Class Archive

Semester
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

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Semester Course #
Instructor
Course Area
Spring 2009

100/1

Junior Seminar:
British Literature and the Global 19th Century (note new title)

MW 4-5:30

During the nineteenth century, Britain emerged as the world’s most expansive planetary empire with a sphere of influence affecting the lives of hundreds of millions of people and discrete communities. Although political historians are now seekin...(read more) Sanchez, Juan
Spring 2009

100/2

Junior Seminar:
Contemporary American Drama

TTh 11-12:30

Contemporary American Drama is a course which will explore inventive ways of engaging the theater text.  In order to enliven the discussion, Professor Gotanda has asked leading theater artists from around the country to submit their favorite cont...(read more) Gotanda, Philip Kan
Gotanda, Philip
Spring 2009

100/5

Junior Seminar:
19th-Century American Poetry

TTh 12:30-2

Proceeding historically, we will survey the poetry of the entire century.  We will focus on central poets now (Whitman, Dickinson) and then (e.g., Longfellow, Whittier, Lowell, Emerson).  We will also read several largely forgotten poets (Si...(read more) Shoptaw, John
Shoptaw, John
Spring 2009

100/6

Junior Seminar:
The Nineteenth-Century Middle Ages

TTh 3:30-5

The ‘Gothic’ or Medieval Revival gave life to a wide variety of literature in the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. This course will examine a number of novels and narrative poems arising from this movement, with a particular focu...(read more) Thornbury, Emily V.
Thornbury, Emily
Spring 2009

100/7

Junior Seminar:
Women's Films of the '40s and '50s

TTh 5:30-7 + Film Screenings Th 7-10 PM

In this course we will examine a range of examples of the genre  “the womanÂ’'s film” of the 40's and 50's, emphasizing maternal, paranoid, romantic and medical discourses, issues of spectatorship, consumerism, and various ...(read more) Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia
Spring 2009

100/8

Junior Seminar:
Post-War American Literature and the Problem of Evil

TTh 12:30-2 + Film Screenings T 6-9 P.M. in 106 Wheeler

"Is evil something you do or something you are?” asks Patrick Bateman, the narrator of Bret Easton Ellis’s American Psycho. This course investigates how American writers have considered this question in the aftermath of World War II, ...(read more) Serpell, C. Namwali
Serpell, Namwali
Fall 2008

100/1

Junior Seminar:
Late 18th-Century British Literature

MW 1:30-3

The theme of this course is the discourse of travel in later eighteenth-century British literature. In this, the period of the �grand tour,� developing ideas of cultural identity and national identity inflect travelers� perceptions of both the foreign...(read more) Murphy, Fiona
Murphy, Fiona
Fall 2008

100/2

Junior Seminar:
Coercion and Reproduction (�birth,� �death,� �love,� and �family�) in modern Black Feminist Fiction .

MW 12-1:30

This course is premised on the notion that the threat of death (e.g. the threat of lynching) is the most fundamental mode of coercion and that oppressive social structures like slavery and Jim Crow society are grounded on the deployment of that threat...(read more) JanMohamed, Abdul R.
JanMohamed, Abdul
Fall 2008

100/3

Junior Seminar:
Toni Morrison

MW 4-5:30

An examination of the development of various themes in Toni Morrison's fiction and the aesthetic rendition of these themes....(read more) JanMohamed, Abdul R.
JanMohamed, Abdul
Fall 2008

100/4

Junior Seminar:
Children's Literature: Up Close and Personal

MW 4-5:30

Please email kwright@berkeley.edu for information regarding this course....(read more) Wright, Katharine E.
Wright, Katharine
Fall 2008

100/7

Junior Seminar:
American Literature and the News

TTh 9:30-11

This course will explore the interconnections between American literature and the news throughout the 20 th-21 st centuries. We will read theoretical and primary texts to scrutinize how American writers, graphic novelists, and photojournalists affirm,...(read more) Nguyen, Marguerite
Nguyen, Marguerite
Fall 2008

100/8

Junior Seminar:
Caribbean Literature

M 3-6

In 1955 the leading Caribbean intellectual and political leader Eric Williams characterized the new writing coming out of the region as ?a literature of poverty, oppression, ignorance, violence, sex, and racial friction.? From such inauspicious beginn...(read more) Premnath, Gautam
Premnath, Gautam
Fall 2008

100/9

Junior Seminar:
Immigrant Narratives: Migration, Nation, Empire

TTh 12:30-2

This course examines the relationship between imperialism and migration through literary texts. We will look at notions of space, the homeland, and belonging. We will also pay attention to the way in which authors engage with U.S. imperial history....(read more) Fajardo, Margaret A.
Fajardo, Margaret
Fall 2008

100/10

Junior Seminar:
Literature of California and the West Up to World War I

TTh 2-3:30

Besides reading and discussing fiction and poetry with Western settings, and essays attempting to identify or explain distinctive regional characteristics, this course will include consideration of some movies shaped by and shaping conceptions of Cali...(read more) Starr, George A.
Starr, George
Fall 2008

