Class Archive

Semester
Course #
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Semester Course #
Instructor
Course Area
Spring 2009

150/1

Senior Seminar:
Novel to Film Adaptation

MW 4-5:30

This course intends to confront the conventional understanding that “The book is always better than the movie.” We will focus on the limitations and possibilities of the form of the novel and the film in the way that they represent, narrat...(read more) Fajardo, Margaret A.
Fajardo, Margaret
Spring 2009

150/3

Senior Seminar:
Nineteenth-Century American Literature and Sexuality

TTh 12:30-2

This course studies the treatment of sexuality in imaginative literature of the mid-nineteenth-century, a period of particular flux when the institutionalization of a strict heterosexual/homosexual binary was not fully in place, when gender roles and ...(read more) Beam, Dorri
Beam, Dorri
Spring 2009

150/4

Senior Seminar:
Mark Twain

TTh 2-3:30

The seminar will read a generous selection of Mark Twain’s most important published writings. We will work our way chronologically through his life and career, beginning with his earliest extant writings and ending with Mysterious Stranger(read more) Hirst, Robert H.
Hirst, Robert
Spring 2009

150/5

Senior Seminar:
Literature of California & the West Since World War I

TTh 3:30-5

Besides reading and discussing fiction and poetry with Western settings, and essays attempting to identify or explain distinctive regional characteristics, this course will include consideration of some movies shaped by and shaping conceptions of Cali...(read more) Starr, George A.
Starr, George
Fall 2008

150/1

Senior Seminar:
Senior Seminar: James Joyce

MWF 11-12

"A polytropically intensive examination of Joyce's fiction. We'll begin the semester with a rapid study of Dubliners and A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, focus lengthily on Ulysses over the major part of the term, and conclude with a brief gaz...(read more) Bishop, John
Bishop, John
Fall 2008

150/2

:
CONVERTED TO 100/1

"Check back later for more information!"

No instructor assigned yet.
Fall 2008

150/4

Senior Seminar:
Senior Seminar: Irish Writing From 1890 to the Present

MW 4-5:30

"This course surveys some of the most popular Irish literature in the last one hundred years. Irish Writing in the early part of the 20th century was part of a cultural revolution that culminated in a political revolution, a war of independence and th...(read more) Rubenstein, Michael
Rubenstein, Michael
Fall 2008

150/5

Senior Seminar:
Virtual Worlds: Wonderland and Wessex: Lewis Carroll and Thomas Hardy

TTh 11-12:30

By focusing on the starkly different fictional worlds created by two (late) nineteenth-century writers, Lewis Carroll and Thomas Hardy, this course is designed to raise questions about the phenomenology of representation. How do these writers produce ...(read more) Langan, Celeste
Langan, Celeste
Fall 2008

150/6

Senior Seminar:
The Literary Image

TTh 12:30-2

Reading relies on the neural and cognitive mechanisms of actual perception, but what this reliance tells us about the actual experience of readers is far from clear; there is no consensus regarding the proper definition or even the very existence of t...(read more) Picciotto, Joanna M
Picciotto, Joanna
Fall 2008

150/7

Senior Seminar:
Modern Horror

TTh 12:30-2

Within the past decade, the phenomenon of J-horror (originally Japanese, but now associated with other Asian countries) has gone from minor cult status to accepted Hollywood convention, due to the success of American adaptations like The Ring. But as ...(read more) Oyama, Misa
Oyama, Misa
Fall 2008

150/9

Senior Seminar:
The New York School

TTh 2-3:30

"Met these four boys Frank O?Hara, John Ashbery, Kenneth Koch, and Jimmy Schuyler?at the Cedar Bar in ?52 or ?53. Met them through Bill (de Kooning) who was a friend of theirs and they admired Kline and all those people. Painters who went to the Cedar...(read more) O'Brien, Geoffrey G.
O'Brien, Geoffrey
Fall 2008

150/11

Senior Seminar:
Nathaniel Hawthorne and Herman Melville

TTh 3:30-5

We will immerse ourselves in the careers of Nathaniel Hawthorne and Herman Melville, taking up issues of literary influence, biography, psychology, authorship, sexuality, aesthetics, and politics. Readings will include a variety of works by the two wr...(read more) Otter, Samuel
Otter, Samuel
Fall 2008

