Class Archive

Semester
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

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Semester Course #
Instructor
Course Area
Fall 2019

200/1

Problems in the Study of Literature

MW 10:30-12

Approaches to literary study, including textual analysis, scholarly methodology and bibliography, critical theory and practice.

Enrollment is limited to entering doctoral students in the English program.

This course satisfi...(read more)

Goldstein, Amanda Jo
Fall 2019

203/1

Graduate Readings:
On Interpretation

MW 12-1:30

The last several decades have heard repeated, even rhythmic, calls to dispense with ‘interpretation’ as the model and indispensable methodological instrument of reading and critical reason, even within intellectual disciplines seemingly...(read more)

Blanton, C. D.
Fall 2019

203/2

Graduate Readings:
Prospectus Workshop

Tues. 2-5

This will be a hands-on writing workshop intended to facilitate and accelerate the transition from qualifying exams to prospectus conference, from prospectus conference to first dissertation chapter, and from the status of student to that of schola...(read more)

Abel, Elizabeth
Fall 2019

203/3

Graduate Readings:
Aesthetics and Politics: Kant and Beyond

TTh 12:30-2

As an introduction to the political possibilities, problems, and questions raised by Kantian aesthetics, this class will navigate between two quotations: 1) Schiller: “If man is ever to solve that problem of politics in practice he will have ...(read more)

Goldsmith, Steven
Fall 2019

212/1

Readings in Middle English

M 3-6

This course will survey Middle English literature, excluding Chaucer, beginning with the earliest Middle English texts and ending with Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. We will focus on language, translation, and close reading to start, leading up t...(read more)

Nolan, Maura
Fall 2019

246F/1

Graduate Proseminar: The Later-Eighteenth Century

W 3-6

The later eighteenth century has presented literary historians with more than the usual challenges to periodization and organization by author, movement, or genre. The years between (roughly) 1740-1800 witnessed the proliferation of new genres in v...(read more)

Goodman, Kevis
Fall 2019

246K/1

Literature in English, 1900-1945

MW 1:30-3

In this seminar, we will read a wide range of British and American novels from the first half of the twentieth century focusing on the intersections between modernism and theories of modernity. While we will pay considerable attention to modernism&...(read more)

Jones, Donna V.
Fall 2019

250/1

Research Seminar:
The English Department

Tues. 3:30-6:30

The English Department is one of the most curious developments in the history of human civilization. What do we study? The answer used to be, “literary texts of the English canon.” But then we questioned what belonged to the canon, what...(read more)

Marno, David
Fall 2019

250/2

Research Seminar:
Transcendentalism

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

This course considers Transcendentalism and its legacies with particular focus on the works of Ralph Waldo Emerson from the publication of Nature (1836) through Letters and Social Aims (1875).  Following Emerson's career ...(read more)

Tamarkin, Elisa
Fall 2019

375/1

The Teaching of Composition and Literature

Tues. 10:30-12:30

This course introduces new English Department GSIs to the theory and practice of teaching literature and writing, first for discussion sections of lecture courses, and second, for self-designed reading and co...(read more)

Sirianni, Lucy
Serpell, C. Namwali
Spring 2019

201A/1

Topics in the Structure of the English Language:
Introduction to Linguistics for Graduate Students in the Humanities

W 3-6

Few areas of research within the humanities are not mediated in some way by language.  Language is an object of philosophical investigation, a medium of historical record and cultural expression, the material of literature, and a metaphor for ...(read more)

Hanson, Kristin
Spring 2019

203/1

Graduate Readings:
William Faulkner and the Historical Novel

TTh 9:30-11

(read more)

Goble, Mark
Spring 2019

203/3

Graduate Readings:
The Queer and the Oriental

Tues. 12:30-3:30

The queer and the oriental are two figures on the wrong sides of Western philosophies of world history. Imagined as perverted deviations from, or inverted reflections of, a progress from despotic ancestral pasts to free reproductive futures, the qu...(read more)

Leong, Andrew Way
Spring 2019

203/4

Graduate Readings:
Renaissance Drama

TTh 2-3:30

Shakespeare’s preeminence as a dramatist has often paradoxically excluded him from courses on English Renaissance drama.  We’ll be returning Shakespeare to the company of his fellow playwrights, reading (among other works) Twelf...(read more)

Knapp, Jeffrey
Spring 2019

203/5

Graduate Readings:
Nineteenth-Century U. S. Historical Poetics

Tues. 3:30-6:30

This course will have three overlapping goals. It will provide a survey of major figures in nineteenth-century U. S. poetry. It will take stock of recent work in “Historical Poetics” by critics who have sought an alternative to what the...(read more)

Otter, Samuel
Spring 2019

218/1

Milton

W 12-3

For better or worse, most roads in literary history lead either to or from Milton. The goal of this course is to find a way through the massive corpus of Milton's writing, to see how Milton “produces himself” in his work. You should...(read more)

Turner, James Grantham
Spring 2019

243N/1

Prose Nonfiction Writing Workshop

W 3-6

Creative Nonfiction:  A graduate level writing workshop, open to graduate students from any department. Open also to undergraduate students from any department who have taken English 143-level writing seminars or have equivalent skills or expe...(read more)

Farber, Thomas
Spring 2019

246C/1

Graduate Proseminars (Renaissance):
the End of Scholarism

MW 3-4:30

"Lately two gentlemen poets... had it in derision, for that I could not make my verses jet upon the stage in tragical buskins, every word filling the mouth like the faburden of Bow Bell, daring God out of heaven with that atheist Tamburlaine, ...(read more)

Landreth, David
Spring 2019

246L/1

Graduate Pro-seminar (Literature in English, 1945 to the Present):
British Fiction Since 1945

W 9-12

This pro-seminar has two interrelated aims. The first is to survey British fiction (broadly construed) from 1945 through the present. The second is to survey that field’s major critical conversations and give students the tools to enter criti...(read more)

Gang, Joshua
Spring 2019

250/1

Research Seminar:
Philosophical Idealizations of Art and Modernist Practices

Thurs. 12:30-3:30

This course stems from my fascination with how often major philosophers idealized art by attributing to it powers that could promise versions of redemption from practical life.  I want to read Hegel, Kant, Nietzsche, Pater, Bergson, Heidegger,...(read more)

Altieri, Charles F.
Fall 2018

200/1

Problems in the Study of Literature

MW 12-1:30

Readings TBA.

Approaches to literary study, including textual analysis, scholarly methodology and bibliography, critical theory and practice.

Enrollment is limited to entering doctoral students in the English program.

...(read more)

Goldsmith, Steven
Fall 2018

202/1

History of Literary Criticism

W 2-5

An introduction to Western literary theory from antiquity to the present, focusing on the historical shift from the disciplines of poetics and rhetoric to that of aesthetics, with special attention to the concept of aesthetics and the discourse of ...(read more)

Kahn, Victoria
Fall 2018

203/1

Graduate Readings:
Allegorical Moments: Public, Private, and the Writing of Everyday Life

MW 10:30-12

This seminar will undertake a critical reading of, and participation in, some possibilities (or impossibilities) of contemporary realisms and realities, public and private. It will query, from an array of perspectives, problems of process, represen...(read more)

Hejinian, Lyn
Fall 2018

203/4

Graduate Readings:
American Genres

TTh 2-3:30

We’ll discuss canonical works of American genre fiction, except for the one genre we usually read: “literary fiction.” Our genres include: children’s lit, YA, spy thriller, fantasy, science fiction, magical realism, noir, cr...(read more)

Serpell, C. Namwali
Fall 2018

203/5

Graduate Readings:
Prospectus Workshop

W 3-6

This will be a hands-on writing workshop intended to facilitate and accelerate the transition from qualifying exams to prospectus conference, from prospectus conference to first dissertation chapter, and from the status of student to that of schola...(read more)

Abel, Elizabeth
Fall 2018

211/1

Chaucer:
Early Chaucer

M 3-6

Please note that this course description was revised on April 30.

This course focuses on the works that Chaucer wrote prior to the Canterbury Tales: the Book of the Duchess, Parliament of Fowls, House ...(read more)

Nolan, Maura
Fall 2018

250/3

Research Seminar:
Textual Communities and the Modern

Tues. 3:30-6:30

We’ll explore collectives made possible by the early modern communications revolution, focusing on print and the rise of periodical and serial forms. Case studies will include the Levellers, the Royal Society, and the Methodists, along with r...(read more)

Picciotto, Joanna M
Fall 2018

250/4

Research Seminar:
Evolution and Literary Form, 1800-1900

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

Reading the newly published On the Origin of Species together in November 1859, George Eliot and George Henry Lewes hailed Charles Darwin’s book as confirmation of the “Development Hypothesis,” founded a hundred years ear...(read more)

Duncan, Ian
Fall 2018

375/1

The Teaching of Composition and Literature

Tues. 10:30-12:30

Co-taught by a faculty member and a graduate student instructor (the department's R & C Assistant Coordinator), this course introduces new English GSIs to the practice and theory of teaching literature and writing at U...(read more)

Snyder, Katherine
Klavon, Evan
Spring 2018

203/1

Graduate Readings:
Radical Enlightenment?

Note new time: TTh 9:30-11

Channeling the voice of his own Enlightened despot, Kant’s famous answer to the question “What is Enlightenment?” included the chilling injunction to “argue as much as you want and about whatever you want, ...(read more)

Goldstein, Amanda Jo
Spring 2018

203/2

Graduate Readings:
The Novel in Theory

TTh 11-12:30

This course traces the development of novel theory in the twentieth century.  Designed as an introduction to major arguments that are still influential in literary studies generally, the course asks why so many different theoretical schools ha...(read more)

Hale, Dorothy J.
Spring 2018

203/3

Graduate Readings:
Prospectus and Grant Workshop

TTh 11-12:30

This workshop is intended for graduate students who are currently working on proposals for major research projects, especially for large multi-year projects such as the doctoral dissertation or long-term grants or fellowships. We will deal with the...(read more)

Thornbury, Emily V.
Spring 2018

203/4

Graduate Readings:
Digital Humanities for Medieval Studies

Note new time: TTh 2-3:30

This course serves as an introduction to the practice of digital humanities in the field of Medieval Studies. The goals of the course are threefold:

  • to explore the conceptual terrain of digital humanities and to become familiar wi...(read more)
Nolan, Maura
Spring 2018

203/5

Graduate Readings:
Contemporary Chicanx/Latinx Novels

TTh 2-3:30

In this course, we’ll examine narrative form in several Chicanx/Latinx novels, focusing on the role of problematic narrators. We’ll explore the specific ways that these novels tend to reify the social world through the eyes and voice of...(read more)

Gonzalez, Marcial
Spring 2018

250/2

Research Seminar:
Ways of Knowing, Ways of Representing in Eighteenth-Century English Fiction

Tues. 3:30-6:30

In this course we will read the early English fiction once associated with “the rise of the novel” with a view to the strategies this writing deployed to address new epistemological challenges. An expanding empire, an urbanizing nation ...(read more)

Sorensen, Janet
Spring 2018

250/3

Research Seminar:
Milton and the English Civil War

W 3-6

An introduction to the literature of the English civil war and following decades, focusing on the work of John Milton, but including the work of Henry Parker, Thomas Hobbes, Andrew Marvell, Margaret Cavendish, Katherine Phillips, Lucy Hutchinson, &...(read more)

Kahn, Victoria
Spring 2018

250/4

Research Seminar:
The Rhetoric of Technique

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

“Sex is boring,” Foucault declared in an interview published posthumously in 1986, before expressing his interest in those “intentional and voluntary actions by which men […] make their life an oeuvre that car...(read more)

Lavery, Grace
Spring 2018

250/5

Research Seminar:
Black Abstraction

F 12-3

This course bears a distinct title, Black Abstraction, the strikeout meant to indicate the degree to which the blackness in "black abstraction" remains perennially subject to question.  The course will inquire into the ways in...(read more)

Best, Stephen M.
Fall 2017

200/1

Problems in the Study of Literature

MW 12:30-2

Readings TBA

Approaches to literary study, including textual analysis, scholarly methodology and bibliography, critical theory and practice.

Enrollment is limited to entering doctoral students in the English program. 

...(read more)
Marno, David
Fall 2017

203/1

Graduate Readings:
Caribbean Literature and Culture

M 9-12

“and either I’m nobody, or I’m a nation.” -Derek Walcott

Walcott’s mongrel regionalism is an apt invitation to consider a field of cultures whose richness comes, at least in part, from its provoking ...(read more)

Ellis, Nadia
Fall 2017

203/2

Graduate Readings:
Comparative Colonialisms: Latin America and the U.S.

Wed. 6-9 PM

A comparative study of Spanish and British colonialism, this course examines specific forms of governmentality implanted in the Americas and consequences thereof, with particular attention to racialization. British and Spanish modes of colonialism ...(read more)

Saldaña, Maria
Fall 2017

203/3

Graduate Readings:
Materiality

TTh 2-3:30

In recent years, new theories of materiality have emerged to account for physical processes and eventualities outside of human volition and identificatory categories. In this course, we will examine these theories in relation to the older paradigms...(read more)

Flynn, Catherine
Fall 2017

211/1

Chaucer

This course was canceled (on August 1).

...(read more)
Justice, Steven
Fall 2017

246D/1

Graduate Pro-seminar: Renaissance:
Seventeenth-Century Literature, before the Restoration

Tues. 3:30-6:30

A sampling of literature in English from 1600 to 1660, a turbulent period of intellectual innovation and political revolution. Key bodies of work will be studied complete – Donne’s Songs and Sonnets and Holy Sonnets, H...(read more)

Turner, James Grantham
Fall 2017

246G/1

Graduate Pro-seminar: Romantic Period

TTh 12:30-2

Book List:  Austen, J., Lady Susan; Blake, W. Complete Poetry and Prose;  Burke, Reflections on the Revolution in France;  Byron, Lord Byron: The Major Works; Coleridge, S...(read more)

Langan, Celeste
Fall 2017

250/1

Research Seminar:
Victorian Cultural Studies

W 9-12

This course will follow the long history of the culture concept in Britain.  We will begin by working through Raymond Williams’ account in Culture & Society in order to see how several senses of the word “culture&rdquo...(read more)

Puckett, Kent
Fall 2017

250/2

Research Seminar:
How to Write a Book

M 2-5

Did you ever wonder how other people get their work done? Or what great ideas look like and where they come from? Are you curious about the best strategies and habits for clear, forceful, and engaging writing? This seminar about writing and publish...(read more)

Kahn, Victoria
Fall 2017

250/3

Research Seminar:
Paranoid States: Empire and the Rise of the Surveillance State

W 3-6

This course examines the long, intimate relationship between technologies of surveillance and the making of British and American empires. While digital technology and state surveillance has been significant in the post-9/11 world, identifying, moni...(read more)

Saha, Poulomi
Fall 2017

250/4

Research Seminar:
Gender, Sexuality, Modernism

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

“Is queer modernism simply another name for modernism?” The question Heather Love poses in her special issue of PMLA will also guide this seminar on the crossovers between formal and sexual “deviance” in modernist l...(read more)

Abel, Elizabeth
Fall 2017

375/1

The Teaching of Composition and Literature

Thurs. 10:30-12:30

Co-taught by a faculty member and a graduate student instructor (the department's R & C Assistant Coordinator), this course introduces new English GSIs to the practice and theory of teaching literature and writing at UC Berkeley in sections...(read more)

Snyder, Katherine
Liu, Aileen
Spring 2017

203/1

Graduate Readings:
World Systems Theory and the Asian Anglophone Novel

MW 9:30-11

World literature theories that have borrowed from the work of Immanuel Wallerstein on early capitalism to conceptualize the dynamics of literary centers and peripheries have difficulty accounting for the Asian Anglophone novel, an ascendant form o...(read more)

Lye, Colleen
Spring 2017

203/2

Graduate Readings:
The Political Economy of Life and Death in African American Literature and Culture

W 3-6

Using psychoanalytic, phenomenological, and economic theorization of death and life, this course will examine instances of the political economy of life (and birthing) and death in African American literature.   