100/11

Junior Seminar:
Henry James and Edith Wharton

TTh 2-3:30

This course considers major texts by Henry James and Edith Wharton in light of their shared fascination with marriage, manners, and extravagant wealth. Our readings will survey the shape of each author?s career, beginning with some of James?s earlier ...(read more) Goble, Mark
Goble, Mark
Fall 2008

100/12

Junior Seminar:
"""The Parasite"" - Dyads in Modern and Postmodern Literature "

TTh 2-3:30

Jacques Lacan has said that ?the first object of desire is to be recognized by the other.? The subject does not desire autonomously; who he is and what he wants are the by-products of a social relation. In this course, we will focus on perverse manife...(read more) Clowes, Erika
Clowes, Erika
Spring 2008

100/1

Junior Seminar:
Chicano/a Novels and the Law

MW 9:30-11

This course will examine representations of working-class characters and their encounters with the law in several Chicana and Chicano novels. Some of these novels were written by lawyers. Others are narrated from the perspective of a lawyer. All of th...(read more) Gonzalez, Marcial
Gonzalez, Marcial
Spring 2008

100/3

Junior Seminar:
Novel Genealogies�Balzac, Eliot, and James

MW 4-5:30

In an 1873 letter to Grace Norton, Henry James writes, �To produce some little exemplary works of art is my narrow and lowly dream. They are to have less �brain� than Middlemarch; but (I boldly proclaim it) they are to have more form.� For the young...(read more) Puckett, Kent
Puckett , Kent
Spring 2008

100/4

Junior Seminar:
Representing the Holocaust�A Question of Genre

MW 4-5:30

The German philosopher Theodor Adorno made the famous comment that to write poetry after Auschwitz was barbaric�but not to produce it even more barbarous. Of course, Adorno referred to �poetry� in the metaphorical sense, connoting artistic representat...(read more) Liu, Sarah
Spring 2008

100/5

Junior Seminar:
American Captivity Narratives

TTh 9:30-11

The captivity narrative is the first literary genre that might be called uniquely �American.� Although its standard protagonist was a white woman kidnapped by Indians, American captivity narratives also related the troubles of sailors and pirates at s...(read more) Donegan, Kathleen
Donegan, Kathleen
Spring 2008

100/6

Junior Seminar:
The Culture of Efficiency�Literature and Popular Culture in Early-Twentieth-Century America

TTh 9:30-11

"This course will examine the origins and, more specifically, the cultural consequences of America's fascination with efficiency, with what has been called ""a secular Great Awakening, an outpouring of ideas and emotions in which a gospel of efficienc...(read more) McQuade, Donald
McQuade, Don
Spring 2008

100/7

Junior Seminar:
19th-Century African-American Women Writers

TTh 11-12:30

"This course surveys a variety of writing by early African-American women writers, both south and north, primarily of the nineteenth century. Readings include slave narrative, spiritual autobiography, memoir, journal writing, abolitionist and feminist...(read more) Beam, Dorri
Beam, Dorri
Spring 2008

100/9

Junior Seminar:
Mark Twain

TTh 12:30-2

Reading , discussion, and writing about the works, life and times of Mark Twain. The primary texts will include a selection of short stories and sketches by Mark Twain and earlier humorists of the �Old Southwest� and the West; The Innocents Abroad; Ro...(read more) Starr, George A.
Starr, George
Spring 2008

100/10

Junior Seminar:
Emily Dickinson

TTh 12:30-2

This is an intensive course in the poetry of Emily Dickinson. We will learn how to read (to describe and interpret) her poems, along with her letters and a biography, deeply but also broadly throughout her career. Topics include early poetry; poetic r...(read more) Shoptaw, John
Shoptaw, John
Spring 2008

100/12

Junior Seminar:
F. Scott Fitzgerald and Ernest Hemingway

TTh 2-3:30

In this seminar, we will read extensively and intensively in the fiction of these two iconic American modernists. We will attend especially to the ways that issues of gender, both femininity and masculinity, inform Fitzgerald�s and Hemingway�s writing...(read more) Snyder, Katie
Spring 2008

100/14

Junior Seminar:
Why Do We Cry? The Literature of Sorrow, Sympathy, and Indifference

TTh 3:30-5

�Why do we cry?� asks Jerome Neu. �My short answer is: because we think.� Neu, like many other philosophers, believes emotions express intelligence rather than physiology. In this class, we will test Neu�s proposition, first by considering some promin...(read more) Goldsmith, Steven
Goldsmith, Steven
Spring 2008

100/15

Junior Seminar:
Nonsense

TTh 3:30-5

This course will justify the indulgence of re-reading of favorite children's books by exploring two dimensions of nonsense literature in general. One is its extreme foregrounding of linguistic structure, including verse structure, a characteristic sha...(read more) Hanson, Kristin
Hanson, Kristin
Spring 2008

100/16

Junior Seminar:
Chicano Narrative�New Mexico/California

TTh 3:30-5

"This course will study the historical and ideological formation of Chicano narrative in two regions. Chicano narrative in New Mexico is suffused with the iconography of Spanish colonial history, religious imagery and ritual, open and communal space r...(read more) Padilla, Genaro M.
Padilla, Genaro
Spring 2008

100/17

Junior Seminar:
Asian American Melodrama

MW 4-5:30

This course examines melodrama�s role in dramatizing Asians in American literature, theater, and film. Since Madame Butterfly and Fu Manchu, melodrama has been the most popular mode for casting Asians as victims and villains, but it has also been a wa...(read more) Oyama, Misa
Oyama, Misa
Spring 2008

100/18

Junior Seminar:
Film Melodrama

"MW 5:30-7 P.M, plus weekly film screenings<br><br>M 7-10 P.M."