150/12

Senior Seminar:
Utopian Literature

TTh 3:30-5

"Most Utopian authors are more concerned with selling readers on the social or political merits of their schemes than with the ""merely"" literary qualities of their writing. Although some Utopian writing has succeeded in the sense of making converts,...(read more) Starr, George A.
Starr, George
Spring 2007

150/1

Senior Seminar:
Wallace Stevens

MW 4-5:30

We will go through Wallace Stevens? career in an effort to interpret his poems as fully as possible and to appreciate his changes in thought and style. Some attention will be paid to related modernist writing and painting that best put his work in con...(read more) Altieri, Charles F.
Altieri, Charles
Spring 2007

150/2

Senior Seminar:
Troy Ancient to Modern

MW 4-5:30

This seminar focuses on one of the most enduring historical legends in human history, the story of Troy and its fall. We will begin with Homer?s Iliad and move on to Virgil?s Aeneid, exploring the epic representations of cities and their destruction t...(read more) Nolan, Maura
Nolan, Maura
Spring 2007

150/3

Senior Seminar:
Virginia Woolf

TTh 9:30-11

This seminar will be devoted to an intensive and extensive reading of Virginia Woolf?s literary career, focusing on her fiction, but also taking into account her essays, diaries, and letters. We will trace the evolution of Woolf?s narrative strategies...(read more) Abel, Elizabeth
Abel, Elizabeth
Spring 2007

150/6

Senior Seminar:
Sexuality and Antebellum Women?s Writing

TTh 11-12:30

This course will look at a wide variety of materials and topics with an emphasis on nineteenth-century American women?s literary and political treatments of chastity, autoeroticism, marriage, interracial sex, sexual identity, and ?romantic friendship....(read more) Beam, Dorri
Beam, Dorri
Spring 2007

150/8

Senior Seminar:
Lewis Carroll?s Alice Books and Industry

TTh 11-12:30

The central aim of this course is to understand the Alice books as a cultural phenomenon rather than as isolate texts themselves. Thus, we will begin by surveying a number of seminal critical responses to Carroll?s tales, including competing Freudian ...(read more) Fielding, John David
Fielding, John
Spring 2007

150/9

Senior Seminar:
Alternate Histories - Counterfacts and Fictions

TTh 12:30-2

This course aims to increase awareness of a widespread intellectual trend?the popularity of alternate history in numerous fields?while also learning to discern its variations across the cultural landscape. We will intensively explore the logic, formal...(read more) Gallagher, Catherine
Gallagher, Catherine
Spring 2007

150/10

Senior Seminar:
Postcolonial Writing

TTh 12:30-2

"A major aspect of this survey will be to question the category of the ""postcolonial"" through readings of the novels and films, and through a critical/theoretical reader that will accompany the readings. We will want to articulate, along with these ...(read more) Rubenstein, Michael
Rubenstein, Michael
Spring 2007

150/11

Senior Seminar:
The Modern Novel of Consciousness

TTh 2-3:30

" The representation of consciousness is as old as the novel itself?but new beliefs about the nature of the mind convinced many twentieth-century writers that the novel as a genre required reinvention. In this senior seminar, we will ask why for moder...(read more) Hale, Dorothy J.
Hale, Dorothy
Spring 2007

150/12

Senior Seminar:
Mark Twain

TTh 2-3:30

The seminar will read a generous selection of Mark Twain?s most important published writings. We will work our way chronologically through his life and career, beginning with his earliest extant writings and ending with Mysterious Stranger (which he l...(read more) Hirst, Robert H.
Hirst, Robert
Spring 2007

150/13

Senior Seminar:
American Realism

TTh 2-3:30

"The term ""realism"" refers to a certain historical period and a certain practice (or theory) of fiction writing. A number of American writers, led by James and Howells, participated in this general movement (which included British and European write...(read more) Hutson, Richard
Hutson, Richard
Spring 2007

150/14

Senior Seminar:
Democracy and Rebellion in American Literature

TTh 2-3:30

From the enlightenment through modernism and beyond, American literature is replete with scenarios of class antagonism and rebellion. But consider the bad ends to which the vast majority of American rebels?Lily Bart, Jay Gatsby, Thomas Sutpen, Bigger ...(read more) Skinfill, Mauri
Spring 2007

150/15

Senior Seminar:
Utopianism

TTh 3:30-5

"Most Utopian authors are more concerned with selling readers on the social or political merits of their schemes than with the ""merely"" literary qualities of their writing. Although some Utopian writing has succeeded in the sense of making converts,...(read more) Starr, George A.
Starr, George
Spring 2007