We will read the ...(read more)

JanMohamed, Abdul R.
Spring 2017

205B/1

Old English:
Anglo-Saxons and the Law

TTh 12:30-2

In the last decade, there has been considerable interest in Anglo-Saxon law from the perspectives of history and literature, including a new, international project to re-edit the corpus. This course will consider both the social and textual dimens...(read more)

O'Brien O'Keeffe, Katherine
Spring 2017

211/1

Chaucer:
The Canterbury Tales

TTh 2-3:30

This course will introduce specialists and non-specialists alike to the close reading of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales.  You need have no previous experience with Middle English; ...(read more)

Nolan, Maura
Spring 2017

246C/1

Graduate Pro-seminar:
Renaissance

TTh 11-12:30

In this survey, we follow how authors from Francesco Petrarca and Thomas More to John Donne participated in the grand cultural project of the Renaissance, ostensibly defined by the belief that consuming and producing culture woul...(read more)

Marno, David
Spring 2017

246H/1

Graduate Pro-seminar:
Victorian Period

MW 11-12:30

We will read and discuss some major works of Victorian poetry, fiction, and critical and scientific prose, in light of nineteenth-century discussions of aesthetic, social, and natural conceptions of form, as well as current debates over the status...(read more)

Duncan, Ian
Spring 2017

246J/1

Graduate Pro-seminar:
American Literature, 1855 to 1900

F 12-3

In a speech delivered on the bicentenary of the ratification of the Constitution, Justice Thurgood Marshall scandalized his audience (and much of the nation) when he proposed that “while the Union survived the civil war, the Constitution did...(read more)

Best, Stephen M.
Spring 2017

250/1

Research Seminar:
Wordsworth and Coleridge in Collaboration

M 3-6

This class will study the major poetry and prose that emerged from the remarkable literary collaboration and conflict between William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor C...(read more)

Goodman, Kevis
Spring 2017

250/2

Research Seminar:
Modernism in Poetry and in Art

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

This course is still a work in progress.  The basic idea is to develop the possibility that new developments in materialism offer tremendous possiblities for appreciating Impressionist art and Imagist writing.  But they also make it impe...(read more)

Altieri, Charles F.
Spring 2017

250/3

Research Seminar:
Idols and Ideology—Readings in Augustine, Milton, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Hobbes, Kant, Marx, Freud, Althusser

W 2-5

The history of Western literary theory is often told in terms of the concept of mimesis. But there is another, equally powerful, anti-mimetic strand to this history, and that is the critique of mime...(read more)

Kahn, Victoria
Fall 2016

200/1

Problems in the Study of Literature

MW 12:30-2

Approaches to literary study, including textual analysis, scholarly methodology and bibliography, critical theory and practice.  

Enrollment is limited to entering doctoral students in the English program.  This course satisfies t...(read more)

Otter, Samuel
Fall 2016

203/1

Graduate Readings:
On Life: Life Philosophy and Culture

MW 9:30-11

This course will explore the literary and cultural significance of philosophies of life. To set the course in motion, we shall begin with two provocative works: Terry Eagleton’s ...(read more)

Jones, Donna V.
Fall 2016

203/2

Graduate Readings:
Early African American Literature

TTh 12:30-2

Major works in the context of slavery and its aftermath. Advance syllabus (read more)

Wagner, Bryan
Fall 2016

203/3

Graduate Readings:
Prospectus Workshop

W 3-6

This will be a hands-on writing workshop intended to facilitate and accelerate the transition from qualifying exams to prospectus conference, from prospectus conference to first dissertation chapter, and from the status of student to that of schol...(read more)

Abel, Elizabeth
Fall 2016

203/4

Graduate Readings:
Lyric, Poetry, Poetics

W 3-6

This course will provide an introduction to poetics and theories of poetry, especially lyric poetry, since the early 19th century.  We will watch as conceptualizations of poetry, lyric, and verse torque a...(read more)

Falci, Eric
Fall 2016

205A/1

Old English

This course will not be offered in 2016-17 (or the following year, either), but English Department graduate students may take the undergraduate equivalent, English 104 (Introduction to Old English) in its place; see the listing for that course in ...(read more)

No instructor assigned yet.
Fall 2016

212/1

Readings in Middle English

MW 11-12:30

For more information on this course, please contact Professor Miller at j_miller@berkeley.edu

This course satisfies the Group 2 (Medieval trhough Sixteenth Century) requirement.

...(read more)
Miller, Jennifer
Fall 2016

217/1

Shakespeare

TTh 2-3:30

An introduction to the study of Shakespeare at the graduate level. We'll examine a range of contemporary approaches to Shakespeare's plays and poems, and consider how they emerge from longstanding preoccupations across four hundred years o...(read more)

Landreth, David
Fall 2016

243B/1

Poetry Writing Workshop

F 11-2

Studies in contemporary poetic cases (Graham Foust, Sarah Nicholson, Morgan Parker, Juliana Spahr, Jenny Zhang, and others)  will focus our discussions of each other's poems.

Only continuing UC Berkeley students are eligible to app...(read more)

O'Brien, Geoffrey G.
Fall 2016

250/1

Research Seminar:
Representing Non-Human Life in Seventeenth- and Eighteenth-Century Britain

M 3-6

We will explore techniques developed by scientists, theologians, and poets to represent other life forms. Contexts we’ll investigate include encounters with new-world flora and fauna, the invention of the microscope, and contemporary debates...(read more)

Picciotto, Joanna M
Fall 2016

250/2

Research Seminar:
Ethnic Modernisms

Tues. 3:30-6:30

This seminar will explore the convergence of modernist and ethnic cultures in twentieth-century America and Europe, placing race and ethnicity in dialogue with the modernist compulsion to "make it new" and the avant-gardist compulsion to...(read more)

Lee, Steven S.
Fall 2016

250/3

Research Seminar:
Literature and the Brain

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

As imaging and computational technologies become more adept at measuring the neurology of reading and writing, literary study faces a number of challenges. Some of ...(read more)

Gang, Joshua
Fall 2016

375/1

The Teaching of Composition and Literature

Thurs. 10:30-12:30

Co-taught by a faculty member and a graduate student instructor (the department's R & C Assistant Coordinator), this course introduces new English GSIs to the practice and theory of teaching literature and writing at UC Berkeley in section...(read more)

Snyder, Katherine
Spring 2016

202/1

History of Literary Criticism

note new time: F 2-5

An introduction to Western literary theory from antiquity to the present, focusing on the historical shift from the disciplines of poetics and rhetoric to that of aesthetics, with special attention to the discourse of the sublime. Readings in Plat...(read more)

Kahn, Victoria
Spring 2016

203/1

Graduate Readings:
George Eliot and Victorian Science

MW1:30-3

A study of the Victorian novel in relation to nineteenth-century theories of natural and aesthetic form, focused on major writings by George Eliot and Charles Darwin. We will read two novels -- Middlemarch and Daniel Deronda &nda...(read more)

Duncan, Ian
Spring 2016

203/2

Graduate Readings:
Aesthetics and Politics: Kant and Beyond

TTh 9:30-11

This introduction to aesthetics will navigate between the following quotations: 1) “If man is ever to solve that problem of politics in practice he will have to approach it through the problem of the aesthetic, because it is only through Bea...(read more)

Goldsmith, Steven
Spring 2016

203/3

Graduate Readings:
Edmund Spenser

TTh 11-12:30

Sidney wrote that a poet's task was to "grow in effect another nature." No poet in English has fulfilled that charge more luxuriantly than Spenser. The plan of the semester will be to roam around in the leisurely, delight-filled capa...(read more)

Landreth, David
Spring 2016

203/4

Graduate Readings:
What Does Critical Theory Have to Do with the Postcolonial?

TTh 12:30-2

This course considers the relationship between the development of critical theory and the colonized and postcolonial worlds. It will ask how and where histories, cultures, and philosophies of the global south appear and intersect with continental ...(read more)

Saha, Poulomi
Spring 2016

205B/1

Old English:
Late Old English

TTh 2-3:30

In this course, we will explore the curious phenomenon of Old English after the Norman Conquest. Although English’s status as a language of power was overturned in 1066, the vernacular lived on in many guises—most remarkably as recogni...(read more)

Thornbury, Emily V.
Spring 2016

243B/1

Poetry Writing Workshop

W 3-6

Studies in contemporary poetic cases (Anne Boyer, Graham Foust, Fred Moten, Chris Nealon, Ed Roberson, Juliana Spahr, Simone White,  and others)  will focus our discussions of each other's poems.

Only continuing UC Berk...(read more)

O'Brien, Geoffrey G.
Spring 2016

246F/1

Graduate Proseminar: The Later-Eighteenth Century

W 9-12

In this survey of British writing from 1740 to the end of the century, we will read a wide range of genres, many of them innovated or undergoing major transformations at this time, from periodical essays, novels, and georgic poem...(read more)

Sorensen, Janet
Spring 2016

250/1

Research Seminar:
Capitalist Crisis and Literature

M 3-6

Since the global financial crisis of 2007-08 and the onset of the “Great Recession,” a small but growing number of literary scholars have strived to theorize the relation between capitalist crisis and literary studies. Two short articl...(read more)

Gonzalez, Marcial
Spring 2016

250/2

Research Seminar:
The Limits of Historicism

Tues. 3:30-6:30

Fredric Jameson famously enjoined critics to “Always historicize!,” and while many responded by committing to ideology critique and the project of demystification, of late a number have sought to satisfy the imperative by “practi...(read more)

Best, Stephen M.
Spring 2016

250/3

Research Seminar:
How It Strikes a Contemporary: Reading the Novel in the 21st Century

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

As a generic term, the “novel” has always been entangled with the new, the up-to-the-moment, the contemporary. If the weft of the genre of the novel is fiction, then its warp is modernity. So what might distinguish our own conte...(read more)

Snyder, Katherine
Snyder, Katie
Spring 2016

250/4

Research Seminar:
Modernism's Metaphysics

F 9-12

Over recent decades, we have become accustomed to speaking of the ‘cultural logic’ of modernism, using a periodizing term to delineate a larger complex of historical effects, while also insinuating its availability to the integrated de...(read more)

Blanton, C. D.
Fall 2015

200/1

Problems in the Study of Literature

MW 11-12:30

Approaches to literary study, including textual analysis, scholarly methodology and bibliography, critical theory and practice.  

Enrollment is limited to entering doctoral students in the English program.  This course satisfies t...(read more)

Hale, Dorothy J.
Fall 2015

202/1

History of Literary Criticism

This course has been postponed until Spring 2016.

...(read more)
Kahn, Victoria
Fall 2015

203/1

Graduate Readings:
Poetic Meter

W 2-5

This course will provide a basic introduction to the major meters of the modern English poetic tradition from the perspective of a theory of poetic meter rooted in generative linguistics.  Taking the "strict" iambic pentameter of Sh...(read more)

Hanson, Kristin
Fall 2015

203/2

Graduate Readings:
Henry James and After

TTh 12:30-2

This course will have two parts: in the first, we will read across the range of Henry James’s career, from its American beginnings to the achievements of his major phase; in the second, we will discuss a series of...(read more)

Goble, Mark
Fall 2015

203/3

Graduate Readings:
Victorian Literature from Hegel to Freud

TTh 2-3:30

This course embarks from the premise that “Victorian” names neither a period of time (1837 – 1901) nor the body of a British sovereign (Alexandrina Victoria Hanover) but a spatially and temporally mobile set of stylistic practice...(read more)

Lavery, Grace
Fall 2015

203/4

Graduate Readings:
Prospectus Workshop

note new time: W 3-6

This will be a hands-on writing workshop intended to facilitate and accelerate the transition from qualifying exams to prospectus conference, from prospectus conference to first dissertation chapter, and from the status of student to that of schol...(read more)

Abel, Elizabeth
Fall 2015

246L/1

Literature in English:
1945 to the Present

This course has been canceled.

...(read more)
Lye, Colleen
Fall 2015

250/1

Research Seminar:
Literature of the English Revolution

M 2-5

We will track the controversies that dominated public life in the generation before the outbreak of war (with particular emphasis on the Martin Marprelate phenomenon and the furor excited by the "Book of Sports"), explore the textual rem...(read more)

Picciotto, Joanna M
Fall 2015

250/2

Research Seminar:
Medieval Literary Thought

Tuesdays 9:30-12:30

The medieval volume of the Cambridge History of Literary Criticism begins by saying that the years from the 1980s until their present (2005) has been "a golden age" for the study of medieval "literary theory and cr...(read more)

Justice, Steven
Fall 2015

250/3

Research Seminar:
Black + Queer

Thursdays 3:30-6:30

Co-taught by Professors Nadia Ellis (English) and Darieck Scott (African American Studies); African American Studies 240 section 1 is the course number for the latter component of the course.

