best, Stephen M.
Fall 2013

190/11

Research Seminar:
The Politics and Aesthetics of Participation

TTh 2-3:30

This course will track the concept of participation across the 20th century, tracing its manifestation in key aesthetic, political, economic and technological forms. The first half of the course will investigate how, over the course of the 20th ce...(read more)

Bernes, Jasper
Fall 2013

H195A/1

Honors Course

MW 12-1:30

This course is designed as the accompaniment to the writing of an honors thesis, the research for and the writing of which will take place in the second semester (H195B). The first semester will prepare you to move toward crafting this long essay ...(read more)

Serpell, C. Namwali
Fall 2013

H195A/2

Honors Course

MW 1:30-3

This seminar has the goal of preparing students to write an Honors thesis on a topic of their own devising in the spring semester.  To prepare for that adventure, together we will read ...(read more)

Langan, Celeste
Fall 2013

203/1

Graduate Readings:
Post-9/11 Fiction

M 1-4

Note: Those interested in taking the course, please email me (ksnyder@berkeley.edu) the first week of classes for the reading assignment required for our first seminar meeting on September 9.

For mo...(read more)

Snyder, Katherine
Fall 2013

203/2

Graduate Readings:
Modernism and Film

MW 4-5:30

This course surveys a range of twentieth-century texts that allow us to explore connections between film and modernist literary practice, and the cultural implications of cinema for the period as a whole. Working with a broad conception of moderni...(read more)

Goble, Mark
Fall 2013

250/1

Research Seminar:
Critical and Peripheral Realisms

Tues. 3:30-6:30

To what extent has our tendency to measure aesthetic achievement within the terms set by the historical modernisms of 1890-1920 blocked our perception of twentieth century peripheral literatures? This course will entertain historical diagnoses of ...(read more)

Lye, Colleen
Fall 2013

250/3

Research Seminar:
The Romantic Novel and the History of Man

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

In his introduction to Tom Jones (1749) Henry Fielding formally announced the “rise of the novel” by grounding the new genre on “human nature,” which David Hume had recently proclaimed the foundation of all the sci...(read more)

Duncan, Ian
Spring 2013

166/3

Special Topics:
Infrastructuralism: Reading Setting in Literature and Film

TTh 3:30-5

In a film essay on the way movies depict Los Angeles, Thom Andersen raises a question that will form the basis for this course: “If we can appreciate documentaries for their dramatic qualities, perhaps we can appreciate fiction films for the...(read more)

Eichenlaub, Justin
Eichenlaub, Justin
Spring 2013

N166 /1

Special Topics:
Freud, Marx, Nietzsche

TTh 3:30-5

Graphic novel is often defined as “a single-author, book-length work, meant for a grown-up reader, with a memoirist or novelistic nature, usually devoid of superheroes.” Many comic artists, ...(read more)

Ring, Joseph
Fall 2012

166/2

Special Topics:
Specters of the Atlantic

TTh 12:30-2

The large scale transportation of Africans to the Americas is a signal fact of modernity in the West. The trouble is that we both do and do not know this. One of the most salient, confounding aspects of life in the Caribbean and the United States,...(read more)

Ellis, Nadia
Fall 2012

190/11

Research Seminar:
Environmental Poetry and Poetics

TTh 11-12:30

I have emarked on this course to help us think about an emergent situation for poets—the earth in crisis.  In this seminar we will explore how poets represent, and think about their place in, their natural environment.  Our primary...(read more)

Shoptaw, John
Fall 2012

H195A/2

Honors Course

TTh 3:30-5

English H195A is the first part of a two-semester sequence for those English majors writing honors theses. It is designed to give students the critical tools and practical skills to write a strong essay, in the spring semester, that will have a gr...(read more)

Saul, Scott
Spring 2012

143T/1

Poetry Translation Workshop

TTh 2-3:30

This is a workshop course in the translation of poetry. Participants need to be at least moderately competent in some language other than English. All of the work will involve translating from other languages into English. Participants will be exp...(read more)

Hass, Robert L.
Hass, Robert
Spring 2012

161/1

Introduction to Literary Theory

TTh 11-12:30

In this course we will study how literary theory developed as a field in the twentieth century, even as it regularly drew its principles, practices, and inspiration from other academic disciplines.  Our focus will be on the major theoretical ...(read more)

Hale, Dorothy J.
Hale, Dorothy
Spring 2012

190/11

Research Seminar:
Mass Entertainment in 1930s Hollywood

TTh 3:30-5

Hollywood movies have always been treated as examples of mass entertainment, but rarely as analyses of the phenomenon.  We'll be exploring a wide range of 1930s Hollywood film -- from gangster pictures to cartoons, music...(read more)

Knapp, Jeffrey
Knapp, Jeffrey
Spring 2012

212/1

Readings in Middle English:
The Auchinleck Manuscript

W 3-6

This course will consider a wide range of Middle English writing through examination of a single manuscript book surviving to us from the early fourteenth-century:  Edinburgh, National Library of Scotland, Advocates' MS 19.2.1, now known ...(read more)

Miller, Jennifer
Miller, Jennifer
Spring 2012

250/1

Research Seminar:
Marxist Literary Theory

Tues. 3:30-6:30

In the early 1990s, literary theorist Fredric Jameson responded to critics who were at once proclaiming the emergence of a rejuvenated capitalist "new world order" and asserting the death of Marxism.  "It does not seem to make ...(read more)

Gonzalez, Marcial
Gonzalez, Marcial
Fall 2010

161/1

Introduction to Literary Theory:
The Theory Monster

MW 4-5:30

At the close of “Structure, Sign and Play in the Discourse of the Human Sciences,” Jacques Derrida takes recourse to the language of monstrosity in his account of the loss of a stable center for human discourse: “the as yet unnam...(read more)

Serpell, C. Namwali
Serpell, Namwali
Fall 2008

160/1

Special Topics:
Methods and Materials of Literary Criticism

TTh 9:30-11

What gives literature its special status, both as an art form and as a culturally important discourse? Does the value of literature reside in its power to improve society? In the quality of the emotion it produces? In the type of knowledge it makes po...(read more) Hale, Dorothy J.
Hale, Dorothy
Spring 2007

161/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Introduction to Literary Theory

TTh 12:30-2

This course will serve as an introduction to literary and cultural theory. We will read closely a number of important (and difficult) theoretical texts while thinking about what relations exist between the different intellectual projects that we call ...(read more) Puckett, Kent
Puckett, Kent
Spring 2006

160/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Methods and Materials of Literary Criticism

TTh 11-12:30

This course will attempt to define narrative fiction (the novel and short story) in terms of the linguistic properties of what Roland Barthes calls ?the writing of the novel, in particular, 1) its uses of narrative tenses to recount the past and 2) it...(read more) Banfield, Ann
Banfield, Ann
Spring 2005

161/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Introduction to Literary Theory

TTh 3:30-5

"Origins of Literary Theory. Before there was ""literary theory,"" there was ""aesthetics""; and before that, there was ""rhetoric."" This course is designed to serve as a kind of prequel to the story of modern literary theory: during the first two th...(read more) Nealon, Christopher
Nealon, Christopher