Class Archive

Semester
Course #
Instructor
Course Area

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Semester Course #
Instructor
Course Area
Spring 2020

104/1

Introduction to Old English

TTh 12:30-2

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

For more information about this course, please contact Professor Miller at j_miller@berkeley.edu.

 

...(read more)
Miller, Jennifer
Spring 2020

114B/1

English Drama from 1603 to 1700

TTh 2-3:30

Reaching across the upheavals of the seventeenth century, this class studies the triumphant age of drama after Shakespeare, the Jacobean period; the reactions against the drama that led to the closing of London's theaters during the English Civ...(read more)

Landreth, David
Spring 2020

115B/1

The English Renaissance (17th Century)

TTh 3:30-5

An introduction to one of the great ages of English literature, focusing on works by John Donne, Ben Jonson, George Herbert, Thomas Hobbes, Andrew Marvell, John Milton, Robert Herrick, Margaret Cavendish, Katharine Phillips. We will discuss the rel...(read more)

Kahn, Victoria
Spring 2020

118/1

Milton

Lectures MW 2-3 in 56 Barrows + one hour of discussion section per week in different locations (sec.101: F 1-2; sec. 102: F 2-3)

We'll explore John Milton's career, a lifelong effort to unite intellectual, political, and artistic experimentation.

Required Text: John Milton, The Complete Poetry and Essential Prose of John Milton, ed. Willi...(read more)

Picciotto, Joanna M
Spring 2020

125A/1

The English Novel (Defoe through Scott)

MWF 1-2

The period from which our reading draws has been credited with the “rise of the novel”—the emergence of the then new genre, the “novel,” so familiar to us today. While critics have qualified and revised that claim, the...(read more)

Sorensen, Janet
Spring 2020

130A/1

American Literature: Before 1800

TTh 11-12:30

This course surveys the literatures of early America, from the tracts that envisioned the impact of British colonization to the novels that measured the after-shock of the American Revolution.  Throughout, we will consider colonial America as ...(read more)

Donegan, Kathleen
Spring 2020

165/2

Special Topics:
Enlightenment & Romance: Scotland in the 18th Century

MWF 10-11

Eighteenth-century Scotland was home both to the so-called Scottish Enlightenment, one of the advanced civil societies in the Atlantic world, and to the beginnings of the global movement of taste and feeling later to be called Romanticism. Here wer...(read more)

Duncan, Ian
Spring 2020

166/7

Special Topics:
Arthurian Romance

TTh 2-3:30

King Arthur and his Round Table together constitute one of the most enduring imaginative inventions in the European literary tradition. In the modern era, writers and artists have created Arthurian plays, films, poems, novels, cartoons, paintings, ...(read more)

Nolan, Maura
Spring 2020

190/4

Research Seminar:
Poetry and the Virtues

MW 5-6:30

Arguments for the moral value of literary study often focus on how narrative forms like the novel offer opportunities for the cultivation of empathy. But in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, literary style itself was treated as an extension ...(read more)

Picciotto, Joanna M
Fall 2019

111/1

Chaucer

MWF 2-3

For more information on this course, please contact Professor Miller at j_miller@berkeley.edu.

This class satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

...(read more)
Miller, Jennifer
Fall 2019

115A/1

The English Renaissance (through the 16th Century)

MWF 12-1

For more information on this course, please contact Professor Miller at j_miller@berkeley.edu.

This class satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

...(read more)
Miller, Jennifer
Fall 2019

120/1

Literature of the Later 18th Century

W 3-6

We’ll investigate the relationship of literature to other arts in the period, particularly painting and landscape design. Our focus will be on engagements with “nature,” understood as the non-human world and the ground of culture....(read more)

Picciotto, Joanna M
Fall 2019

165/2

Special Topics:
The Pleasures of Allegory

MWF 12-1

If you want to understand both how stories are put together and how we experience stories, allegory is not a bad place to start. Broadly speaking, an allegory is a story that demands to be read on more than one level. One version of this&mdash...(read more)

Wilson, Evan
Fall 2019

166/8

Special Topics:
Green Thought in a Green Shade

TTh 2-3:30

The natural world and the non-urban environment have inspired writers and artists, especially in the 17th and 18th centuries, but they have also provoked intense critical d...(read more)

Turner, James Grantham
Fall 2019

166AC/1

Special Topics in American Cultures:
Race and Revision in Early America

Lectures MW 1-2 in 50 Birge + one hour of discussion section per week in various locations (sec. 101: F 1-2; sec. 102: F 2-3; sec. 104: Th 10-11; sec. 105: Th 2-3; sec. 106: Th 4-5)

In this course, we will read both historical and literary texts to explore how racial categories came into being in New World cultures, and how these categories were tested, inhabited, and re-imagined by the people they sought to define. Our s...(read more)

Donegan, Kathleen
Fall 2019

190/2

Research Seminar:
Shakespeare and Company

MW 1:30-3

In this research seminar, we'll be considering Shakespeare, his playwriting rivals, his actorly partners, and their audiences as participants in the burgeoning entertainment industry of early modern London. We'll attend to the conditions an...(read more)

Landreth, David
Spring 2019

111/1

Chaucer:
Canterbury Tales

MW 5-6:30

In the late fourteenth century, Geoffrey Chaucer created a fictional pilgrimage in which travelers competed with one another to tell a tale “of best sentence and moost solaas”—meaning, a tale that best combines moral seriousness w...(read more)

Nolan, Maura
Spring 2019

114A/1

English Drama to 1603

TTh 12:30-2

For more information on this course, please contact Professor Miller at j_miller@berkeley.edu.