This graduate seminar surveys the intersections ...(read more)

Ellis, Nadia
Fall 2015

250/4

Research Seminar:
John Donne and T.S. Eliot: Lyric Poetry and Society

Thursdays 3:30-6:30

“Permit me to repeat,” Adorno writes in his celebrated essay on lyric poetry’s relationship to its context, “that we are concerned not with the poet as a private person, not with his psychology or his so-called social persp...(read more)

Marno, David
Fall 2015

375/1

The Teaching of Composition and Literature

Thursdays 10:30-12:30

Co-taught by a faculty member and a graduate student instructor (the department's R&C Assistant Coordinator), this course introduces new English GSIs to t...(read more)

Xin, Wendy Veronica
Snyder, Katherine
Spring 2015

203/1

Graduate Readings:
Erotic Renaissance

MW 9:30-11

A sampling of sixteenth-century discourses of sexuality, theories of Eros, artworks and writings about the erotic in art, from Italy, France and England. The aim is to test the hypothesis of my recent research – that an “erotic revolut...(read more)

Turner, James Grantham
Spring 2015

203/2

Graduate Readings:
Readings in Chicano/Latino Narrative

F 12-3

In this graduate reading course we will survey Chican@/Latino narrative, art and some drama/film from the 1960s through more recent cultural and aesthetic formations.

The seminar will open with a survey of a particularly fertile period duri...(read more)

Padilla, Genaro M.
Spring 2015

203/3

Graduate Readings:
Judgment in Early Medieval Literature

W 11-2

Judgment--alternately or simultaneously a mental faculty, abstract entity, virtue, void, or threat--pervades medieval literature and thought. Focusing particularly (though not exclusively) on Anglo-Saxon England, in this seminar we will attempt to...(read more)

Thornbury, Emily V.
Spring 2015

203/4

Graduate Readings:
The Anglophone Novel

TTh 9:30-11

Anglophone fiction is a capacious term. Simply put, Anglophone fiction refers to fiction written in English; however, in the context of postwar canon formation, Anglophone refers specifically to literature written in English from former British co...(read more)

Jones, Donna V.
Spring 2015

246D/1

Graduate Proseminar:
Renaissance (17th Century)

Tues. 3:30-6:30

An introduction to one of the great ages of English literature, focusing on works by Francis Bacon, John Donne, Ben Jonson, George Herbert, Andrew Marvell, Thomas Hobbes, John Milton, Robert Herrick, Lucy Hutchinson, and Anne Hal...(read more)

Kahn, Victoria
Spring 2015

246G/1

Graduate Proseminar:
Romantic Period

TTh 2-3:30

“Thou hast a voice, great Mountain, to repeal/ Large codes of fraud and woe…”.

Taking these lines from Shelley’s “Mont Blanc” as a point of departure, we will read widely in literature from 1789 to 1830,...(read more)

Langan, Celeste
Spring 2015

246I/1

Graduate Proseminar:
American Literature to 1855

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

In this course, we will read widely in U.S. fiction and other narrative forms in the first half of the nineteenth century, bringing together the old and the new, the canonical and the peripheral, the long-in-print and the recently rediscovered. We...(read more)

Otter, Samuel
Spring 2015

250/1

Research Seminar

This section of English 250 has been canceled.

 

...(read more)
Best, Stephen M.
Spring 2015

250/2

Research Seminar:
The Grammar of Poetry, the Poetry of Grammar

M 11-1

I want to try a course that explores what Wittgenstein calls philosophical grammar, on the assumption that poets are the most likely characters to develop the full conceptual implications of how we deploy grammatical elements in our structuring of...(read more)

Altieri, Charles F.
Spring 2015

250/3

Research Seminar:
Gender, Sexuality, and Modernism

W 3-6

“Is queer modernism simply another name for modernism?” The question Heather Love poses in her special issue of PMLA will also guide this seminar on the crossovers between formal and sexual “deviance” in modernist ...(read more)

Abel, Elizabeth
Spring 2015

250/4

Research Seminar

This section of English 250 has been canceled.
 
...(read more)
Falci, Eric
Fall 2014

200/1

Problems in the Study of Literature

MW 10:30-12

(read more)

Blanton, C. D.
Fall 2014

203/2

Graduate Readings:
Allegories of Late Capitalism and the Writing of Everyday Life

TTh 12:30-2

This seminar will undertake a critical reading of, and participation in, some possibilities (or impossibilities) of contemporary realisms and realities. It will query, from an array of perspectives, problems of process, location, historical awaren...(read more)

Hejinian, Lyn
Fall 2014

203/3

Graduate Readings:
The Novel in Theory

TTh 2-3:30

This course traces the development of novel theory in the twentieth century.  Designed as an introduction to major arguments that are still influential in literary studies generally, the course asks why so many different theoretica...(read more)

Hale, Dorothy J.
Fall 2014

205A/1

Old English

This course will not be offered in 2014-15, but English Department graduate students may take the undergraduate equivalent, English 104 (Introduction to Old English), this fall in its place; see the listing for that course in this Announcement of ...(read more)

No instructor assigned yet.
Fall 2014

211/1

Chaucer

MW 1:30-3

For more information on this course, please contact Professor Miller at j_miller@berkeley.edu.

This course satisfies the Group 2 (Medieval through Sixteenth Century) requirement.

...(read more)
Miller, Jennifer
Fall 2014

217/1

Shakespeare

M 3-6

Instead of pursuing a master problematic, we will take up a wide range of issues: when I read Shakespeare these days, I am interested in his representations of citizenship, compassion, artificial persons (political representatives, diplomats, surr...(read more)

Arnold, Oliver
Fall 2014

243N/1

Prose Nonfiction Writing Workshop

This course has been canceled.

...(read more)
Farber, Thomas
Fall 2014

246C/1

Renaissance

W 3-6

This survey course will focus on the poetry, drama, and prose literature of sixteenth-century England.  We'll also read key works from the past fifty years of literary scholarship on the period.

Whenever possible, readings will be ...(read more)

Knapp, Jeffrey
Fall 2014

246K/1

Literature in English 1900-1945:
The Modernist Novel

MW 12-1:30

In this seminar, we will read ten modernist novels. We will consider the strangeness of their modes of narrative and characterization as they respond to challenges such as the destabilizing of traditional social hierarchies and gender roles, the...(read more)
Flynn, Catherine
Fall 2014

250/1

Research Seminars:
Comintern Modernisms

W 3-6

It has long been common practice to see Western metropolises like Paris and New York as competing centers of global modernism, as capitals of a "world republic of letters."  The aim of this seminar is to posit an alternate mapping o...(read more)

Lee, Steven S.
Fall 2014

250/2

Research Seminars:
Victorian Prose Style

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

In this course, we’ll look at the idea of prose style in a few different ways.  First, we’ll read some key texts on the theory of st...(read more)

Puckett, Kent
Fall 2014

250/3

Research Seminars:
Poetry and the Fate of the Senses

M 3-6

This comparative seminar in lyric poetry borrows its title from Susan Stewart's Poetry and the Fate of the Senses (University of Chicago Press, 2002), to ask about the relation between poetry and sensory deprivation (or plenitude) and...(read more)

Francois, Anne-Lise
Fall 2014

310/1

Field Studies in Tutoring Writing

T.B.A.

Through seminars, discussions, and reading assignments, students are introduced to the language/writing/literacy needs of diverse college-age writers such as the developing, bi-dialectal, and non-native English-speaking (NNS) writer. The course wi...(read more)

No instructor assigned yet.
Fall 2014

310/1

Field Studies in Tutoring Writing

T. B. A.

Through seminars, discussions, and reading assignments, students are introduced to the language/writing/literacy needs of diverse college-age writers such as the developing, bi-dialectal, and non-native English-speaking (NNS) writer. The course wi...(read more)

Staff
Fall 2014

375/1

The Teaching of Composition and\nLiterature

Thurs. 9-11

Co-taught by a faculty member and a graduate student instructor (the department's R&C Assistant Coordinator), this course introduces new English GSIs to the theory and practice of teaching literature and writing both at UC Berkeley (in Eng...(read more)

Goodman, Kevis
Spring 2014

202/1

History of Literary Criticism

W 2-5

An introduction to Western literary theory from antiquity to the present, focusing on the historical shift from the disciplines of poetics and rhetoric to that of aesthetics, with special attention to the concept of mimesis and the discourse of th...(read more)

Kahn, Victoria
Spring 2014

203/1

Graduate Readings:
American Enlightenment and Revolution

M 2-5

This course broadly examines the history of the Enlightenment in eighteenth-century America.  In readings of literary, political, and religious texts alongside visual arts of the period, we will look at the American Revolution's impact on...(read more)

Tamarkin, Elisa
Spring 2014

203/2

Graduate Readings:
Campus/Novel/Theory

Tues. 3:30-6:30

This course considers the relationship between the campus, the novel, and literary theory in the West. Accordingly, we will discuss theories of the novel, read some post-war British and American “campus novels,” consider the campu...(read more)

Serpell, C. Namwali
Spring 2014

203/4

Graduate Readings:
African American Literature in the Twentieth Century

F 11-2

A survey of major African American writers in the context of social history. 

This course satisfies the Group 5 (20th century) or Group 6 (non-historical)  requirement.

Advance syllabus (read more)

Wagner, Bryan
Spring 2014

205B/1

Old English:
Reading Beowulf

TTh 2-3:30

In “Reading Beowulf” we will be particularly interested in the making of Beowulf as a text and as a canonical poem. The first goal addresses issues of language, paleography, and textual editing as we translate; the se...(read more)

O'Brien O'Keeffe, Katherine
Spring 2014

243B/1

Poetry Writing Workshop

M 11-2

Studies in contemporary poetic cases (Anne Boyer, Farnoosh Fathi, Brenda Hillman, Ben Lerner, Fred Moten, Lisa Robertson, Dana Ward, and others) and a few essays will focus our discussions of each other's poems.

To be considered for...(read more)

O'Brien, Geoffrey G.
Spring 2014

246E/1

Restoration and Early 18th Century

TTh 12:30-2

An exploration of the satire, devotional autobiography, prose fiction, letter-writing, diaries, heroic verse, drama, pornography, and feminist polemic produced in England between the Restoration of Charles II (1660) and circa 1735; these ...(read more)

Turner, James Grantham
Spring 2014

246J/1

American Literature, 1855 to 1900

TTh 11-12:30

In a speech delivered on the bicentenary of the ratification of the Constitution, Justice Thurgood Marshall scandalized his audience (and much of the nation) when he proposed that “while the Union survived the civil war, the Constitution did...(read more)

Best, Stephen M.
Spring 2014

246L/1

Literature in English, 1945 to the Present:
In the Archive with American Fiction and Poetry

TTh 9:30-11

This course is two courses rolled into one.

First, it offers a survey of post-WWII American fiction and poetry, with an eye especially to how aesthetic forms were reshaped under the pressure of social movements (the 1930s left, the Civil Ri...(read more)

Saul, Scott
Spring 2014

250/1

Research Seminars:
Religion and Poetry in Early Modern England

W 11-2

What does it mean to speak to God through a sonnet? Why would someone retell the story of the Biblical Fall in verse? Why rewrite the Psalms in rhyme royal? In this course, we’ll read sixteenth- and seventeenth-century religious poetry along...(read more)

Marno, David
Spring 2014

250/2

Research Seminars:
Aesthetics and the Orient

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

The kinds of writing called “aesthetics” and “Orientalism” are usually studied in relative isolation from each other, but they share certain features. Both pull readers outside their comfort zones, towards an unfamiliar pla...(read more)

Lavery, Grace
Fall 2013

200/1

Problems in the Study of Literature

MW 10:30-12

Approaches to problems of literary study, designed to concentrate on questions of scholarly method, from traditional modes of textual analysis to more recent styles of critical theory and practice.

This course satisfies the Group 1 (problem...(read more)

Blanton, C. D.
Fall 2013

203/1

Graduate Readings:
Post-9/11 Fiction

M 1-4

Note: Those interested in taking the course, please email me (ksnyder@berkeley.edu) the first week of classes for the reading assignment required for our first seminar meeting on September 9.

For mo...(read more)

Snyder, Katherine
Fall 2013

203/2

Graduate Readings:
Modernism and Film

MW 4-5:30

This course surveys a range of twentieth-century texts that allow us to explore connections between film and modernist literary practice, and the cultural implications of cinema for the period as a whole. Working with a broad conception of moderni...(read more)

Goble, Mark
Fall 2013

203/3

Graduate Readings:
Prospectus Course

Th 2-5

This is a practical writing workshop intended to facilitate and accelerate the transitions from qualifying exams to prospectus conference, from prospectus conference to first dissertation chapter, and from the status of student to that of scholar....(read more)

Hanson, Kristin
Fall 2013

205A/1

Old English

TTh 11-12:30

This class introduces students to the language, literature, and modern critical study of the written vernacular culture of England before the Norman Conquest—an era whose language and aesthetics now seem radically foreign. By the end of the ...(read more)

Thornbury, Emily V.
Fall 2013

246F/1

Graduate Proseminar: The Later-Eighteenth Century

Tues. 3:30-6:30

The later eighteenth century has presented literary historians with more than the usual challenge to periodization or organization by author and movement; they have responded with an unusual number of designations: the “Age of Johnson,&rdquo...(read more)

Goodman, Kevis
Fall 2013

250/1

Research Seminar:
Critical and Peripheral Realisms

Tues. 3:30-6:30

To what extent has our tendency to measure aesthetic achievement within the terms set by the historical modernisms of 1890-1920 blocked our perception of twentieth century peripheral literatures? This course will entertain historical diagnoses of ...(read more)

Lye, Colleen
Fall 2013

250/2

Research Seminar:
Sensory Aesthetics in Late Medieval and Early Renaissance Poetry and Drama

W 1-4

Sensation is a liminal phenomenon, a phenomenon that marks edges and borders. It is the interface between the material world and the physical body as well as between the body and the mind. Medieval writing is full of sensation, from the theoretica...(read more)

Nolan, Maura
Fall 2013

250/3

Research Seminar:
The Romantic Novel and the History of Man

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

In his introduction to Tom Jones (1749) Henry Fielding formally announced the “rise of the novel” by grounding the new genre on “human nature,” which David Hume had recently proclaimed the foundation of all the sci...(read more)

Duncan, Ian
Fall 2013

375/1

The Teaching of Composition and Literature

Tues. 1-3

This course (previously numbered English 302) will explore the theory and practice of teaching literature and writing. Designed as both a critical seminar and a hands-on practicum for new college teachers, the class will cover topics such as cours...(read more)

Landreth, David
Spring 2013

137T/1

Topics in Chicana/o Literature and Culture:
Chicano Art and Literature

TTh 12:30-2

We will survey Chicano/a literature, art and film from the Chicano/a Movement (1960s through the 1980s) through more recent political and aesthetic formations.

The class will open with study of  a particularly fertile period during whi...(read more)

Padilla, Genaro M.
Fall 2012

200/1

Problems in the Study of Literature

MW 12-1:30

Approaches to literary study, including textual analysis, scholary methodology and bibliography, critical theory and practice.