We will focus on a range of film melodramas from early silents to contemporary examples, analyzing melodrama�s relationship to the body, the family, gender roles, excess and spectacle. We will be interested in melodrama and modernity, and in the genre...(read more) Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia
Fall 2007

100/1

Junior Seminar:
The Novel and Its Theory/Theory and Its Novels

MW 11-12:30

The seminar undertakes to read four major novelists, each in conjunction with a theorist or critic who has based his account of the novel-form on this one particular practitioner. The pairings are: Balzac/Barthes, Flaubert/Bourdieu, Dostoevsky/Bakhtin...(read more) Miller, D.A.
Miller, D.A.
Fall 2007

100/2

Junior Seminar:
The Harlem Renaissance

MW 12-1:30

This seminar will examine significant works of the extraordinary cultural unfolding that has come to be known as the Harlem Renaissance. Though we will concentrate on literary works, we will also examine some of the music and visual works from the per...(read more) Hejinian, Lyn
Hejinian, Lyn
Fall 2007

100/3

Junior Seminar:
Introduction to Narrative Theory

MW 4-5:30

"This is an introduction to some classics in the theory of narrative. We will look also at a number of, mainly, short narratives and analyze them closely, slowly. Theorists as early as Aristotle always used an exemplary narrative for their analyses,...(read more) Hutson, Richard
Hutson, Richard
Fall 2007

100/4

Junior Seminar:
Literature of the Americas

MW 4-5:30

This course takes a comparative look at the literature of North and South America , focusing on the construction of racial and regional identities in a comparative context. We shall also explore the question of method, through an examination of critic...(read more) Jones, Donna V.
Jones, Donna
Fall 2007

100/5

Junior Seminar:
Prison Literature

MW 5-6:30

"Because the percentage of the American population that has experienced incarceration is at an historical high and growing, particularly within the African American community, a study of the literature of incarceration has never been more timely. In t...(read more) Fielding, John David
Fielding, John
Fall 2007

100/7

Junior Seminar:
Women, Nationality, and Modernism

TTh 9:30-11

In Three Guineas, Virginia Woolf�s critique of patriarchy and war, she claims: �As a woman, I have no country. As a woman, I want no country. As a woman, my country is the whole world.� In this seminar, we will read women�s modernist fiction�from both...(read more) Hollis, Catherine
Hollis, Catherine
Fall 2007

100/8

Junior Seminar:
Herman Melville

TTh 11-12:30

A close reading of several of Melville�s works, emphasizing his recursiveness, the manner in which his writing returns repeatedly to several fundamental issues in order to explore more deeply the contradictions that launched his writing. Attendance an...(read more) Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell
Fall 2007

100/9

Junior Seminar:
Daniel Defoe

TTh 11-12:30

Reading and discussion of representative works in various genres, treating Defoe�s career and writings as of interest in themselves, and as offering direct (if slanted) access to all the major cultural issues of his day, political, economic, and relig...(read more) Starr, George A.
Starr, George
Fall 2007

100/12

Junior Seminar:
Narratives of Biographical Detection

TTh 2-3:30

Something about someone dead catches the attention of someone living. The person still living knows enough about the dead person to come to feel an urgent interest in the dead person�s story, but not enough to know why the story is so urgent. So the l...(read more) Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell
Fall 2007

100/15

Junior Seminar:
Literature and Media Theory

TTh 3:30-5

"This course will treat literature�its various genres, including novel, drama, poetry�from the point of view of media theory. Our particular interest will be in the status of the ""document��an historically real or ostensibly real document that is som...(read more) Langan, Celeste
Langan, Celeste
Fall 2007

100/19

Junior Seminar:
Film Noir

TTh 5:30-7 P.M., plus film screenings Thursdays 7-10 P.M.

We will examine film noir�s relationship to �classical� Hollywood cinema, as well as its history, theory and generic markers, while analyzing in detail the major films in this area. The course will also be concerned with the social and cultural backgr...(read more) Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia
Spring 2007

100/1

Junior Seminar:
Close Reading?Theory, Practice, Ideology, Pleasure

MW 10-11:30

"It may be argued that close reading is literary criticism. Certainly, it is its only technique and its most widely shared belief. If close reading is central to literary criticism, however, it has been made marginal almost everywhere else, with excep...(read more) Miller, D.A.
Miller, D.A.
Spring 2007

100/2

Junior Seminar:
Why Do We Cry? The Literature of Sorrow, Sympathy, and Indifference

MW 4-5:30

?Why do we cry?? asks the philosopher, Jerome Neu. ?My short answer is: because we think.? Neu belongs with those who believe emotions manifest intelligence rather than physiology. In this class, we will test Neu?s proposition, first by considering th...(read more) Goldsmith, Steven
Goldsmith, Steven
Spring 2007