This class satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

...(read more)
Miller, Jennifer
Spring 2019

115A/1

The English Renaissance (through the 16th Century)

TTh 3:30-5

In this course, we follow how English authors from Thomas More to John Donne participated in the grand cultural project of the Renaissance, defined by the belief that consuming and producing culture would elevate human beings above ...(read more)

Marno, David
Spring 2019

115B/1

The English Renaissance (17th Century)

MWF 1-2

A survey of England's "century of revolution," focusing on relationships between literature, religion, and politics. Readings will be made available electronically and in an optional reader.

This class satisfies the pre...(read more)

Picciotto, Joanna M
Spring 2019

119/1

Literature of the Restoration and the Early 18th Century

TTh 11-12:30

In this course we shall read a variety of texts that sought to represent strange new worlds—or invited readers to see their own world as strange—from Royal Society publications describing microscopic worlds to popular voyage accounts re...(read more)

Sorensen, Janet
Spring 2019

130A/1

American Literature: Before 1800

TTh 12:30-2

This course provides a survey of English-language American literature to 1800. We will explore a wide range of texts from narratives of colonial settlement through the literature of the American Revolution, the Constitutional Convention, and the ea...(read more)

Tamarkin, Elisa
Spring 2019

165/1

Special Topics:
Global Tudors

This seminar challenges us to look back to a time before England's colonial period and consider how people of the 16th century began to perceive of themselves as part of a truly global world. The class will begin by thinking about what the conc...(read more)

Honig, Elizabeth
Spring 2019

165/3

Special Topics:
John Milton's Last Poems

MW 5-6:30

Four years after publishing the first edition of Paradise Lost, Milton came out with a volume called Paradise Regain’d...to which is added, Samson Agonistes. We will spend the semester carefully reading these poems...(read more)

Picciotto, Joanna M
Spring 2019

180E/1

The Epic: Imagined Communities and the Classical Epic

TTh 5-6:30

I am  convinced that the classical epic is crucial for a literary education whatever field you specialize in—for the profound encounters it offers, for the intensity and vivacity of the memorable scenes the works construct, and...(read more)

Altieri, Charles F.
Spring 2019

190/6

Research Seminar:
Carnal Knowledge in Medieval and Early Modern Literature

TTh 9:30-11

Medieval feminist scholar Carolyn Dinshaw has argued that the body is "a field on which issues of representation and interpretation are literally and metaphorically played out" ("Eunuch Hermeneutics," 27). This re...(read more)

Miller, Jasmin
Summer 2019

111/1

Chaucer

TuWTh 9:30-12

In this course we will study The Canterbury Tales and its continuations, paying special attention to the topics of imitation, innovation, and literary influence. As we learn about the literary traditions Chaucer so deftly passes over and t...(read more)

Ripplinger, Michelle
Fall 2018

104/1

Introduction to Old English

MWF 11-12

This course will equip you to read the earliest English literature: lives of saints, accounts of Viking invasion, poetry about onions, and the rest. You will learn to read Old English by direct study of texts in the original. This course will help ...(read more)

Hobson, Jacob
Fall 2018

110/1

Medieval Literature

MWF 2-3

For more information on this course, please contact Professor Miller at j_miller@berkeley.edu.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

...(read more)
Miller, Jennifer
Fall 2018

118/1

Milton

MW 5-6:30

Probably the most influential and famous (and, in his own time, infamous) literary figure of the seventeenth century, John Milton has too often been misrepresented as a mainstay of a traditional canon rather than as the rebel he was. Those who do n...(read more)

Goodman, Kevis
Fall 2018

166/3

Special Topics:
Journeys: British World-Building, c. 700-1700

TTh 11-12:30

"Britain, formerly known as Albion, is an island in the ocean, lying towards the north west at a considerable distance from the coasts of Germany, Gaul, and Spain, which together form the greater part of Europe." (Bede, Ecclesias...(read more)

Miller, Jasmin
Fall 2018

166AC/1

Special Topics in American Cultures:
Race & Revision in Early America

Lectures MW 1-2 + one hour of discussion section per week (sec. 101: F 10-11; sec. 102: F 1-2; sec. 103: Thurs. 10-11; sec. 104: Thurs. 1-2; sec. 105: Thurs. 1-2; sec. 106: Thurs. 4-5)

In this course, we will read both historical and literary texts to explore how racial categories came into being in New World cultures, and how these categories were tested, inhabited, and re-imagined by the human actors they sought to define.&nbsp...(read more)

Donegan, Kathleen
Fall 2018

180E/1

The Epic

TTh 12:30-2

Homer’s Iliad was composed in the eighth century BCE. Both the story that it narrated (the conflict between the Greeks and the Trojans) and the particular form that the story took (the genre of the epic) would become foundational bui...(read more)

Nolan, Maura
Fall 2018

190/14

Research Seminar

MW 5-6:30

For more information on this course, please contact Professor Miller at j_miller@berkeley.edu.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

Please read the paragraph about English 190 on page 2 ...(read more)

Miller, Jennifer
Spring 2018

112/1

Middle English Literature

TTh 2-3:30

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

...(read more)
Hobson, Jacob
Spring 2018

118/1

Milton

Lectures TTh 11-12 + one hour of discussion section per week (sec. 101: F 9-10; sec. 102: F 1-2)

We'll explore John Milton's whole career, a lifelong effort to unite intellectual, political, and artistic experimentation.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