...(read more)
Francois, Anne-Lise
Fall 2012

203/1

Graduate Readings:
20th-Century Poetry

MW 1:30-3

This course will be devoted to how specific philosophical texts can help us think about models of authorship and reading typified by Pound, Yeats,  Stevens, and Ashbery, but with I hope significant implications for most recent poetry.  W...(read more)

Altieri, Charles F.
Fall 2012

203/2

Graduate Readings:
Discursive Identities in British Romanticism

TTh 2-3:30

The Romantic Age is arguably the first age in which we see systematic attempts at deriving the self from itself, at constructing an identity through the discourse that is produced by a subject, which, however, is itself seen as the product of that...(read more)

Bode, Christoph
Bode, Christoph
Fall 2012

203/3

Graduate Readings:
Prospectus Course

This section of English 203 has been canceled.

...(read more)
Hanson, Kristin
Fall 2012

203/4

Graduate Readings

This section of English 203 has been canceled.

...(read more)
Miller, Jennifer
Fall 2012

205A/1

Old English

This course will not be offered in 2012-13, but English Department graduate students may take the undergraduate equivalent, English 104 (Introduction to Old English), in its place; see the listing for that course in this Announcement of Classes.(read more)

No instructor assigned yet.
Fall 2012

218/1

Milton

TTh 12:30-2

This course will perform various operations on the massive corpus of Milton's writing. We will try to break down the isolation and idealization of a few major poems, to bring the prose writings into focus, to confront the politics of gender, a...(read more)

Turner, James Grantham
Fall 2012

243A/1

Fiction Writing Workshop

Tues. 3:30-6:30

This workshop course will concentrate on the form, theory and practice of fiction. Workshop participants are required to write a minimum of 45 pages of original fiction, fulfill specific assignments on craft, attend all workshop sessions, and prov...(read more)

Mukherjee, Bharati
Fall 2012

246I/1

American Literature to 1855

TTh 11-12:30

The series of great earthquakes at New Madrid, Missouri that rattled the entire Mississippi Valley in December 1811 sent shock waves of horror across the new nation. The newspaper and personal accounts of ...(read more)

McQuade, Donald
Fall 2012

250/1

Research Seminars:
Victorian Cultural Studies

M 3-6

This course will follow the long history of the culture concept in Britain.&n...(read more)

Puckett, Kent
Fall 2012

250/2

Research Seminars

This section of English 250 has been canceled.

...(read more)
Marno, David
Fall 2012

250/3

Research Seminars:
Reconstruction

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

“Among the revolutionary processes that transformed the nineteenth-century world, none was so dramatic in its human consequences or far-reaching in its social implications as the abolition of chattel slavery,” the historian Eric Foner ...(read more)

Wagner, Bryan
Fall 2012

302/1

The Teaching of Composition and Literature

Thurs. 9-11

<!--{cke_protected}{C}%3C!%2D%2D%0A%20%2F*%20Font%20Definitions%20*%2F%0A%40font-face%0A%09%7Bfont-family%3ACambria%3B%0A%09panose-1%3A2%204%205%203%205%204%206%203%202%204%3B%0A%09mso-font-charset%3A0%3B%0...<a href="/courses/3629" target="_blank">(read more)</a>

Snyder, Katherine
Fall 2012

310/1

Field Studies in Tutoring Writing

T.B.A.

Through seminars, discussions, and reading assignments, students are introduced to the language/writing/literacy needs of diverse college-age writers such as the developing, bi-dialectal, and non-native English-speaking (NNS) writer. The course wi...(read more)

No instructor assigned yet.
Spring 2012

137T/1

Topics in Chicana/o Literature and Culture:
Chicano Poetry--Text and Context

MWF 1-2

We will open with "Yo soy Joaquin"/"I am Joaquin," Rodolfo 'Corky' Gonzalez's stirring political poem of 1968 that inspired a politically based literary output that dominated Chicano poetics for well over a decade a...(read more)

Padilla, Genaro M.
Padilla, Genaro
Spring 2012

203/1

Graduate Readings:
Literature & the Science of the Feelings, 1740-1819

M 3-6

William Wordsworth’s 1800 declaration that poetry “is the history or science of feelings” cuts many ways, as such genitive constructions often do.  His phrase alludes both to the contemporary human and life sciences that mad...(read more)

Goodman, Kevis
Goodman, Kevis
Spring 2012

203/2

Graduate Readings:
Struggling With Consolation--Reading Boethius in Anglo-Saxon England

TTh 9:30-11

This course has a double aim: to explore the reception of Boethius’s De consolatione Philosophiae in Anglo-Saxon England and to do so by engaging one of the remarkable achievements of Anglo-Saxon translation, the Old English version...(read more)

O'Brien O'Keeffe, Katherine
O'Brien O'Keeffe, Katherine
Spring 2012

203/3

Graduate Readings:
Politics of Death, Cultural Regenerations

W 3-6

This course will be jointly taught by Abdul JanMohamed (English) and Stefania Pandolfo (Anthropology), and it is cross-listed with Anthropology 250X section 6.

This seminar is a two-voice reflection on violence, death, subjugation,...(read more)

JanMohamed, Abdul R.
JanMohamed, Abdul\n& Pandolfo, Stefania
Spring 2012

203/4

Graduate Readings:
British Novel--1800-1900

W 3-6

Reading and discussion of a selection of major nineteenth-century British novels.  We will bring large questions to bear on one another, concerning: the worlds and communities the novel aims to represent and to address (region or province; na...(read more)

Duncan, Ian
Spring 2012

211/1

Chaucer:
Early Poetry and the Troilus and Criseyde

MW 10:30-12

This course studies all Chaucer's majors works before the Canterbury Tales. About the first third of the semester will use the earlier works--the Book of the Duchess and the Parliament of Fowls especially--to introdu...(read more)

Justice, Steven
Justice, Steven
Spring 2012

212/1

Readings in Middle English:
The Auchinleck Manuscript

W 3-6

This course will consider a wide range of Middle English writing through examination of a single manuscript book surviving to us from the early fourteenth-century:  Edinburgh, National Library of Scotland, Advocates' MS 19.2.1, now known ...(read more)

Miller, Jennifer
Miller, Jennifer
Spring 2012

243N/1

Prose Nonfiction Writing Workshop:
Like & Love

M 3-6

A graduate creative nonfiction writing workshop open to students from any department. Drawing on narrative strategies found in memoir, the diary, travel writing, and fiction, students will have work-shopped three 10-20 page literary nonfiction pie...(read more)

Farber, Thomas
Farber, Thomas
Spring 2012

250/1

Research Seminar:
Marxist Literary Theory

Tues. 3:30-6:30

In the early 1990s, literary theorist Fredric Jameson responded to critics who were at once proclaiming the emergence of a rejuvenated capitalist "new world order" and asserting the death of Marxism.  "It does not seem to make ...(read more)

Gonzalez, Marcial
Gonzalez, Marcial
Spring 2012

250/2

Research Seminar:
Renaissance Things

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

In the middle of the nineteenth century, the intellectual historian Jacob Burckhardt argued that the Renaissance marked the beginning of modern culture—an emergence which he defined as the disruption of medieval systems that had discouraged ...(read more)

Landreth, David
Landreth, David
Spring 2012

250/3

Research Seminar:
Everyday Postcoloniality

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

One of the defining preoccupations of literary realism is the precise, penetrating depiction of everyday life. This course will consider how this ambition is pursued in the context of postcolonial writing. Our primary reading will be a series of f...(read more)

Premnath, Gautam
Premnath, Gautam
Fall 2011

137B/1

Chicana/o Literature and Culture Since 1910:
Chicana and Chicano Novels

TTh 12:30-2

The purpose of this course is to provide students with a general knowledge of post-1970 Chicano/a novels. Our study will focus on both the form and content of each novel. As we shall see, the formal features and thematic representations of Chicano...(read more)

Gonzalez, Marcial
Gonzalez, Marcial
Fall 2011

200/1

Problems in the Study of Literature

MW 10:30-12

An approach to problems of literary study, designed to concentrate on questions of scholarly method, from traditional modes of textual analysis to more recent styles of critical theory.

...(read more)
Blanton, C. D.
Blanton, Dan
Fall 2011

200/2

Problems in the Study of Literature

MW 10:30-12

Approaches to literary study, including textual analysis, scholarly methodology and bibliography, critical theory and practice.

...(read more)
Goldsmith, Steven
Goldsmith, Steven
Fall 2011

203/1

Graduate Readings:
State of the Art Film: 1963

note new time: W 12-3

The course centers on the conception and practice of the so-called international art film around 1963. Without making a fetish of the date, it may be agreed that 1963 was a remarkable year: for quality of product, for the upsurge in points of dist...(read more)

Miller, D.A.
Miller, D.A.
Fall 2011

203/3

Graduate Readings:
The Novel in Theory

TTh 12:30-2

This course traces the development of novel theory in the twentieth century. Designed as an introduction to major arguments that have been--and still are--influential to literary studies generally, the course asks why so many different theoretical...(read more)

Hale, Dorothy J.
Hale, Dorothy
Fall 2011

203/4

Graduate Readings:
On Life

TTh 12:30-2

This course will explore the literary and cultural significance of philosophies of life. To set the course in motion, we shall begin with two provocative works: Terry Eagleton’s The Meaning of Life and Elizabeth Grosz’s Th...(read more)

Jones, Donna V.
Jones, Donna
Fall 2011

203/5

Graduate Readings:
Prospectus Workshop

TTh 3:30-5

This is a practical writing workshop intended to facilitate and accelerate the transitions from qualifying exams to prospectus conference, from prospectus conference to first dissertation chapter, and from the status of student to that of scholar....(read more)

Hanson, Kristin
Hanson, Kristin
Fall 2011

203/6

Graduate Readings:
Anglophone Poetry

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

This class will broadly survey British, Irish, and postcolonial poetry after 1945. It is a large and multifaceted body of work, and much of it remains under-read, especially in the American academy. We will think through the development of a late ...(read more)

Falci, Eric
Falci, Eric
Fall 2011

203/7

Graduate Readings:
What was Asian American Literature?

Tues. 3:30-6:30

Adapting the title of Kenneth Warren’s recent intervention in African American Studies, this course explores the history of Asian American literary formation, and the making of Asian American racial formation through literary agencies (speci...(read more)

Lye, Colleen
Lye, Colleen
Fall 2011

205A/1

Old English

TTh 11-12:30

This class introduces students to the language, literature, and modern critical study of the written vernacular culture of England before the Norman Conquest—an era whose language and aesthetics now seem radically foreign. By the end of the ...(read more)

Thornbury, Emily V.
Thornbury, Emily
Fall 2011

246F/1

Graduate Proseminar: 18th Century

F 12-3

Many eighteenth-century British writers imagined their world as one of increasing complexity. Technologies of print, ever more specialized divisions of labor, an expanding empire, major shifts in credit and commerce—the growth of a speculati...(read more)

Sorensen, Janet
Sorensen, Janet
Fall 2011

246I/1

Graduate Proseminar: American Literature to 1855

TTh 2-3:30

For more information on this course, please contact Professor Tamarkin at tamarkin@berkeley.edu.

...(read more)
Tamarkin, Elisa
Tamarkin, Elisa
Fall 2011

250/1

Research Seminar:
Marxist Literary Theory

Tues. 9:30-11:30

In the early 1990s, literary theorist Fredric Jameson responded to journalists who were at once proclaiming the emergence of a rejuvenated capitalist "new world order" and asserting the death of Marxism. "It does not seem to make mu...(read more)

Gonzalez, Marcial
Gonzalez, Marcial
Fall 2011

250/2

Research Seminar:
Victorian Poetry

W 3-6

In this course we will approach the literature and culture of the Victorian period through its poetry and poetics. We'll read a lot of both in order to do three related things. First, we'll consider in what terms the idea of the literary a...(read more)

Puckett, Kent
Puckett, Kent
Fall 2011

250/3

Research Seminar:
The Recovery Imperative

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

Men fight and lose the battle, and the thing that they fought for comes about in spite of defeat, and when it comes it turns out not to be what they meant, and other men have to fight for what they meant under another name.
(read more)

Best, Stephen M.
Best, Stephen
Fall 2011

250/4

Research Seminar:
Eros and Expression

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

At the core, highly selective readings from the most influential explorations of Eros, desire, and sexuality: Plato’s Symposium and passages from Phaedrus, episodes from Lucretius’ De Rerum Natura and Ovid&rs...(read more)

Turner, James Grantham
Turner, James
Fall 2011

302/1

The Teaching of Composition and Literature

Thurs. 9-11

This course will explore the theory and practice of teaching literature and writing. Designed as a both a critical seminar and a hands-on practicum for new college teachers, the class will cover topics such as course design; leading discussion; te...(read more)

Schweik, Susan
Schweik, Susan
Fall 2011

310/1

Field Studies in Tutoring Writing

T.B.A.

Through seminars, discussions, and reading assignments, students are introduced to the language/writing/literacy needs of diverse college-age writers such as the developing, bi-dialectal, and non-native English-speaking (NNS) writer. The course wi...(read more)

Staff
Spring 2011

137T/1

Topics in Chicana/o Literature and Culture:
Chicana and Chicano Films

MWF 10-11

An introduction to the study of Chicana/o films produced in the second half of the twentieth century.  In this course we will analyze films directed by Moctesuma Esparza, Paul Espinosa, Harry Gamboa, Jr., Efrain Gutierrez, Edward James Olmos,...(read more)

Gonzalez, Marcial
Gonzalez, Marcial
Spring 2011

200/1

Medieval Studies

"Check back later for more information!"

O'Brien O'Keeffe, Katherine
Spring 2011

203/1

Graduate Readings:
Aesthetics

TTh 9:30-11

As an introduction to the problems and questions raised by aesthetics, this class will navigate between the following quotations, which can serve as our epigraphs: 1) "If man is ever to solve that problem of politics in practice he will have ...(read more)

Goldsmith, Steven
Goldsmith, Steven
Spring 2011

203/3

Graduate Readings:
Birth and Death in Neo-slave and Jim Crow Feminist Narratives

TTh 2-3:30

Building on O. Patterson's notion of "social death" and my own definition of the "death-bound-subject," this course will examine black feminist (mostly neo-slave and Jim Crow) narratives that are concerned with the "bi...(read more)

JanMohamed, Abdul R.
JanMohamed, Abdul
Spring 2011

203/4

Graduate Readings:
Tolstoy and Realism

M 6-9 P.M.

This is a team-taught course with Mark Danner, journalist, war correspondent and professor in the graduate school of journalism and Robert Hass from the English department. The aim of the course is to read through the major novels, novellas, and s...(read more)

Danner, Mark
Hass, Robert, and Danner, Mark
Spring 2011

203/5

Graduate Readings:
Alfred Hitchcock

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

For more information on this course, please contact Professor Miller at damiller@berkeley.edu.