100/3

Junior Seminar:
Representing Elizabeth I?Feminine Sovereignty in Poetry and Painting

MW 4-5:30

At the crossing of historiography, poetry, and the visual arts in sixteenth-century England stands the enigmatic and paradoxical figure of Elizabeth Tudor, the sovereign Queen of a patriarchal society. Elizabeth crafted her power through a complex and...(read more) Landreth, David
Landreth, David
Spring 2007

100/5

Junior Seminar:
Satire

MW 4-5:30

"We will explore England?s ""age of satire"" and the secondary literature on its generative tropes: discovery, exposure, magnification, correction. In the final two weeks of the semester, we?ll investigate contemporary experiments in satire. Students ...(read more) Picciotto, Joanna M
Picciotto, Joanna
Spring 2007

100/9

Junior Seminar:
The Bloomsbury Group and British Modernism

TTh 11-12:30

"This course places Virginia Woolf and the Bloomsbury Group in context with larger developments in British modernism. Bloomsbury is a neighborhood in London that includes Russell Square, the British Museum, and University College London. But Bloomsbur...(read more) Hollis, Catherine
Hollis, Catherine
Spring 2007

100/10

Junior Seminar:
Mark Twain

TTh 12:30-2

Close readings of Twain?s major works, emphasizing the development of his career. I am particularly interested in the interplay of humor and bitterness in Twain?s social and political thought, but class discussion will be open for any aspect of Twain?...(read more) Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell
Spring 2007

100/12

Junior Seminar:
Western American Literature

TTh 2-3:30

Reading, discussion , and writing about fiction, poetry, memoirs, and essays that have western settings, or that try to describe or account for western experience in ?regional? terms?emphasizing, for example, the formative influence of the natural lan...(read more) Starr, George A.
Starr, George
Spring 2007

100/13

Junior Seminar:
Wordsworth Circle

TTh 3:30-5

This class presents an intensive study of a group of writers and circle of friends: William Wordsworth, Dorothy Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and Thomas de Quincey. As we read these writers? poetry, journals, letters, essays, and memoirs, we wi...(read more) Francois, Anne-Lise
Francois, Anne-Lise
Spring 2007

100/14

Junior Seminar:
Literature and Psychoanalysis

TTh 3:30-5

What do literature and psychoanalysis have in common? For one, both are usually about two or more of the following: sex, death, love, hate, work, jealousy, obsession, parents, children, anxiety, and loss. Seemingly made for each other, literature and ...(read more) Puckett, Kent
Puckett, Kent
Spring 2007

100/15

Junior Seminar:
Women?s Films of the ?40s and ?50s

TTh 5:30-7, plus films Thurs. 7-10 P.M

In this course we will examine a range of examples of the genre ?the woman?s film? of the 40's and 50's, emphasizing maternal, paranoid, romantic and medical discourses, issues of spectatorship, consumerism, and various ?female? problems and fantasies...(read more) Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia
Fall 2006

100/1

Junior Seminar:
Asian American Literature

MW 1:30-3

It is by now commonplace to describe Asian American identity as impossibly heterogeneous and hybrid. Can there be a textual basis for Asian American identity? In particular, is there such a thing as an Asian American novel, and if so, what are its ide...(read more) Lye, Colleen
Lye, Colleen
Fall 2006

100/3

Junior Seminar:
Post-War American Detective Fiction

MW 4-5:30

"In this survey of post-war American detective fiction we will examine one of the most popular, long-lasting and diverse literary genres of the modern canon. Beginning in the years immediately following the end of World War II, we will explore the hig...(read more) Fielding, John David
Fielding, John
Fall 2006

100/5

Junior Seminar:
The Metaphysicals

MW 4-5:30

The term �the metaphysicals� originated in an insult: John Dryden faulted John Donne and the poets who fell under his influence for �affecting the metaphysics�; intent on perplexing their readers with �nice philosophical speculations,� they failed to ...(read more) Picciotto, Joanna M
Picciotto, Joanna
Fall 2006

100/6

Junior Seminar:
Northern Irish Literature and �The Troubles�

MW 4-5:30

This course will explore contemporary Northern Irish literature and its relationship to the political strife, social turmoil, and sectarian violencethat have characterized life in Northern Ireland since the late 1960�s, euphemistically known as �The T...(read more) Falci, Eric
Falci, Eric
Fall 2006

100/7

Junior Seminar:
Literature of the African Diaspora�Black Atlantic Culture and Modernity

TTh 9:30-11

"In this course we will take a comparative look at the literature and cultural history of the African Diaspora, focusing on the area known as the Black Atlantic�North America, the Caribbean, and West Africa. This area comprises great cultural diversit...(read more) Jones, Donna V.
Jones, Donna
Fall 2006

100/8

Junior Seminar:
Nineteenth-Century American Women Writers�Women and Style

TTh 11-12:30

This course will focus on gender and style while covering a diverse range of texts. We will be interested in the way women writers styled themselves�in what manner they present themselves as authors and artists in the literary marketplace, how they en...(read more) Beam, Dorri
Beam, Dorri
Fall 2006