...(read more)
Picciotto, Joanna M
Spring 2018

125A/1

The English Novel (Defoe through Scott)

TTh 12:30-2

The period from which our reading draws has been credited with the “rise of the novel”—the emergence of the then new genre, the “novel,” so familiar to us today. While critics have qualified and revised that claim, the...(read more)

Sorensen, Janet
Spring 2018

130A/1

American Literature: Before 1800

MWF 2-3

This course surveys the literatures of early America, from the tracts that envisioned the impact of British colonization to the novels that measured the aftermath of the American Revolution.  Throughout, we will consider colonial America as a ...(read more)

Donegan, Kathleen
Spring 2018

165/2

Special Topics:
Handel's Art in Setting English Words to Music

MW 3:30-5

Rhythm is a significant source of artistic effects in both poetry and music.  However, while the forms it can take in the two arts are similar in some ways, they are different in others.  An interesting window into these similarities and ...(read more)

Hanson, Kristin
Spring 2018

166/3

Special Topics:
Classical & Renaissance Drama

TTh 3:30-5

In a poem for the first edition of Shakespeare’s collected plays in 1623, his fellow playwright Ben Jonson expressed a characteristic ambivalence about classical drama.  On the one hand, he praised it as the standard by which all subsequ...(read more)

Knapp, Jeffrey
Spring 2018

174/2

Literature and History:
History as Literature

TTh 3:30-5

Are the events of the world and human lives meaningful? And if they are, how do we discern the meaning?

History, as a form of narrative literature, seeks to answer these questions. In this class we will read a range of historical texts, w...(read more)

Thornbury, Emily V.
Spring 2018

180R/1

The Romance

MW 5-6:30

Everybody thinks they know what “romance” is, but in fact the term is controversial and difficult to define. Does it mean escapist fiction with monsters and enchanters, entertaining but unbelievable? (What makes fiction believable(read more)

Turner, James Grantham
Spring 2018

190/9

Research Seminar:
The Faerie Queene: The Ethics of Imagination

TTh 2-3:30

Edmund Spenser's Faerie Queene (1590-96) is the most vast, most gorgeous, and most deliriously strange of English poems. Its hallucinatory dreamworld mingles self with landscape, character with plot, happenstance events with ...(read more)

Landreth, David
Spring 2018

190/10

Research Seminar:
Pagan Fictions in Christian Literature

TTh 5-6:30

Although late antique and medieval Christian authors routinely decried the falsehood of pagan literature, they could hardly get enough of it. Pagan mythology became not only a major inspiration of medieval poetry and philosophy but even a part of e...(read more)

Hobson, Jacob
Spring 2018

190/11

Research Seminar:
Andrew Marvell

TTh 5-6:30

An intensive study of Marvell's poetry and prose. Students will complete a final research paper of 15-20 pages. 

All readings will be made available on the course site.

This section of English 190 satisfies the pre-...(read more)

Picciotto, Joanna M
Summer 2018

166/2

Special Topics:
Games of Thrones, Medieval to Modern

TuWTh 10-12

This course will show how Game of Thrones and A Song of Ice and Fire draw on a long literary-historical legacy, emphasizing the preoccupations that have made their way from medieval and Renaissance writers into mod...(read more)

Strub, Spencer
Fall 2017

104/1

Introduction to Old English

MWF 10-11

Hwæt! Leorniað Englisc!

In this introduction to Old English, you will begin to read and write Old English from your first day in class, while also learning fundamental principles of grammar and historical language change. As you...(read more)

Thornbury, Emily V.
Fall 2017

110/1

Medieval Literature

MWF 12-1

For more information about this course, please contact Professor Miller at j_miller@berkeley.edu.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

...(read more)
Miller, Jennifer
Fall 2017

115A/1

The English Renaissance (through the 16th Century)

MWF 3-4

For more information about this course, please contact Professor Miller at j_miller@berkeley.edu.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

...(read more)
Miller, Jennifer
Fall 2017

120/1

Literature of the Later 18th Century

TTh 2-3:30

We’ll investigate the relationship of literature to other arts in the period, particularly painting and landscape design. Our focus will be on engagements with “nature,” understood as the non-human world and the ground of culture....(read more)

Picciotto, Joanna M
Fall 2017

166AC/1

Special Topics in American Cultures:
Race and Revision in Early America

TTh 12:30-2

In this course, we will read both historical and literary texts to explore how racial categories came into being in New World cultures and how these categories were tested, inhabited, and re-imagined by the human actors they sought to define. Our s...(read more)

Donegan, Kathleen
Fall 2017

190/7

Research Seminar:
Monsters, Exiles, and Outlaws in Medieval Literature

TTh 9:30-11

This course focuses on murderers, monsters, and thieves. Zombies, although not our main focus, also arise. Such figures are excluded from society and cut off from their fellow human beings, whether because they have committed an unpardonable crime ...(read more)

Hobson, Jacob
Spring 2017

105/1

Anglo-Saxon England

TTh 2-3:30

“Britain, once called Albion, is an island of the ocean...” When the priest Bede set out in the early 700s to write the history of the place we now call England, he portrayed it as a new nation with a deep past, a remote corner of the ...(read more)

Thornbury, Emily V.
Spring 2017

111/1

Chaucer

TTh 3:30-5

The course will read Chaucer's two greatest works--the Canterbury Tales (easily one of the most entertaining works and one of the most compelling works in English) and the Troilus and Criseyde (perhaps less entertaining, but ...(read more)

