Class Archive

Semester
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

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Semester Course #
Instructor
Course Area
Spring 2020

165/1

Special Topics:
Traditions of Mourning and the Representation of the Holocaust

MW 3-4:30

After World War II, the German writer Theodor Adorno famously commented that it is “barbaric” to continue to write poetry after Auschwitz, because any attempt to convert extreme suffering into aesthetic image or form commits an injustic...(read more)

Goodman, Kevis
Spring 2020

165/2

Special Topics:
Enlightenment & Romance: Scotland in the 18th Century

MWF 10-11

Eighteenth-century Scotland was home both to the so-called Scottish Enlightenment, one of the advanced civil societies in the Atlantic world, and to the beginnings of the global movement of taste and feeling later to be called Romanticism. Here wer...(read more)

Duncan, Ian
Spring 2020

165/3

Special Topics:
On Lies, Lying, and Post-Truths--A Reading- and Writing-Intensive Investigation

W 3-6

Read a newspaper, listen to the news or a podcast, scan social media—lies are everywhere. The subject of much intellectual debate, social and political anxiety, and ethical and psychological consternation, lies are hard to grasp and capture, ...(read more)

Nadaff, Ramona
Spring 2020

165/4

Special Topics:
Family Histories from the Margins

TTh 3:30-5

This seminar will explore the fraught status of families in literature and what it means to write about one’s own family. The family has generated a diverse range of literary or textual forms, from the list of “begats” in the book...(read more)

Wilson, Evan
Spring 2020

165AC/1

Special Topics in American Cultures:
Ethnicity, Religion and Literature

TTh 11-12:30

This class will explore how 20th- and 21st-century American prose fictions have imagined the relationship between religion and ethnicity. Our first questions will be formal: How do different formal choices allow these writers ...(read more)

Fehrenbacher, Dena
Spring 2020

166/2

Special Topics:
The Literature & Art of Incarceration

MWF 11-12

This is a course on the literature of incarceration variously defined and experienced across a range of control systems that attempt to stunt the entire human being. I want to think about the forms of suppression, confinement, and the humiliations ...(read more)

Padilla, Genaro M.
Spring 2020

166/3

Special Topics:
Moby-Dick

TTh 11-12:30

Baroque, intense, and demanding, Moby-Dick richly rewards all the attention a reader can muster. We will delve in as slowly as we can in order to cultivate the intellectual receptivity that Melville hoped for in his readers, beco...(read more)

Breitwieser, Mitchell
Spring 2020

166/4

Special Topics:
Colossi of Post-Modernism

TTh 3:30-5

More details about this section of English 166 will be posted here soon.

...(read more)
Danner, Mark
Spring 2020

166/5

Special Topics:
American Humor: Books & Movies

Tues. 5-8:30 PM

In this course short 19th- and 20th-century writings available electronically, by such authors as G. W. Harris, J. J. Hooper, Mark Twain, F. P. Dunne, G. Ade, R. Lardner, J. Thurber and the like, will be read and discusse...(read more)

Starr, George A.
Spring 2020

166/6

Special Topics:
Art of Writing: Grant Writing, Food Writing, Food Justice

Lectures MW 12-1 in 122 Barrows + one hour of discussion section per week in different locations (sec. 101: F 12-1; sec. 102: F 12-1)

This course will help students develop writing skills through intensive focus on the demands of two very different modes: popular and creative food writing (essay, poetry, travel, memoir, manifesto), and grant-writing. Reading and thinking together...(read more)

Schweik, Susan
Spring 2020

166/7

Special Topics:
Arthurian Romance

TTh 2-3:30

King Arthur and his Round Table together constitute one of the most enduring imaginative inventions in the European literary tradition. In the modern era, writers and artists have created Arthurian plays, films, poems, novels, cartoons, paintings, ...(read more)

Nolan, Maura
Spring 2020

172/1

Literature and Psychology:
Literature and Therapy

Lectures MW 1-2 in 2060 Valley LSB + one hour of discussion section per week in different locations (sec. 101: F 1-2; sec. 102: F 2-3; sec. 103: W 3-4; sec. 104: W 4-5)

The originator of the “talking cure,” Sigmund Freud, placed a great deal of faith in the capacities of literature: both to depict and figure psychic problematics for a reader, and to transform an author’s own neurotic condition in...(read more)

Lavery, Grace
Spring 2020

177/1

Literature and Philosophy:
Reading Capital

MW 10:30-12

Marx's Capital stands as one of the foundational texts of modern critical theory. Some acknowledge openly the debts owed to Marx's critique of political economy and of the capitalist mode of production; others consider th...(read more)

Lye, Colleen
Spring 2020

180A/1

Autobiography:
Disability Memoir

Lectures TTh 3:30-4:30 in 300 Wheeler + one hour of discussion section per week in different locations (sec. 101: F 12-1; sec. 102: F 2-3)

This course will examine autobiography as a literary genre. We will survey the history of the genre and consider such questions as: How is reading autobiography like/unlike reading fiction? How do the truth claims made by autobiographies shape read...(read more)

Kleege, Georgina
Spring 2020

180H/1

The Short Story

TTh 11-12:30

This course will be a survey of the short story from the 19th century to the present: its historical and cultural contexts, its formal and stylistic properties. We’ll consider the short story’s predecessors, the work of its m...(read more)

McFarlane, Fiona
Spring 2020

180T/1

Tragedy

MWF 12-1

An ancient (if not foundational) genre in the western literary tradition, tragedy is the one most closely linked with key religious and philosophical questions, due to its concern with catastrophic misfortune, suffering and fatality in human life. ...(read more)

Duncan, Ian
Spring 2020

180Z/1

Science Fiction

TTh 12:30-2

This course will examine in depth the history of speculative fiction and its engagement with the thematics and topoi of the new life sciences—representation of cloning, ecological dystopias, hybrid life-forms, genetic engineering dystopias. W...(read more)

Jones, Donna V.
Fall 2019

20/1

Modern British and American Literature:
The Handmaid's Tale in Adaptation

TTh 12:30-2

With the advent of the Trump presidency (2016-present), Margaret Atwood’s dystopian, feminist masterpiece, The Handmaid’s Tale, has gained new relevance. And with the popular and critical success of its Hulu TV series adaptatio...(read more)

Snyder, Katherine
Fall 2019

165/1

Special Topics:
Utopian and (mostly) Dystopian Movies

W 5-8 PM (note slight change in time; ends at 8:00 rather than 8:30)

Most utopian and dystopian authors are more concerned with persuading readers of the merits of their ideas than with the "merely" literary qualities of their writing. Although utopian writing has sometimes made converts, inspiring readers...(read more)

Bader, Julia
Fall 2019

165/2

Special Topics:
The Pleasures of Allegory

MWF 12-1

If you want to understand both how stories are put together and how we experience stories, allegory is not a bad place to start. Broadly speaking, an allegory is a story that demands to be read on more than one level. One version of this&mdash...(read more)

Wilson, Evan
Fall 2019

166/1

Special Topics:
Getting Global: Literature & Film of an Expanding & Unequal World

MWF 12-1

This is a course about literature and cinema in our increasingly global world. We will look at some of the most exciting pieces of fiction and film, most of them centered on the theme of travel and human relationships forged across continents.&nbsp...(read more)

Saha, Poulomi
Fall 2019

166/2

Special Topics:
Literature in the Century of Film

MWF 1-2

This course examines various intersections between literature and visual media in the twentieth century, with a particular focus on texts concerned with film and its cultural influence. We will read novels, stories, poetry, and essays which not onl...(read more)

Goble, Mark
Fall 2019

166/3

Special Topics:
Writing as Social Practice

MW 3-4:30

One of the ideas behind this course offering is that poetry and essays (life-writing, creative nonfiction, "essaying," etc.) have similar aims or field-marks—both are literary vehicles of exploration and documentation; both value ex...(read more)

Giscombe, Cecil S.
Fall 2019

166/4

Special Topics:
Literatures of the Asian Diaspora in America

TTh 9:30-11

This aim of this survey is two-fold: First, to interrogate the concept of nationhood and, particularly, what it means to be American.  Focusing on writings by and about peoples of Asian descent across the twentieth century and into the twenty-...(read more)

Lee, Steven S.
Fall 2019

166/7

Special Topics:
Charles Dickens

TTh 2-3:30

Close readings of several of Charles Dickens's major works.

Grading will be based on two eight-page essays, on-time completion of all assigned reading, and attendance and participation in discussion.

Please purchase the indi...(read more)

Breitwieser, Mitchell
Fall 2019

166/8

Special Topics:
Green Thought in a Green Shade

TTh 2-3:30

The natural world and the non-urban environment have inspired writers and artists, especially in the 17th and 18th centuries, but they have also provoked intense critical d...(read more)

Turner, James Grantham
Fall 2019

166/9

Special Topics:
New Orleans

TTh 5-6:30

We will be thinking about the culture and history of New Orleans as represented in fiction, folklore, and documentary cinema. We will also engage with the current controversy over monuments and memorialization in the c...(read more)

Wagner, Bryan
Fall 2019

166/11

Special Topics:
The Works of Vladimir Nabokov

TTh 11-12:30

We will study the work of Nabokov as a novelist on two continents over a period of nearly sixty years. The course will be structured (more or less) chronologically and divided between novels translated from Russian and written in English. After beg...(read more)

Naiman, Eric
Fall 2019

177/1

Literature and Philosophy

MWF 1-2

This class will be organized around two questions that have been of perennial concern to literary writers and philosophers: who are we? How should we live? We’ll read a wide range of texts that respond to these questions in different way...(read more)

Zhang, Dora
Fall 2019

180H/1

The Short Story

This course has been canceled (June 4, 2019).

...(read more)
Chandra, Vikram
Spring 2019

165/1

Special Topics:
Global Tudors

This seminar challenges us to look back to a time before England's colonial period and consider how people of the 16th century began to perceive of themselves as part of a truly global world. The class will begin by thinking about what the conc...(read more)

Honig, Elizabeth
Spring 2019

165/2

Special Topics:
21st-Century U. S. Poetry

M 2-5

In this course we’ll review the U.S. poetry of the present, reading representative poems from the last 15 years or so in relation to a number of formal concerns, poetic subjects, and debates within the social field (and its media), including:...(read more)

O'Brien, Geoffrey G.
Spring 2019

165/3

Special Topics:
John Milton's Last Poems

MW 5-6:30

Four years after publishing the first edition of Paradise Lost, Milton came out with a volume called Paradise Regain’d...to which is added, Samson Agonistes. We will spend the semester carefully reading these poems...(read more)

Picciotto, Joanna M
Spring 2019

165/4

Special Topics:
The Art of Writing: The Visible Made Verbal

W 3-6

Audio Description is a set of practices that seeks to make visual media—the fine arts, theatrical performance, dance, film and video—accessible to people who are blind and visually impaired.  In theater and film, brief descriptions...(read more)

Kleege, Georgina
Spring 2019

165/5

Special Topics:
Note: See English 165 section 6

On October 16 we canceled this section of English 165 because we ended up doubling the size of English 165 section 6 (on the same topic) instead. So if you are interested in this topic, please enroll in English 165 section 6.  Professors Danne...(read more)

Danner, Mark
Spring 2019

165/6

Special Topics:
Nabokov and Naipaul

TTh 3:30-5

This is a team-taught course on two of the most controversial novelists of the 20th century and—some critics think—two of the greatest. Vladimir Nabokov (1899-1977) was a Russian emigre who wrote novels in both Russian and English,...(read more)

Hass, Robert L.
Danner, Mark
Spring 2019

165/7

Special Topics:
The Materialist Epic

TTh 12:30-2

“We live our everyday lives surrounded by, immersed in, matter . . . Our existence depends from one moment to the next . . . on our own hazily understood bodily and cellular reactions and on pitiless cosmic motions, on the material artifacts ...(read more)

Goldsmith, Steven
Spring 2019

165/8

Special Topics:
American Humor

Tues. 5-8:30 (incl. 1/2 hr. break)

In this course short 19th- and 20th-century writings available electronically, by such authors as G. W. Harris, J. J. Hooper, Mark Twain, F. P. Dunne, G. Ade, R. Lardner, J. Thurber and the like, will be read and discussed, wi...(read more)

Starr, George A.
Bader, Julia
Spring 2019

165/9

Special Topics:
The 1890s

Thurs. 5-8

What difference does a date make? What is it about the numerical end of a century that encourages feelings of apocalypse, degeneration, or renewal? This course will consider texts written in and around the 1890s, a decade characterized by its inten...(read more)

Puckett, Kent
Spring 2019

166/1

Special Topics:
Gothic

MWF 2-3

In the eighteenth century, Gothic was a historical category (the “Dark” or “Middle” Ages, between the fall of Rome and the Renaissance) and then an ethnic one (the Germanic peoples who overthrew classical civilization). It&r...(read more)

Duncan, Ian
Spring 2019

166/2

Special Topics:
Marxism and Literature

MWF 2-3

In the early 1990s, the Marxist literary theorist Fredric Jameson responded to critics who were at once proclaiming the emergence of a capitalist “new world order” and asserting the death of Marxism.  Jameson wrote: “It does ...(read more)