This course is cross-listed with Film 240 section 3.

...(read more)
Miller, D.A.
Miller, D.A.
Spring 2011

205B/1

Old English

F 1-4

Ever since 1840, when two scholars simultaneously announced that the runes in three Old English poems spelled out the name "Cynewulf," the subject of this seminar has been entangled in controversy. Through a close reading of the four &qu...(read more)

Thornbury, Emily V.
Thornbury, Emily
Spring 2011

218/1

Milton

MW 1-2:30

We will explore John Milton's entire career, a life-long effort to unite intellectual, political, and artistic experimentation.

...(read more)
Picciotto, Joanna M
Picciotto, Joanna
Spring 2011

246G/1

Romantic Period

TTh 12:30-2

A reading-intensive survey of major and minor texts of the Romantic period, with special attention to how writers understand "things"--particularly things like air, water, bodies, ideas, words, revolution, war, and poems.

...(read more)
Langan, Celeste
Langan, Celeste
Spring 2011

246J/1

American Literature, 1855 to 1900

TTh 11-12:30

In a speech delivered on the bicentenary of the ratification of the Constitution, Justice Thurgood Marshall scandalized his audience (and much of the nation) when he proposed that “while the Union survived the civil war, the Constitution did...(read more)

Best, Stephen M.
Best, Stephen
Spring 2011

250/1

Research Seminar:
Bondage and Freedom in Early Modern English Culture

W 3-6

We will begin with three aims (and then see where our various interests take us): (1) to piece out a literary, philosophical, and political history of the early modern exceptionalist claim that the English were uniquely free and freedom-loving and...(read more)

Arnold, Oliver
Arnold, Oliver
Spring 2011

250/2

Research Seminar:
Modernism and the End of Europe: 1914-45

W 3-6

In the summer of 1914, despite a century's talk of revolution, most of the major powers of Europe were titular monarchies (and most of the titular monarchs were cousins). Despite decades of rapid industrialization, most of the continent's ...(read more)

Blanton, Dan
Spring 2011

250/3

Research Seminar:
The Transnational and Comparative Turns in American Ethnic Literature

W 3-6

The study of race and ethnicity across national boundaries has become an academic norm. It is now widely accepted that nation-based methods and approaches risk limiting our understanding of ethnic literatures and histories. Thus, in African Americ...(read more)

Lee, Steven S.
Lee, Steven
Spring 2011

250/4

Research Seminar:
Melville's Forms

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

In 1986, in the influential volume Ideology and Classic American Literature, Sacvan Bercovitch and Myra Jehlen used "the example of Melville" to make their case for a historically and politically informed literary criticism. In ...(read more)

Otter, Samuel
Otter, Samuel
Spring 2011

250/5

Research Seminar:
Writing and Reading Cultural History: Ireland in the 1930s

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

The primary aim of this course is to consider how we read and study literary and cultural history. The focus of the course is on the culture of Ireland in the 1930s and by the end of this course students will have a broad understanding of this cul...(read more)

Pine, Emily
Spring 2011

310/1

Field Studies in Tutoring Writing

TBA

Through seminars, discussions, and reading assignments, students are introduced to the language/writing/literacy needs of diverse college-age writers such as the developing, bi-dialectal, and non-native English-speaking (NNS) writer. The course wi...(read more)

Staff
Fall 2010

137T/1

Topics in Chicana/o Literature and Culture:
The Literature of the Chicano Movement

MWF 2-3

We will survey the literary and cultural production of the Chicano/a Movement during the 1960s through the 1980s. This was a particularly fertile period during which the civil rights movement fomented a cultural florescence within the Chicano comm...(read more)

Padilla, Genaro M.
Padilla, Genaro
Fall 2010

200/1

Problems in the Study of Literature

MW 12-1:30

Approaches to literary study, including textual analysis, scholarly methodology and bibliography, critical theory and practice.

...(read more)
Blanton, C. D.
Blanton, Dan
Fall 2010

200/2

Problems in the Study of Literature

MW 12-1:30

Approaches to literary study, including textual analysis, scholarly methodology and bibliography, critical theory and practice.

...(read more)
Puckett, Kent
Puckett, Kent
Fall 2010

201B/1

Topics in the History of the English Language

This course has been canceled.

...(read more)
Hanson, Kristin
Hanson, Kristin
Fall 2010

203/1

Graduate Readings:
Pastoral/Animal Studies

MW 10:30-12

A wide-ranging exploration of pastoral modes from Virgil’s rewriting of Theocritus to contemporary imitations less of rural life per se than of lives deemed somehow “poor” or “simple.” Drawing on Empson’s sense...(read more)

Francois, Anne-Lise
Francois, Anne-Lise
Fall 2010

203/2

Graduate Readings:
Prospectus Workshop

W 3-6

This will be a hands-on writing workshop intended to facilitate and accelerate the transition from qualifying exams to prospectus conference, from prospectus conference to first dissertation chapter, and from the status of student to scholar. The w...(read more)

Abel, Elizabeth
Abel, Elizabeth
Fall 2010

203/3

Graduate Readings:
The Writing of Everyday Life

TTh 12:30-2

This seminar will undertake a critical reading of, and participation in, some possibilities (or impossibilities) of contemporary realisms and realities. It will query, from an array of perspectives, problems of representation, referentiality, hist...(read more)

Hejinian, Lyn
Hejinian, Lyn
Fall 2010

203/4

Graduate Readings:
American Enlightenment & Revolution

TTh 2-3:30

This course broadly surveys the cultural history of the Enlightenment in eighteenth-century America.  In readings of literary, political, religious and scientific texts alongside visual culture of the period, we will look at the Revolution...(read more)

Tamarkin, Elisa
Tamarkin, Elisa
Fall 2010

205A/1

Old English

See below

This course will not be offered in 2010-2011, but English Department graduate students may take the undergraduate equivalent, English 104 (Introduction to Old English), in its place; see the listing for that course in this Announcement of Classes. ...(read more)

See below
Fall 2010

217/1

Shakespeare

MW 1:30-3

This class is an introduction to the criticism of Shakespeare at the graduate level. I've decided to perform that introduction this semester by following the development of Shakespeare criticism into a professional practice, tracing the reception h...(read more)

Landreth, David
Landreth, David
Fall 2010

246E/1

Restoration and Early 18th Century

TTh 11-12:30

An exploration of the satire, devotional autobiography, prose fiction, letter-writing, diaries, heroic verse, drama, pornography and feminist polemic produced in England between the Restoration of Charles II (1660) and circa 1735; these will includ...(read more)

Turner, James Grantham
Turner, James
Fall 2010

250/1

Research Seminar:
Modernist Abstraction in Art and Poetry

W 3-6

This course will study relations between three modernist poets and some modern philosophers. We will be concerned primarily with how the philosophers help provide a perspective for interpreting and assessing what the poets can achieve by their re...(read more)

Altieri, Charles F.
Altieri, Charles
Fall 2010

250/2

Research Seminar

This section of English 250 has been canceled....(read more) Banfield, Ann
Fall 2010

250/3

Research Seminar:
The Novel and the New Ethics

Thurs. 3:30-5:30

In the last decade, a new call for ethical criticism has been sounded from unexpected quarters of the academy. The renewed interest in ethics is sparked by the academy’s general dissatisfaction w...(read more)

Hale, Dorothy J.
Hale, Dorothy
Fall 2010

302/1

The Teaching of Composition and Literature

Thurs. 9-11

This course will explore the theory and practice of teaching literature and writing. Designed as both a critical seminar and a hands-on practicum for new college teachers, the class will cover topics such as course design; leading discussion; teach...(read more)

Snyder, Katherine
Snyder, Katherine
Spring 2010

137T/1

Topics in Chicana/o Literature and Culture:
The Politics of Chicano/a Literature and Film

MW 12:30-2

The emergence of Chicano/a literary studies as an academic discipline, along with the production of the first Chicano/a films, coincided historically with the Chicano Movement in the late 1960s and early 1970s. There is no disputing that the politica...(read more) Gonzalez, Marcial
Gonzalez, Marcial
Spring 2010

203/1

Research Seminars:
Visuality, Textuality, and Cultural Memory

W 3-6

Probing what has been called the “visual turn” in literary studies, this course will scrutinize the interplay between verbal and visual modes of representation in a range of philosophical, literary, and visual texts. We will ask how and wh...(read more) Abel, Elizabeth
Abel, Elizabeth
Spring 2010

203/2

Graduate Readings:
Poetic Meter

MW 1:30-3

This course will provide a basic introduction to the major meters of the modern English poetic tradition from the perspective of a theory of meter rooted in generative linguistics. Taking the strict iambic pentameter of Shakespeare's Sonnets, the loo...(read more) Hanson, Kristin
Hanson, Kristin
Spring 2010

203/3

Graduate Readings:
Poetry, Theater, and Visual Culture in the Renaissance

TTh 2-3:30

This course will be structured as a scholarly detective story, driven by a question that has never been satisfactorily answered: how did “that rare Italian master, Julio Romano”—prized pupil of Raphael; designer of sexually explicit...(read more) Altman, Joel B.
Altman, Joel
Spring 2010

203/4

Graduate Readings:
Queer/Of Color

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

This seminar is dedicated to the intersection between queer theory and “minority” literatures and cultures. We will take as our starting point the critique of queer theory’s ethnocentrism most potently embodied in Cathy Cohenâ€â„...(read more) Ellis, Nadia
Ellis, Nadia
Spring 2010

246I/1

American Literature to 1855

TTh 11-12:30

A survey of U.S. literature in the decades before the Civil War with special attention to narratives of race and nation, the development of American romanticism, and cultures of poetry in the U.S....(read more) Beam, Dorri
Beam, Dorri
Spring 2010

246K/1

Literature in English, 1900-1945

TTh 9:30-11

This course surveys a range of Anglo-American texts from the first half of the twentieth-century—with a strong emphasis on US figures—that explore different versions of a modernist fascination with media aesthetics.  Working with an e...(read more) Goble, Mark
Goble, Mark
Spring 2010

250/1

Research Seminars:
Mass Entertainment

M 3-6

We will examine the theory and practice of mass entertainment during two comparable moments of major innovation in mass entertainment: the construction of permanent theaters in sixteenth-century London, and the invention of talking pictures in twentie...(read more) Knapp, Jeffrey
Knapp, Jeffrey
Spring 2010

250/2

Research Seminars:
Theories of the World and World Literature from Goethe to the Present

T 3:30 - 6:30

The intensification of globalization in the past decade has led to a renewed interest in reinventing Goethe’s project of world literature. Recent discussions of the topic, however, have taken the normative significance of ‘the worldâ€...(read more) Cheah, Pheng
Spring 2010

250/3

Research Seminars:
Agents [and Others] in Anglo-Saxon England

Tues. 3:30-6:30

This course will investigate questions of agency and identity (particularly religious identity) in the textual world of Anglo-Saxon England. As part of our investigations, we will begin with some early medieval engagements of predestination and free w...(read more) O'Brien O'Keeffe, Katherine
O'Brien O'Keeffe, Katherine
Spring 2010

250/5

Research Seminars:
Wordsworth and Coleridge in Collaboration: Poetry, Human Science, & Romantic Aesthetics

F 10:30-1:30

This course will offer an intensive reading of the major poetry and prose written by William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge, whose remarkable literary collaboration, friendship, and conflict (should) dispel old truisms about the solitary Roman...(read more) Goodman, Kevis
Goodman, Kevis
Fall 2009

200/1

Problems in the Study of Literature

MW 10:30-12

Approaches to literary study, including textual analysis, scholarly methodology and bibliography, critical theory and practice....(read more) Goldsmith, Steven
Goldsmith, Steven
Fall 2009

200/2

Problems in the Study of Literature

MW 10:30-12

Approaches to literary study, including textual analysis, scholarly methodology and bibliography, critical theory and practice....(read more) Puckett, Kent
Puckett, Kent
Fall 2009

203/1

The Strange Career of Jim Crow

Tues. 3:30-6:30

Major novels written in the United States between the end of slavery and the start of the Civil Rights Movement. Weekly reading responses, one project on reception history, and one essay....(read more) Wagner, Bryan
Wagner, Bryan
Fall 2009

203/2

Graduate Readings: Modernism, Race and Modernity

TTh 11-12:30

In this prose seminar we will focus on recent attempts in cultural criticism to shift the study of modernism beyond Anglo-American works and formalism. We will begin with an examination of questions about race and ‘otherness’ in modernist ...(read more) Jones, Donna V.
Jones, Donna
Fall 2009

203/3

Graduate Readings: Edmund Spenser

M 3-6

Sidney wrote that a poet's task was to "grow in effect another nature." No poet in English has fulfilled that charge more luxuriantly than Spenser. The plan of the semester will be to roam around in the leisurely, delight-filled capaciou...(read more) Landreth, David
Landreth, David
Fall 2009

203/4

Graduate Readings: Prospectus Workshop

W 3-6

This will be a hands-on writing workshop intended to facilitate and accelerate the transition from qualifying exams to prospectus conference, from prospectus conference to first dissertation chapter, and from the status of student to scholar. The work...(read more) Abel, Elizabeth
Abel, Elizabeth
Fall 2009

203/5

Graduate Readings: British Empiricism, the Novel, and the Science of Man

TTh 2-3:30

The course will examine the conjunction of the novel and the main tradition of philosophical empiricism in Great Britain. In A Treatise of Human Nature (1739-40) David Hume gave the general project of Enlightenment philosophy the title &ldquo...(read more) Duncan, Ian
Duncan, Ian
Fall 2009

203/6

Graduate Readings: Poetics and Theories of Poetry

Tues. 3:30-6:30

This course will attempt to provide a general introduction to poetics, to sketch a more detailed history of the ways in which poetry has been theorized since the nineteenth century, and to think through some of the more recent trends in scholarshi...(read more)

Falci, Eric
Falci, Eric
Fall 2009

205A/1

Old English

TTh 9:30-11

This class introduces students to the language, literature, and modern critical study of the written vernacular culture of England before the Norman Conquest—an era whose language and aesthetics now seem radically foreign. By the end of the seme...(read more) Thornbury, Emily V.
Thornbury, Emily V.
Fall 2009

211/1

Chaucer: Canterbury Tales

W 3-6

In this course, we will read all of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, along with relevant sources and other contemporary texts. We will also read current scholarship on the Tales, with the goal of attaining a reasonably complete knowl...(read more) Nolan, Maura
Nolan, Maura
Fall 2009

246F/1

Graduate Proseminar: The Later-Eighteenth Century

MW 12-1:30

In this survey of British literature post 1740, we shall consider the ways in which literature responded to and at times facilitated and shaped major transformations in the period’s print culture and market relationships. This broad organizing p...(read more) Sorensen, Janet
Sorensen, Janet
Fall 2009