100/11

Junior Seminar:
The Fictionalization of the American Sixties and Seventies

TTh 12:30-2

In this course we will examine a number of fictionalized representations of the tumultuous liberal revolutions of the American sixties and the conservative counterrevolutions which brought them full circle by the 1980s. In comparing the ways in which ...(read more) Richards, Diane
Fall 2006

100/13

Junior Seminar:
19th-Century American Poetry

TTh 12:30-2

While concentrating on the poetry of Whitman and Dickinson, we will consider the full sweep of nineteenth-century American poetry. We will read poets better known for their prose�Emerson, Thoreau, Poe, and Melville�poets popular in their time�Longfell...(read more) Shoptaw, John
Shoptaw, John
Fall 2006

100/14

Junior Seminar:
Herman Melville

TTh 2-3:30

I will emphasize the developments and contradictions that occur over the course of Melville�s career, with special attention to his struggle with political and religious authority. But class discussion will be open to whatever is of interest to the me...(read more) Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell
Fall 2006

100/15

Junior Seminar:
Arthurian Legends

TTh 2-3:30

In this course, we will read, discuss, and write about the medieval Arthurian tradition, starting with its origins in Latin accounts of English history and continuing through the fifteenth century. We will also examine contemporary representations of ...(read more) Nolan, Maura
Nolan, Maura
Fall 2006

100/16

Junior Seminar:
Langston Hughes

TTh 2-3:30

This course offers the opportunity to spend an entire semester reading Langston Hughes, one of the most prolific and consistently exciting black writers of the twentieth century. Our focus will be on the poetry, and especially on its relation to its v...(read more) Wagner, Bryan
Wagner, Bryan
Fall 2006

100/17

Junior Seminar:
The Holocaust and the Postmodern

TTh 3:30-5

This course focuses on the deep interconnections between the Holocaust and Western culture and thought. Postmodernism begins as a response to the Holocaust, not rejecting rationality but acknowledging its limits, basing humanism on a sense of fundamen...(read more) Liu, Sarah
Fall 2006

100/18

Junior Seminar:
Alfred Hitchcock

MW 5:30-7 P.M, plus film screenings Mondays 7-10 P.M.

The course will focus on the Hitchcock oeuvre from the early British through the American period, with emphasis on analysis of cinematic representation of crime, victimhood, and the investigation of guilt. Our discussions and critical readings will co...(read more) Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia
Spring 2006

100/1

Junior Seminar:
American Writers in Paris

MW 10:30-12

We will primarily address American writers who found themselves in Paris and environs during the 1920's, with a brief look backward to their main precursor in the late 19th century, Henry James. The ex-patriots, as these writers and artists were calle...(read more) Porter, Carolyn
Porter, Carolyn
Spring 2006

100/2

Junior Seminar:
Introduction to Narrative Theory

MWF 11-12

"This is an introduction to some classics in the theory of narrative. We will look also at a number of, mainly, short narratives and analyze them closely, slowly. Theorists as early as Aristotle always used an exemplary narrative for their analyses, a...(read more) Hutson, Richard
Hutson, Richard
Spring 2006

100/3

Junior Seminar:
Home Invasions--Domestic Transgressions in 19th-Century Britain

TTh 2-3:30

"This class will analyze discourses of ""home"" in the Victorian and Edwardian eras (ex: the degeneration vs. purity of the house) and how issues of crime and criminality are variously constructed in a cultural context of growing unease regarding the ...(read more) Chevalier, Antoinette
Chevalier, Antoinette
Spring 2006

100/4

Junior Seminar:
Mark Twain

MWF 1-2

"Reading, discussion, and writing about the works, life and times of Mark Twain. The primary texts will include a selection of short stories and sketches by Mark Twain and earlier humorists of the ""Old Southwest"" and the West; The Innocents Abroad; ...(read more) Starr, George A.
Starr, George
Spring 2006

100/5

Junior Seminar:
Modernism--Theory and Practice

MW 4-5:30

"""What are Master-pieces and why are there so few of them?"" asked Gertrude Stein in 1936. These basic questions of how to define literature, what it is for, what its function is, find new answers over time. This course follows the development of an ...(read more) Liu, Sarah
Spring 2006

100/6

Junior Seminar:
Mapping the Atlantic�Slavery and its Afterlife

TTh 9:30-11

This course focuses on issues of history and memory in contemporary novels of slavery. In particular, the course grapples with issues of literary representation and historical responsibility in African American letters, the complex interaction of mast...(read more) Hartman, Saidiya V.
Hartman, Saidiya
Spring 2006

100/7

Junior Seminar:
Comedy, Carnival, and Folly

TTh 11-12:30

"""License"": what does it mean? It refers to permission, and the authority that grants it. It also refers to what one enjoys or indulges--one's liberty--and hence to behavior that might become licentious or libertine, thereby threatening the authorit...(read more) Altman, Joel B.
Altman, Joel
Spring 2006