150/16

Senior Seminar:
Books and Blogs: 20th- Century Print Culture

TTh 3:30-5

" We are living in a time of technological revolution that may be changing the way we read. Digital media?blogs, magazines, hypertext fiction, e-books?place the continued existence of the paper-based book into question, generating debates and jeremiad...(read more) Hollis, Catherine
Hollis, Catherine
Spring 2007

150/17

Senior Seminar:
Film Melodrama

MW 5:30-7, plus film screenings Mondays 7-10

We will focus on a range of film melodramas from early silents to contemporary examples, analyzing melodrama?s relationship to the body, the family, gender roles, excess and spectacle. We will be interested in melodrama and modernity, and in the genre...(read more) Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia
Fall 2006

150/3

Senior Seminar:
Fictions of Los Angeles

MW 4-5:30

"Los Angeles has been described, variously, as a ""circus without a tent"" (Carey McWilliams), ""seventy-two suburbs in search of a city"" (Dorothy Parker), ""the capital of the Third World "" (David Rieff), and ""the only place for me that never rain...(read more) Saul, Scott
Saul, Scott
Fall 2006

150/5

Senior Seminar:
Victorian Masculinities in Conflict

TTh 9:30-11

"In this class we will examine the varied and often conflicting forms of masculinity in the latter-half of the Victorian era. We will look at �hegemonic� masculinities (i.e., heterosexual, white, middle-upper class) alongside �other� masculinities and...(read more) Chevalier, Antoinette
Chevalier, Antoinette
Fall 2006

150/7

Senior Seminar:
James Joyce

TTh 11-12:30

A polytropically intensive examination of Joyce's fiction. We'll begin the semester with a rapid study of Dubliners and A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, focus lengthily on Ulysses over the major part of the term, and conclude with a brief gaze...(read more) Bishop, John
Bishop, John
Fall 2006

150/8

Senior Seminar:
Senior Seminar: Classical and Renaissance Drama

TTh 11-12:30

In a famous poem prefixed to the first edition (1623) of Shakespeare's collected works, Ben Jonson claimed that Shakespeare was at least the equal of ancient tragedians such as Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripedes, and Seneca, while for comedy Shakespeare ...(read more) Knapp, Jeffrey
Knapp, Jeffrey
Fall 2006

150/10

Senior Seminar:
Irish Writing in the 20th Century

TTh 12:30-2

This course surveys some of the most popular Irish literature in the last one hundred years. Irish Writing in the early part of the 20th century was part of a cultural revolution that culminated in a political revolution, a war of independence and the...(read more) Rubenstein, Michael
Rubenstein, Michael
Fall 2006

150/12

Senior Seminar:
Is It Useless to Revolt?

TTh 2-3:30

�Is it useless to revolt?� Our seminar borrows its lead question from the title of an essay by Foucault on the Iranian Revolution of 1979. Foucault urges us to listen to the voices of revolt, even as they seem entangled in a history of inescapable, re...(read more) Goldsmith, Steven
Goldsmith, Steven
Fall 2006

150/16

Senior Seminar:
Film Noir/Neo-Noir

TTh 5:30-7 P.M, plus film screenings Thursdays 7-10 P.M. (also in 203 Wheeler)

Our focus will be on the evolution of neo-noirs from classic noirs. We will follow the genre from early European and American examples to the 70's and onwards, and analyze gender presentations, popular narrative patterns, postmodern nostalgia, and que...(read more) Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia
Spring 2006

150/1

Senior Seminar:
Faulkner, Paredes, Garcia Marquez, and Morrison

MWF 1-2

"A detailed trans-American study of William Faulkner, Americo Paredes, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, and Toni Morrison's imaginative writings in the aesthetic and geopolitical contexts of the New South and the Global South. Topics include the significance o...(read more) Saldivar, Jose David
Saldivar, Jose
Spring 2006

150/2

Senior Seminar:
Utopianism

MW 4-5:30

"Most Utopian authors are more concerned with selling readers on the social or political merits of their schemes than with the ""merely"" literary qualities of their writing. Although some Utopian writing has succeeded in the sense of making converts,...(read more) Starr, George A.
Starr, George
Spring 2006

150/3

Senior Seminar:
Jane Austen (topic changed as of Jan. 5)

MW 12:30-2

While there is hardly a dearth of criticism on Jane Austen, it is rare to find her used, as Balzac, Flaubert, Dostoevsky, or Proust is used, as the basis for theorizing the Novel as a form. Classic continental novel theory ignores her, and even recen...(read more) Miller, D. A.
Spring 2006