Justice, Steven
Spring 2017

114A/1

English Drama to 1603

TTh 11-12:30

For more information on this course, please contact Professor Miller at j_miller@berkeley.edu

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

...(read more)
Miller, Jennifer
Spring 2017

118/1

Milton

MW 10-11 + discussion sections F 10-11

Probably the most influential and famous (and, in his own time, infamous) literary figure of the seventeenth century, John Milton has been misrepresented too often...(read more)

Goodman, Kevis
Spring 2017

119/1

Literature of the Restoration and the Early 18th Century

TTh 12:30-2

In an age of commercial print expansion, men and women writers negotiated the possibilities, limits, and perceived dangers of publishing. In this class, we will explore the forms and strategies writers deployed in those negotiati...(read more)

Sorensen, Janet
Spring 2017

130A/1

American Literature: Before 1800

MWF 12-1

This course surveys the literatures of early America, from the tracts that envisioned the impact of British colonization to the novels that measured the after-sho...(read more)

Donegan, Kathleen
Spring 2017

C181/1

Digital Humanities, Visual Cultures:
Digital Travels

MWF 10-11

This course introduces tools and methods of the Digital Humanities as they can be used in studying the art and literature of the early modern period. Our focus is on how, around 1600, things were in motion: people, but also objects and ideas. By 1...(read more)

Honig, Elizabeth
Spring 2017

190/5

Research Seminar:
Writing a World in Crisis: Medieval and Modern

MWF 1-2

Please note the changes in the topic, book list, and courses description of this class (as of November 22).

This course looks at two distinct moments in which individual authors attempted to create encyclopedic visions in an attemp...(read more)

Perry, R. D.
Spring 2017

190/8

Research Seminar:
Literatures of the Ocean

TTh 9:30-11

In this seminar we’ll explore literary (and some non-literary) representations of life at sea and of sailors, both offshore and on, primarily but not exclusively during the expansion of Britain’s first empire during the eighteenth cent...(read more)

Sorensen, Janet
Spring 2017

190/9

Research Seminar:
Beowulf

TTh 9:30-11

Beowulf is the longest, subtlest, and in many ways the strangest and most difficult Old English poem that has survived from Anglo-Saxon England. Since its rediscovery in the 18th century, we have learned much about its language...(read more)

Thornbury, Emily V.
Summer 2017

N166/2

Special Topics:
Arthurian Literature

MTTh 12-2

This course will be taught in Session D, from July 3 to August 10.

...(read more)
Miller, Jennifer
Fall 2016

104/1

Introduction to Old English

MWF 10-11

Canst þu þis gewrit understandan? Want to? “Introduction to Old English” will give you the tools to read a wide variety of writings from among the earliest recorded texts in the English language. What is there to r...(read more)

O'Brien O'Keeffe, Katherine
Fall 2016

110/1

Medieval Literature:
Heaven, Hell, and Fairyland: Visions of Other Worlds in Medieval British Literature

MWF 9-10

This course provides a tour of otherworld visions and journeys in the literature of medieval Britain. After looking at some foundational texts from antiquity that influenced writers up to the present day, we’ll examine the geography of the a...(read more)

Thornbury, Emily V.
Fall 2016

115A/1

The English Renaissance (through the 16th Century)

MWF 3-4

For more information on this course, please contact Professor Miller at j_miller@berkeley.edu

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

...(read more)
Miller, Jennifer
Fall 2016

166/1

Special Topics:
Aesthetics and the Environment in the Eighteenth Century

MWF 12-1

Why do we take pleasure in contemplating the natural world? What sort of pleasure is this? The eighteenth century was preoccupied with this question, which abutted on others: What is beauty? Is it something we perceive directly, or do we experienc...(read more)

Picciotto, Joanna M
Fall 2016

170/1

Literature and the Arts:
The Deaths and Lives of Saints

MWF 11-12

The paradox of Western sainthood is summed up by a phrase from Latin calendars: dies natalis, “birthday.” Marking a saint’s chief feast, the dies natalis celebrates the day of his or her death: death as birth wi...(read more)

Thornbury, Emily V.
Fall 2016

190/6

Research Seminar:
The Medium Is the Message: Reading Poetry in Manuscript & Print, 1300-1600

TTh 9:30-11

Modern readers almost exclusively encounter medieval and Renaissance literature in highly mediated anthologies and scholarly editions, far removed from the manuscripts and early print books in which they first circulated. In this course, we will p...(read more)

Bahr, Stephanie M
Fall 2016

190/7

Research Seminar:
Note new topic: Troy and Tragedy

TTh 11-12:30

Note the new topic (and book list and instructor):

From the earliest moments of the western literary tradition, the story of the fall of Troy has been associated with the genre of tragedy. This course charts that association from Ancient Ro...(read more)

Perry, R. D.
Spring 2016

111/1

Chaucer

This course has been canceled.

...(read more)
No instructor assigned yet.
Spring 2016

114A/1

English Drama to 1603

This course has been canceled.

...(read more)
No instructor assigned yet.
Spring 2016

165/1

Special Topics:
Arthurian Medievalisms

MW 9-10:30

This course will focus on medievalism, i.e., the representation and conceptualization of the Middle Ages, in order to analyze how ideas about the past are used in literature and the arts, in both "high" and popular culture. The point of ...(read more)

No instructor assigned yet.
Spring 2016

165/4

Special Topics: Representing Non-Human Life in Seventeenth- and Eighteenth-Century Britain

TTh 12:30-2

We will explore techniques developed by scientists, theologians, and poets to represent other life forms. Contexts we’ll investigate include encounters with new-world flora and fauna, the invention of the microscope and the discovery of the ...(read more)

Picciotto, Joanna M
Spring 2016

165/7

Special Topics:
Later 17th-Century Nonfictional Prose

TTh 6-7:30 P.M.