100/8

Junior Seminar:
William Faulkner and American Literary Criticism

TTh 11-12:30

How and why has William Faulkner been elevated into the pantheon of great American writers? To answer this question, we will study Faulkner's work in relation to the American literary critics who have significantly fashioned--and regularly revised--th...(read more) Hale, Dorothy J.
Hale, Dorothy
Spring 2006

100/9

Junior Seminar:
The 1960s

TTh 12:30-2

This course will explore the literature and the culture of the 1960s, focusing primarily on fiction, poetry, drama (and some film) in Britain. What can we make of a moment suspended somewhere between the modern and the postmodern, one that has now rec...(read more) Blanton, Dan
Spring 2006

100/10

Junior Seminar

TTh 12:30-2

For more information on this class, please email the professor at j_miller@berkeley.edu. ...(read more) Miller, Jennifer
Miller, Jennifer
Spring 2006

100/11

Junior Seminar:
19th-Century American Women Writers--Women and Style

TTh 2-3:30

This course will focus specifically on women and style while covering a diverse range of texts. We will be interested in the way women writers styled themselves--in what manner they present themselves as authors and artists in the literary marketplace...(read more) Beam, Dorri
Beam, Dorri
Spring 2006

100/12

Junior Seminar:
History and the Postcolonial

TTh 3:30-5

This class will examine the question of history and the conceptualization of the modern in postcolonial literature and theory. It is only at death, when the possibility of future action for an individual is foreclosed, that we are able to begin to giv...(read more) Jones, Donna V.
Jones, Donna
Spring 2006

100/13

Junior Seminar:
Criminal Literature-Writing Against the Law

TTh 3:30-5

"This course will focus on a selection of twentieth-century American crime novels (as well as upon a few films). Throughout the course we will consider why America, a nation founded by puritan zealots and known infamously as the policeman of the world...(read more) Fielding, John David
Fielding, John
Fall 2005

100/1

Junior Seminar:
Work in the Mid-Victorian Novel-- Elisabeth Gaskell and Charles Dickens

MWF 1-2

"In this course we will read novels by two of Victorian England's most brilliant writers of social fiction, Elizabeth Gaskell and Charles Dickens. Focusing on theme of work, we will discuss central questions of Victorian social, economic and political...(read more) Ben-Yishai, Ayelet
Fall 2005

100/2

Junior Seminar:
Zora Neale Hurston

MW 3-4:30

"The two-volume Library of America edition of Hurston's major works will provide the foundation for our exploration of one of the twentieth century's most brilliant, elusive and contradictory writers. Our goal will be to understand how Hurston used he...(read more) Kramer, Eliza
Fall 2005

100/4

Junior Seminar:
The End of the Poem

MW 4-5:30

"This class addresses an inevitable feature of all poems, the last line: the position from which the poem's entire form is, for the first time, apprehended. This focus will require attention to all the formal and thematic principles by which a poem ge...(read more) O'Brien, Geoffrey G.
O'Brien, Geoffrey
Fall 2005

100/5

Junior Seminar:
Diasporic Identities

TTh 9:30-11

This course examines representations of the African diaspora in contemporary literature by black writers in the U.S., Africa and the Caribbean. Through an engagement with literature, film and theories of diaspora, the class will consider a range of qu...(read more) Hartman, Saidiya V.
Hartman, Saidiya
Fall 2005

100/6

Junior Seminar:
Christopher Marlowe

TTh 9:30-11

"Marlowe invented the modern theater, unleashing a power of spectacle, dialogue, and oratory that instantly addicted much of the teeming city of London and horrified the rest. This seminar will use the unbounded, amoral ambition of Marlowe's staged pr...(read more) Landreth, David
Landreth, David
Fall 2005

100/7

Junior Seminar:
Criminal Literature--Writing Against the Law

TTh 9:30-11

"This course will focus on a selection of twentieth-century American crime novels (as well as upon a few films). Throughout the course we will consider why America, a nation founded by puritan zealots and known infamously as the policeman of the world...(read more) Fielding, John David
Fielding, John
Fall 2005

100/8

Junior Seminar:
Ventriloquism and the Novel

TTh 11-12:30

Our topic is the curious relation of identification-and-dissociation between a novel's implied author and its given protagonist. We will concentrate on specific formal features that structure this relation: narration, focalization, and, most important...(read more) Miller, D. A.
Fall 2005

100/9

Junior Seminar:
Holocaust Literature

TTh 11-12:30

The German philosopher Theodor Adorno made the famous comment that to write poetry after Auschwitz was barbaric--but not to produce it even more barbarous. In this class we will focus on how literary art responds to this paradoxical injunction. How ca...(read more) Liu, Sarah
Fall 2005

100/10

Junior Seminar:
Darkest London--Exploring the Post-1945 Metropolis

TTh 12:30-2

"Throw away your A to Z Street Atlas--we'll find our way around London this semester with a different set of guides. Our reading will foreground a series of narratives of colonial and postcolonial figures at loose in twentieth-century London. We'll co...(read more) Premnath, Gautam
Premnath, Gautam
Fall 2005

100/11

Junior Seminar:
Literature and Psychoanalysis

TTh 12:30-2

What do literature and psychoanalysis have in common? For one, both are usually about two or more of the following: sex, death, love, hate, work, jealousy, obsession, parents, children, anxiety, and loss. Seemingly made for each other, literature and ...(read more) Puckett, Kent
Puckett, Kent
Fall 2005