150/4

Senior Seminar:
James Joyce

MWF 3-4

A polytropically intensive examination of Joyce's fiction. We'll begin the semester with a rapid study of Dubliners and A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, focus lengthily on Ulysses over the major part of the term, and conclude with a brief gaze...(read more) Bishop, John
Bishop, John
Spring 2006

150/7

Senior Seminar:
American Beauty

TTh 9:30-11

"When we think about what ?beauty? means in America, we immediately confront issues of race, ethnicity, sexuality, femininity, faith, and class. Beauty, we discover, is a highly coded word, a concept that expresses desire entangled with history, aesth...(read more) Adams, Jessica
Spring 2006

150/8

Senior Seminar:
Chicana/o Poetry Since 1967

TTh 11-12:30

In this course, we will study the major movements and developments in Chicana and Chicano poetry since 1967. The thematic focus of the course will be broad. Thus, at a minimum, we will discuss and analyze the following topics: the Epic Corrido as a re...(read more) Gonzalez, Marcial
Gonzalez, Marcial
Spring 2006

150/9

Senior Seminar:
The Apocalyptic Imagination

MW 3-4:30

"When Lincoln's 1858 senate-race speech on The House Divided drew famously on biblical rhetoric to underscore the impending Union crisis over slavery, it offered one example of a peculiar American preoccupation?one now curiously shared by politicians,...(read more) Skinfill, Mauri
Spring 2006

150/10

Senior Seminar:
Theories and Literatures of Globalization

TTh 12:30-2

Processes of globalization ostensibly have wrought economic interdependence, as well as mutual intelligibility, among a newly-integrated world citizenry. Literary studies has kept apace with this re-organization of people?s experiences by tracing prev...(read more) Ray, Kasturi
Spring 2006

150/11

Senior Seminar:
Henry James and the Invention of Novel Theory

TTh 2-3:30

"This course will focus on James as a foundational figure for twentieth-century novel theory. We will consider how James?s literary critical writing inspired later thinkers to think systematically about the novel as a high art form; and why James?s ow...(read more) Hale, Dorothy J.
Hale, Dorothy
Spring 2006

150/12

Senior Seminar:
Chaucer's Canterbury Tales

TTh 3:30-5

This seminar will focus on Chaucer?s Canterbury Tales, one of the most complicated, funny, tragic, moral, irreverent and engaging texts written in English. Students will learn to read Middle English both silently and out loud, and will have the opport...(read more) Nolan, Maura
Nolan, Maura
Spring 2006

150/13

Senior Seminar:
Gender, Modernism, and Print Culture

TTh 3:30-5

Robert McAlmon famously observed that ?it is some kind of commentary on the modern period that Joyce?s work and acclaim should have been fostered by high-minded ladies, rather than by men,? without going into detail about why gender matters in the pub...(read more) Hollis, Catherine
Hollis, Catherine
Spring 2006

150/14

Senior Seminar:
Romantic Versification

Thurs. 3:30-6:30

English Romantic poets issued a great many pronouncements about the language of poetry. In this course we will explore these views not so much through what they said as through what they did. Focusing specifically on those resources of poetry which ar...(read more) Hanson, Kristin
Hanson, Kristin
Spring 2006

150/15

Senior Seminar:
Film Noir

Seminars Th 5:30-8:30 P.M. in 300 Wheeler, plus film screenings Th 8:30-10 P.M.(also in 300 Wheeler)

"We will examine film noir's relationship to ""classical"" Hollywood cinema, as well as its history, theory and generic markers, while analyzing in detail the major films in this area. The course will also be concerned with the social and cultural bac...(read more) Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia
Fall 2005

150/1

Senior Seminar:
Literature of the Americas--History, Narrative and Event

MW 1:30-3

Examining a wide selection of texts from throughout the Americas, this class will look at the literary and historiographic methods of representing the discontinuous historical narratives of the New World. How does the way we narrate history influence ...(read more) Jones, Donna V.
Jones, Donna
Fall 2005

150/2

Senior Seminar:
Modernism/Postmodernism

W 2-5

We will read an array of 20th-century novels which will stand as test cases for a baggy, theoretical construction which sometimes lumps together the modern and the postmodern, and sometimes sets them apart from each other. Topics for discussion will i...(read more) Snyder, Katherine
Snyder, Katherine
Fall 2005