Gonzalez, Marcial
Spring 2019

166/4

Special Topics:
Poetry and Prose of Race and Social Class

TTh 2-3:30

One of the ideas behind this course offering is that poetry and essays (life-writing, creative nonfiction, "essaying," etc.) have similar aims or field-marks—both are literary vehicles of exploration and documentation; both value ex...(read more)

Giscombe, Cecil S.
Spring 2019

166/5

Special Topics:
Asian American Literature - World, Nation, Locality

MWF 1-2

This class provides a foundation for reading Asian American literature at three levels of scale: world, nation, and locality. At the world scale, we will discuss the political origins of the phrase “Asian American” in the late 1960...(read more)

Leong, Andrew Way
Spring 2019

166/6

Special Topics:
Realism, Then and Now

MW 5-6:30

This course explores the relationship between life and literature, with a focus on the following types of questions: How have novelists and poets—as well as filmmakers, television producers, and Instagram aficionados—attempted to repres...(read more)

Cordes Selbin, Jesse
Spring 2019

166/7

Special Topics:
Anton Chekhov

MWF 3-4

Anton Chekhov’s (1860-1904) prominence in the English-speaking world is comparable only to Shakespeare’s place in Russian culture. This course is devoted to Chekhov’s fictional and dramatic writing, and to the lasting influence of...(read more)

Muza, Anna
Spring 2019

172/1

Literature and Psychology:
Literatures of the Self

MW 9-10:30

In this course, we will survey literatures of the self and their history from antiquity to the present. We will attend to the writing of the self in its many genres and forms: the diary, the autobiography, the poem, the novel, the memoir, the case ...(read more)

Zeavin, Hannah
Summer 2019

166AC/1

Special Topics in American Cultures:
Race and Ethnicity in Classical Hollywood Cinema

TuWTh 12-2:30

An introduction to critical thinking about race and ethnicity, focused on films produced in Hollywood between the 1920s and 1960s and independent cinema from the 1980s that responds to these classical precedents. Themes include law and violence, ki...(read more)

Wagner, Bryan
Fall 2018

165/1

Special Topics:
Oscar Wilde and the Nineteenth Century

MW 3-4:30

Oscar Wilde's jokes, and his pathos, can seem out of place in Victorian literature: they leap off the dusty page and into a present moment where their author seems to fit more happily. Without wishing to consign him back to that potentially hos...(read more)

Lavery, Grace
Fall 2018

165/2

Special Topics:
The English Department

MW 5-6:30

The English Department is one of the most curious developments in the history of human civilization. What do we study? The answer used to be, “literary texts of the English canon.” But then we questioned what belonged to the canon, what...(read more)

Marno, David
Fall 2018

165/3

Special Topics:
Literature and Media Theory

TTh 9:30-11

This course will consider literature in relation to media theory.  Is literature made obsolete by new media?  What happens when we consider print literature in re...(read more)

Langan, Celeste
Fall 2018

165/4

Special Topics:
The Ecology of Utopia

TTh 2-3:30

Since long before Thomas More coined the catching term “Utopia” – meaning “no place” or “not-place” – to name his fiction of a perfect island commonwealth, the literature of non-existent worlds has be...(read more)

Goldstein, Amanda Jo
Fall 2018

165/5

Special Topics:
Reading Walden With Care

TTh 3:30-5

Assigned text: Henry David Thoreau, Walden, Civil Disobedience and Other Writings (Norton Critical Editions). You are required to use this edition.

We will read Walden twice, in order to gain a d...(read more)

Breitwieser, Mitchell
Fall 2018

165/6

Special Topics:
Hardly Strictly Lyric Poems

TTh 3:30-5

Historically and etymologically, lyric poetry was sung to the accompaniment of a lyre.  Most lyric poetry studied as English literature today, however, reflecting the term "literature"'s own history and etymology, is related...(read more)

Hanson, Kristin
Fall 2018

165/7

Special Topics:
Utopian and (mostly) Dystopian Movies

Tues. 5-8:30 (incl. 1/2-hr. break)

Most utopian and dystopian authors are more concerned with persuading readers of the merits of their ideas than with the "merely" literary qualities of their writing. Although utopian writing has sometimes made converts, inspiring readers...(read more)

Starr, George A.
Fall 2018

166/2

Special Topics:
Alfred Hitchcock

Mon. 4:30-9:00 (incl. half-hour break)

This course will focus on the Hitchcock oeuvre from the early British through the American period, with emphasis on analysis of cinematic representation of crime, victimhood, and the investigation of guilt. Our discussions and critical readings wil...(read more)

Bader, Julia
Fall 2018

166/3

Special Topics:
Journeys: British World-Building, c. 700-1700

TTh 11-12:30

"Britain, formerly known as Albion, is an island in the ocean, lying towards the north west at a considerable distance from the coasts of Germany, Gaul, and Spain, which together form the greater part of Europe." (Bede, Ecclesias...(read more)

Miller, Jasmin
Fall 2018

166/4

Special Topics:
"this morning's minion": Sonic Mysticism in Gerard Manley Hopkins and Emily Dickinson

TTh 3:30-5

"...it is said that light is a sound too high-pitched for the human ear to hear but that one day it will become accessible to another ear awakened in another life and that, indeed, we will be able to hear the music of the spheres, like the mov...(read more)

Stancek, Claire Marie
Fall 2018

166/5

Special Topics

TTh 9:30-11

This section of English 166 has been canceled (7/5/18).

...(read more)
Le, Serena
Fall 2018

166AC/1

Special Topics in American Cultures:
Race & Revision in Early America

Lectures MW 1-2 + one hour of discussion section per week (sec. 101: F 10-11; sec. 102: F 1-2; sec. 103: Thurs. 10-11; sec. 104: Thurs. 1-2; sec. 105: Thurs. 1-2; sec. 106: Thurs. 4-5)

In this course, we will read both historical and literary texts to explore how racial categories came into being in New World cultures, and how these categories were tested, inhabited, and re-imagined by the human actors they sought to define.&nbsp...(read more)

Donegan, Kathleen
Fall 2018

172/1

Literature and Psychology:
Literatures of the Self

TTh 11-12:30

In this course, we will survey literatures of the self and their history from antiquity to the present. We will attend to the writing of the self in its many genres and forms: the diary, the autobiography, the poem, the novel, the memoir, the case ...(read more)

Zeavin, Hannah
Fall 2018

173/1

The Language and Literature of Films:
The Film Essay: James Baldwin, Roland Barthes, Susan Sontag

Lectures TTh 3:30-5 + film screenings Thurs. 5-8

This course offers an in-depth study of three of the most influential public intellectuals of the twentieth century: James Baldwin, Roland Barthes, and Susan Sontag. Working in the postwar period between France and the United States, and grappling ...(read more)

Best, Stephen M.
Young, Damon
Fall 2018

174/1

Literature and History:
Culture in the Age of Obama

MWF 12-1

This seminar explores the forms of culture that emerged, or experienced a renaissance, during the presidency of Barack Obama. Starting with Obama's own bildungsroman-like Dreams from My Father, we will then explore such forms as t...(read more)

Saul, Scott
Fall 2018

175/1

Literature and Disability

TTh 3:30-5

We will examine the ways disability is represented in a variety of works of fiction and drama.  Sometimes disability is used as a metaphor or symbol of something else.  In other cases, texts explore disability as a lived experience. ...(read more)

Kleege, Georgina
Fall 2018

180A/1

Autobiography:
Chicanx Autobiographies

TTh 11-12:30

The autobiography is a problematic narrative form. In telling their stories, Chicanx autobiographers reconstruct the past partly by relying on unreliable memory, creating the illusion of historical accuracy through the imagination. Chicanx autobiog...(read more)

Gonzalez, Marcial
Fall 2018

180H/1

The Short Story

MWF 10-11

The lyf so short, the crafte so longe to lerne…

                              &nb...(read more)

Chandra, Vikram
Spring 2018

152/1

Women Writers: Studies in Prose Fiction: Isak Dinesen

TTh 11-12:30

This course will examine the works of the Danish author Karen Blixen (1885-1962), who also wrote under the pen name of Isak Dinesen. Dinesen is often seen as a modern-day Scheherazade, making storytelling into a matter of life and death. She famous...(read more)

Sanders, Karin
Spring 2018

165/1

Special Topics:
H.P. Lovecraft in His Tradition

MW 3-4:30

--William Hope Hodgson, The House on the Borderland (Dover: 978-0486468792)

--D. Thin, ed., Shadows of Carcosa: Tales of Cosmic Horror (New York Book Review of Books Classics).

--H. P. Lovecraft, Tales...(read more)

Breitwieser, Mitchell
Spring 2018

165/2

Special Topics:
Handel's Art in Setting English Words to Music

MW 3:30-5

Rhythm is a significant source of artistic effects in both poetry and music.  However, while the forms it can take in the two arts are similar in some ways, they are different in others.  An interesting window into these similarities and ...(read more)

Hanson, Kristin
Spring 2018

165/3

Special Topics:
Is It Useless To Revolt?

MW 9:30-11

“Is it useless to revolt?”  Our course borrows its title from an essay by Foucault on the Iranian Revolution of 1979.  Foucault urges us to suspend judgment and listen to the voices of revolt, even as they seem entangled in a ...(read more)

Goldsmith, Steven
Spring 2018

165/4

Special Topics:
Neo-Slave Narratives

TTh 3:30-5

While this course will focus on neo-slave narratives, we will begin by briefly examining several slave narratives.  The course will explore the similarities and differences between the two groups, asking the following kinds of questions: how d...(read more)

JanMohamed, Abdul R.
Spring 2018

165/5

Special Topics:
Incarcerations: The Literature of (Physical, Mental, Spiritual) Imprisonment

TTh 3:30-5

This is a course on the literature of incarceration variously defined and experienced across a range of control systems that attempt to stunt the entire human being. I want to think about the forms of suppression, confinement and the humiliations o...(read more)

Padilla, Genaro M.
Spring 2018

166/1

Special Topics:
Comedy & Violence

MWF 2-3

What relation does comedy have to violence? Can humor be a gauge of political freedom? How does it resist violence or ally itself with it? In this class, we will consider various styles of humor—wit, buffoonery, satire, parody, nonsense, absu...(read more)

Flynn, Catherine
Spring 2018

166/2

Special Topics:
Romantic Science

Note new time: TTh 2-3:30

Today we use the word “experimental” to designate both the most respected scientific method and the most outlandish works of art. This course on Romantic era literature and science explores a key phase of the hidden interrelation (and r...(read more)

Goldstein, Amanda Jo
Spring 2018

166/3

Special Topics:
Classical & Renaissance Drama

TTh 3:30-5

In a poem for the first edition of Shakespeare’s collected plays in 1623, his fellow playwright Ben Jonson expressed a characteristic ambivalence about classical drama.  On the one hand, he praised it as the standard by which all subsequ...(read more)

Knapp, Jeffrey
Spring 2018

166/4

Special Topics:
Marxism & Literature

TTh 3:30-5

For the past thirty years, it’s become a cliché that it’s easier to imagine the end of the world than the end of capitalism. Yet, ever since the 2008 financial crash, there’s been rising popular consciousness of capitalism&...(read more)

Lye, Colleen
Spring 2018

166/5

Special Topics:
Emily Dickinson

TTh 11-12:30

This seminar will provide you with a sustained reading course in the poetry of Emily Dickinson, my favorite poet.  We’ll begin with her early poetry, and trace her evolution into the singular poet we read today, with particular attention...(read more)

Shoptaw, John
Spring 2018

166/6

Special Topics:
Speculative Fiction

Lectures MW 1-2 + one hour of discussion section per week (sec. 101: F 10-11; sec. 102: F 1-2)

This course will examine in depth the history of speculative fiction and its engagement with the thematics and topoi of the new life sciences—representation of cloning, ecological dystopias, hybrid life-forms, genetic engineering dystopias. W...(read more)

Jones, Donna V.
Spring 2018

170/1

Literature and the Arts:
Moving Through Loss; or, The Space and Stage of Mourning

Note new time: MW 5-6:30

“My suffering is inexpressible but all the same utterable, speakable. The very fact that

language affords me the word ‘intoler...(read more)

Xin, Wendy Veronica
Spring 2018

173/1

The Language and Literature of Films:
(Post)colonial Film

Lectures TTh 11-12:30 + film screenings W 6-9 PM

This course will screen and examine a series of films that focus on the nature and structure of Western colonialism and postcolonialism.  We will study the different forms of colonialism, as depicted from various perspectives, as well as the s...(read more)

JanMohamed, Abdul R.
Spring 2018

174/1

Literature and History:
The 1970s

TTh 11-12:30

As one historian has quipped, it was the worst of times, it was the worst of times. “The ’70s” routinely come in for mockery: even at the time, it was known as the decade when “it seemed like nothing happened.&rdquo...(read more)

Saul, Scott
Spring 2018

174/2

Literature and History:
History as Literature

TTh 3:30-5

Are the events of the world and human lives meaningful? And if they are, how do we discern the meaning?