100/12

Junior Seminar:
Literature of California and the West

TTh 12:30-2

"Reading, discussion , and writing about fiction, poetry, memoirs, and essays that have western settings, or that try to describe or account for western experience in ""regional"" terms--emphasizing, for example, the formative influence of the natural...(read more) Starr, George A.
Starr, George
Fall 2005

100/13

Junior Seminar:
Tragedy, Agony, Vision, and Death

TTh 2-3:30

"In this course, we will explore the dramatic genre of tragedy as it has manifested itself at three different times in history: Athens in the 5th century, B.C.; late 16th- and early 17th-century England, and 20th-century France and America. All the pl...(read more) Altman, Joel B.
Altman, Joel
Fall 2005

100/15

Junior Seminar:
Gender, Sexuality, and Modernism

TTh 3:30-5

Gender norms and literary forms both exploded at the turn of the twentieth century. These paired crises in social and literary narratives were perceived on the one hand as the stuttering end of western culture's story, the drying up of libidinal fuel;...(read more) Abel, Elizabeth
Abel, Elizabeth
Fall 2005

100/16

Junior Seminar:
William Carlos Williams

TTh 3:30-5

"This course will introduce you to one of the most prolific, most daringly experimental, most influential, and most passionately autobiographical American writers of the 20th century. William Carlos Williams is primarily known, anthologized, and taugh...(read more) Buck, Chansonette
Spring 2005

100/1

Junior Seminar:
Colonialism and Its Dissed Contents: An Introduction to Postcolonial Theory

MW 11-12:30

"This is a research intensive junior seminar in which we will explore the theories and fictions that have characterized the encounter between the European metropolis and its colonial peripheries during the very long nineteenth century that has somehow...(read more) Joshi, Priya
Spring 2005

100/2

Junior Seminar:
Science Fiction

MW 12-2

Escapism' is effective when it is intricately and intensely related to the world from which the reader escapes, and we are therefore entitled to try to read back from the work to the longing it addresses, especially in the case of works such as these,...(read more) Breitwieser, Mitchell
Breitwieser, Mitchell
Spring 2005

100/3

Junior Seminar:
Western American Literature

MW 12-2

Reading, discussion , and writing about fiction, poetry, memoirs, and essays that have western settings, or that try to describe or account for western experience in 'regional' terms -- emphasizing, for example, the formative influence of the natural ...(read more) Starr, George A.
Starr, George
Spring 2005

100/4

Junior Seminar:
Irish Writing in English, 1900-45

MW 2-4

Irish writing in the period is almost invariably concerned with Irish national independence, which was often justified by way of arguments for Irish difference or Irish originality. We will explore the idea of Irishness through the writing of those, i...(read more) Rubenstein, Michael
Rubenstein, Michael
Spring 2005

100/5

Junior Seminar:
Men, Women and Texts

TTh 3:30-5

"The Junior Seminar is intended to introduce English majors to ""intensive study of critical and methodological problems in the study of literature."" Ever since Virginia Woolf's classic A Room of One's Own (1929) issues of gender have been central to...(read more) Turner, James Grantham
Turner, James
Spring 2005

100/6

Junior Seminar:
Emily Dickinson and Her Legacies

MW 4-5:30

"This course presents a study of Dickinson's poetry, with an eye to writers who inherited and re-interpreted her legacies in the twentieth century. Taking as our starting point the coincidence between the publication of 'serious' critical editions of ...(read more) Francois, Anne-Lise
Francois, Anne-Lise
Spring 2005

100/7

Junior Seminar:
Black Experimental Writing

MW 4-5:30

African American literature arrived, at its inception, as the self-acknowledged antidote to a longstanding tradition that relegated black expression to the status of noise. Whether cast as the malapropism of the urban parvenu or the stuttering of the ...(read more) Wagner, Bryan
Wagner, Bryan
Spring 2005

100/8

Junior Seminar:
Jane Austen

TTh 9:30-11

We will read the complete works of Jane Austen, an author who thoughtfully wrote exactly one semester's worth of novels, stories, and letters. In class we will examine Austen's contributions to the novel as a form, including her revision of its style,...(read more) Gallagher, Catherine
Gallagher, Catherine
Spring 2005

100/9

Junior Seminar:
Gender and Asian/Pacific America

TTh 2-3:30

In this course we will explore how different Asian/Pacific American writers, over time, have mapped out the pitfalls and possibilities of both normative and transgressive gender roles for Asian/Pacific Americans. There are two main goals for this seme...(read more) Ray, Kasturi
Spring 2005

100/10

Junior Seminar:
Modernism and the City

TTh 12:30-2

Skyscrapers and subways, crowds and solitary strollers, cacophony and kaleidoscope -- the modern city provoked, both urged onward and challenged, the makers of literary modernism. We will investigate how a handful of modernist writers of the 1920s and...(read more) Snyder, Katherine
Snyder, Katherine
Spring 2005