150/3

Senior Seminar:
Nation and Narration

MW 3-4:30

"Why does it seem so natural to study literary forms by breaking them up into distinct national literatures? Why do we persistently study ""American Literature"" or ""British Literature"" as opposed, say, to ""Literatures in English""? What is the cur...(read more) Rubenstein, Michael
Rubenstein, Michael
Fall 2005

150/4

Senior Seminar:
Virginia Woolf and the Bloomsbury Group

MW 4-5:30

"This course situates Virginia Woolf, the Bloomsbury Group, and British modernism within the social and historical context of the early 20th century, while also investigating ""Virginia Woolf"" and the ""Bloomsbury Group"" as categories still resonant...(read more) Hollis, Catherine
Hollis, Catherine
Fall 2005

150/5

Senior Seminar:
The Short Poem--Wyatt to the Present

TTh 9:30-11

For more information on this class, please email the professor at bobhass@berkeley.edu. ...(read more) Hass, Robert L.
Hass, Robert
Fall 2005

150/6

Senior Seminar:
Asian American Novel

TTh 11-12:30

"It is by now a commonplace to describe Asian American identity as impossibly heterogeneous and hybrid. At the same time, Asian American Studies is founded upon the strategic necessity of the pan-ethnic category. Can there be a textual basis for Asian...(read more) Lye, Colleen
Lye, Colleen
Fall 2005

150/9

Senior Seminar:
Emily Dickinson

TTh 11-12:30

"This is an intensive course in the poetry of Emily Dickinson. We will read her poems, along with her letters and a biography, deeply but also broadly throughout her career. Topics include early poetry; musical poetics; figuration; definition and ridd...(read more) Shoptaw, John
Shoptaw, John
Fall 2005

150/12

Senior Seminar:
Underbelly-- Other Classes, Other Cultures in Victorian England

TTh 12:30-2

"In this class we will explore the literature and culture surrounding Britain's poor, working classes, and racial outsiders in the Victorian era. Critical analysis of these marginalized classes and cultures will give us a more thorough and nuanced und...(read more) Chevalier, Antoinette
Chevalier, Antoinette
Fall 2005

150/15

Senior Seminar:
Homocinema

TTh 2-3:30

"Under the assumption that male homosexual fantasy is not the peculiar coinage of a homosexual brain, but the common, even central daydream of the normal world, the course identifies three modes of broaching it in narrative cinema. In Hollywood classi...(read more) Miller, D. A.
Fall 2005

150/17

Senior Seminar:
Fictions of Los Angeles

TTh 3:30-5

"Los Angeles has been described, variously, as a ""circus without a tent"" (Carey McWilliams), ""seventy-two suburbs in search of a city"" (Dorothy Parker), ""the capital of the Third World"" (David Rieff), and ""the only place for me that never rains...(read more) Saul, Scott
Saul, Scott
Fall 2005

150/18

Senior Seminar:
Alfred Hitchcock

TTh 5:30-7 P.M, plus film screenings Thursdays 7-10 P.M. in 140 Barrows

"The course focuses on Hitchcock, ""auteur"" and consummate craftsman, with a remarkably long and varied career. We will view most of his films, discuss them from a variety of critical perspectives, and examine the key critical writings about them. "...(read more) Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia
Spring 2005

150/2

Senior Seminar:
The Contemporary Indian Novel in English

MW 12-2

Over the last twenty-five years Indian novelists writing in English have achieved extraordinary prominence in the global literary marketplace. Their success has coincided with a protracted and profound crisis of the Indian nation-state, which has mani...(read more) Premnath, Gautam
Premnath, Gautam
Spring 2005

150/3

Senior Seminar:
James Joyce

MW 4-5:30

A polytropically intensive examination of Joyce's fiction. We'll begin the semester with a rapid study of Dubliners and A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, focus lengthily on Ulysses over the major part of the term, and conclude with a brief gaze...(read more) Bishop, John
Bishop, John
Spring 2005

150/4

Senior Seminar:
Early Modern Women Writers

M 3-6

"Reading works written or dictated by women in England from the fourteenth through the eighteenth centuries, we will explore how exclusion from the priesthood prompted women to style themselves as religious authorities outside the pulpit, how the Engl...(read more) Picciotto, Joanna M
Picciotto, Joanna
Spring 2005

150/5

Senior Seminar:
Shakespearean and Postmodern Sensibilities

TTh 9:30-11

While 'Shakespeare' has been an important presence in western culture since the seventeenth century, that presence has never been self-identical. Shakespeare the man began turning himself into 'Shakespeare' in his own lifetime, as he revised his plays...(read more) Altman, Joel B.
Altman, Joel
Spring 2005

150/6

Senior Seminar:
Maxine Hong Kingston and 'Postmodern

TTh 9:30-11

We will examine writings by this major figure of Asian American letters and consider the ways in which she has been taken up in the academy and by a wider public. Kingston's experimentation with different forms of writing will be used as a lens throug...(read more) Lye, Colleen
Lye, Colleen
Spring 2005

150/7

Senior Seminar:
Reading New Orleans

TTh 9:30-11

The Big Easy, the City that Care Forgot, The Most Interesting City in the World, the Great Southern Babylon....what has New Orleans done to earn these sobriquets? In what ways has New Orleans been imagined by those who have lived or visited there? Wha...(read more) Snyder, Katherine
Snyder, Katherine
Spring 2005

150/8

Senior Seminar:
William S. Burroughs and the Beat Generation

TTh 11-12:30

This class will examine the work of William S. Burroughs within the context of the Beat Generation, concentrating on the work of Burroughs' two closest friends and mutual influences, Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg. We will spend some time on the hist...(read more) Loewinsohn, Ron
Loewinsohn, Ron
Spring 2005

150/9

Senior Seminar:
Charles Dickens

TTh 12:30-2

This course will trace the career of the nineteenth century's most exuberantly creative novelist. We will pay special attention to the idea of 'character' in the novels, to their innovative narrative techniques and to their role in creating the Victor...(read more) Gallagher, Catherine
Gallagher, Catherine
Spring 2005

150/10

Senior Seminar:
Mark Twain

TTh 2-3:30

The seminar will read a generous selection of Mark Twain's most important published writings. We will work our way chronologically through his life and career, beginning with his earliest extant writings and ending with Mysterious Stranger (which he l...(read more) Hirst, Robert H.
Hirst, Robert
Spring 2005

150/11

Senior Seminar:
Chaucer and the Traditions of Amatory Verse

TTh 2-3:30

This seminar will examine Chaucer's varied use of traditions of verse about love and lovers, and the sentiments and values attached to amatory experience in relation to other discursive and ideational registers of fictive and philosophical writing, si...(read more) Middleton, Anne
Middleton, Anne
Spring 2005

150/12

Senior Seminar:
The Poetry of Edmund Spenser

TTh 3:30-5

I am offering this course because I am frustrated by the constraints of 45A. I have always found reading Spenser's work to be not only an intellectually enlivening and emotionally enriching experience but also a delight, and I am convinced that readin...(read more) Adelman, Janet
Adelman, Janet
Spring 2005

150/13

Senior Seminar:
Poe, and More

TTh 3:30-5

We will immerse ourselves in Edgar Allan Poe's career: poetry, tales, comic satires and grotesques, essays, and reviews. We will discuss issues of aesthetics, style, genre, humor, politics, authorship, gender, sexuality, and race. We will consider Poe...(read more) Otter, Sam
Spring 2005

150/14

Senior Seminar:
Virginia Woolf

TTh 11-12:30

The semester will be devoted to an intensive and extensive reading of Virginia Woolf's literary career, focusing on her fiction but also taking into account her essays, diaries, and letters. We will trace the evolution of Woolf's narrative strategies ...(read more) Abel, Elizabeth
Abel, Elizabeth
Spring 2005

150/15

Senior Seminar:
Film Noir and Neo-Noir

Seminars TTh 5:30-7 P.M. in 210 Wheeler, plus film screenings Thursdays 7-10 P.M. in 210 Wheeler

We will analyze the cinematic texts and social/theoretical contexts of a variety of post-WWII film noirs, using a range of critical approaches, focusing on spectatorship, the femme fatale, the noir hero and techniques of narration. ...(read more) Bader, Julia
Bader, Julia
Fall 2004

150/2

Senior Seminar:
14th-Century Alliterative Traditions

MW 10-12

"This seminar will read a substantial selection of the best alliterative poetry of the later 14C in England. These works represent an intensive cultivation, during a few decades, of a metrical preference with much deeper roots in earlier English verse...(read more) Middleton, Anne
Middleton, Anne
Fall 2004

150/3

Senior Seminar

"Check back later for more information!"

No instructor assigned yet.