250/2

Research Seminar: Postwar British Literary Culture at Mid-Century

W 3-6

1945 continues to serve as the central periodizing marker of twentieth-century literary history, separating the long arc of high modernism from a sprawling expanse of time loosely understood as “contemporary.” This course will attempt to d...(read more) Premnath, Gautam
Premnath, Gautam
Fall 2009

302/1

The Teaching of Composition and Literature

Thurs. 3:30-5:30

This course will explore the theory and practice of teaching literature and writing. Designed as both a critical seminar and a hands-on practicum for new college teachers, the class will cover topics such as course design...(read more) Beam, Dorri
Infante-Abbatantuono, Jhoanna
Beam, Dorri and Infante, Jhoanna
Spring 2009

201B/1

Topics in the History of the English Language:
The Development of Linguistic Representations of Point of View

Note new time: Th 9:30-12:30

This course will be devoted to the history of the development of styles for the representation of subjectivity or consciousness in narrative, including, importantly, represented speech and thought (free indirect style). It will use the original compa...(read more) Banfield, Ann
Banfield, Ann
Spring 2009

203/1

Graduate Readings:
Gender, Poetry and Psychoanalysis in Irish Poetry

MW 10:30-12

Using feminist theory, object relations theory and psychoanalysis, this course will examine the work of a number of leading contemporary Irish poets with a view to reflecting on gender, representation and representatives in contemporary Irish culture....(read more) Sullivan, Moynagh
Spring 2009

203/2

Graduate Readings:
Literature and Psychoanalysis

MW 1:30-3

What do literature and psychoanalysis have in common?  For one, both are usually about at least two of the following: sex, death, love, hate, jealousy, anxiety, loss, and the search for some kind of structure.  Seemingly made for each other,...(read more) Puckett, Kent
Puckett, Kent
Spring 2009

203/3

Graduate Readings: Victorian Novel

T 9:30-12:30

Over 7,000 novels were published in Victorian England; we’ll read the best seven.  The course will emphasize the place of novels and novelists in a variety of Victorian cultural innovations, such as the creation of modern cosmopolitan and h...(read more) Gallagher, Catherine
Gallagher, Catherine
Spring 2009

203/4

Graduate Readings:
The Writings of Henry Adams and William James

TTh 2-3:30

These two American friends stand at the beginning of the twentieth century reprising the melancholy and experimental strains of New England culture, and anticipating modernism:  T.S. Eliot, Gertrude Stein, W.E.B. DuBois, Wallace Stevens and Thoma...(read more) Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell
Spring 2009

203/5

Graduate Readings

TTh 2-3:30

In “Reading Beowulf" we will be particularly interested in the making of Beowulf as a text and as a canonical poem. The first goal addresses issues of language, paleography, and textual editing as we translate; the second ...(read more) O'Brien O'Keeffe, Katherine
O'Brien O'Keeffe, Katherine
Spring 2009

203/6

Graduate Readings:
Reading Novels Now

Th 3:30-6:30

This course aims to formulate new phenomenological models of reading contemporary novels.  We will conduct a broad survey of theories of reading, old and new, dabbling along the way in cognitive theories of reading; historical accounts of reading...(read more) Serpell, C. Namwali
Serpell, Namwali
Spring 2009

203/7

Graduate Readings:
Narrative and Middle Passage

TTh 9:30-11

Toni Morrison once remarked, on the subject of African American slave culture, that “no slave society in the history of the world ever wrote more – or more thoughtfully – about its own enslavement.”  For those Africans who...(read more) Best, Stephen M.
Best, Stephen
Spring 2009

218/1

Milton

W 2-5

An introduction to the poetry and major prose of John Milton. We will discuss Milton's conception of authorship, Milton and the English civil war, Milton's relation to humanism and to the Protestant Reformation. Extensive secondary reading in ...(read more) Kahn, Victoria
Kahn, Victoria
Spring 2009

246C/1

Graduate Proseminars:
Renaissance (16th-Century): Faustus' Books

MW 10:30-12

               Divinity, adieu.
These metaphysics of magicians
And necromantic books are heavenly:
... his dominion that exceeds in this
Stretcheth as far as...(read more)
Landreth, David
Landreth, David
Spring 2009

250/1

Research Seminar:
Philosophy and the Arts

M 3-6

This course will try to relate the concept of sensuousness to the roles the affects can play in aesthetic experience.  The first half of the course will be devoted to familiarizing ourselves with basic concepts that establish...(read more)

Altieri, Charles F.
Altieri, Charles
Spring 2009

250/3

Research Seminar:
Native American Fiction

W 3-6

Contemporary Native American stories are survival stories, reckonings with the brutal history of colonization and its ongoing consequences:  they calculate indigenous positions, settle overdue accounts, note old debts, and demand an accounting. T...(read more) Wong, Hertha D. Sweet
Wong, Hertha Sweet
Fall 2008

250/1

Research Seminar:
Ecocriticism Meets Biopolitics

M 3-6

"This research seminar addresses two areas of literary and critical theory concerned with animal/human divides and the relationship between place, language and politics. ""Biopolitics"" commonly refers to the politicization...(read more)

Francois, Anne-Lise
Francois, Anne-Lise
Fall 2008

200/1

Graduate Course:
Problems in the Study of Literature

MW 10:30-12

Approaches to literary study, including textual analysis, scholarly methodology and bibliography, critical theory and practice....(read more) Best, Stephen M.
Best, Stephen
Fall 2008

200/2

Graduate Course:
Problems in the Study of Literature

MW 10:30-12

Approaches to literary study, including textual analysis, scholarly methodology and bibliography, critical theory and practice....(read more) Rubenstein, Michael
Rubenstein, Michael
Fall 2008

203/2

Graduate Readings:
The Turn to Language and the Writing of Everyday Life

MW 1:30-3

This seminar will undertake a critical reading of, and participation in, some possibilities (or impossibilities) of 20th/21st century �realism�; it will query, from an array of perspectives, problems of representation, referentiality, literary histori...(read more) Hejinian, Lyn
Hejinian, Lyn
Fall 2008

203/3

Graduate Readings:
Colonial America in the Atlantic World

T 3:30-6:30

This course will locate colonial and early national texts from North America in the broad circuit of the Atlantic world, examining that Atlantic context both as a cultural arena and as a critical construction. Through close literary readings, we will ...(read more) Donegan, Kathleen
Donegan, Kathleen
Fall 2008

203/4

Graduate Readings:
Prospectus Workshop

T 3:30-6:30

This will be a hands-on writing workshop intended to facilitate and accelerate the transition from qualifying exams to prospectus conference, and from prospectus conference to the first dissertation chapter. The workshop will provide a collaborative c...(read more) Abel, Elizabeth
Abel, Elizabeth
Fall 2008

203/5

Graduate Readings:
The Novel in Theory

W 3-6

This course traces the development of novel theory in the twentieth century. Designed as an introduction to major arguments that have been--and still are--influential to literary studies generally, the course asks why so many different theoretical sch...(read more) Hale, Dorothy J.
Hale, Dorothy
Fall 2008

205A/1

Graduate Readings:
Old English

MW 9-10:30

This class is intended to equip students with the linguistic and cultural knowledge necessary to read and analyze Old English texts in prose and verse. Much of the work for the earlier part of the course will consist of in-class translation and commen...(read more) Thornbury, Emily V.
Thornbury, Emily
Fall 2008

212/1

Graduate Course:
Readings in Middle English

TTh 12:30-2

Please email j_miller@berkeley.edu for information regarding this course....(read more) Miller, Jennifer
Miller, Jennifer
Fall 2008

217/1

Graduate Course:
Shakespeare

TTh 5-6:30

"I expect this course to do all the basic work of a Shakespeare survey and also to have seminar-like intellectual crossfire. We will take up all the topics that concern Shakespeare scholars, but rather than approaching them systematically, we will wai...(read more) Booth, Stephen
Booth, Stephen
Fall 2008

246E/1

Graduate Proseminar:
Restoration and Early 18th Century

TTh 11-12:30

An exploration of the satire, devotional autobiography, prose fiction, letter-writing, diaries, heroic verse, drama, pornography and feminist polemic produced in England between the Restoration of Charles II (1660) and circa 1735; these will include B...(read more) Turner, James Grantham
Turner, James
Fall 2008

246J/1

Graduate Proseminar:
American Literature, 1855-1900

TTh. 2-3:30

"We will read widely in prose from the mid-nineteenth through the early-twentieth century, with particular attention to the ways in which pragmatism functioned as a seam for American literature and popular culture. We will begin - and - end the course...(read more) McQuade, Donald
McQuade, Donald
Fall 2008

250/3

Research Seminar:
William Blake

W 3-6

What does Blake mean by ?the Poets Work,? and how can that work be achieved ?Within a Moment? that has the length of a historical ?Period? but is also as brief as ?a Pulsation of the Artery?? We will read enough of Blake?s poetry to let us grapple wit...(read more) Goldsmith, Steven
Goldsmith, Steven
Fall 2008

250/6

Research Seminar:
Modernist Critical Prose

W 3-6

"It is an odd fact of modernist literary history that a large number of the period?s major figures produced as much critical prose--by turns polemical, self-authorizing, speculative, outlandish, and extreme--as poetry or fiction. Scaling from aestheti...(read more) Blanton, Dan
Fall 2008

302/1

Graduate Course:
The Teaching of Composition and Literature

Th 3:30-5:30

Please email dbeam@berkeley.edu for information regarding this course....(read more) Beam, Dorri
Beam, Dorri
Spring 2008

202/1

History of Literary Criticism:
Critical Realism

W 3:30-6:30

This course in the �History of Literary Criticism� will be an intensively focused and partial survey of the dialectic of formalism and historicism in the history of literary (and aesthetic) criticism. A core focus of the course will be the theoretical...(read more) Lye, Colleen
Lye, Colleen
Spring 2008

203/1

Graduate Readings:
Disability in Theory

TTh 11-12:30

Disability Studies as it has emerged in the academy in the last decade is a multidisciplinary, cross-disciplinary, interdisciplinary field. For complex historical reasons themselves worth exploring, in the United States that field has had particularly...(read more) Schweik, Susan
Schweik, Susan
Spring 2008

203/2

Graduate Readings:
Virginia Woolf

TTh 2-3:30

This course will examine the evolution of Woolf�s career across the nearly three decades that define the arc of British modernism. This co-incidence will allow us to theorize the shape of a career and of a literary movement, and to re-read that moveme...(read more) Abel, Elizabeth
Abel, Elizabeth
Spring 2008

203/3

Graduate Readings:
American Transcendentalism and American Pragmatism

MW 12:30-2

We will study the (mostly) productive tension between consolidating and dispersing impulses in American philosophical literature. Most of the discussion time will be spent on close reading, but members of the class will on occasion present secondary c...(read more) Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell
Spring 2008

203/4

Graduate Readings:
English Fiction to 1800

TTh 9:30-11

As we read a variety of works of eighteenth-century fiction we shall consider a series of revisionist (especially feminist) histories and theories of the early novel. The eighteenth-century British texts we have retroactively named novels often argued...(read more) Sorensen, Janet
Sorensen, Janet
Spring 2008

203/5

Graduate Readings:
Modernism in Poetry

Tues. 3:30-6:30

"I am concerned with what the new historical work in modernism puts at risk�the possibility that it has continuing vitality for engaged imaginations because it still does significant affective and intellectual work. I think much of this work derives ...(read more) Altieri, Charles F.
Altieri, Charles
Spring 2008

203/6

Graduate Readings:
The Novel and Romanticism

TTh 11-12:30

We will read major works of Gothic, Jacobin, domestic, regional, national and historical fiction, published in Great Britain between 1764 and 1824, in relation to the literary and historical contexts of British Romanticism. Critical readings will be a...(read more) Duncan, Ian
Duncan, Ian
Spring 2008

246F/1

Graduate Pro-seminar:
"The Later-Eighteenth Century

"

M 3:30-6:30

This course offers a survey of the period from 1740 to 1800, or from Hume�s new �science of man� to Wordsworth�s account of poetry as the �history or science of feelings.� The many different titles that have affixed themselves to these years (Pre-Roma...(read more) Goodman, Kevis
Goodman, Kevis
Spring 2008

246I/1

Graduate Pro-seminar:
American Literature to 1855

TTh 12:30-2

We will consider American prose literature from the late-eighteenth to the mid-nineteenth century in a transatlantic context. We will analyze literary influence as it travels, in some familiar and some surprising ways, between North America and Englan...(read more) Otter, Sam
Spring 2008

250/1

Research Seminar:
Form and Style from Chaucer to Spenser

Tues. 3:30-6:30

In this course, we will explore the lyric tradition in English, beginning with Chaucerian lyrics and ending with Spenser�s sonnets. Along the way, we will read poems from figures like Gower, Hoccleve, Lydgate, Charles d�Orleans, Hawes, Barclay, Audela...(read more) Nolan, Maura
Nolan, Maura
Spring 2008

250/2

Research Seminar:
Compassion and Representation in Early Modern England

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

How did early modern subjects represent and conceptualize compassion, pity, and sympathy? We will be especially interested in compassion as a complex point of intersection among literary, political, theological, and devotional discourses and practices...(read more) Arnold, Oliver
Arnold, Oliver
Spring 2008

250/3

Research Seminar:
Proust

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

A reading of Proust�s Recherche (in the Moncrieff/Kilmartin translation) alongside�and as�a reflection on traditional novel form. ...(read more) Miller, D.A.
Miller, D.A.
Spring 2008

250/4

Research Seminar:
A Small Place �Irish Fictions, 1890-2005

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

This course is a survey of Irish literature and culture from the Celtic Revival (1890-1930) to the Celtic Tiger (1990s-present). The Celtic Revival was an upsurge of nationalist sentiment that resulted in the creation of an Irish Republic in defiance...(read more) Rubenstein, Michael
Rubenstein, Michael
Fall 2007

136C/2

Topics in American Studies:
The Border

TTh 11-12:30

"Acosta, O. Z.: The Autobiography of a Brown Buffalo; Bulosan, C.: America is in the Heart; Castillo, A.: Sapogonia: An anti-romance in 3/8 meter; Gilb, D.: The Last Known Residence of Mickey Acu�a; Kadohata, C.: The Floating World; Kingston, M. H.: T...(read more) Lye, Colleen
Co-taught by Gonzalez, Marcial and Lye, Colleen
Fall 2007

202/1

History of Literary Criticism:
Critical Realism

W 3:30-6:30

This course in the �History of Literary Criticism� will be an intensively focused and partial survey of the dialectic of formalism and historicism in the history of literary (and aesthetic) criticism. A core focus of the course will be the theoretical...(read more) Lye, Colleen
Lye, Colleen
Fall 2007

203/1

Graduate Readings:
Disability in Theory

TTh 11-12:30

Disability Studies as it has emerged in the academy in the last decade is a multidisciplinary, cross-disciplinary, interdisciplinary field. For complex historical reasons themselves worth exploring, in the United States that field has had particularly...(read more) Schweik, Susan
Schweik, Susan
Fall 2007

203/2

Graduate Readings:
Virginia Woolf

TTh 2-3:30

This course will examine the evolution of Woolf�s career across the nearly three decades that define the arc of British modernism. This co-incidence will allow us to theorize the shape of a career and of a literary movement, and to re-read that moveme...(read more) Abel, Elizabeth
Abel, Elizabeth
Fall 2007

203/3

Graduate Readings:
American Transcendentalism and American Pragmatism

MW 12:30-2

We will study the (mostly) productive tension between consolidating and dispersing impulses in American philosophical literature. Most of the discussion time will be spent on close reading, but members of the class will on occasion present secondary c...(read more) Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell
Fall 2007

203/4

Graduate Readings:
English Fiction to 1800

TTh 9:30-11

As we read a variety of works of eighteenth-century fiction we shall consider a series of revisionist (especially feminist) histories and theories of the early novel. The eighteenth-century British texts we have retroactively named novels often argued...(read more) Sorensen, Janet
Sorensen, Janet
Fall 2007

203/5

Graduate Readings:
Modernism in Poetry

Tues. 3:30-6:30

"I am concerned with what the new historical work in modernism puts at risk�the possibility that it has continuing vitality for engaged imaginations because it still does significant affective and intellectual work. I think much of this work derives ...(read more) Altieri, Charles F.
Altieri, Charles
Fall 2007

203/6

Graduate Readings:
The Novel and Romanticism

TTh 11-12:30

We will read major works of Gothic, Jacobin, domestic, regional, national and historical fiction, published in Great Britain between 1764 and 1824, in relation to the literary and historical contexts of British Romanticism. Critical readings will be a...(read more) Duncan, Ian
Duncan, Ian
Fall 2007

246F/1

Graduate Pro-seminar:
The Later-Eighteenth Century

M 3:30-6:30

This course offers a survey of the period from 1740 to 1800, or from Hume�s new �science of man� to Wordsworth�s account of poetry as the �history or science of feelings.� The many different titles that have affixed themselves to these years (Pre-Roma...(read more) Goodman, Kevis
Goodman, Kevis
Fall 2007

246I/1

Graduate Pro-seminar:
American Literature to 1855

TTh 12:30-2

We will consider American prose literature from the late-eighteenth to the mid-nineteenth century in a transatlantic context. We will analyze literary influence as it travels, in some familiar and some surprising ways, between North America and Englan...(read more) Otter, Sam
Fall 2007

250/1

Research Seminar:
Form and Style from Chaucer to Spenser

Tues. 3:30-6:30

In this course, we will explore the lyric tradition in English, beginning with Chaucerian lyrics and ending with Spenser�s sonnets. Along the way, we will read poems from figures like Gower, Hoccleve, Lydgate, Charles d�Orleans, Hawes, Barclay, Audela...(read more) Nolan, Maura
Nolan, Maura
Fall 2007

250/2

Research Seminar:
Compassion and Representation in Early Modern England

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

How did early modern subjects represent and conceptualize compassion, pity, and sympathy? We will be especially interested in compassion as a complex point of intersection among literary, political, theological, and devotional discourses and practices...(read more) Arnold, Oliver
Arnold, Oliver
Fall 2007

250/3

Research Seminar:
Proust

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

A reading of Proust�s Recherche (in the Moncrieff/Kilmartin translation) alongside�and as�a reflection on traditional novel form. ...(read more) Miller, D.A.
Miller, D.A.
Fall 2007

250/4

Research Seminar:
A Small Place �Irish Fictions, 1890-2005

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

This course is a survey of Irish literature and culture from the Celtic Revival (1890-1930) to the Celtic Tiger (1990s-present). The Celtic Revival was an upsurge of nationalist sentiment that resulted in the creation of an Irish Republic in defiance...(read more) Rubenstein, Michael
Rubenstein, Michael
Spring 2007

137T/1

Junior Coursework:
Topics in Latina/o Literature and Culture: The Trans-American Novel? Faulkner, Garcia Marquez, Morrison, and Cisneros

MWF 1-2

"A detailed trans-American study of William Faulkner, Sandra Cisneros, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, and Toni Morrison's imaginative writings in the aesthetic and geopolitical contexts of the New South and the Global South. Topics include the significance o...(read more) Saldivar, Jose David
Saldivar, Jose
Spring 2007

201A/1

Graduate Course:
Topics in the Structure of the English Language: Syntax and the Language Arts

TTh 11-12:30

This course will explore the relations between syntax and literary form. We will begin by acquainting ourselves with grammatical theory and argumentation and then consider hypotheses about the language of literature that they seem to open up, beginnin...(read more) Banfield, Ann
Banfield, Ann
Spring 2007

203/1

Graduate Readings:
British Novel, 1800-1900

M 3-6

A selection of major nineteenth-century British novels. We will bring some large questions to bear on one another: questions about the world, locality or society the novel aims to represent (region or province; nation; empire / ?the globe?; ?the condi...(read more) Duncan, Ian
Duncan, Ian
Spring 2007

203/3

Graduate Readings:
History and the Postcolonial

TTh 9:30-11

This class will examine the question of history and the conceptualization of the modern in postcolonial literature and theory. It is only at death, when the possibility of future action for an individual is foreclosed, that we are able to begin to giv...(read more) Jones, Donna V.
Jones, Donna
Spring 2007

203/4

Graduate Readings:
Edmund Spenser

TTh 11-12:30

Perhaps this course should be sub-titled Spenserian Recoveries and Explorations, or Wandering in the Spenserian Landscape. I take enormous pleasure in reading The Faerie Queene, but I think it?s hard for people to find that pleasure when it is crammed...(read more) Adelman, Janet
Adelman, Janet
Spring 2007

203/5

Graduate Readings:
Poetic Meter

TTh 12:30-2

This course will provide a basic introduction to the major meters of the modern English poetic tradition from the perspective of a specific theory of meter rooted in generative linguistics. Taking the strict iambic pentameter of Shakespeare's Sonnets,...(read more) Hanson, Kristin
Hanson, Kristin
Spring 2007

203/6

Graduate Readings:
Nineteenth-Century American Women Writers

Thurs. 2-5

This course offers the opportunity to read a wide selection of fiction, essays, and poetry written by women prior to and during the Civil War. We will examine the history of recovery of nineteenth-century American women writers and the key debates aro...(read more) Beam, Dorri
Beam, Dorri
Spring 2007

203/7

Graduate Readings:
Chekhov, the Conventions of Realism, and the Depiction of Reality

Tues. 6-9 P.M

This is a team-taught course, cross-listed with the Department of Journalism. The instructors are Robert Hass from the English Department and Mark Danner from Journalism. Danner is a staff writer for the New Yorker and the New York Review of Books, wh...(read more) Hass, Robert L.
Danner, Mark
Hass, Robert and Danner, Mark
Spring 2007

212/1

Graduate Course:
Readings in Middle English

TTh 9:30-11

"The course aims to introduce students to the Middle English, as a period both of the language and of literary history. There will be three main ""movements"" to the course. The first three weeks will introduce Middle English itself, offering a broad ...(read more) Justice, Steven
Justice, Steven
Spring 2007

218/1

Graduate Course:
Milton

Thurs. 2-5

An intensive study of Milton?s major works. ...(read more) Picciotto, Joanna M
Picciotto, Joanna
Spring 2007

246C/1

Graduate Pro-seminar:
Renaissance?16th Century

TTh 5-6:30

"My chief concern as a student of literature is aesthetic. This therefore is probably not a serviceable course for students swatting up answers for doctor?s orals. This will be a survey course, but a highly selective one. Although I plan to look at th...(read more) Booth, Stephen
Booth, Stephen
Spring 2007

246K/1

Graduate Pro-seminar:
Literature in English, 1900-1945

TTh 12:30-2

We will read widely in British and American literature of the first half of the twentieth century with an eye to the intersections between modernism and modernity. While attending closely to aesthetic and formal concerns, our discussions may also rang...(read more) Snyder, Katherine
Snyder, Katherine
Spring 2007

250/1

Research Seminar:
Black Reconstruction

M 11-2

Among the revolutionary processes that transformed the nineteenth-century world, none was so dramatic in its human consequences or far-reaching in its social implications as the abolition of chattel slavery,? the historian Eric Foner has written. And ...(read more) Wagner, Bryan
Wagner, Bryan
Spring 2007

250/3

Research Seminar:
Melville and Aesthetics

Tues. 3:30-6:30

"What do literary critics mean by an ?aesthetic turn? or a ?return to form?? (Have we ever left? If we are ?returning? to form, where have we been?) Are these reactionary moves, conjuring the specter of the New Criticism? The latest swing in the pendu...(read more) Otter, Samuel
Otter, Samuel
Spring 2007

250/4

Research Seminar:
Class and Race in U.S. Ethnic Literature

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

What would happen if we placed class at the center of U.S. ethnic literary studies? Is class analysis obsolete? Does the study of class in literature necessarily preclude the importance of theorizing the specificity of race and racism? How can we crit...(read more) Gonzalez, Marcial
Gonzalez, Marcial
Spring 2007

250/5

Research Seminar:
James Joyce

F 11-2

"This course will explore Joyce's later work?focusing in its first nine or ten weeks on Ulysses, and then moving into an initiatory probe of Finnegans Wake. Though particular topics explored in the seminar will be determined by the research interests ...(read more) Bishop, John
Bishop, John
Fall 2006

200/1

Graduate Course:
Problems in the Study of Literature

MW 10:30-12

Approaches to literary study, including textual analysis, scholarly methodology and bibliography, critical theory and practice. ...(read more) Gallagher, Catherine
Gallagher, Catherine
Fall 2006

200/2

Graduate Course:
Problems in the Study of Literature

MW 10:30-12

Approaches to literary study, including textual analysis, scholarly methodology and bibliography, critical theory and practice. ...(read more) Puckett, Kent
Puckett , Kent
Fall 2006

203/1

Graduate Readings:
Prospectus Workshop

Tues. 3:30-6:30

This will be a hands-on writing workshop intended to facilitate and accelerate the transition from qualifying exams to prospectus conference, and from prospectus conference to the first dissertation chapter. Every week, students will submit some formu...(read more) Abel, Elizabeth
Abel, Elizabeth
Fall 2006

203/2

Graduate Readings:
The Novel in Theory

W 3-6

This course traces the development of novel theory in the twentieth century. Designed as an introduction to major arguments that have been--and still are--influential to literary studies generally, the course asks why so many different theoretical sch...(read more) Hale, Dorothy J.
Hale, Dorothy
Fall 2006

203/3

Graduate Readings:
Cultures of U.S. Imperialism & the War of 1898

TTh 11-12:30

This course has a double trajectory. One examines representations of U.S. imperialism in a variety of literary and nonliterary texts within a broad time frame, from the 1880s to the present. The second explores recent theoretical work about culture an...(read more) Saldivar, Jose David
Saldivar, Jose
Fall 2006

203/4

Graduate Readings:
Renaissance Drama

TTh 2-3:30

A survey of English drama from the sixteenth to the seventeenth centuries. We will consider the drama from a variety of perspectives: its roots in classical and medieval theater; its generic diversity and complexity; the business practices of the prof...(read more) Knapp, Jeffrey
Knapp, Jeffrey
Fall 2006

217/1

Graduate Course:
Shakespeare

TTh 12:30-2

"This class is an introduction to the criticism of Shakespeare at the graduate level. I've decided to perform that introduction this semester through following the development of Shakespeare criticism into a professional practice, tracing the receptio...(read more) Landreth, David
Landreth, David
Fall 2006

246E/1

Graduate Pro-seminar:
Restoration and Early 18 th Century

MW 4-5:30

An exploration of the satire, devotional autobiography, prose fiction, letter-writing, diaries, heroic verse, drama, pornography, and feminist polemic produced in England between the Restoration of Charles II (1660) and 1725; these will include Behn�s...(read more) Turner, James Grantham
Turner, James
Fall 2006

246G/1

Graduate Pro-seminar:
British Romanticism

TTh 11-12:30

This class is not a 203 or a 250 in disguise. We will read widely in and around Romanticism, taking up as many pertinent topics as we can, perhaps including: aesthetics, politics, and ideology; the performance of lyric subjectivity; the gendering of g...(read more) Goldsmith, Steven
Goldsmith, Steven
Fall 2006

250/1

Research Seminar:
Death and Reproduction in 20th-Century African-American Fiction

M 3-6

Having recently completed a study of a paradigmatic instance of the production of the death-bound-subject in African-American literature, I am currently exploring the reproduction of that subject. Thus this course will focus predominantly on black fem...(read more) JanMohamed, Abdul R.
JanMohamed, Abdul
Fall 2006

250/2

Research Seminar:
William Faulkner

Tues. 3:30-6:30

An intensive seminar on the major works of William Faulkner. ...(read more) Porter, Carolyn
Porter, Carolyn
Fall 2006

250/3

Research Seminar:
Studies in the Lyric�Genre and Theory

W 3-6

"This course offers an introduction to the genre and theory of lyric poetry, as well as indirectly to the theory of genre itself. While weekly readings will be organized by topics rather than historically determined, we will address the following bro...(read more) Francois, Anne-Lise
Francois, Anne-Lise
Fall 2006

250/4

Research Seminar:
Philosophy and the Arts

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

This course will explore some of the ways that reading in philosophical texts can have an impact on literary studies and on the arts in general. I don�t want to call this either �theory� or �aesthetics,� because such choices obviously tilt the philoso...(read more) Altieri, Charles F.
Altieri, Charles
Fall 2006

250/5

Research Seminar:
Renaissance Prosopography and Drayton�s Polyolbion

Thurs. 3:30-630

"Check back later for more information!"

Miller, Jennifer
Miller, Jennifer
Fall 2006

250/6

Research Seminar:
The Medieval Lyric

M 3-6

"This course surveys the forms, traditions, and environments of lyric poetry in the European Middle Ages. It will read closely in examples from Latin and the vernacular languages, but it also hopes to ask some broader theoretical and cultural question...(read more) Lerer, Seth
Fall 2006

302/1

Graduate course:
The Teaching of Composition and Literature

Thurs. 9-11

"This jointly taught course will introduce new English GSIs to the theory and practice of teaching in 45 A-B-C, R1A and R1B, and other classes they are likely to teach both at Berkeley and beyond. Designed as both a critical seminar and a hands-on pra...(read more) Goodman, Kevis
Katz, Stephen A
Goodman, Kevis and Katz, Stephen
Spring 2006

137A/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Chicana/o Literature and Culture to 1910

TTh 3:30-5

In this course, we will study major literary and cultural texts written by Mexican Americans from 1835 to 1910. We will concentrate mainly on prose: fiction, memoirs and essays. One section of the course, however, will be devoted to the study of folk ...(read more) Gonzalez, Marcial
Gonzalez, Marcial
Spring 2006

202/1

Graduate course:
History of Literary Criticsm

M 3-6

"This course offers a historical survey of important texts of literary theory, with particular focus on texts that are important for English graduate students. We will devote particular attention to the concept of the sublime and the emergence of the ...(read more) Kahn, Victoria
Kahn, Victoria
Spring 2006

203/1

Graduate Readings:
Poetry and the ?Science of the Feelings

M 3-6

"William Wordsworth?s often-quoted statement that poetry is the ?science of the feelings? is double-edged, as such genitive constructions always are. It evokes both the contemporary sciences that took the feelings as their object of study (e.g., the p...(read more) Goodman, Kevis
Goodman, Kevis
Spring 2006

203/2

Graduate Readings:
Visual Autobiography

TTh 11-12:30

"Visual culture is not just about pictures, but the (post) ""modern tendency to picture or visualize existence,? what W.J.T. Mitchell refers to as ""the pictorial turn."" While visual and literary studies have been seen as historically separate discip...(read more) Wong, Hertha D. Sweet
Wong, Hertha Sweet
Spring 2006

203/3

Graduate Readings:
On Life

TTh 12:30-2

The structuring influence of vitalist aesthetics can be felt in the philosophy of the Fruhromantiks, Georg Simmel's tragedy of culture, the cult of Bergson in France, the pseudo-Nietzschean politics of Rosenberg, modernist poetics in North America, th...(read more) Jones, Donna V.
Jones, Donna
Spring 2006

203/4

Research Seminar:
Gender, Sexuality, Modernism

Wed. 3-6

"Gender norms and literary forms both exploded at the turn of the twentieth century. These paired crises in social and literary narratives were perceived on the one hand as the stuttering end of western culture's story, the drying up of libidinal fuel...(read more) Abel, Elizabeth
Abel, Elizabeth
Spring 2006

246H/1

Graduate Pro-seminar:
Victorian Period

MW 1:30-3

This course is an introduction to the literature and culture of the Victorian period. Victorian poets, novelists, and critics responded to rapid industrial growth, colonial expansion, and profound developments in science, technology, and social life w...(read more) Puckett, Kent
Puckett, Kent
Spring 2006

246L/1

Graduate Pro-seminar:
Literature in English, 1945 to the Present

MW 9-10:30

"This seminar is designed to introduce students to US intellectual and cultural history between WWII and the present, with particular attention to the relationship between social movements in the realm of politics and cultural movements in the realm o...(read more) Saul, Scott
Saul, Scott
Spring 2006

250/1

Research Seminar:
Renaissance Economies

Tues. 3:30-6:30

"This research seminar considers a range of possible forms that an economic criticism of sixteenth- and early-seventeenth-century texts might take. The totality of scarcity-engendered choice that we know as ?the economy? was not a concept available to...(read more) Landreth, David
Landreth, David
Spring 2006

250/2

Research Seminar:
Theory, Secular and Post-secular

Tues. 3:30-6:30

"Do we still live in a ""secular era""? Did we ever? By what gestures has ""the secular"" become an unmarked or habitual term? This course will offer one genealogy of secularism in the west -- we will trace the articulation of its terms in philosophy,...(read more) Nealon, Christopher
Nealon, Christopher
Spring 2006

250/4

Research Seminar:
Modernism and the City

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

Skyscrapers and subways, crowds and solitary strollers, cacophony and kaleidoscope?the modern city provoked, both urged onward and challenged, the makers of literary modernism. We will investigate how a handful of more-or-less canonical modernist writ...(read more) Snyder, Katherine
Snyder, Katherine
Spring 2006

250/5

Research Seminar:
Occultism, Postcoloniality, and Modernism

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

"This course probes the shaping of the modern subject through such ""occult"" devises as mesmerism, ventriloquism, hypnotism, telepathy, disembodiment, telekinesis, and clairvoyance. We will examine the ways that occultism constituted a crucial enactm...(read more) Viswanathan, Gauri
Fall 2005

137T/1

Upper Division Coursework:
Topics in Chicana/o Literature and Culture: The Borderlands of Chicano/a Literature

TTh 9:30-11

This course will explore the invention of a Chicano and Chicana sense of place. How do imaginative writers such as Am�rico Paredes, Gloria Anzald�a, and Sandra Cisneros negotiate the tension between the national and transnational forces at work in the...(read more) Saldivar, Jose David
Saldivar, Jose
Fall 2005

200/1

Graduate course:
Problems in the Study of Literature

MW 10:30-12

Approaches to literary study, including textual analysis, scholarly methodology and bibliography, critical theory and practice. ...(read more) Hale, Dorothy J.
Hale, Dorothy
Fall 2005

200/2

Graduate course:
Problems in the Study of Literature

MW 10:30-12

Approaches to literary study, including textual analysis, scholarly methodology and bibliography, critical theory and practice. ...(read more) Hanson, Kristin
Hanson, Kristin
Fall 2005

203/1

Graduate Readings:
Prospectus Workshop

MW 12-1:30

Dissertation prospectus writing workshop ...(read more) Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell
Fall 2005

203/2

Graduate Readings:
Transnational Feminisms

MW 1:30-3

This course will trace the emergence and vicissitudes of feminist theory, struggle, and literature in moments of national crisis--particularly decolonization and globalization. The focus of our work will be conversations and contestations among femini...(read more) Ray, Kasturi
Fall 2005

203/3

Graduate Readings:
Coercion and Resistance in 20th-Century African American Fiction

TTh 12:30-2

"Lying precisely at the intersection of hegemonic and violent forms of coercion as well as at the intersection of absolute power and absolute powerlessness, the threat of death (lynching, etc.) is arguably the most fundamental mode of coercion. The de...(read more) JanMohamed, Abdul R.
JanMohamed, Abdul
Fall 2005

203/4

Graduate Readings:
American Literature and the American Ugly Laws, 1881-1991

223 Wheeler

"""It is hereby prohibited for any person, who is diseased, maimed, mutilated or deformed in any way, so as to be an unsightly or disgusting object, to expose himself to public view."" Between 1881 and the First World War, cities around the U.S. passe...(read more) Schweik, Susan
Schweik, Susan
Fall 2005

203/5

Graduate Readings:
The Contemporary Long Poem

TTh 3:30-5

"It is often said that the fragmentation and disjuncture characteristic of postmodern poetry is a reflection (or symptom) of contemporary life--a speedy life of multiple distractions, constant interruptions, unconnected events. How then do we account ...(read more) Hejinian, Lyn
Hejinian, Lyn
Fall 2005

211/1

Graduate Course:
Chaucer

TTh 2-3:30

This course will focus on Chaucer�s poetry, excluding the Canterbury Tales, and on its sources and intertexts. We will also be exploring the various critical approaches to Chaucer that have emerged in the last thirty years or so. Students will be resp...(read more) Nolan, Maura
Nolan, Maura
Fall 2005

246D/1

Graduate Pro-seminar:
The Renaissance

TTh 5-6:30

"Aside from Bacon's essays and, perhaps, Pilgrim's Progress, the course will concentrate on verse (because verse is what the seventeenth century did best and because I'm not worth listening to about seventeenth-century prose). We will read as much as ...(read more) Booth, Stephen
Booth, Stephen
Fall 2005

246J/1

Graduate Pro-seminar:
American Literature, 1855 to 1900

TTh 11-12:30

"In his 1987 ""Bicentennial Speech"" Justice Thurgood Marshall scandalized his audience (and much of the nation) when he proposed that ""[w]hile the Union survived the civil war, the Constitution did not""; the latter, he added, had been superceded by...(read more) Best, Stephen M.
Best, Stephen
Fall 2005

250/1

Research Seminar:
Modernism and the Novel Form

M 3-6

"This course will examine the modernist novel and short story (or fiction in general) as perhaps the modernist genres par excellence. We will look at alternative views of ""modern fiction"" (to use Virginia Woolf's term) in its relation to nineteenth-...(read more) Banfield, Ann
Banfield, Ann
Fall 2005

250/2

Research Seminar:
William Blake

M 3-6

" For in this Period the Poets Work is Done: and all the Great Events of Time start forth & are conceived in such a Period-- Within a Moment: a Pulsation of the Artery.



What does Blake mean by ""the Poets Work,"" achieved ""Within a ...(read more)
Goldsmith, Steven
Goldsmith, Steven
Fall 2005

250/3

Research Seminar:
Race as Method--Or, What Is Ethnic Literature?

Tues. 3:30-6:30

This course will be concerned with the implications of recent research in racialization theory --in particular, historical/materialist approaches to conceptualizing race, racism, and racialization-- for how we might go about reconceptualizing what is ...(read more) Lye, Colleen
Lye, Colleen
Fall 2005

250/4

Research Seminar:
Tragic Realism--Tragedy and Revolution in Postcolonial Narrative

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

This course will explore tragedy as a key site for coming to terms with the consequences of revolutionary politics in modernity. We'll focus in particular on the renewed interest in tragic modes among postcolonial literary practitioners and theorists,...(read more) Premnath, Gautam
Premnath, Gautam
Spring 2005

200/1

Graduate Course:
Problems in the Study of Literature

MW 10:30-12

Approaches to literary study, including textual analysis, scholarly methodology and bibliography, critical theory and practice. ...(read more) Hale, Dorothy J.
Hale, Dorothy
Spring 2005

200/2

Graduate Course:
Problems in the Study of Literature

MW 10:30-12

Approaches to literary study, including textual analysis, scholarly methodology and bibliography, critical theory and practice. ...(read more) Hanson, Kristin
Hanson, Kristin
Spring 2005

203/1

Graduate Readings:
Prospectus Workshop

MW 12-1:30

Dissertation prospectus writing workshop ...(read more) Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell
Spring 2005

203/2

Graduate Readings:
Coercion and Resistance in 20th-Century African American Fiction

TTh 12:30-2

"Lying precisely at the intersection of hegemonic and violent forms of coercion as well as at the intersection of absolute power and absolute powerlessness, the threat of death (lynching, etc.) is arguably the most fundamental mode of coercion. The de...(read more) JanMohamed, Abdul R.
JanMohamed, Abdul
Spring 2005

203/2

Graduate Readings:
Transnational Feminisms

MW 1:30-3

This course will trace the emergence and vicissitudes of feminist theory, struggle, and literature in moments of national crisis--particularly decolonization and globalization. The focus of our work will be conversations and contestations among femini...(read more) Ray, Kasturi
Spring 2005

203/4

Graduate Readings:
American Literature and the American Ugly Laws, 1881-1991

223 Wheeler

"""It is hereby prohibited for any person, who is diseased, maimed, mutilated or deformed in any way, so as to be an unsightly or disgusting object, to expose himself to public view."" Between 1881 and the First World War, cities around the U.S. passe...(read more) Schweik, Susan
Schweik, Susan
Spring 2005

203/5

Graduate Readings:
The Contemporary Long Poem

TTh 3:30-5

"It is often said that the fragmentation and disjuncture characteristic of postmodern poetry is a reflection (or symptom) of contemporary life--a speedy life of multiple distractions, constant interruptions, unconnected events. How then do we account ...(read more) Hejinian, Lyn
Hejinian, Lyn
Spring 2005

211/1

Graduate Course:
Chaucer

TTh 2-3:30

This course will focus on Chaucer�s poetry, excluding the Canterbury Tales, and on its sources and intertexts. We will also be exploring the various critical approaches to Chaucer that have emerged in the last thirty years or so. Students will be resp...(read more) Nolan, Maura
Nolan, Maura
Spring 2005

246D/1

Graduate Pro-seminar:
The Renaissance

TTh 5-6:30

"Aside from Bacon's essays and, perhaps, Pilgrim's Progress, the course will concentrate on verse (because verse is what the seventeenth century did best and because I'm not worth listening to about seventeenth-century prose). We will read as much as ...(read more) Booth, Stephen
Booth, Stephen
Spring 2005

246J/1

Graduate Pro-seminar:
American Literature, 1855 to 1900

TTh 11-12:30

"In his 1987 ""Bicentennial Speech"" Justice Thurgood Marshall scandalized his audience (and much of the nation) when he proposed that ""[w]hile the Union survived the civil war, the Constitution did not""; the latter, he added, had been superceded by...(read more) Best, Stephen M.
Best, Stephen
Spring 2005

250/1

Research Seminar:
Modernism and the Novel Form

M 3-6

"This course will examine the modernist novel and short story (or fiction in general) as perhaps the modernist genres par excellence. We will look at alternative views of ""modern fiction"" (to use Virginia Woolf's term) in its relation to nineteenth-...(read more) Banfield, Ann
Banfield, Ann
Spring 2005

250/2

Research Seminar:
William Blake

M 3-6

" For in this Period the Poets Work is Done: and all the Great Events of Time start forth & are conceived in such a Period-- Within a Moment: a Pulsation of the Artery.



What does Blake mean by ""the Poets Work,"" achieved ""Within a ...(read more)
Goldsmith, Steven
Goldsmith, Steven
Spring 2005

250/3

Research Seminar:
Race as Method--Or, What Is Ethnic Literature?

Tues. 3:30-6:30

This course will be concerned with the implications of recent research in racialization theory --in particular, historical/materialist approaches to conceptualizing race, racism, and racialization-- for how we might go about reconceptualizing what is ...(read more) Lye, Colleen
Lye, Colleen
Spring 2005

250/4

Research Seminar:
Tragic Realism--Tragedy and Revolution in Postcolonial Narrative

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

This course will explore tragedy as a key site for coming to terms with the consequences of revolutionary politics in modernity. We'll focus in particular on the renewed interest in tragic modes among postcolonial literary practitioners and theorists,...(read more) Premnath, Gautam
Premnath, Gautam
Fall 2004

137T/1

Topics in Chicana/o Literature and Culture:
The Borderlands of Chicano/a Literature

TTh 12:30-2

This course will explore the invention of a Chicano and Chicana sense of place, and with the sense of freedom and dystopia associated with ethno-racial structures of feeling tied to a geoculture and region. How do imaginative writers such as Am?rico P...(read more) Saldivar, Jose David
Saldivar, Jose