Reading, discussing, and writing about British prose of the later 17th century. Among the genres to be considered will be representative samples of the “character” (of places as well as human types); the essay (controversial as well as...(read more)

Starr, George A.
Spring 2016

165/9

Special Topics:
Ovid and the English Renaissance

TTh 3:30-5

Her bosom was wrapped in smooth thin bark; her slender arms were changed to branches and her hair to leaves; her feet but now so swift were anchored fast in numb stiff roots; her face and head became the crown of a green tree. -- Ovid, Metamor...(read more)

Landreth, David
Spring 2016

166/2

Special Topics:
Elizabethan Renaissance: Art, Culture, and Visuality

MW 4-5:30 + discussion sections

This course has two goals: to explore visual culture and the role of visuality in renaissance England, and to develop research skills.

Elizabeth I's long reign saw a remarkable flowering of the arts. Her unique position as a female mona...(read more)

Honig, Elizabeth
Spring 2016

180E/1

The Epic: Legends of Troy

TTh 2-3:30

Homer’s Iliad was composed in the eighth century BCE. Both the story that it narrated (the conflict between the Greeks and the Trojans) and the particular form that the story took (the genre of the epic) would become foundational bu...(read more)

Nolan, Maura
Spring 2016

190/6

Research Seminar:
Classical and Renaissance Drama

MW 4-5:30

In a poem for the first edition of Shakespeare’s collected works, Ben Jonson expressed a characteristic ambivalence about classical drama.  On the one hand, he praised it as the standard by which all subsequent playwriting sh...(read more)

Knapp, Jeffrey
Spring 2016

190/9

Research Seminar:
Medieval and Renaissance Lyric

TTh 2-3:30

From drinking songs and poems of seduction to works of religious meditation and devotion, the lyric reflects a variety of subjects and concerns.  This course serves as an extensive introduction to lyric poetry from the twelfth to the sixteent...(read more)

Crosson, Chad Gregory
Spring 2016

190/10

Research Seminar:
Purcell and Handel: Their Art in Setting English Texts to Music

TTh 3:30-5

In the early 1600s, in England Shakespeare was exploring new ways of creating drama through language, with music often playing an important role, but a mostly distinct one.  In those same years, in Italy Monteverdi was exploring new ways of c...(read more)

Hanson, Kristin
Spring 2016

190/12

Research Seminar:
Daniel Defoe and the Rise of the 18th-Century Novel

TTh 3:30-5

Reading, discussing, and writing mainly about the fictional works of Daniel Defoe, and (depending on student interests) about contemporary writing on some of Defoe’s subjects, such as overseas commerce, colonies, and piracy; the predicaments...(read more)

Starr, George A.
Fall 2015

104/1

Introduction to Old English

MWF 10-11

Hwæt! Leorniað Englisc!

In this all-new version of the introduction to Old English, you will begin to read and write Old English from your first day in class, while also learning fundamental principles of grammar and historical la...(read more)

Thornbury, Emily V.
Fall 2015

115B/1

The English Renaissance (17th Century)

MWF 12-1

A survey of England's "century of revolution," focusing on relationships between literature, religion, and politics. 

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

...(read more)
Picciotto, Joanna M
Fall 2015

118/1

Milton

MW 4-5:30

Intensive reading in the poetry and prose of John Milton (1608-1674), written during a period of dramatic historical change, and including the most influential single poem in the English language, Paradise Lost. Our goal is to get under t...(read more)

Turner, James Grantham
Fall 2015

130A/1

American Literature:
Before 1800

This course has been canceled.

...(read more)
McQuade, Donald
Fall 2015

165/8

Special Topics:
Modern Medievalism: A Study of Medieval Poetry and Modern Fantasy

TTh 9:30-11

The medieval period is often swept under broad descriptors, like the "Dark Ages," and with these descriptors come equally vague notions of medieval society. One might, for example, imagine medieval society enveloped by religious hysteria...(read more)

No instructor assigned yet.
Fall 2015

166/1

Special Topics:
Epistles: The Letter in Life and Literature

MWF 12-1

In this course, we will explore one of the most intimate, versatile, and surprising of literary forms: (read more)

Thornbury, Emily V.
Fall 2015

180R/1

The Romance

MW 12:30-2

Everybody thinks they know what “romance” is, but in fact the term is controversial and difficult to define. Does it mean escapist fiction with monsters and enchanters, entertaining but unbelievable? (What makes fiction believable(read more)

Turner, James Grantham
Fall 2015

190/11

Research Seminar:
Poetry and Poetics in the Middle Ages

TTh 2-3:30

This class will explore early England's shifting literary landscape in order to better understand what poetry was and what it was for in the Middle Ages. Juxtaposing our close analyses of individual poems and groups of poems with medieval theo...(read more)

T. B. A.
Spring 2015

112/1

Middle English Literature

TTh 11-12:30

For more information on this course, please contact Professor Miller at j_miller@berkeley.edu.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

...(read more)
Miller, Jennifer
Spring 2015

114A/1

English Drama to 1603

TTh 2-3:30

For more information on this course, please contact Professor Miller at j_miller@berkeley.edu

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

...(read more)
Miller, Jennifer
Spring 2015

118/1

Milton

TTh 9:30-11

Probably the most influential and famous (sometimes infamous) literary figure of the seventeenth century, John Milton has been misrepresented too often as a mainstay of a traditional canon rather than the rebel he was. He is also sometimes assumed...(read more)

Goodman, Kevis
Spring 2015

120/1

Literature of the Later 18th Century

TTh 2-3:30

Late-eighteenth-century writing shaped many of the forms and institutions of literature we now take for granted. Fiction writers worked to establish the genre—and—legitimate as worthy reading—what we now call novels, while others...(read more)

Sorensen, Janet
Spring 2015

125A/1

The English Novel (Defoe through Scott)

TTh 9:30-11

This class explores eighteenth-century British innovations in narrative prose writings that we have come to call novels. A scientific revolution, broadened financial speculation, expanding empire, changing notions of gender, and new philosophies o...(read more)

Sorensen, Janet
Spring 2015

125A/2

The English Novel (Defoe through Scott)

TTh 3:30-5

A survey of early fiction, much of which pretended to be anything but. Most was published anonymously and purported to be a true "History," "Expedition," or the like, about "Things as They Are." We will consider at th...(read more)

Starr, George A.
Spring 2015

130A/1

American Literature: Before 1800

This class has been canceled.

...(read more)
McQuade, Donald
Spring 2015

166/1

Special Topics:
Scotland and Romanticism

MWF 11-12

Between 1760 and 1830 Scotland was one of the centers of the European-North Atlantic “Republic of Letters.” Here were invented the signature forms and discourses of the “Enlightenment” and “Romanticism” (terms f...(read more)

Duncan, Ian
Fall 2014

104/1

Introduction to Old English

MWF 11-12

Hwæt! Leorniaþ Englisc!

In this class, you will learn to read, write, and even speak the language of Beowulf. Once you have completed it, you will be able to understand—and will have read!—a wide range of te...(read more)

Thornbury, Emily V.
Fall 2014

115A/1

The English Renaissance (through the 16th century)

MWF 3-4

In this course, we follow how English authors from Thomas More to John Donne participated in the grand cultural project of the Renaissance, defined by the belief that consuming a...(read more)

Marno, David
Fall 2014

115B/1

The English Renaissance (17th century)

TTh 11-12:30

An introduction to one of the great ages of English literature (poetry, prose, and drama), focusing on works by King James I, Donne, Jonson, Herbert, Marvell, Milton, Cavendish, Hutchinson, Halkett, and Bunyan. We will discuss the relationship bet...(read more)

Kahn, Victoria
Fall 2014

119/1

Literature of the Restoration & the Early 18th Century

TTh 3:30-5

The period from the "Restoration" of Charles II (1660) to the death of Alexander Pope (1744) produced the last poems of Milton, the first English pornography and feminist polemic, the most devastating satires ever written, some of the mo...(read more)

Turner, James Grantham
Fall 2014

130A/1

American Literature: Before 1800

MWF 2-3

This course will offer a survey of the literature in English produced in North America before 1800: competing British versions of settlement; Puritan history, sermons, and poetry; conversion, captivity, and slave narratives; diaries, journals, ess...(read more)

Otter, Samuel
Fall 2014

165/3

Special Topics:
Greek Tragedy in Translation

TTh 12:30-2

The lectures, class discussions, readings, and writing assignments are intended to develop students' ability to analyze, understand, and evaluate a number of important ancient texts. The class will examine the deep implications of these early ...(read more)

No instructor assigned yet.
Fall 2014

190/1

Research Seminar:
American Captivities

MW 3-4:30

The Indian captivity narrative is the first literary genre that might be called uniquely “American.”  Its standard protagonist was a white woman kidnapped by Indians, but American captivity narratives also related the captivities ...(read more)

Donegan, Kathleen
Fall 2014

190/5

Research Seminar:
Paradise Lost and the Ancient Epic

TTh 11-12:30

“Not less but more heroic” … that is Milton’s claim in his modern epic Paradise Lost, comparing his own Biblical theme to the achievements of ancient epic, Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey and Vir...(read more)

Turner, James Grantham
Spring 2014

110/1

Medieval Literature:
Heaven, Hell, and Fairyland - Visions of Other Worlds

MWF 2-3

This course provides a tour of otherworld visions and journeys in the literature of medieval Britain. After looking at some foundational texts from antiquity that influenced writers up to the present day, we’ll examine the geography of the a...(read more)

Thornbury, Emily V.
Spring 2014

111/1

Chaucer

TTh 11-12:30

For more information on this course, please contact Professor Miller at j_miller@berkeley.edu.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

...(read more)
Miller, Jennifer
Spring 2014

114A/1

English Drama to 1603

TTh 2-3:30

For more information on this course, please contact Professor Miller at j_miller@berkeley.edu.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

...(read more)
Miller, Jennifer
Spring 2014

118/1

Milton

TTh 3:30-5

Intensive reading in the poetry and prose of John Milton (1608-1674), written during a period of dramatic historical change, and including the most influential single poem in the English language, Paradise Lost. Our goal is to get under t...(read more)

Turner, James Grantham
Spring 2014

120/1

Literature of the Later 18th Century

TTh 9:30-11

Late-eighteenth-century writing shaped many of the forms and institutions of literature we now take for granted. Fiction writers worked to establish the genre—and—legitimate as worthy reading—what we now call novels, while others...(read more)

Sorensen, Janet
Spring 2014

130A/1

American Literature: Before 1800

MW 9:30-11

This course provides a survey of English-language American literature to 1800. We will explore a wide range of texts from narratives of colonial settlement through the literature of the American Revolution and the early republic. Topics to be disc...(read more)

Tamarkin, Elisa
Spring 2014

165/1

Special Topics:
Donne: Poetry, Prose, Letters

MW 4-5:30

“I wonder, by my troth, what thou and I did, till we loved?” Fresh, intimate, vulnerable and yet tyrannical: Donne’s voice demands our full attention -- but rarely receives it. Writing between Shakespeare and Milton, Donne is the...(read more)

Marno, David
Spring 2014

190/9

Research Seminar:
Literature of the Ocean

TTh 12:30-2

Provisional Book List:  William Wycherley, The Plain-Dealer; Ned Ward, The Wooden World Dissected; Daniel Defoe, Captain Singleton; Olaudah Equiano, Interesting Narrative; Tobias Smollett, Roderick Rand...(read more)

Sorensen, Janet
Fall 2013

105/1

Anglo-Saxon England

TTh 2-3:30

“Britain, once called Albion, is an island of the ocean...” When the priest Bede set out in the early 700s to write the history of the place we now call England, he portrayed it as a new nation with a deep past, a remote corner of the ...(read more)

Thornbury, Emily V.
Fall 2013

115A/1

The English Renaissance (through the 16th Century)

MWF 1-2

For more information on this course, please contact Professor Miller at j_miller@berkeley.edu.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

 

...(read more)
Miller, Jennifer
Fall 2013

152/1

Women Writers:
Early American Women Writers

TTh 9:30-11

This course will survey the writing of American women from narratives of colonial settlement through the novels of the early republic.  During this period, women produced immensely popular works and developed major literary traditions that wo...(read more)

Donegan, Kathleen
Fall 2013

190/12

Research Seminar:
Metaphysical Poets from Donne to Vaughan

TTh 2-3:30

This class focuses on a group of poets who were philosophical before there was philosophy. Four decades before the publication of René Descartes’ Meditations, John Donne began writing poems in which, in the words of a later c...(read more)

Marno, David
Spring 2013

114B/1

English Drama from 1603 to 1700

TTh 11-12:30

This course will be a survey of some of the best seventeenth-century English drama. We will focus on the plays as plays – as series of actions upon the minds of audiences – and on ones first performed between 1603 and 1642, when the th...(read more)

No instructor assigned yet.
Spring 2013

119/1

Literature of the Restoration and the Early 18th Century

TTh 12:30-2

We will explore the relationship between literature and everyday life in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. Areas of emphasis include popular periodical literature (England's first advice column, the first "women's m...(read more)

Picciotto, Joanna M
Spring 2013

120/1

Literature of the Later 18th Century

TTh 2-3:30

Late-eighteenth-century writing shaped many of the forms and institutions of literature we now take for granted. Fiction writers worked to establish the genre—and—legitimate as worthy reading—what we now call novels, while others...(read more)

Sorensen, Janet
Spring 2013

125A/1

The English Novel (Defoe through Scott)

TTh 3:30-5

A survey of early fiction, much of which pretended to be anything but. Most of it, published anonymously, purported to be a true "History," "Expedition," or the like, about "Things as They Are." We will consider at th...(read more)

Starr, George A.
Spring 2013

130B/1

American Literature: 1800-1865

TTh 12:30-2

In Beneath the American Renaissance, David Reynolds argues that “delving beneath the American Renaissance occurs in two senses: analysis of the process by which hitherto neglected popular modes and stereotypes were imported into lit...(read more)

McQuade, Donald
Fall 2012

104/1

Introduction to Old English

TTh 12:30-2

Canst þu þis gewrit understandan? Want to? “Introduction to Old English” will give you the tools to read a wide variety of writings from among the earliest recorded texts in the English language. What is there to r...(read more)

O'Brien O'Keeffe, Katherine
Fall 2012

114A/1

English Drama to 1603

TTh 5-6:30

This course offers a wide-ranging survey of sixteenth-century drama up to and beyond the building of the first commercial theaters in London in the 1570s. After sampling the medieval mystery and morality traditions, we will consider the formal and...(read more)

No instructor assigned yet.
Fall 2012

115A/1

The English Renaissance (Through the 16th Century)

TTh 2-3:30

For more information on this course, please contact Professor Miller at j_miller@berkeley.edu.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

...(read more)
Miller, Jennifer
Fall 2012

116/1

Backgrounds of English Literature in the Continental Renaissance

TTh 12:30-2

This course will survey some of the major prose writings of the continental Renaissance in their cultural and historical contexts. Various in genre, including political philosophy (Machiavelli), essays (Montaigne), and proto-novels (Rabelais and C...(read more)

No instructor assigned yet.
Fall 2012

130A/1

American Literature: Before 1800

MWF 1-2

(read more)

Donegan, Kathleen
Fall 2012

165/2

Special Topics:
The Elizabethan Renaissance

TTh 3:30-5 + one hour of disc. sec. (sec. 201: W 12-1, 2070 Valley LSB; sec. 202: W 9-10, 2066 Valley LSB)

This course has two goals: to explore visual culture and the role of visuality in renaissance England, and to develop research skills. Elizabeth I's long reign saw a remarkable flowering of the arts. Her unique position as a female monarch sur...(read more)

Honig, Elizabeth
Fall 2012

166/1

Special Topics:
18th-Century British Travel Writing

TTh 11-12:30

This course is based on the idea that if there is one genre in which ideas of identity--ideas of how one's own self and culture are related to other selves and other cultures--are systematically negotiated, then this must be the hybrid genre o...(read more)

Bode, Christoph
Fall 2012

190/13

Research Seminar:
Ben Jonson, Robert Herrick, and the Cavalier Poets

MW 9-10:30

This seminar will focus on Jonson’s and Herrick’s verse, particularly on the openly frivolous poems. Our aim will be to come to conclusions about what these poems do that gives pleasure. We will also think about the usefulness and accu...(read more)

No instructor assigned yet.
Spring 2012

118/1

Milton

TTh 3:30-5

The most influential and famous (sometimes infamous) literary figure of the seventeenth century, John Milton has been misrepresented too often as a mainstay of a traditional canon, rather than the rebel he was. Or he is assumed to be a remote reli...(read more)

Goodman, Kevis
Goodman, Kevis
Spring 2012

119/1

Augustan Age: Literature of the Restoration and the Early 18th Century

TTh 3:30-5

We will explore the relationship between literature and everyday life in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. Areas of emphasis include popu...(read more)

Picciotto, Joanna M
Picciotto, Joanna
Spring 2012

125A/1

The English Novel (Defoe through Scott)

TTh 12:30-2

This class explores eighteenth-century British innovations in narrative prose writings that we have come to call novels. A scientific revolution, broadened financial speculation, expanding empire, changing notions of gender, and new philosophies o...(read more)

Sorensen, Janet
Sorensen, Janet
Spring 2012

180E/1

The Epic

MWF 2-3

This course will be team-taught by Professors Altieri and Nolan. Our primary concern is to read carefully and discuss intensely most of the major epics in Western European literature. We love these texts and we are convinced that students will fin...(read more)

Altieri, Charles F.
Nolan, Maura
Nolan, Maura
Spring 2012

190/8

Research Seminar:
Medieval English Poetry

TTh 12:30-2

The poetry of medieval England, often witty, sometimes moving, occasionally shocking, and frequently creative in form, style and use of language, has inspired poets including Seamus Heaney, Gerard Manley Hopkins and Geoffrey Hill. We will be explo...(read more)

Lankin, Andrea
Fall 2011

110/1

Medieval Literature

TTh 3:30-5

For more information on this course, please contact Professor Miller at j_miller@berkeley.edu.

This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement for the English major.

...(read more)
Miller, Jennifer
Fall 2011

120/1

Literature of the Later 18th Century

TTh 12:30-2

Unfamiliar to many undergraduates, eighteenth-century writing shaped many of the forms of writing and institutions of literature we now take for granted. Fiction writers worked to establish the form—and—legitimate as worthy reading&mda...(read more)

Sorensen, Janet
Fall 2011

130A/1

American Literature: Before 1800

TTh 11-12:30

This course provides a survey of English-language American literature to 1800. We will explore a wide range of texts from narratives of discovery and exploration through the literature of the American Revolution and the formations of an early nati...(read more)

Tamarkin, Elisa
Tamarkin, Elisa
Fall 2011

165/1

Special Topics:
(note new topic) Religion and Poetry in the Renaissance

TTh 11-12:30

What does it mean to speak to God through a sonnet? Why would someone retell the story of the Biblical Fall in verse? Why rewrite the Psalms in rhyme royal? In this course, we’ll do a case study of sixteenth and seventeenth cent...(read more)

Marno, David
Marno, David
Fall 2011

166AC/1

Special Topics in American Cultures:
Race and Revision in Early America

TTh 9:30-11

In this course, we will read both historical and literary texts to explore how racial categories came into being in New World cultures and how these categories were tested, inhabited, and re-imagined by the human actors they sought to define. Our ...(read more)

Donegan, Kathleen
Donegan, Kathleen
Fall 2011

190/3

Research Seminar:
The Writings of Daniel Defoe

MW 4-5:30

Reading and discussion of representative works in various genres, treating Defoe’s career and writings as of interest in themselves, and as offering direct (if slanted) access to all the major cultural issues of his day, political, economic,...(read more)

Starr, George A.
Starr, George
Fall 2011

190/12

Research Seminar:
Paradise Lost, Found, Lost Again

TTh 12:30-2

An intensive reading of John Milton’s great epic Paradise Lost and two works that adapt it in imaginative ways, Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and Philip Pullman’s His Dark Materials trilogy. The modern an...(read more)

Turner, James Grantham
Turner, James
Fall 2011

190/15

Research Seminar:
American Captivities

TTh 2-3:30

The captivity narrative is the first literary genre that might be called uniquely “American.” Although its standard protagonist was a white woman kidnapped by Indians, the captivity narrative genre extended to the capture of sailors an...(read more)

Donegan, Kathleen
Donegan, Kathleen
Fall 2011

190/16

Research Seminar:
Chaucer and His Contexts

TTh 2-3:30

The works of Geoffrey Chaucer (c. 1343-1400) have been canonized as the most important and best-known materials in Middle English literature. But Chaucer did not appear in a vacuum. On the contrary, Chaucer participated in several rich literary co...(read more)

Lankin, Andrea
Fall 2011

190/17

Research Seminar:
History of the Book, 597-2011

TTh 2-3:30

In this research seminar, we will study the development of one of the most influential technologies ever created: the book. Beginning with the introduction of the manuscript codex into England, we will trace the book through many transformations: ...(read more)

Thornbury, Emily V.
Thornbury, Emily