History, as a form of narrative literature, seeks to answer these questions. In this class we will read a range of historical texts, w...(read more)

Thornbury, Emily V.
Spring 2018

180A/1

Autobiography:
Disability Memoir

TTh 12:30-2

This course will examine autobiography as a literary genre. We will survey the history of the genre and consider such questions as: How is reading autobiography like/unlike reading fiction? How do the truth claims made by autobiographies shape read...(read more)

Kleege, Georgina
Summer 2018

166/1

Special Topics:
Speculative Fictions, Possible Futures

TuWTh 4-6:30

This course will present the genre of speculative fiction and its historical commitment to imagining plausible and implausible alternatives to the present. We will begin by looking at the Golden Age of the science fiction short story, the 1950s and...(read more)

O'Brien, Geoffrey G.
Summer 2018

166/2

Special Topics:
Games of Thrones, Medieval to Modern

TuWTh 10-12

This course will show how Game of Thrones and A Song of Ice and Fire draw on a long literary-historical legacy, emphasizing the preoccupations that have made their way from medieval and Renaissance writers into mod...(read more)

Strub, Spencer
Summer 2018

173/1

The Language and Literature of Films:
Cinematic Futures, Literary Visions

MTuTh 2-4:30

This course will compare literary works of futurism—science fiction, utopian and fantastic literature—with cinematic adaptations of speculative fiction. Some of the thematic questions we will address: how does the contemporary shape bot...(read more)

Jones, Donna V.
Summer 2018

176/1

Literature and Popular Culture:
The 1990s: A Decade About Nothing

TuWTh 9:30-12

The 1990s are sometimes understood as a period between major events: the fall of the Berlin Wall and the attacks on the World Trade Center; the initial phase of neoliberal economics (Reagan/Thatcher) and the mature phase (Bush/Bl...(read more)

Lavery, Grace
Fall 2017

C136/1

Topics in American Studies:
New Orleans

TTh 2-3:30

We will consider the representation of New Orleans in four related formats: (1) historical monograph, (2) folklore collection, (3) as-told-to autobiography, and (4) cinematic documentary. Our premise is that New Orleans is stranger than f...(read more)

Wagner, Bryan
Fall 2017

165/1

Special Topics:
Genres of Free Speech

MW 5-6:30

We endure a difficult relation to free speech. Most arguments on the topic, whether for or against, focus on the capacity of language to harm others, directly or indirectly, and therefore concern the scope and nature of necessary prohibitions of sp...(read more)

Lavery, Grace
Fall 2017

165/2

Special Topics:
Art of Writing

TTh 2-3:30

This seminar/workshop, co-taught by Lyn Hejinian and Daniel Benjamin, will be devoted to collaboratively composed writing in a range of genres, including poetry, short fiction, performance, and critical essays. Multiple examples of collaborations w...(read more)

Benjamin, Daniel
Hejinian, Lyn
Fall 2017

166/3

Special Topics:
Black Science Fiction

TTh 3:30-5

This course addresses two genres—black fiction and science fiction—at their point of intersection, which is sometimes called Afrofuturism. The umbrella term “black fiction” will include texts that issue out of and specu...(read more)

Serpell, C. Namwali
Fall 2017

166/4

Special Topics:
Writing Poetry and Nonfiction, Writing as Social Practice

TTh 5-6:30

One of the ideas behind this course offering is that poetry and essays (life-writing, creative non-fiction, “essaying,” etc.) have similar aims or field-marks—both are literary vehicles of exploration and documentation; both value...(read more)

Giscombe, Cecil S.
Fall 2017

170/1

Literature and the Arts:
Literature and Music

MW 11-12 + discussion sections F 11-12

In this course, we will think about the strangely vital links between literature and music.  Beginning in the early nineteenth century, we’ll track a series of crossings, conjunctions, and fissures.  We’ll think about the...(read more)

Falci, Eric
Fall 2017

173/1

The Language and Literature of Films:
The Film Essay: Cinema, the Minoritized Subject, and the Practice of Writing

TTh 3:30-5

Taking as a point of departure James Baldwin’s dazzling work of film criticism, The Devil Finds Work, this course introduces students to some of the best writing on film that describes the encounter with cinema—and with particu...(read more)

Best, Stephen M.
Young, Damon
Fall 2017

175/1

Literature and Disability

TTh 3:30-5

This course will have several components. An introductory section will provide students with a grounding in disability theory; we’ll wonder whether it’s possible to develop a common “theory” adequate to various disability ca...(read more)

Langan, Celeste
Fall 2017

180H/1

The Short Story:
The Short Story

MWF 2-3

The lyf so short, the crafte so longe to lerne…

                         &nbsp...(read more)

Chandra, Vikram
Spring 2017

80K/1

Children's Literature

MWF 12-1

This course has two principle aims: (1) to provide an overview of the history of children’s literature in English; (2) to introduce students to the major generic, political, aesthetic, and philosophical questions such literature has posed. A...(read more)

Lavery, Grace
Spring 2017

C136/1

Topics in American Studies:
The Fields: California Farmworker Literature

TTh 2-3:30

This course will focus on the lives and struggles of Mexican farm workers in California as represented in Chicano/a literature from the 1970s to the early twentieth-first century—or roughly the period that coincides with the rise of neoliber...(read more)

Gonzalez, Marcial
Spring 2017

165/1

Special Topics:
The Graphic Memoir

MWF 10-11

A graphic novel is often defined as “a single-author, book-length work, meant for a grown-up reader, with a memoirist or novelistic nat...(read more)

Wong, Hertha D. Sweet
Spring 2017

165/2

Special Topics:
Incarcerations: The Literatures of Physical Confinement and Spiritual Liberation

TTh 3:30-5

This is a course primarily on the literature of incarceration variously defined and experienced across a range of control systems that attempt to stunt the entire human being. We will read prison narrative/poetry (George Jackson's prison lette...(read more)

Padilla, Genaro M.
Spring 2017

166/1

Special Topics:
Marxism and Literature

MWF 1-2

For the past thirty years, it’s become a cliché that it’s easier to imagine the end of the world than the end of capitalism. Yet, ever since the 2008 financial crash, there’s been rising popular consciousness of capitalism...(read more)

Lye, Colleen
Spring 2017

166/2

Special Topics:
Studies in Literature and Environment (Shelter and Weather)

MWF 3-4

What makes environmental violence hard to represent and how can literature bear witness to the silence, slowness, and invisibility of ecological relations? Of what use is the problematic concept of “nature” in ordering our relations to...(read more)

Francois, Anne-Lise
Spring 2017

166/3

Special Topics:
Slavery and Conspiracy

MWF 3-4

This is a multidisciplinary seminar on the law and literature of slave conspiracy. We will be reading novels and stories by authors such as Martin Delany and Herman Melville alongside contemporary newspapers, confessions, warrants, witness deposit...(read more)

Wagner, Bryan
Spring 2017

166/4

Special Topics:
Literature in the Century of Film

MW 5-6:30 PM

In this course, we will examine intersections between literature and visual media in the twentieth century, with a particular focus on texts concerned with film and its cultural effects. We will read novels, short stori...(read more)

Goble, Mark
Spring 2017

166/5

Special Topics:
Modern Irish Literature

TTh 11-12:30

In this course we will focus on one of the major canons in modern literature, one that includes, some would argue, the most significant English-language poet, the most important novelist, and the most remarkable playwright of the 20th century. &...(read more)
Falci, Eric
Spring 2017

180A/1

Autobiography:
Disability Memoir

TTh 11-12:30

Autobiographies written by people with disabilities offer readers a glimpse into lives at the margins of mainstream culture, and thus can make disability seem less alien and frightening.  Disability rights activists, however, often criticize ...(read more)

Kleege, Georgina
Spring 2017

180Z/1

Science Fiction

TTh 9:30-11

This course will examine in depth the history of speculative fiction and its engagement with the thematics and topoi of the new life sciences—representation of cloning, ecological dystopias, hybrid life-forms, genetic engineering dystopias. ...(read more)

Jones, Donna V.
Summer 2017

N173/1

The Language and Literature of Films:
The Hollywood Western, 1940-1963

M 2-5 & W 2-4

Regular attendance is required. Two seven-page essays and a final quiz. Viewing notes taken during films viewed on Mondays will be handed in on Wednesdays. The class will be a mix of lecture and discussion.

This class is open to UC Berkel...(read more)

Breitwieser, Mitchell
Fall 2016

C77/1

Introduction to Environmental Studies

TTh 12:30-2 + 1-1/2 hours of discussion section per week

This is a team-taught introduction to environmental studies. The team consists of a professor of environmental science (Gary Sposito), a professor of English (Robert Hass), and three graduate student instructors working in the field. The aim of th...(read more)

Hass, Robert L.
Sposito, Gary
Fall 2016

C136/1

Special Topics

This class has been canceled.

...(read more)
No instructor assigned yet.
Fall 2016

165/1

Special Topics:
Telling Stories: The Power of Narrative in Academic Writing

MWF 1-2

This seminar is dedicated to the principle that because narrative is at the core of how we come to understand the world, narrative is also an especially powerful method of scholarly practice. We will study the art of storytelling as it is practice...(read more)

Donegan, Kathleen
Fall 2016

166/1

Special Topics:
Aesthetics and the Environment in the Eighteenth Century

MWF 12-1

Why do we take pleasure in contemplating the natural world? What sort of pleasure is this? The eighteenth century was preoccupied with this question, which abutted on others: What is beauty? Is it something we perceive directly, or do we experienc...(read more)

Picciotto, Joanna M
Fall 2016

166/2

Special Topics:
Vladimir Nabokov

MWF 10-11

We will study the work of Nabokov as a novelist on two continents over a period of nearly sixty years. The course will be structured (more or less) chronologically and divided between novels translated from Russian and written in English. After be...(read more)

Naiman, Eric
Fall 2016

170/1

Literature and the Arts:
The Deaths and Lives of Saints

MWF 11-12

The paradox of Western sainthood is summed up by a phrase from Latin calendars: dies natalis, “birthday.” Marking a saint’s chief feast, the dies natalis celebrates the day of his or her death: death as birth wi...(read more)

Thornbury, Emily V.
Fall 2016

170/2

Literature and the Arts:
Opera and Literary Form

TTh 3:30-5

Together with the novel, opera became one of the characteristic European art forms of the long nineteenth century. Attending to the hybrid status of opera as a dramatic as well as a musical form, the course will focus on a series of major musical-...(read more)

Duncan, Ian
Fall 2016

171/1

Literature and Sexual Identity:
Postcolonial Sex

MWF 3-4

This course will explore the intersection of theories of gender and sexuality and the postcolonial world. We will consider how gender and nation are shaped and represented in literature and film. Why are nations routinely imagined as women, a...(read more)

Saha, Poulomi
Fall 2016

174/1

Literature and History:
The Seventies

TTh 3:30-5

As one historian has quipped, it was the worst of times, it was the worst of times. “The ’70s” routinely come in for mockery: even at the time, it was known as the decade when “it seemed like nothing happened.&rdqu...(read more)

Saul, Scott
Fall 2016

175/1

Literature and Disability

TTh 9:30-11

We will examine the ways disability is represented in a variety of works of fiction and drama.  Assignments will include two short (5-8 page) critical essays, a group performance project and a take-home final examination.  (This is a cor...(read more)

Kleege, Georgina
Fall 2016

180H/1

The Short Story

MWF 12-1

The lyf so short, the crafte so longe to lerne…

                          &...(read more)

Chandra, Vikram
Spring 2016

20/1

Modern British and American Literature:
Graphic Poetics

TTh 3:30-5

This course takes its inspiration from two very recent works of poetry: Caroline Bergvall’s Drift (2014) and Claudia Rankine’s Citizen, both of which rely on a vast array of contemporary multimedia, printing, and pe...(read more)
Le, Serena
Spring 2016

C136/1

Topics in American Studies:
The Great Exhaling: American History, Culture and Politics, 1946-1952

MW 4-5:30 + discussion sections

1948 was the year that America–after the Great Depression, after the Second World War, after sixteen year of the all but revolutionary experiment in national government of the New Deal–let out its collective breath. Finally, that great...(read more)

Moran, Kathleen and Marcus, Greil
Spring 2016

165/1

Special Topics:
Arthurian Medievalisms

MW 9-10:30

This course will focus on medievalism, i.e., the representation and conceptualization of the Middle Ages, in order to analyze how ideas about the past are used in literature and the arts, in both "high" and popular culture. The point of ...(read more)

No instructor assigned yet.
Spring 2016

165/2

Special Topics:
21st-Century U.S. Poetry

MW 12-1:30

In this course we’ll review the U.S. poetry of the present, reading representative poems from the last 15 years or so in relation to a number of formal concerns, poetic subjects, and debates within the social field (and its media), including...(read more)

O'Brien, Geoffrey G.
Spring 2016

165/3

Special Topics:
Oscar Wilde and the Nineteenth Century

MW 4-5:30

Oscar Wilde's jokes, and his pathos, can seem out of place in Victorian literature: they leap off the dusty page and into a present moment where their author seems to fit more happily. Without wishing to consign him back to that potentially ho...(read more)

Lavery, Grace
Spring 2016

165/4

Special Topics: Representing Non-Human Life in Seventeenth- and Eighteenth-Century Britain

TTh 12:30-2

We will explore techniques developed by scientists, theologians, and poets to represent other life forms. Contexts we’ll investigate include encounters with new-world flora and fauna, the invention of the microscope and the discovery of the ...(read more)

Picciotto, Joanna M
Spring 2016

165/5

Special Topics:
Is It Useless to Revolt?: Literature of Revolt

TTh 2-3:30

“Is it useless to revolt?”  Our course borrows its title from an essay by Foucault on the Iranian Revolution of 1979.  Foucault urges us to suspe...(read more)

Goldsmith, Steven
Spring 2016

165/6

Special Topics:
Queer Lifestyles in Literature and Theory

TTh 3:30-5

Before the twentieth century, "queer" usually just meant strange or peculiar; it suggested an unusual way of living or being. The word gradually became a slur to describe someone sexually different, and we have now rehab...(read more)

Weiner, Joshua J
Spring 2016

165/7

Special Topics:
Later 17th-Century Nonfictional Prose

TTh 6-7:30 P.M.

Reading, discussing, and writing about British prose of the later 17th century. Among the genres to be considered will be representative samples of the “character” (of places as well as human types); the essay (controversial as well as...(read more)

Starr, George A.
Spring 2016

165/8

Special Topics:
Arts of Writing: Academic Writing, Grant Writing, Food Writing

TTh 11-12:30

This course for juniors and seniors will help students develop writing skills through intensive focus on the demands of three very different modes: academic argument, popular and creative food writing (essay, poetry, travel, memoir, manifesto), an...(read more)

Rahimtoola, Samia Shabnam
Schweik, Susan
Spring 2016

165/9

Special Topics:
Ovid and the English Renaissance

TTh 3:30-5

Her bosom was wrapped in smooth thin bark; her slender arms were changed to branches and her hair to leaves; her feet but now so swift were anchored fast in numb stiff roots; her face and head became the crown of a green tree. -- Ovid, Metamor...(read more)

Landreth, David
Spring 2016

166/2

Special Topics:
Elizabethan Renaissance: Art, Culture, and Visuality

MW 4-5:30 + discussion sections

This course has two goals: to explore visual culture and the role of visuality in renaissance England, and to develop research skills.

Elizabeth I's long reign saw a remarkable flowering of the arts. Her unique position as a female mona...(read more)

Honig, Elizabeth
Spring 2016

170/1

Literature and the Arts:
Literature and Music

MWF 11-12

In this course, we will investigate the strangely vital links between literature and music. Beginning in the early 19th century, we’ll track a series of crossings, conjunctions, and fissures.  We’ll think about the place of music,...(read more)

Falci, Eric
Spring 2016

173/1

The Language and Literature of Films:
Hidden Hitchcock

MW 11-12:30 + film screenings Thursdays 7-10 P.M.

Few film styles have more successfully courted mass-audience understanding and approval than Hitchcock’s.  In the overstated lucidity of his narrative communication, nothing deserves our attention that his camera doesn’t go out of...(read more)

Miller, D.A.
Spring 2016

177/1

Literature and Philosophy

TTh 2-3:30

This class will be organized around three questions that have been of perennial concern to literary writers and philosophers: who are we? What can we know? How should we live? We’ll read a wide range of texts that respond to these questions ...(read more)

Zhang, Dora
Spring 2016

180A/1

Autobiography:
Disability Memoir

TTh 11-12:30

This course will examine autobiography as a literary genre. We will survey the history of the genre and consider such questions as: How is reading autobiography like/unlike reading fiction? How do the truth claims made by autobiographies shape rea...(read more)

Kleege, Georgina
Spring 2016

180Z/1

Science Fiction

This course has been canceled.

...(read more)
Jones, Donna V.
Summer 2016

N166/1

Special Topics:
Moby-Dick and the Theory of the Novel

MTTh 4-6

In this summer session, we'll read one and only one novel: Herman Melville's Moby-Dick (1851). We'll read the book carefully and closely, working particularly to understand Melville's idiosyncratic use of particuar aesthet...(read more)

Puckett, Kent
Summer 2016

N166/2

Special Topics:
The U.S. Novel Since 1945: Authors and Workers

TTh 10-12

This course will examine the development of the U.S. novel in light of the profound reorganization of working life since 1945, a process that has involved a m...(read more)

Bernes, Jasper
Summer 2016

N173/1

The Language and Literature Films: The Hollywood Western

M 2-5 & W 2-4

Regular attendance is required. Two seven-page essays and a final quiz. Viewing notes taken during films viewed on Mondays will be handed in on Wednesdays. The class will be a mix of lecture and discussion.

This class is open to UC students...(read more)

Breitwieser, Mitchell
Summer 2016

N180Z/1

Science Fiction

MTTh 10-12

This course will examine in depth the history of speculative fiction and its engagement with the thematics and topoi of the new life sciences--representation of cloning, ecological dystopias, hybrid life-forms, genetic engineering dystopi...(read more)

Jones, Donna V.
Fall 2015

C77/1

Introduction to Environmental Studies

TTh 12:30-2 + 1-1/2 hours of discussion section per week

This is a team-taught introduction to environmental studies. The team consists of a professor of environmental science (Gary Sposito), a professor of English (Robert Hass), and three graduate student instructors working in the field. The aim of th...(read more)

Hass, Robert L.
Fall 2015

C107/1

The Bible as Literature

MW 3-4; discussion sections F 3-4

We will read a selection of biblical texts as literature.  That is, we will read the Bible in many ways, but not as divine revelation.  We will take up traditional literary questions of form, style, and structure, but we will also learn ...(read more)

Goldsmith, Steven
Fall 2015

C136/1

Topics in American Studies:
Mark Twain and the Gilded Age

TTh 11-12:30

Mark Twain’s and Charles Dudley Warner’s collaborative novel of 1873, The Gilded Age, has given a name to the American historical period of the post-Civil War era (roughly 1865 to 1890).  It is a period of great changes i...(read more)

Hutson, Richard
Fall 2015

165/1

Special Topics:
Contemporary Poetry

MW 4-5:30

In this class we will read seven books of (very) contemporary poetry, which highlight the multiple national and linguistic identities that characterize the poetic subject in an increasingly globalized world. We will investigate different poetic st...(read more)

Gaydos, Rebecca
T. B. A.
Fall 2015

165/2

Special Topics

This section of English 165 has been canceled.

 

...(read more)
Thomas-Bignami, Ian M.
T. B. A.
Fall 2015

165/3

Special Topics

This section of English 165 has been canceled.

 

...(read more)
Wong, Hertha D. Sweet
Fall 2015

165/4

Special Topics:
Longing and Belonging in Contemporary Writing

MW 3-4:30

This course will interrogate the possible relationships between desire and social position or identity (what I conceive myself to have and to lack) by reading contemporary literature in which (read more)

Langan, Celeste
Fall 2015

165/5

Special Topics:
Hardly Strictly Lyric Poems

TTh 2-3:30

Historically and etymologically, lyric poetry was sung to the accompaniment of a lyre.  Most lyric poetry studied as English literature today, however, reflecting the term "literature"'s own history and etymology, is relate...(read more)

Hanson, Kristin
Fall 2015

165/6

Special Topics

This class has been postponed till Spring 2016.

...(read more)
Lavery, Grace
Fall 2015

165/7

Special Topics:
Modern California Books and Movies

Tuesdays 6-9 P.M.

Besides discussing fiction and poetry with Western settings, and essays that attempt to identify or explain distinctive regional characteristics, this course will include consideration of various movies shaped by and shaping conceptions of Califor...(read more)

Starr, George A.
Fall 2015

165/8

Special Topics:
Modern Medievalism: A Study of Medieval Poetry and Modern Fantasy

TTh 9:30-11

The medieval period is often swept under broad descriptors, like the "Dark Ages," and with these descriptors come equally vague notions of medieval society. One might, for example, imagine medieval society enveloped by religious hysteria...(read more)

No instructor assigned yet.
Fall 2015

165AC/1

Special Topics in American Cultures

This course has been canceled.

...(read more)
Lye, Colleen
Fall 2015

166/1

Special Topics:
Epistles: The Letter in Life and Literature

MWF 12-1

In this course, we will explore one of the most intimate, versatile, and surprising of literary forms: (read more)

Thornbury, Emily V.
Fall 2015

166/2

Special Topics:
Where the Wild Things Are: Empire and Travel Writing

MWF 11-12

This course journeys to the far-flung places where wild things roam. Our itinerary takes us through novels, travel narratives, journalism, and online sources that depict fantastical lands populated by wild beasts, "savage" peoples, and s...(read more)

Saha, Poulomi
Fall 2015

175/1

Literature and Disability

MWF 12-1

In this course we will think about the concept of literature via the category of disability. We are told that "poems make nothing happen" (Auden); for speech-act theory, fictional utterance is a peculiarly "parasitic" form of s...(read more)

Langan, Celeste
Fall 2015

176/1

Literature and Popular Culture

This course has been canceled.

...(read more)
McQuade, Donald
Spring 2015

80K/1

Children's Literature

TTh 12:30-2

This course has two principal aims: (1) to provide an overview of the history of children's literature in English from the eighteenth century to the present; (2) to introduce students to the major generic, political, and aesthetic questions su...(read more)

Lavery, Grace
Spring 2015

165/1

Special Topics:
American Modernism

TTh 2-3:30

We will survey major American writers from the first half of the twentieth century, with a special focus on texts that challenged both the formal and social conventions of literature in the period. We will examine a range of responses to such event...(read more)

Goble, Mark
Spring 2015

165/2

Special Topics:
Fathers and Sons

TTh 2-3:30

We will explore the burdens and blessings, affections and alienation of the father-son relationship through the novels, memoirs, autobiographies, and a play by American, British, and Russian writers.

Their works take us to how sons look bac...(read more)

Isenberg, Steven
Isenberg, Steven
Spring 2015

166/1

Special Topics:
Scotland and Romanticism

MWF 11-12

Between 1760 and 1830 Scotland was one of the centers of the European-North Atlantic “Republic of Letters.” Here were invented the signature forms and discourses of the “Enlightenment” and “Romanticism” (terms f...(read more)

Duncan, Ian
Spring 2015

166/2

Special Topics:
Literature in the Century of Film

TTh 9:30-11

In this course, we will examine intersections between literature and visual media in the twentieth century, with a particular focus on texts that are concerned with film and its cultural effects. We will read novels, short stories, poetry, and ess...(read more)

Goble, Mark
Spring 2015

166/3

Special Topics:
The Works of Vladimir Nabokov

TTh 9:30-11

We will study the work of Nabokov as a novelist on two continents over a period of nearly sixty years. The course will be structured (more or less) chronologically and divided between novels translated from Russian and written in English. Aft...(read more)

Naiman, Eric
Spring 2015

176/1

Literature and Popular Culture

This class has been canceled.

...(read more)
McQuade, Donald
Spring 2015

180A/1

Autobiography:
Disability Memoir

TTh 3:30-5

Autobiographies written by people with disabilities offer readers a glimpse into lives at the margins of mainstream culture, and thus can make disability seem less alien and frightening.  Disability rights activists however, often criticize t...(read more)

Kleege, Georgina
Spring 2015

180H/1

The Short Story

TTh 3:30-5

The lyf so short, the crafte so longe to lerne…

                          &...(read more)

Chandra, Vikram
Spring 2015

180Z/1

Science Fiction

TTh 12:30-2

This course will examine in depth the history of speculative fiction and its engagement with the thematics and topoi of the new life sciences--representation of cloning, ecological dystopias, hybrid life-forms, genetic engineering dystopias. While...(read more)

Jones, Donna V.
Summer 2015

N173/1

The Language and Literature Films:
The Hollywood Western

M 2-5 & W 2-4

Regular attendance is required. Two seven-page essays and a final quiz. Viewing notes taken during films viewed on Mondays will be handed in on Wednesdays. The class will be a mix of lecture and discussion.

This class is open to UC students...(read more)

Breitwieser, Mitchell
Summer 2015

N180Z/1

Science Fiction

MTTh 10-12

(read more)

Jones, Donna V.
Fall 2014

C77/1

Introduction to Environmental Studies

TTh 12:30-2 + 1-1/2 hours of discusssion section per week

This is a team-taught introduction to environmental studies. The team consists of a professor of environmental science (Gary Sposito), a professor of English (Robert Hass), and three graduate student instructors working in the field. The aim of th...(read more)

Hass, Robert L.
Fall 2014

C136/1

Topics in American Studies:
Boys and Girls in the Era of Mark Twain and Henry James

MWF 12-1

Historians often define the era after the Civil War and especially from 1880 to ca. 1915 as the “era of the child.”  Children became the heroes of popular  culture as well as major subjects for painters and intellectuals and ...(read more)

Hutson, Richard
Fall 2014

165/1

Special Topics:
Critical Influences in Contemporary Culture

TTh 9:30-11

The lectures, class discussions, readings, and writing assignments of this course are intended to develop students’ ability to analyze, understand, and evaluate a number of difficult and important texts concerning the concepts of free...(read more)

Campion, John
Fall 2014

165/2

Special Topics:
Freedom and the University: The 1960s and Its Afterlives

TTh 11-12:30

The sixties represent a period in which the university became for the first time a central locus of struggles for freedom—for civil rights, Black Power, Third World self-determination, and women’s and gay liberation, and a...(read more)

Lye, Colleen
Fall 2014

165/3

Special Topics:
Greek Tragedy in Translation

TTh 12:30-2

The lectures, class discussions, readings, and writing assignments are intended to develop students' ability to analyze, understand, and evaluate a number of important ancient texts. The class will examine the deep implications of these early ...(read more)

No instructor assigned yet.
Fall 2014

165/5

Special Topics:
The Graphic Memoir

TTh 11-12:30

The graphic novel is often defined as "a single-author, book-length work meant for a grown-up reader, with a memoirist or novelistic nature, usually devoid of superheroes."  Many comic artists, however, ridicule the term as a preten...(read more)

Wong, Hertha D. Sweet
Fall 2014

165/6

Special Topics:
The End of the Poem: Poetic Closure

TTh 2-3:30

This class addresses an inevitable feature of all poems, the last line: the position from which the poem’s entire form is, for the first time, apprehended. This focus will require attention to all the formal and thematic principles by which ...(read more)

O'Brien, Geoffrey G.
Fall 2014

166/3

Special Topics:
Black Science Fiction

TTh 2-3:30

This course considers two specific genres—black fiction and science fiction—to explore how they inflect each other when they blend. Under the umbrella “black,” we include fictions that issue out of and/or purport to describ...(read more)

Serpell, C. Namwali
Fall 2014

166/4

Special Topics:
Global Cities

TTh 9:30-11

Globalization has given rise to a new kind of urban space, a nexus where the networks of capital, labor, and bodies meet: the global city. This course, a survey of contemporary Anglophone literature, considers the narratives--fictional and otherwi...(read more)

Saha, Poulomi
Saha, Poulomi
Fall 2014

175/1

Literature and Disability

MW 4-5:30

We will examine the ways disability is represented in a variety of works of fiction and drama.  Assignments will include two short (5-8 page) critical essays, a group presentation project, and a take-home final examination.  (This is a c...(read more)

Kleege, Georgina
Spring 2014

20/1

Modern British and American Literature:
Music and Literary Modernism

TTh 3:30-5

“All art,” wrote English critic Walter Pater in 1877, “constantly aspires to the condition of music.” In this course, we will launch our own investigation into music’s influence on British and American modernist ...(read more)

Le, Serena
Spring 2014

165/3

Special Topics:
Modern Short Story Masters: James Joyce, Ernest Hemingway, Franz Kafka, and Flannery O'Connor

TTh 2-3:30

The reading and writing assignments—linked with the lectures and class discussions—are intended to develop students’ ability to analyze, understand, and interpret four great masters of the short story: Joyce, Hemingway, Kafka (in...(read more)

Campion, John
Spring 2014

166/1

Special Topics:
Theory of the Poet

MWF 11-12

The figure of The Poet occupies a significant place in cultural imagination, even when The Poet is thought to occupy a marginal position or engage in useless activity. Bard, rebel, cultural diplomat, priest, historian, recluse—who or what is...(read more)

Thornbury, Emily V.
Spring 2014

166/2

Special Topics:
Contemporary British and Irish Poetry

TTh 11-12:30

This course will survey British and Irish poetry from the past sixty years. It is a large and multifaceted body of work, and much of it remains under-read, especially in the U.S. We will consider the development of a late modernist and postmodern ...(read more)

Falci, Eric
Spring 2014

180A/1

Autobiography:
Disability Memoir

TTh 3:30-5

Autobiographies written by people with disabilities offer readers a glimpse into lives at the margins of mainstream culture, and thus can make disability seem less alien and frightening.  Disability rights activists, however, often criticize ...(read more)

Kleege, Georgina
Spring 2014

180H/1

Short Story

MW 4-5:30

The lyf so short, the crafte so longe to lerne…

                          &nb...(read more)

Chandra, Vikram
Summer 2014

N173/1

The Language and Literature of Films:
The Hollywood Western

M 2-5 & W 2-4

Regular attendance is required. Two seven-page essays and a final quiz. Viewing notes taken during films viewed on Mondays will be handed in on Wednesdays. The class will be a mix of lecture and discussion.

This course will be taught in...(read more)

Breitwieser, Mitchell
Summer 2014

N180Z/1

Science Fiction:
Speculative Fiction and Dystopias

MTuTh 10-12

This cou...(read more)

Jones, Donna V.
Fall 2013

C77/1

Introduction to Environmental Studies

TTh 12:30-2 + 1-1/2 hours of discussion section per week

This is a team-taught introduction to environmental studies. The team consists of a professor of environmental science, a professor of English, and three graduate student instructors woking in the field. The aim of the course is to give students t...(read more)

Hass, Robert L.
Fall 2013

152/1

Women Writers:
Early American Women Writers

TTh 9:30-11

This course will survey the writing of American women from narratives of colonial settlement through the novels of the early republic.  During this period, women produced immensely popular works and developed major literary traditions that wo...(read more)

Donegan, Kathleen
Fall 2013

165/1

Special Topics:
Modern Poetry

MWF 12-1

The reading and writing assignments—linked with the lectures and class discussions—are intended to develop students’ ability to analyze, understand, and interpret modern poetry, as they gain greater authority in critical writing....(read more)

Campion, John
Fall 2013

165/2

Special Topics:
Hardly Strictly Lyric Poetry

MW 4-5:30

Historically and etymologically, lyric poetry was poetry sung to the accompaniment of a lyre.  Most lyric poetry studied as English literature today, however, reflecting "literature"'s own history and etymology, is ...(read more)

Hanson, Kristin
Fall 2013

166/2

Special Topics:
Engaging the Play--Being the Player

TTh 12:30-2

This course will explore inventive ways of engaging the theater text.

Students will read from a selection of plays and be expected to give presentations analyzing theme, story, as well as point of view of the playwright. This will be follow...(read more)

Gotanda, Philip Kan
Fall 2013

166/1

Special Topics:
Literature and Science from the Romantics to the Present

MWF 1-2

This course offers an introduction to questions and problems in the study of literature and science, with special attention to Romantic science and its afterlife. Romanticism has come to name both a historical moment (sometimes called an “ag...(read more)

Savarese, John L.
Savarese, John
Fall 2013

175/1

Literature and Disability

MW 4-5:30

We will examine the ways disability is represented in a variety of works of fiction and drama.  Assignments will include two short (5-8 page) critical essays, a group performance project and a take-home final examination.  (This is a cor...(read more)

Kleege, Georgina
Spring 2013

165/1

Special Topics:
Modern Latin American Fiction

MWF 12-1

The reading and writing assignments--linked with the lectures and class discussions--are intended to develop students’ ability to analyze, understand, and interpret six great masters of Latin American fiction (in English translations): Jorge...(read more)

Campion, John
Spring 2013

166/1

Special Topics:
African American Literature from Reconstruction to Renaissance

TTh 9:30-11

This course offers an overview of African American literature from Reconstruction through the New Negro (or Harlem) Renaissance. Particular attention will be paid to questions of history, memory, and changing notions of modernity.

...(read more)
Carmody, Todd
Spring 2013

166/2

Special Topics:
Readings for Fiction Writers

TTh 12:30-2

This course will focus on each novelist's invention of, or critique of, national identity myths in a time of national crisis.  Students will explore the intimate connection between choice of narrative strategy and construction of meaning....(read more)

Mukherjee, Bharati
Spring 2013

166/3

Special Topics:
Infrastructuralism: Reading Setting in Literature and Film

TTh 3:30-5

In a film essay on the way movies depict Los Angeles, Thom Andersen raises a question that will form the basis for this course: “If we can appreciate documentaries for their dramatic qualities, perhaps we can appreciate fiction films for the...(read more)

Eichenlaub, Justin
Eichenlaub, Justin
Spring 2013

N166 /1

Special Topics:
Freud, Marx, Nietzsche

TTh 3:30-5

Graphic novel is often defined as “a single-author, book-length work, meant for a grown-up reader, with a memoirist or novelistic nature, usually devoid of superheroes.” Many comic artists, ...(read more)

Ring, Joseph
Fall 2012

C77/1

Introduction to Environmental Studies

TTh 12:30-2 + 1-1/2 hours of discussion section per week

This is a team-taught introduction to environmental studies. The team consists of a professor of environmental science, a professor of English, and three graduate student instructors woking in the field. The aim of the course is to give students t...(read more)

Hass, Robert L.
Hass, Robert & Sposito, Gary
Fall 2012

165/1

Special Topics:
Poetry Writing in an Ecological Field of Composition

TTh 9:30-11

Among other issues associated with the composition of poetry, this class seeks to contend with the difficulties that arise from how a poem is displayed on the page. We will look at a number of poets, such as Cummings...(read more)

Campion, John
Fall 2012

165/2

Special Topics:
The Elizabethan Renaissance

TTh 3:30-5 + one hour of disc. sec. (sec. 201: W 12-1, 2070 Valley LSB; sec. 202: W 9-10, 2066 Valley LSB)

This course has two goals: to explore visual culture and the role of visuality in renaissance England, and to develop research skills. Elizabeth I's long reign saw a remarkable flowering of the arts. Her unique position as a female monarch sur...(read more)

Honig, Elizabeth
Fall 2012

166/1

Special Topics:
18th-Century British Travel Writing

TTh 11-12:30

This course is based on the idea that if there is one genre in which ideas of identity--ideas of how one's own self and culture are related to other selves and other cultures--are systematically negotiated, then this must be the hybrid genre o...(read more)

Bode, Christoph
Fall 2012

166/2

Special Topics:
Specters of the Atlantic

TTh 12:30-2

The large scale transportation of Africans to the Americas is a signal fact of modernity in the West. The trouble is that we both do and do not know this. One of the most salient, confounding aspects of life in the Caribbean and the United States,...(read more)

Ellis, Nadia
Fall 2012

166/3

Special Topics:
Engaging the Play: Being the Player

TTh 2-3:30

The course will explore inventive ways of engaging the theater text.

Students will read from a selection of plays and be expected to give presentations analyzing theme, story, as well as point of view of the playwright. This will be followe...(read more)

Gotanda, Philip Kan
Fall 2012

166/4

Special Topics:
Hitchcock's Secret Style

MW 2-3:30 + films Thurs. 6-9 P.M.

It is the claim of “Hitchcock’s Secret Style” that the work of this famous filmmaker, viewed all over the world and analyzed ad infinitum, has only barely begun to be looked at.  DVD technology, by facilitating a closer atte...(read more)

Miller, D.A.
Fall 2012

175/1

Literature and Disability

MW 4-5:30

We will examine the ways disability is depicted in a diverse range of texts.  Sometimes disability is used as a metaphor or symbol of something else.  In other cases, texts explore disability as a lived experience.  We will analyze ...(read more)

Kleege, Georgina
Fall 2012

180H/1

Short Story

TTh 2-3:30

“The lyf so short, the crafte so longe to lerne…”

                            &nb...(read more)

Chandra, Vikram
Fall 2012

190/9

Research Seminar:
The Urban Postcolonial

TTh 9:30-11

For reasons to do with some of its most canonical texts (Achebe’s Things Fall Apart being the most proffered example), postcolonial literature is often thought to present a conflict between “tradition” and “moderni...(read more)

Ellis, Nadia
Fall 2012

190/11

Research Seminar:
Environmental Poetry and Poetics

TTh 11-12:30

I have emarked on this course to help us think about an emergent situation for poets—the earth in crisis.  In this seminar we will explore how poets represent, and think about their place in, their natural environment.  Our primary...(read more)

Shoptaw, John
Spring 2012

C107/1

The English Bible as Literature

TTh 9:30-11

We will read a selection of biblical texts as literature.  That is, we will read these texts in many ways, but not as divine revelation.  We will take up traditional literary questions of form, style, and structure, but we will also lear...(read more)

Goldsmith, Steven
Goldsmith, Steven
Spring 2012

C136/1

Topics in American Studies:
Boys and Girls in the Era of Mark Twain and Henry James

TTh 3:30-5

Historians often define the era after the Civil War and especially from 1880 to ca. 1915 as the “era of the child.”  Children became the heroes of popular  culture as well as major subjects for painters and intellectuals and ...(read more)

Hutson, Richard
Hutson, Richard
Spring 2012

165/1

Special Topics:
The Pisan and Later Cantos of Ezra Pound

MW 1:30-3

This course will look at one of the most influential and controversial poets of the 20th century, Ezra Pound. Beginning with the Pisan, we'll study the rest of the Cantos of Ezra Pound during the course of a single semester. ...(read more)

Campion, John
Campion, John
Spring 2012

165/2

Special Topics:
Race, Literature, and the Archive

TTh 9:30-11

In this course we will read works of nineteenth- and twentieth-century American writing that engage with what we might call extra-literary modes of documenting racial difference. Drawing on insights from comparative media studies and critical race...(read more)

Carmody, Todd
Carmody, Todd
Spring 2012

165/4

Special Topics:
Self Creation--Confession, Memoir, Autobiography

M 3-6

In confession we create the self. Confession is premised on truth - ultimate truth, the truth that exposes everyday truth as pretense, pose and mendacity. To create a confession is to create a new self: a self cleansed, reborn, redeemed. To create...(read more)

Danner, Mark
Danner, Mark
Spring 2012

166/1

Special Topics:
Specters of the Atlantic

This section of English 166 has been canceled.

...(read more)
Ellis, Nadia
Ellis, Nadia
Spring 2012

166/2

Special Topics:
Narrating the Nation

TTh 12:30-2

This course will focus on each novelist’s invention of, or critique of, national identity myths in a time of national crisis. Students will explore the intimate connection between choice of narrative strategy and construction of meaning.

...(read more)
Mukherjee, Bharati
Mukherjee, Bharati
Spring 2012

171/1

Literature and Sexual Identity:
Sex & Race in Postcolonial London

This course has been canceled.

...(read more)
Ellis, Nadia
Ellis, Nadia
Spring 2012

176/1

Literature and Popular Culture:
The Promised Land--Representations of Confidence, Trust, Belief, and Faith in Nineteenth Century American Literature, Religion, and Patent Medicine Advertising

TTh 9:30-11

In the “Worship” section of The Conduct of Life (1860), Ralph Waldo Emerson observed that “Society is a masked ball, where everyone hides his real character, and reveals it by hiding. . . .”  In the August 184...(read more)

McQuade, Donald
McQuade, Donald
Spring 2012

180A/1

Autobiography:
Disability Memoir

TTh 2-3:30

Autobiographies written by people with disabilities offer readers a glimpse into lives at the margins of mainstream culture, and thus can make disability seem less alien and frightening.  Disability rights activists, however, often criticize ...(read more)

Kleege, Georgina
Kleege, Georgina
Spring 2012

180Z/1

Science Fiction:
Speculative Fiction and Dystopias

MWF 12-1

This course will examine in depth the history of speculative fiction and its engagement with the thematics and topoi of the new life sciences—representation of cloning, ecological dystopias, hybrid life-forms, genetic engineering dy...(read more)

Jones, Donna V.
Spring 2012

190/11

Research Seminar:
Mass Entertainment in 1930s Hollywood

TTh 3:30-5

Hollywood movies have always been treated as examples of mass entertainment, but rarely as analyses of the phenomenon.  We'll be exploring a wide range of 1930s Hollywood film -- from gangster pictures to cartoons, music...(read more)

Knapp, Jeffrey
Knapp, Jeffrey
Spring 2012

203/2

Graduate Readings:
Struggling With Consolation--Reading Boethius in Anglo-Saxon England

TTh 9:30-11

This course has a double aim: to explore the reception of Boethius’s De consolatione Philosophiae in Anglo-Saxon England and to do so by engaging one of the remarkable achievements of Anglo-Saxon translation, the Old English version...(read more)

O'Brien O'Keeffe, Katherine
O'Brien O'Keeffe, Katherine
Summer 2012

N166 /1

Special Topics:
Graphic Novels

MTuTh 10-12

Graphic novel is often defined as: “a single-author, book-length work, meant for a grown-up reader, with a memoirist or novelistic nature, usually devoid of superheroes.” Many comic artists, however, ridicule the term...(read more)

Wong, Hertha D. Sweet
Summer 2012

N166 /2

Special Topics

TTh 4-6

We will examine mostly the early work of the four central figures of the Beat Geneartion--- William S Burroughs, Allen Ginsberg,. Jack Kerouac and Gary Snyder.  We will look at the hisrtorical and literary-historical context in which they wor...(read more)

Loewinsohn, Ron
Summer 2012

N173/1

The Language and Literature of Films:
The Film Western

M 2-5 & W 2-4

An exploration of the durability and the versatility of this literary genre. We will watch a film each week, and read four novels.

Two six-page essays, a final quiz, and regular attendance will be required.

This course will be ta...(read more)

Breitwieser, Mitchell
Fall 2011

C77/1

Introduction to Environmental Studies

TTh 12:30-2 + 1-1/2 hours of discussion section per week

This is a team-taught introduction to environmental studies. The team consists of a professor of environmental science, a professor of English, and three graduate student instructors working in the field. The aim of the course is to give students ...(read more)

Hass, Robert L.
Hass, Robert & Sposito, Gary
Fall 2011

C136/1

Topics in American Studies:
Black Reconstruction

MWF 2-3

“Among the revolutionary processes that transformed the nineteenth-century world, none was so dramatic in its human consequences or far-reaching in its social implications as the abolition of chattel slavery,” the historian Eric Foner ...(read more)

Wagner, Bryan
Wagner, Bryan
Fall 2011

165/1

Special Topics:
(note new topic) Religion and Poetry in the Renaissance

TTh 11-12:30

What does it mean to speak to God through a sonnet? Why would someone retell the story of the Biblical Fall in verse? Why rewrite the Psalms in rhyme royal? In this course, we’ll do a case study of sixteenth and seventeenth cent...(read more)

Marno, David
Marno, David
Fall 2011

166/1

Special Topics:
Engaging the Play: Being the Player

TTh 2-3:30

The course will explore inventive ways of engaging the theater text.

Students will read from a selection of plays and be expected to give presentations analyzing theme, story, as well as point of view of the playwright. This will be followe...(read more)

Gotanda, Philip Kan
Gotanda, Philip
Fall 2011

166/2

Special Topics:
Race and Cultures of Mobility in American Literature

MWF 1-2

This course examines how nineteenth- and twentieth-century U.S. writers imagined the connections between race, mobility, and national identity. Movement in American literature is often understood to betoken freedom, exploration, and escape--whethe...(read more)

Carmody, Todd
Carmody, Todd
Fall 2011

175/1

Literature and Disability:
Representations of Disability in Literature

MWF 3-4

We will examine the ways disability is represented in a variety of works of fiction and drama. Writing assignments will include two short (5-8 page) critical essays and a take-home final examination. (This is a core course for the Disability Studi...(read more)

Kleege, Georgina
Kleege, Georgina
Fall 2011

180H/1

Short Story

MW 4-5:30

“The lyf so short, the crafte so longe to lerne…”

-- Chaucer

This course will investigate how authors craft stories, so that both non-writers and writers may gain a new perspective on reading stor...(read more)

Chandra, Vikram
Chandra, Vikram
Spring 2011

80K/1

Children's Literature

TTh 2-3:30

Children's Literature is a complex subject of intersecting concerns. Ideas about childhood and about what is good or bad for children rub up against commercial interests and the interests of educators and parents, not to mention those of the (...(read more)

Wright, Katharine E.
Wright, Katharine
Spring 2011

C136/1

Topics in American Studies:
The Progressive Era

MWF 2-3

We will look at a number of books, films, etc. from or about the U.S. in the early 20th century, roughly 1890-1916. Modern United States begins to be formed definitively in this period, with important developments in the economy (large corporation...(read more)

Hutson, Richard
Hutson, Richard
Spring 2011

152/1

Women Writers:
Early American Women Writers

TTh 2-3:30

This course will survey the writing of American women from narratives of colonial settlement through the novels of the early republic. During this period, women produced immensely popular works and developed major literary traditions that would fu...(read more)

Donegan, Kathleen
Donegan, Kathleen
Spring 2011

166/1

Special Topics:
Scotland and Romanticism

TTh 11-12:30

Between 1760 and 1830 Scotland was one of the centers of the European-North Atlantic "Republic of Letters." Here were invented the signature forms and discourses of the "Enlightenment" and "Romanticism" (terms for cul...(read more)

Duncan, Ian
Duncan, Ian
Spring 2011

170/1

Literature and the Arts:
Medievalism and Art

MWF 11-12

Loved, hated, imitated, and mocked (sometimes by the same people), the medieval-inspired style of the Gothic Revival was inescapable in Britain and America during the nineteenth century, and its legacy is still visible today. In this class, we wil...(read more)

Thornbury, Emily V.
Thornbury, Emily
Spring 2011

173/1

The Language and Literature of Films:
Film Noir

TTh 5:30-7 + films Thurs. 7-10 p.m.

We will examine film noir's influence on neo-noir and its relationship to "classical" Hollywood cinema, as well as its history, theory and generic markers, while analyzing in detail the major films in this area. The course will also ...(read more)

Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia
Spring 2011

175/1

Literature and Disability

TTh 3:30-5

Rather than focus simply on literary representations of disability, in this course we will try to think about the concept of literature via the category of disability. We are told that "poems make nothing happen" (Auden); for speech-act ...(read more)

Langan, Celeste
Langan, Celeste
Spring 2011

180A/1

Autobiography:
Disability Memoir

TTh 11-12:30

Autobiographies written by people with disabilities offer readers a glimpse into lives at the margins of mainstream culture, and thus can make disability seem less alien and frightening. Disability rights activists, however, often criticize these ...(read more)

Kleege, Georgina
Kleege, Georgina
Spring 2011

180Z/1

Science Fiction

TTh 9:30-11

This course will examine in depth the history of speculative fiction and its engagement with the thematics and topoi of the new life sciences--representation of cloning, ecological dystopias, hybrid life-forms, genetic engineering dystopi...(read more)

Jones, Donna V.
Jones, Donna
Summer 2011

N166/1

Special Topics:
A Critical Approach to Children's Literature

MW 12-2P

With a jump-start from the 19th century with Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, we will focus on books written for and/or read by children in the 20th and 21st centuries. Using a variety of critical techniques we will examine a range o...(read more)

Wright, Katharine E.
Wright, Katherine
Fall 2010

C77/1

Introduction to Environmental Studies

TTh 12:30-2 + 1 - 1/2 hours discussion section per week

This is a team-taught introduction to environmental studies. The team consists of a professor of environmental science, a professor of English, and three graduate student instructors working in the field. The aim of the course is to give students t...(read more)

Hass, Robert L.
Hass, Robert and Sposito, Gary
Fall 2010

80K/1

Children’s Literature

MWF 2-3

Children's Literature is a complex subject of intersecting concerns. Ideas about childhood and about what is good or bad for children rub up against commercial interests and the interests of educators and parents, not to mention those of the (s...(read more)

Wright, Katharine E.
Wright, Katharine
Fall 2010

C136/1

Topics in American Studies:
Literature and History of Mexican American Farm Workers

TTh 11-12:30

In this course we will study the social movements, political aspirations, and literary expressions of Mexican American farm workers in the U.S. during the twentieth century, focusing on the period from 1930 to 1990. The methodological approach will...(read more)

Gonzalez, Marcial
Gonzalez, Marcial
Fall 2010

166/1

Special Topics:
Postwar British Drama

MWF 3-4

A survey of the post-war renaissance of British dramatic writing, concentrating on the decades after the tumultuous year of 1956, when the Suez Crisis abroad and the emergence of the 'Angry Young Men' at home demonstrated the extent to which both c...(read more)

Blanton, C. D.
Blanton, Dan
Fall 2010

166/2

Special Topics:
Vladimir Nabokov

TTh 9:30-11

We will study the work of Nabokov as a novelist on two continents over a period of nearly sixty years. The course will be structured (more or less) chronologically and evenly divided between novels translated from Russian and written in English. ...(read more)

Naiman, Eric
Fall 2010

166/3

Special Topics:
Engaging the Play—Being the Player

TTh 12:30-2

The course will explore inventive ways of engaging the theater text.

Students will read from a selection of plays and be expected to give presentations analyzing theme, story, as well as intention of playwright. This will be followed with ...(read more)

Gotanda, Philip Kan
Gotanda, Philip Kan
Fall 2010

174/1

Literature and History

TTh 12:30-2

This course will interrogate the binary implied in its rubric--the distinction between literature and history--by considering the ways in which literary remains constitute the pieces with which we may begin to puzzle out a fully embodied past and ...(read more)

Miller, Jennifer
Miller, Jennifer
Spring 2010

152/1

Women Writers

MWF 11-12

Please contact Jennifer Miller at j_miller@berkeley.edu for more information about this course.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major....(read more)
Miller, Jennifer
Miller, Jennifer
Spring 2010

165/1

Special Topics:
Short Story Modern Masters: Joyce, Hemingway, Kafka, Borges

MWF 1-2

The Reading and writing assignments--linked with the lectures and class discussions--are intended to develop students’ ability to analyze, understand, and interpret four great masters of the short story: Joyce, Hemingway, Kafka, and Borges. (Th...(read more) Campion, John
Campion, John
Spring 2010

165/2

Special Topics:
Narrating Absence: Not-Knowing in Literary Analysis

MW 4-5:30

Critical reading usually involves reading “between the lines” of a literary text, picking up on the implications of its manifest content. In this course, however, we will focus on reading what is altogether missing: for example, the lack ...(read more) Clowes, Erika
Clowes, Erika
Spring 2010

166/1

Special Topics:
Studies in Literature and Environment

MWF 10-11

What does literature have to teach us about contemporary debates on genetic engineering, food politics, toxic pollution, global warming, e-waste, species extinction and the “death of the planetÃ&...(read more)

Francois, Anne-Lise
Francois, Anne-Lise
Spring 2010

166/2

Special Topics:
American Regionalism

MWF 1-2

What makes a work of literature characteristically “American”? This question is complicated by the variety of distinct geographical and cultural landscapes that make up the country. In some ways, the representation of place in American r...(read more) Clowes, Erika
Clowes, Erika
Spring 2010

166/3

Special Topics:
The Essay: Traditions and the Individual Talent

TTh 11-12:30

This course will focus on reading — and writing about — essays on the craft of writing by a medley of historical and contemporary figures in American literature. The essays we will read provide a view of writing literature from the insid...(read more) McQuade, Donald
McQuade, Don
Spring 2010

166/4

Special Topics:
Literary and Cinematic Cities

TTh 2-3:30

This course examines representations of the city in twentieth-century literature and film, asking how urban experience shapes modernist and postmodernist aesthetics. The course will examine the material conditions and demands of the city, but it will...(read more) Edwards, Erin E
Edwards, Erin
Spring 2010

173/1

The Language and Literature of Films:
Film Noir

TTh 5:30-7 Films: Thurs. 7-10 pm

We will examine film noir’s relationship to “classical” Hollywood cinema, as well as its history, theory and generic markers, while analyzing in detail the major films in this area. The course will also be concerned with the social...(read more) Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia
Spring 2010

180H/1

Short Story

MW 4-5:30



“The lyf so short, the crafte so longe to lerne…”

-- Chaucer

This course will investigate how authors craft stories, so that both non...(read more)
Chandra, Vikram
Chandra, Vikram
Spring 2010

180Z/1

Science Fiction:
Speculative Fiction and Dystopias

MWF 11-12

This course will examine in depth the history of speculative fiction and its engagement with the thematics and topoi of the new life sciences—representation of cloning, ecological dystopias, hybrid life-forms, genetic engineering dystopias. Whi...(read more) Jones, Donna V.
Jones, Donna
Summer 2010

N166/1

Special Topics:
The Beat Generation

TTh 2-4

This course will examine major works (mostly the early stuff) by four central figures of the Beat Generation-- Allen Ginsberg, Jack Kerouac, W.S. Burroughs, and Gary Snyder.  First we'll survey the literary/historical context in which thes...(read more)

Ron Loewinsohn
Fall 2009

C77/1

Introduction to Environmental Studies

TTh 12:30-2 + 1-1/2 hours of discussion per week

This integrative course, taught by a humanities professor and a science professor, surveys current global environmental issues; introduces the basic intellectual tools of environmental science; investigates ways the human relationship to nature has be...(read more) Hass, Robert L.
Hass, Robert and Sposito, Garrison
Fall 2009

80K/1

Children's Literature

MWF 12-1

This introductory course looks at children's literature in several genres, historically and culturally.  Readings will include fairy tales, The Princess and the Goblin, Charlotte's Web, and other novels, as well as pictu...(read more) Wright, Katharine E.
Wright, Katharine
Fall 2009

C107/1

English Bible as Literature

MWF 2-3

In this class, we will read a selection of biblical texts as literature; that is, we will read them through many interpretive lenses, but not as divine revelation. We will take up traditional literary questions of form, style, and structure, but we w...(read more) Goldsmith, Steven
Goldsmith, Steven
Fall 2009

C136/1

Topics in American Studies: The Literature and History of Mexican American Farm Workers

TTh 12:30-2

In this course we will study the social movements, political aspirations and cultural expressions of Mexican farm workers in the U.S. during the twentieth century, focusing on the period from 1930-1980. The methodological approach will be interdis...(read more)

Gonzalez, Marcial
Gonzalez, Marcial
Fall 2009

C136/2

Topics in American Studies: A Gallery of Wonders, Curiosities, Spectacles, Cynics, and Suckers: Consumer Culture in Post-Civil War America

MW 4-5:30

This course will focus on the interrelations of the rise of consumerism and the culture industry in post-Civil War America. We will examine a wide range of materials, including advertisements (especially patent medicine ads), trade cards, commercial ...(read more) McQuade, Donald
McQuade, Donald
Fall 2009

165/1

Special Topics: Scotland and Romanticism

TTh 11-12:30

Between 1760 and 1830 Scotland was one of the generative centers of the European-North Atlantic “Republic of Letters.” Here were invented the signature forms and discourses of both the “Enlightenment” and “Romanticism&rdq...(read more) Duncan, Ian
Duncan, Ian
Fall 2009

165/2

Special Topics: American Postmodernism--Olson and the Black Mountain School

TTh 12:30-2

This course will look at the development of American Postmodernism (in poetry, painting, music, dance, etc.), focusing on the artistic and institutional influence of one of its founding figures: the poet, Charles Olson.

In many ways Charl...(read more)
Campion, John
Campion, John
Fall 2009

166/1

Special Topics: The Global South: Faulkner, Garcia Marquez, Morrison, and Cisneros 


TTh 11-12:30

A detailed trans-American study of William Faulkner, Sandra Cisneros, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, and Toni Morrison's imaginative writings in the aesthetic and geopolitical contexts of the South and the Global South. Topics include the significance of...(read more) Saldivar, Jose David
Saldivar, Jose David
Fall 2009

166/2

Special Topics: Readings for Fiction Writers

TTh 3:30-5

This course will focus on each novelist’s invention of, or critique of, national identity myths in a time of national crisis. Students will explore the intimate connection between narrative strategy and construction of meaning....(read more) Mukherjee, Bharati
Mukherjee, Bharati (a.k.a. Blaise, Bharati)
Fall 2009

166/3

Special Topics: British Cinema

MW 4-5:30 + films Tues. 6-9 P.M. in 300 Wheeler

François Truffaut once observed “a certain incompatibility between the terms ‘Britain’ and ‘cinema.’” Certainly, in its main traditions, this cinema exhibits a defining tendency to resist its status as cinema...(read more) Miller, D.A.
Miller, D.A.
Fall 2009

173/1

The Language and Literature of Films: Meta-Cinema and the Hollywood Novel

TTh 3:30-5

Hollywood is traditionally conceived as a “dream factory,” the place where common cultural fantasies are articulated. Books and films about filmmaking, however, tend to associate it with superficiality, immorality, and even violence and d...(read more) Clowes, Erika
Clowes, Erika
Fall 2009

175/1

Literature and Disability

TTh 3:30-5

We will examine the ways disability is portrayed in a variety of works of fiction and drama. Assignments will include two short (5-8 page) critical essays, a take-home final examination and a group presentation or rehearsed reading from one of the pl...(read more) Kleege, Georgina
Kleege, Georgina
Fall 2009

180R/1

The Romance

TTh 9:30-11

For more information on this course, please see professor Miller during her office hours on Fridays from 2-4.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major. ...(read more)
Miller, Jennifer
Miller, Jennifer
Spring 2009

80K/1

Children's Literature

TTh 11-12:30

This introductory course looks at children's literature in several genres, historically and culturally. Readings will include fairy tales, The Princess and the Goblin, Charlotte's Web, and other novels, as well as picture boo...(read more) Wright, Katharine E.
Wright, Katharine
Spring 2009

165/1

Special Topics:
Poetry Writing in an Ecological Field of Composition

MWF 2-3

This class seeks to contend with the difficulties that arise from how a poem is displayed on the page. We will look at a number of poets, such as Cummings, Pound, and Olson, who have presented their poetry in inventive ways. We’ll study other ar...(read more) Campion, John
Campion, John
Spring 2009

166/1

Special Topics:
Readings for Writers/Narrating the Nation

TTh 3:30-5

This course will focus on each author’s representation or invention of foundational national myths.  Students will explore the intimate connection between narrative strategy and construction of meaning....(read more) Mukherjee, Bharati
Mukherjee, Bharati (a.k.a. Blaise, B.)
Spring 2009

173/1

The Language and Literature of Films:
Alfred Hitchcock

MW 10:30-12 + Film Screenings Th 5-8 P.M. in 123 Wheeler

Unique among Hollywood directors, Hitchcock played on two boards.  As a master of entertainment who had nothing to say, he produced work as thoroughly trivial as it was utterly compelling.  But thanks to the French reception of his work in 1...(read more) Miller, D.A.
Miller, D.A.
Spring 2009

175/1

Literature and Disability

MW 12-1:30

We will examine the ways disability is portrayed in a variety of works of fiction and drama.  Assignments will include two short (5-8 page) critical essays, a take-home final examination and a group presentation or staged reading from one of the ...(read more) Kleege, Georgina
Kleege, Georgina
Spring 2009

180H/1

The Short Story

MW 4-5:30

The lyf so short, the crafte so longe to lerne -- Chaucer

This course will investigate how authors craft stories, so that both non-writers and writers may gain a new perspective on reading stories.  In thinking of short stories as art...(read more)
Chandra, Vikram
Chandra, Vikram
Fall 2008

C77/1

Introduction to Environmental Studies:
Introduction to Environmental Studies

Lectures TTh 12:30-2, plus one and a half hours of discussion section per week

This is an innovative team-taught course that surveys global environmental issues at the beginning of the twenty-first century and that introduces students to the basic intellectual tools of environmental science and to the history of environmental th...(read more) Hass, Robert L.
Hass, Robert and Sposito, Garrison
Fall 2008

C136/1

Topics In American Studies:
American Literature and the City

Lectures TTh 12:30-2 in 390 Hearst Mining, plus one hour of discussion section per week

Co-taught by a literary scholar and a historian, this course offers an interdisciplinary examination of how the American metropolis has been portrayed in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries in novels, short stories, poetry, journalism, essays, phot...(read more) Otter, Sam and Henkin, David
Fall 2008

165/1

Special Topics:
Greek Drama in Translation

TTh 9:30-11

"The lectures, class discussions, readings, and writing assignments are intended to develop students ability to analyze, understand, and evaluate a number of important ancient texts. The class will examine the deep implications of these early sources ...(read more) Campion, John
Campion, John
Fall 2008

166/1

Special Topics:
The Works of Vladimir Nabokov

MWF 10-11

Visual art may include: Rubens, Goya, Corot, Warhol, Koons. This course will consider the relationship between concepts of fraud and authenticity in literature, using this basic opposition to explore questions about originality, representation, and id...(read more) Naiman, Eric
Fall 2008

166/2

Special Topics:
The Global South: William Faulkner, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Toni Morrison, & Sandra Cisneros

MWF 11-12

This course is an intensive and rigorous course in the literature of the Americas and in trans-American literary and cultural criticism. We will be reading intensively and extensively, and the format of our course requires constant attendance. Our cou...(read more) Saldivar, Jose David
Saldivar, Jose
Fall 2008

166/3

Special Topics:
Literature in the Century of Film

TTh 9:30-11

This course examines the intersections between literature and visual media in the twentieth century, with a particular focus on film and its cultural effects. We will read novels, short stories, poetry, and essays that not only track the social and hi...(read more) Goble, Mark
Goble, Mark
Fall 2008

170/1

Literature:
Literature and the Arts

MWF 11-12

"Literature, especially poetry, has in common with one other art, music, that a key element of its aesthetic structure is rhythm. This course will explore rhythm, considering how even its most basic forms are similar yet also different in each of thes...(read more) Hanson, Kristin
Hanson, Kristin
Fall 2008

180A/1

Literature:
Autobiography: Disability Memoir

TTh 11-12:30

"Autobiographies written by people with disabilities offer readers a glimpse into lives at the margins of mainstream culture, and thus can make disability seem less alien and frightening. Disability rights activists, however, often criticize these tex...(read more) Kleege, Georgina
Kleege, Georgina
Spring 2008

80K/1

Freshman and Sophomore Studies:
Children�s Literature

TTh 9:30-11

This course will explore the complex and controversial issues that arise around a literature defined by its audience. We'll read British and American children's books from the 19th century to the present as well as a wide range of critical commentary....(read more) Wright, Katharine E.
Wright, Katharine
Spring 2008

C136/1

Topics In American Studies:
The U.S. in the Progressive Era, 1890-1917

MWF 2-3

This is an introduction to a number of cultural/political/economic/social issues from a �transitional� period of the United States between the rise of industrial capitalism (big corporate businesses and huge urban centers) in the late-19 th century an...(read more) Hutson, Richard
Hutson, Richard
Fall 2007

C77/1

Lower Division Coursework:
Introduction to Environmental Studies

TTh 12:30-2, plus one and a half hours of discussion section per week

This is an innovative team-taught course that surveys global environmental issues at the beginning of the twenty-first century and that introduces students to the basic intellectual tools of environmental science and to the history of environmental th...(read more) Hass, Robert L.
Hass, Robert and Sposito, Gary
Spring 2007

95/1

Sophomore Seminar:
Other Voices: Multicultural Literary Perspectives

M 12-1, plus one our of discussion section per week (W 12-1)

This course will introduce students to the work currently being undertaken by both Berkeley faculty and local artists in issues of race and class, gender and ethnicity, and the formations of minority discourse. Each week a different scholar or writer ...(read more) Saldivar, Jose David
Saldivar, Jose
Spring 2007

C107/1

Junior Coursework:
The Bible as Literature

MWF 1-2

In this class, we will read a selection of biblical texts as literature; that is, we will read them as anything but divine revelation. We will take up traditional literary questions of form, style, and structure, but we will also learn how to ask hist...(read more) Goldsmith, Steven
Goldsmith, Steven
Spring 2007

C136/1

Junior Coursework:
Topics in American Studies: The Era of the Child--The U.S. 1865-1900

TTh 9:30-11

"Historians often define the era after the Civil War and especially from 1880 to ca. 1915 as the ""era of the child."" Children became the heroes of popular culture as well as major subjects for painters and intellectuals and cultural observers. This...(read more) Hutson, Richard
Hutson, Richard
Spring 2007

165/1

Special Topics:
Hollywood Talkies to World War II

MW 2-3:30, plus film screenings Mondays 3:30-6:30

Our topic will be the theory and practice of mass entertainment in 1930?s Hollywood. The films we will watch include: The Jazz Singer, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, Public Enemy, Footlight Parade, Lady Killer, Baby Face, The Lady Eve, City Westerne...(read more) Knapp, Jeffrey
Knapp, Jeffrey
Spring 2007

166/1

Special Topics:
Readings for Writers/Narrating the Nation

TTh 11-12:30

This course will focus on each author?s representation or invention of foundational national myths. Students will explore the intimate connection between narrative strategy and construction of meaning....(read more) Mukherjee, Bharati
Mukherjee (Blaise), Bharati
Spring 2007

166/2

Special Topics:
Hitchcock's Skin (or, A Theory of the Thriller)

MW 12:30-2, plus film screenings Tuesdays 6-9 P.M

"She really got under your skin, didn?t she???said to the protagonist of North by Northwest



The corpus: This course is divided in its attention between an auteur and a genre. In one sense, the division is a superficial one, since there ...(read more)
Miller, D.A.
Miller, D.A.
Spring 2007

175/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Literature and Disability

MWF 10-11

For more information on this course, please email the professor at j_miller@berkeley.edu....(read more) Miller, Jennifer
Miller, Jennifer
Fall 2006

C136/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Topics in American Studies: The U.S. in the Progressive Era, 1890-1917

MWF 10-11

This is an introduction to a number of cultural/political/economic/social issues from a �transitional� period of the United States between the rise of industrial capitalism (big corporate businesses and huge urban centers) in the late 19 th century an...(read more) Hutson, Richard
Hutson, Richard
Fall 2006

165/1

Special Topics:
Elegy, Mourning, and the Representation of the Holocaust

TTh 2-3:30

"The German critic Theodor Adorno famously commented that it is �barbaric� to continue to write poetry after Auschwitz , that any attempt to convert such suffering into aesthetic images commits an injustice against the victims. Yet as Adorno also ackn...(read more) Goodman, Kevis
Goodman, Kevis
Fall 2006

166/1

Special Topics:
Race and Performance in the 20th-Century U.S.

MWF 11-12

"This course takes as its point of departure an observation made by writer James Baldwin in 1953: ""The time has come to realize that the interracial drama acted out on the American continent has not only created a new black man, it has created a new ...(read more) Saul, Scott
Saul, Scott
Fall 2006

166/2

Special Topics:
The 20th-Century Epic in Prose

TTh 9:30-11

Historically the epic has to do with heroes. The problem in the twentieth century, with the �coming of the state,� of rationalization and modernization, is that the age of heroes is, generally speaking, over. How does the novel, then, both preserve so...(read more) Rubenstein, Michael
Rubenstein, Michael
Fall 2006

170/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Literature and the Arts

MWF 1-2

Areas of Concentration, Book List, and Course Description: For more information on this class, please email the professor at khanson@berkeley.edu. ...(read more) Hanson, Kristin
Hanson, Kristin
Spring 2006

95/1

Lower Division Coursework:
Other Voices: Multicultural Literary Perspectives

M 12-1, plus one our of discussion section per week (W 12-1)

This course will introduce students to the work currently being undertaken by both Berkeley faculty and local artists in issues of race and class, gender and ethnicity, and the formations of minority discourse. Each week a different scholar or writer ...(read more) Padilla, Genaro M.
Padilla, Genaro
Spring 2006

166/1

Special Topics:
Theorizing Children's Literature

TTh 9:30-11

What is children's literature? How do (real and imagined) children read? What do various texts in the canon of children?s literature (and texts that lie outside that tradition) reveal about our own culture's, and other cultures,? ideologies of childho...(read more) Schweik, Susan
Schweik, Susan
Spring 2006

166/2

Special Topics:
Readings for Writers

TTh 11-12:30

Through close scrutiny of selected texts, students will explore forms and theories of the novel. The aim of the course is to discover the intimate connection between the authorial choices of narrative strategies and the construction of meaning. Partic...(read more) Mukherjee, Bharati
Mukherjee (Blaise), Bharati
Spring 2006

166/3

Special Topics:
1922

TTh 3:30-5

The year 1922 (or Year 1, as Ezra Pound declared it) has long marked the central moment in histories of literary modernism: the date of Ulysses (published in February in Paris) and The Waste Land (published in October in London). But a number of other...(read more) Blanton, Dan
Spring 2006

166/4

Special Topics:
Vladimir Nabokov

MWF 10-11

We will study the work of Nabokov as a novelist on two continents over a period of nearly sixty years. The course will be structured (more or less) chronologically and evenly divided between novels translated from Russian and written in English. After...(read more) Naiman, Eric
Spring 2006

166/5

Special Topics:
Post-War Italian Cinema (1945-70)

MW 3:30-5 in 300 Wheeler, plus film screenings Tues. 6-9 P.M. (also in 300 Wheeler)

"Post-war Italian cinema became internationally famous for two things: first, for revitalizing a nineteenth-century realist aesthetic, and then, for developing the cinematic modernism that ran directly counter to this realism. It ought to have been fa...(read more) Miller, D. A.
Spring 2006

171/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Literature and Sexual Identity

TTh 12:30-2

This course will take up the complicated relationship between literature and sexuality by way of sexual science, the aesthetics of sexuality, and sociologies and histories of sexuality. Throughout the course we will ask what role literature has to pl...(read more) Nealon, Christopher
Nealon, Christopher
Spring 2006

175/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Literature and Disability

TTh 12:30-2

What is disability? Rosemarie Garland Thomson has provisionally defined it as ?first, a system for interpreting bodily variations; second, a relationship between bodies and their environments; third, a set of practices that produce both the able-bodie...(read more) Schweik, Susan
Schweik, Susan
Spring 2006

180H/1

Upper Division Coursework:
The Short Story

MWF 3-4

"Check back later for more information!"

Chandra, Vikram
Chandra, Vikram
Fall 2005

C77/1

Lower Division Coursework:
Introduction to Environmental Studies

TTh 12:30-2 in 159 Mulford, plus 1_ hours of discussion section per week

This is an innovative team-taught course that surveys global environmental issues at the beginning of the twenty-first century and that introduces students to the basic intellectual tools of environmental science and to the history of environmental th...(read more) Hass, Robert L.
Hass, Robert and Sposito, Gary
Fall 2005

C136/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Topics in American Studies: The 1950's

TTh 2-3:30

"This class will explore the American 1950's through a sampling of history, literature, movies, and the popular culture of the decade, trying to understand some of its concerns and its contradictions. A period of massive conformity (""The Man in the G...(read more) Loewinsohn, Ron
Loewinsohn, Ron
Fall 2005

166/1

Special Topics:
Race and Performance in the 20th-Century U.S.

TTh 11-12:30

"This course takes as its point of departure an observation made by writer James Baldwin in 1953: ""The time has come to realize that the interracial drama acted out on the American continent has not only created a new black man, it has created a new ...(read more) Scott, Saul
Fall 2005

176/1

Upper Division Coursework:
"Literature and Popular Culture: The Western in Fiction and Film

Hutson, Richard "

In this course, I plan to get us all thinking about the popular genre of the Western and its cultural background. The films each week are an important and integral part of the course, and the films are required viewing. It is in the films that we see ...(read more) Seminars MWF 2-3. in 120 Latimer, plus film screenings Wednesdays 5-8 P.M. in 105 North Gate
Fall 2005

180A/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Disability Autobiography

MWF 12-1

Autobiographies written by people with disabilities offer readers a glimpse into lives at the margins of mainstream culture, and thus can make disability seem less alien and frightening. Disability rights activists, however, often criticize these text...(read more) Kleege, Georgina
Kleege, Georgina
Spring 2005

95/1

Lower Division Coursework:
Other Voices: Multicultural Literary Perspectives

M 12-1, plus one hour of discussion section per week (all sections W 12-1)

This course will introduce students to the work currently being undertaken by both Berkeley faculty and local artists in issues of race and class, gender and ethnicity, and the formations of minority discourse. Each week a different scholar or writer ...(read more) Padilla, Genaro M.
Padilla, Genaro
Spring 2005

C136/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Topics in American Studies: New York and Philadelphia

Lectures TTh 12:30-2 in 2040 Valley LSB, plus one hour of discussion section per week

This course offers an interdisciplinary examination of the literature and history of these two American cities in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We will read fiction, poetry, urban sketches, diaries, and autobiographies by writers such as Ben...(read more) Sam Otter and David Henkin
Spring 2005

C136/2

Upper Division Coursework:
Topics in American Studies: The War of 1898 and the Cultures of US Imperialism

MWF 10-11

"This survey course explores the narratives (memoirs, essays, novels, paintings, testimonies, letters) and history of the Cultures of United States Imperialism. We will start by considering the multiple meanings of US imperialism and anti-imperialism,...(read more) Saldivar, Jose David
Saldivar, Jose
Spring 2005

165/1

Special Topics:
Hollywood Film of the 1930s

MW 2-4

Our topic will be the theory and practice of mass entertainment in 1930s Hollywood. ...(read more) Knapp, Jeffrey
Knapp, Jeffrey
Spring 2005

165/2

Special Topics:
Fictions of Los Angeles

MW 4-5:30

"Los Angeles has been described, variously, as a ""circus without a tent"" (Carey McWilliams), ""seventy-two suburbs in search of a city"" (Dorothy Parker), ""the capital of the Third World"" (David Rieff), and ""the only place for me that never rains...(read more) Saul, Scott
Saul, Scott
Spring 2005

166/1

Special Topics:
In Flanders Field--The Great War in European Literature

TTh 3:30-5

This course is first of all devoted to the very different ways in which the First World War is represented in European literature. British poets like Owen, Sassoon, Rosenberg, Brooke, and Graves are internationally known for their work--they are The W...(read more) Buelens, Geert
Spring 2005

166/2

Special Topics:
Hitchcock and His Artistic Children

MW 11-12:30 in 300 Wheeler, plus film screenings Mondays 5-8 P.M. in 300 Wheeler

Unique among Hollywood directors, Hitchcock played on two boards. As a master of entertainment who had nothing to say, he produced work as thoroughly trivial as it was utterly compelling. But thanks to the French reception of his work in the 1950s, Hi...(read more) Miller, D.A.
Miller, D.A.
Spring 2005

173/1

The Language and Literature of Films:
Fantasy Film and Realms of Enchantment

TTh 11-12:30 in 22 Warren, plus film screenings Tues. 5-8 P.M. in 2040 Valley LSB

"Fantasy is an unusually elastic cinematic category that encompasses horror films, animation, science fiction, Arabian Nights adventures, fairy tales, religious epics, and even musicals. Its roots are labyrinthine and very old; we will try to fashion ...(read more) Merritt, Russell
Spring 2005

175/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Representations of Disability in Literature

TTh 9:30-11

We will examine the ways disability is portrayed in a variety of works of fiction, autobiography and drama. We will also screen some film versions of these texts. Writing assignments will include two short (5-8 page) critical essays and a take-home fi...(read more) Kleege, Georgina
Kleege, Georgina
Spring 2005

180A/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Auto/bio/graphy

TTh 11-12:30

In 1909 William Dean Howells called autobiography, 'the most democratic province in the republic of letters.' Acknowledging autobiography as a 'characteristically American mode of storytelling,' contemporary scholars tend to celebrate the liberatory p...(read more) Wong, Hertha D. Sweet
Sweet Wong, Hertha
Fall 2004

C77/1

Lower Division Coursework:
Introduction to Environmental Studies

TTh 12:30-2 in 105 North Gate, plus 1? hours of discussion section per week (sec. 101: Tues. 2-3:30; sec. 102: Thurs. 11-12:30; sec. 103: Tues. 3:30-5; sec 104: Thurs. 2-3:30; sec. 105: Thurs. 8-9:30; sec. 106: Thurs. 9:30-11)

This is an innovative team-taught course that surveys global environmental issues at the beginning of the twenty-first century and that introduces students to the basic intellectual tools of environmental science and to the history of environmental th...(read more) Hass, Robert L.
Hass, Robert
Fall 2004

C136/1

Topics in American Studies:
The U.S. in the Progressive Era, 1890-1917

TTh 12:30-2

This is an introduction to a number of cultural/political/economic/social issues from a transitional period of the United States between the rise of industrial capitalism (big corporate businesses and huge urban centers) in the late 19th-century and t...(read more) Hutson, Richard
Hutson, Richard
Fall 2004

C136/2

Topics in American Studies:
The American 1920's

TTh 2-3:30

This course will focus on American literature and culture in the 1920?s. We will address the main features of this extraordinary decade through novels, memoirs, films, and cultural histories. We will devote substantial time to Americans in Paris, incl...(read more) Porter, Carolyn
Porter, Carolyn