100/11

Junior Seminar:
Victorian Prosody

TTh 3:30-5

The age of Victorian poetry was an age of great metrical experimentation and achievement. From Tennyson's renowned 'exquisite' versifying through Browning's innovative dramatic iambic pentameter to Hopkins' 'Sprung Rhythm' which so transformed the mod...(read more) Hanson, Kristin
Hanson, Kristin
Spring 2005

100/12

Junior Seminar:
Women's Films of the 40's and 50's

MW 5:30-7 P.M, plus film screenings M 7-10 P.M. in 140 Barrows

We will examine women's films of the 40's and 50's from historical, structural, thematic, psychoanalytic and feminist perspectives. Issues of gender, race and the gaze as well as cinematic techniques and theories will be considered in our analyses, as...(read more) Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia
Spring 2005

100/14

Junior Seminar:
Mark Twain

MW 3:30-5

Students interested in this newly added section should attend the class; the instructor will give out class entry codes to the students he admits to enable them to enroll in the class on Tele-BEARS. It is possible that some non-majors and students of ...(read more) Starr, George A.
Starr, George
Fall 2004

100/1

Junior Seminar:
"Fabricating ""Englishness"""

MW 1:30-3

"This is a research intensive junior seminar that explores some of the compulsions and contradictions inherent in the fabrication of a national culture. We will begin by posing two questions: who are the ""English"" who have named our language, this d...(read more) Joshi, Priya
Fall 2004

100/2

Junior Seminar:
19th-Century American Women Writers--Women and Style

MW 10-12

"This course will focus specifically on women and style while covering a diverse range of texts. We will be interested in the way women writers styled themselves-in what manner they present themselves as authors and artists, how they encode textual se...(read more) Beam, Dorri
Beam, Dorri
Fall 2004

100/3

Junior Seminar:
American Objectivist Poets, 1928-1980

MW 12-2

"With strong literary affiliations to Ezra Pound and William Carlos Williams (and with political commitments thoroughly antithetical to those of Pound), the Objectivist Poets emerged as a group in a 1931 issue of Poetry magazine, guest edited by the g...(read more) Hejinian, Lyn
Hejinian, Lyn
Fall 2004

100/6

Junior Seminar:
Song Cycles and Poetic Sequences from Shakespeare to Bishop

TTh 9:30-11

"This seminar focuses on the protean form of the poetic sequence in a broad range of poets mostly writing in English. It is NOT a survey course in literary history and makes no pretense to canonical coverage. It IS a chance to read some great poetry w...(read more) Francois, Anne-Lise
Francois, Anne-Lise
Fall 2004

100/7

Junior Seminar:
Introduction to Narrative Theory

TTh 9:30-11

"This is an introduction to some classics in the theory of narrative. We will look also at a number of, mainly, short narratives and analyze them closely, slowly. Theorists as early as Aristotle always used an exemplary narrative for their analyses, a...(read more) Hutson, Richard
Hutson, Richard
Fall 2004

100/9

Junior Seminar:
Workers and the Law in Chicana/o Novels

TTh 11-12:30

"This course will examine representations of working class characters and their encounters with the law in nine Chicana/o novels. All of these novels tell stories of workers who challenge the law in one form or another. Six of the novels were written ...(read more) Gonzalez, Marcial
Gonzalez, Marcial
Fall 2004

100/10

Junior Seminar:
The Novel and its Theory/Theory and its Novels

TTh 2-3:30

"The seminar undertakes to read four major novelists, each in conjunction with a theorist or critic who has based his account of the novel-form on this one particular practitioner. The pairings are: Balzac/Barthes, Flaubert/Bourdieu, Dostoevsky/Bahkti...(read more) Miller, D. A.
Fall 2004

100/12

Junior Seminar:
Western American Literature

TTh 3:30-5

"Reading, discussion , and writing about fiction, poetry, memoirs, and essays that have western settings, or that try to describe or account for western experience in ""regional"" terms--emphasizing, for example, the formative influence of the natural...(read more) Starr, George A.
Starr, George
Fall 2004

100/13

Junior Seminar:
The Author in the Text

TTh 3:30-5

"Reading across a wide historical and generic range, we will explore how literary works conceive of their creators. Whether presented as a literal ""expression""-a symptom of melancholia, lovesickness, or religious ecstasy-as an extension of the autho...(read more) Picciotto, Joanna M
Picciotto, Joanna
Fall 2004

100/14

Junior Seminar:
Three Nineteenth-Century British Novels

TTh 5-6:30

"Big nineteenth-century novels are noted for sprawling. The novels of Charles Dickens are particularly noted for sprawling. I want this course to show you that genuine sprawl can and often does coexist with organizations of wholes and parts as precise...(read more) Booth, Stephen
Booth, Stephen
Fall 2004

100/15

Junior Seminar:
Film Melodrama

MW 5:30-7 P.M. in (note new room) 203 Wheeler, plus film screenings M 7-10 P.M. in 203 Wheeler

We will examine film melodramas from some early silent examples to 50?s & 60?s Hollywood classic realist/narratives. Melodrama has affiliations to a range of genres and invites interpretations from neo-Marxist, psychoanalytic and feminist critiques. W...(read more) Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia